WO2014190413A1 - Device for intercepting crawling insects - Google Patents

Device for intercepting crawling insects Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2014190413A1
WO2014190413A1 PCT/CA2014/000453 CA2014000453W WO2014190413A1 WO 2014190413 A1 WO2014190413 A1 WO 2014190413A1 CA 2014000453 W CA2014000453 W CA 2014000453W WO 2014190413 A1 WO2014190413 A1 WO 2014190413A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
surface
barrier
insects
insect
adhesive
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/CA2014/000453
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Stéphane BARIBEAU
Original Assignee
Baribeau Stéphane
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to CA 2817026 priority Critical patent/CA2817026A1/en
Priority to CA2,817,026 priority
Application filed by Baribeau Stéphane filed Critical Baribeau Stéphane
Publication of WO2014190413A1 publication Critical patent/WO2014190413A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M1/00Stationary means for catching or killing insects
    • A01M1/14Catching by adhesive surfaces
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M1/00Stationary means for catching or killing insects
    • A01M1/10Catching insects by using Traps
    • A01M1/103Catching insects by using Traps for crawling insects
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M29/00Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus
    • A01M29/30Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus preventing or obstructing access or passage, e.g. by means of barriers, spikes, cords, obstacles or sprinkled water
    • A01M29/34Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus preventing or obstructing access or passage, e.g. by means of barriers, spikes, cords, obstacles or sprinkled water specially adapted for insects

Abstract

The invention relates to a barrier against crawling insects, which intercepts insects attempting to pass over the sides of the surface defined by said barrier. In said invention, the insects fall in a hollow section. As a result of the geometry and the surface properties of said hollow section, the insects cannot get out the same way via which they fell in, nor can they cross the perimeter defined by said barrier. In the most simple embodiment, said barrier is a profiled element comprising: at least one hollow section, at least one longitudinal opening, and at least one cover surface. In the most developed embodiment, said barrier also consists of at least one adhesive present on the bottom, inside the profiled element. When an insect comes into contact with one of said adhesives, the at least one adhesive slows or immobilises the insects in the barrier, preventing them from getting out.

Description

 DEVICE FOR INTERCEPTING ROCKING INSECTS Technical field

The present invention relates to a barrier that intercepts crawling insects, more specifically bed bugs, but also woodlice, spiders, earwigs and centipedes. It is a barrier that blocks the passage of crawling insects by forcing them to go through a hollow cavity. In addition, when an adhesive is added inside this hollow cavity, this barrier is capable of capturing insects.

Prior art

In the example of patent US 3816956 (Article for catching insects), which consists of a double-sided adhesive tape, the exposed surface immobilizes the insects. However, the adhesive loses its effectiveness by also adhering to foreign bodies that come into contact with this adhesive, which affects the proper functioning and durability of the device. The invention shown in US4048747 (Baseboard Trap for Crawling Insects) is a two-part molding in which the capture adhesive is protected. On the other hand, there is always a space through which small insects can migrate, coming and going directly into a wall, without going into the trap.

The main problem encountered in US4709504 (Portable disposable insect trap) is that the upper wall of the device clogs with that of the capture adhesive underneath when a weight is applied to the profile. In addition, the tabs formed to support the top wall allow insects to pass over the trap.

The difficulty encountered mainly by the device of patent US4876823 (Insect trap), is that the open 'P' shaped profile allows insects, which in contact with their legs or their antennae, to detect the texture or odor of the sticky surface, can turn back without being caught in the trap.

When using the device described in US Pat. No. 7,995,887 B (Method and apparatus for controlling pests), which is in fact a small box, this invention does not make it possible to effectively circumscribe the perimeter of a large surface such as the contour of a room or a bed. In the case of patent CA2723624 (Device and method of interception of creeping arthropods), the insects fallen in the cupolas remain visible. In addition, foreign bodies can fall into the trap and affect its operation by allowing insects to emerge by climbing on these foreign bodies.

Finally, the invention described in patent CA2767322 (Bugs trap and others) is an odor-emitting invention that attracts insects as long as it emits vapors. By cons, this machine does not allow the capture of insects indefinitely without having to reload the active product.

Context of the invention

Since prehistoric times, bedbugs accompany people to all places where they rest and sleep. The small size of the bedbug allows it to hide in cracks in walls, floors, and furniture. All these places of predilection allowed the bedbugs to remain discreet during the day to return later to sting their host during his sleep. In the 20th century, the use of insecticides has greatly reduced the population level of this insect. After the Second World War, thanks to the invention of the insecticide DDT, it was believed that the bug was almost eradicated. But, later, the ban on the use of DDT and other insecticides known to be dangerous to humans, and the insensitization of bedbugs to less potent products (resulting from the use of DDT), meant that during the 90's, the bedbug made a comeback. The revival of this insect has been accelerated around the world by the increase of tourism and the densification of the population of the cities. Today in 2013, bedbugs invade all major cities of the world. The most affected being those that attract the most tourism such as Las Vegas, New York, London, Vancouver, Montreal, Tokyo. From an entomological point of view, the bedbug, whose scientific name is "Cimex Lectularius", feeds exclusively on blood for living. Adult, this insect measures 4 to 8 mm, and its body is oval in shape, broad and flat, of brown-red to dark brown color. The bed bug does not jump and does not fly. Its legs are provided with hooks, but without suction cups. They can therefore climb on all fibrous or rough surfaces, but they are unable to cling to vertical surfaces, smooth and clean. Its flattened shape allows it to hide in tight spaces, such as mattress seams, under furniture, wall bottoms and cracks in floors. Feeding exclusively on human blood and sometimes animal blood, these insects escape most of the time light and are mostly active at night. To feed, a bedbug can bite several times an hour to successfully complete the meal. Once force - fed, the insect will remain hidden for 3 to 15 days depending on the stage of growth. For the female, the last feeding will allow her to start laying eggs. The female can lay two to fifteen eggs a day. Depending on the ambient temperature, eggs take one to three weeks to hatch. The egg is about the size of a pinhead and is whitish in color. A female lays up to 500 eggs in her life. When the egg hatches, the bug is transparent and is called nymph. She becomes an adult after 3 to 4 weeks, provided the ambient temperature is between 14 degrees C and 27 degrees C and she can feed easily. From hatching to adulthood, the nymph will go through five stages of growth. Each stage, which is a feeding of blood, will allow the insect to undergo a growth spurt allowing it to move to the next stage. Once an adult, if the temperature of the air is kept around 20 degrees C, the bedbug can live 6 to 8 months. But if the air temperature drops to 5 degrees C and the food is lacking, its metabolism will slow down so much that it can plunge into a state of deep lethargy allowing it to survive for more than a year. It is a fact, the bedbug parasites the man to feed. Stings can cause itching, hives, asthmatic reactions, and even anemia if the bites are very plentiful. In addition to the physiological consequences for humans, the presence of bed bugs in their environment often causes insomnia, anxiety, phobias and depression. Starting from the fact that a bed contaminated by a few bugs, by the interaction with its host, can migrate it from a bed to an armchair, then be deposited a little later on a seat at the cinema or in a taxi . It is easy to understand that the human is an excellent factor of migration of this parasite. Because they hide in small spaces, they measure a few millimeters and they act especially at night, it is very difficult, with conventional means, to detect their presence during the first month of infestation. We also understand why many people invaded by these insects often adopt compulsive and paranoid behaviors.

The documentation on intervention methods for bed bugs states that it is very difficult to get rid of this type of insect. It takes several interventions and more than a month to eliminate them. Once the center of the infestation has been detected, the most recent and innovative methods for killing bed bugs are: use of hot steam, attracting traps emitting C0 2 , heating of ambient air above 60 degrees C. or cooling the air below - 15 degrees C. for 24 hours. There are also rare insecticides that can be used, but most of them are all more or less harmful to humans, and they are almost useless for killing eggs. In recent years, however, extermination experts have been trying to put into practice a new type of intervention called "integrated pest management". It is a method that focuses on preventing bed bug infestations, rather than having to intervene with long and expensive treatments. If there is an infestation, the early detection of bed bugs, while there are only a few individuals in a room, allows to intervene in a targeted way and much more effective. In such a context, we do not speak of extermination strictly speaking, but of 'parasitic management'. In cases where the number of bedbugs is important, the extermination methods put forward are those that attract insects, not those that cause them to flee and disperse them in the environment, as the products too often do. chemical. To protect against new infestations and to treat infested sites more effectively, it is therefore necessary to create a product that catches bed bugs, makes it easy to identify, and captures them as needed. This is the subject of this patent.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION By putting into perspective the context of the invention and the study of the prior art, the following list of parameters and needs follows. Create a creeping insect barrier to delineate a watertight border along a perimeter of the surface, preventing insects from reaching the other side of the boundary, the one within the surface bounded by this boundary. fence. This device must intercept the insects that enter and if possible trap the insects inside the barrier. We must be able to walk on this barrier without risk of clogging. This barrier must be provided with a cover to partially or completely hide insects from the view of users. If necessary, this cover must be able to be opened to allow to go to see the insects trapped inside the barrier. Also, in order not to interfere with the proper functioning of this barrier, the foreign bodies must not be able to easily enter the barrier. The invention must be able to intercept insects permanently and be able to catch insects over a period of time of at least one month, without having to fill or reload any of its elements. In addition, insects entering the barrier must not be able to exit where they fell. Finally, the barrier must not contain any insecticide or chemicals that are dangerous to humans.

Although this list of requirements and parameters is imposing, the invention which relates to this patent integrates into a single device all these criteria and meets all these needs simultaneously. It consists of a shaped and hollow assembly, comprising at least one longitudinal opening through which insects, such as bedbugs, enter the device by a surface on which the claws of their legs can catch. The assembly also includes a cover surface and a hollow cavity. This cavity includes a shallow bed on which insects may fall, but can not come out where they fell. When insects crawl over the top of the steep, smooth surface that descends to the main cavity, the sloping and slippery finish of this surface causes insects, such as bedbugs, to slip and fall on the bottom. bottom of the main cavity. Insects with feet without suction cups can not go back to the top of the slippery surface they entered. In addition, when the bottom surface is adhesive, as soon as one of their legs touches the surface of the adhesive material located on the bottom of this cavity, these insects fall on this surface and remain mostly glued or captured on it. In the facts, the higher the holding force and the surface of the adhesive used, the greater the number of insects captured on this adhesive. If it turns out that the insect has managed to reach a non-adhesive portion of the shallow and that an adhesive is present further into the cavity, it is only a matter of time before the insect be immobilized by the adhesive.

Brief description of the drawings.

The invention will be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which like reference numerals identify like elements, and wherein: Fig. 1 is a side view of a first embodiment of the crawling insect barrier showing insects entering it.

 Figure 2 is a sectional view of a second crawling insect barrier embodiment having a cliff surface (12) tangent to the shallow surface.

 Figure 3 is a sectional view of a third embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a concave cliff surface (12).

 Figure 4 is a sectional view of a fourth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a domed cliff surface (12).

 Figure 5 is a side view illustrating the main section of the one-piece extruded barrier.

 Figure 6 is a side view illustrating the assembly of two profiles nested together and forming the main profile of the crawling insect barrier.

 Figure 7 is a sectional view illustrating the assembly of three profiles nested together and forming the main profile of the crawling insect barrier.

Figure 8 is an isometric view of a fifth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier installed on the surface of a ceramic tile. The barrier is installed in such a way as to form a perimeter inside which a bait is placed. The isometric view is cut in order to show a medallion view illustrating a side view of the crawling insect barrier. Figure 9 is a sectional view of a sixth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier including a foam tape (25) for sealing the bottom of the climb.

 Figure 10 is a sectional view of a seventh embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a crimped foam tape in the climb, to seal the bottom of the climb.

 Figure 11 is a sectional view of an eighth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a flap foldable tongue (27) for sealing the underside of the barrier and also having a fin (28) for sealing the underside of the barrier.

 Fig. 12 is a side view of a ninth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier showing the weight of a foot applied to the lid.

 Fig. 13 is a sectional view of a tenth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a first embodiment of the spring and stop play to hold the lid open.

 Fig. 14 is a sectional view of an eleventh embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a second embodiment of the spring and stop play to hold the lid open.

 Fig. 15 is a sectional view of a twelfth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having spacers (35) for holding the lid open.

 Fig. 16 is a side view of a thirteenth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a first embodiment of the hinge of the lid with the hinge recess (21) in the lid.

 Fig. 17 is a sectional view of a fourteenth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a second embodiment of the hinge of the lid with the hinge recess (21) in the installation base.

Fig. 18 is a sectional view of a fifteenth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a tongue (38) adhered to the cover.

 Fig. 19 is a sectional view of a sixteenth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a tab (38) embedded in notches (39).

Figure 20 is a sectional view of a seventeenth embodiment of the creeping insect barrier consisting of two sections and allowing insects to enter each side of the barrier. Figure 21 is a sectional view of an eighteenth embodiment of the creeping insect barrier, consisting of a one-piece profile and allowing insects to enter each side of the barrier.

 FIG. 22 is a sectional view of a nineteenth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier in which a fin, located under the cover, serves as a stop (48) for immobilizing the body of the detachable tongue (47). .

 Fig. 23 is a sectional view of a twentieth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having an opening notch (56) on the top of the lid and also showing crimping notches (55) for securing the spacers in the lid.

 Fig. 24 is a sectional view of a twenty-first embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having an electrically conductive wire (57) crimped into the cover and an aluminum conductive lead (59).

 Fig. 25 is a sectional view of a twenty-second embodiment of the crawling insect barrier having a light beam (61) adhered to the surface of the main profile, a conductive tape bonded to the surface under the cover, and a conductive aluminum mounting.

 Fig. 26 is a sectional view of a twenty-third embodiment of the crawling insect barrier installed on the surface beneath an object.

 Fig. 27 is a sectional view of a twenty-fourth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier installed on a vertical wall.

 Fig. 28 is a sectional view of a twenty-fifth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier incorporating many of the elements recited in this patent.

 Fig. 29 is a sectional view of a twenty-sixth embodiment of the crawling insect barrier incorporating several elements cited in this patent.

Although the invention may be subject to various modifications and other forms, its specific embodiments have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are here described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the description in this document of the specific embodiments is not intended to limit the invention to the particular forms described, but on the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents and variants forming part of the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. Best way to realize the invention

Below are described the representative embodiments of the invention. For the sake of clarity, not all actual implementation features are described in this specification. Of course, in the development of any such real embodiment, many implementation-specific decisions must be made to achieve specific developer objectives, such as compliance with application-related constraints. of the invention, which will vary from one implementation to another. Moreover, it will be noted that such a development effort could be complex and long, but would nonetheless be a commitment of use for those skilled in the art having the benefit of this description. I will describe the present invention with reference to the accompanying drawings which are included to describe and explain representative examples of the invention. The words and expressions used herein should be understood and interpreted as having a meaning consistent with the understanding of those words and phrases by those skilled in the relevant art. No special definition of a term or expression, that is to say a definition which is different from the ordinary and ordinary meaning understood by those skilled in the art, is intended to be implied by the art. consistent use of the term or expression of this document. To the extent that a term or phrase is intended to have a particular meaning, that is, a meaning other than that understood by those skilled in the art, that special definition will be expressly set forth in the description of the art. a definitional way that directly and unequivocally provides the special definition of the term or expression.

The present invention is a crawling insect barrier which serves to delimit, on a surface, a sealed perimeter or a sealed perimeter section, preventing crawling insects from reaching the interior of the surface bounded by the perimeter formed by this barrier. This device intercepts the passage of insects then slows down the progression or immobilises them when in addition there is presence of an adhesive material located inside the barrier. Although the invention described in this patent can detect the presence of several species of insects, throughout this detailed description, attention will often be put on bed bugs. The reason is that these insects greatly affect the quality of life of humans and the number of infestations caused by these insects is increasing around the world. To begin, by studying carefully the natural behavior of the bedbug one learns the following facts: this insect is attracted, inter alia, by the carbon dioxide (C0 2 ) that the human exhale during his breathing. Bed bugs feed almost exclusively on human blood. During its life, this insect passes through six stages of growth; each stage must be preceded by at least one gavage of blood. Finally, the life expectancy of the bug is a few days in its first stage of growth and can reach several months in its last adult stage. As a result, in their earliest stages of growth, bedbugs have little time to feed on their host if they want to survive. This allows us to say that when we manage to keep these insects away from their food, which is the blood of their human host, bed bugs will eventually starve to death. So, the idea at the heart of this patent is to create a barrier that intercepts insects and prevents them from reaching their food easily, all offering the opportunity to capture these insects permanently. This invention will be better understood on reading the following description of some preferred embodiments.

Figure 1 shows the simplest embodiment of the invention. In this figure, it is shown that the barrier has a lateral opening 1 through which the insects located outside the barrier 2 access inside the barrier 3. Once the insects have entered through this opening and fallen into the hollow section, this one is designed to prevent the insects from being able to leave by where they entered. Thus, crawling insects, such as bed bugs, are intercepted inside the barrier.

Represented in three other variants of the barrier, shown in Figures 2, 3 and 4, these devices consist of a minimum of two components which are: a main section 4, and an adhesive material capable of slowing the progression and and / or to immobilize insects, hereinafter called capture adhesive 5. If necessary, an adhesive material capable of fixing the objects, hereinafter called fixing adhesive 6, will be applied to one of the outer surfaces of the barrier in order to be able to fix it on the installation surface 7 to be protected. Note that the two types of adhesives mentioned, capture adhesive 5 and fixing adhesive 6, will be further described a little further and are selected from the following forms: in the form of a sticky liquid, in the form of a sticky paste, in the form of an adhesive tape on one side, in the form of an adhesive tape on both sides, and in the form of removable sticky tabs. Regarding the main profile, note that this profile is either a one-piece profile or a profile assembly. That being said, we also show in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 that this main section 4 comprises three distinctive portions which are: the rise 8, the main cavity 9 and the cover 10. We also show that the section of this main section has four main surfaces which are: the surface 1 1 input, the cliff surface 12, the bottom-bottom surface-13 and the surface under the cover 14. We will now study these four surfaces with reference to Figure 4.

The first surface, shown in FIG. 4, is the entrance surface 1 1. This is adjacent to the installation surface 7 and forms part of the rise 8. This entrance surface is the main access through which crawling insects enter the barrier 3. The choice of the finish of this input surface 1 1 depends on the elevation angle 15 of the steepest segment of this input surface. The higher the elevation angle of this surface, the rougher the finish of this surface will be. As soon as the elevation angle of this surface prevents insects from catching their claws, this surface must have a rough or porous finish so that crawling insects can climb over and enter the barrier. rough or porous surface finish is obtained in several ways, for example, by installing, on the input surface January 1, an adhesive tape of ordinary paper, sand paper, fabrics, felt, cork or foam . The rough or porous surface finish is also obtained by modifying the state of the surface of the material constituting the rise 8, by a method of manufacturing sanding, knurling, grooving or stamping. It is even possible to make the entrance surface 1 1 more adherent by embedding sand or granular material. 16

The second surface, shown in FIG. 4, is the bottom-bottom surface 13. This surface is located in a hollow, dark space, called the main cavity 9, in which certain species of insects, such as bed bugs, have the instinct of wanting to hide there. It is in this main cavity that there is a capture adhesive 5. The insect which enters this cavity, falls sooner or later to the bottom of the main cavity 9, on the bottom-bottom surface, and can not go upstream again. cliff surface 12 to get out of the barrier. Indeed, the lack of adhesion of the legs of the insect on the vertical and smooth portion of the cliff surface, combined with the effect of its own weight, ensure that the insect can not come out of the barrier. Moreover, in the presence of an adhesive on the shallow bottom, the contact and the pull of only one of the legs of the insect, on this capture adhesive 5, is sufficient to make it impossible for the insect to to be able to go up and out of the barrier. Ultimately, by struggling to get rid of the capture adhesive 5, the insect comes to stick also the body on this adhesive. Thus, in this scenario, the insect retained at the bottom of the cliff surface 12 is captured. For an optimal use of the adhesive surface of the capture adhesive 5, this adhesive must be juxtaposed near the cliff surface 12, but when this adhesive is located elsewhere in the main cavity 9, the insects will be captured when they walk in the space of the main cavity.

The third surface, shown in Figure 4, is the cliff surface 12. This is a surface whose finish is very smooth and thus prevents the claws of insects from adhering or clinging to it. At least one segment of this cliff surface forms a minimum elevation angle of 45 degrees with the installation surface. Thus, the slope of the steepest segment of this cliff surface causes the insect to slide and fall to the bottom of the cliff surface 12, in the main cavity 9. As explained above, the insects are thus intercepted or trapped in the barrier, because they can no longer go up the cliff surface 12. Moreover, the combined work of the vertical and smooth segments of the cliff surface, coupled with the sticky surface of the capture adhesive 5 is so effective that even insects with cupping on their feet, including ants and flies, can be trapped in this barrier as soon as their paws come into contact with the shallow surface.

Finally, the fourth surface, shown in Figure 4, is the surface under the lid 14. This serves to cover the bottom surface 13 in order to prevent foreign bodies to adversely affect the proper functioning of the barrier. The lid 10, for its part, serves to partially or completely hide the view of users captured insects. Indeed, for aesthetic reasons, the majority of users are not interested in seeing insects caught in the barrier. On the other hand, in order to be able to look at what has been captured in the main cavity 9, certain embodiments are provided in which this cover 10 can be opened in several ways, these will be described a little further.

As previously cited and shown in Figure 2, Figure 3 and Figure 4, the main section 4 serves as a rise 8, main cavity 9 and cover 10. This main section will now be described. First, this profile can be extruded into one or more profiles. Indeed, all the profiles shown in Figure 2, Figure 3 and Figure 4 are extradited in one profile. But nothing prevents them from being extradited in different combinations of extruded profiles. In Figure 5, Figure 6 and Figure 7, we show different cases of these combinations of profiles. First combination case, shown in Figure 5: mounted 8, main cavity 9 and cover 10 in a single profile. Second combination case, shown in Figure 6: mounted 8 and main cavity 9 manufactured in a single profile, and cover 10 in another profile. It could also have been represented: the main cavity and the cover made in a single section, and the rise in another profile (not shown), or the climb and the cover made in one profile and the main cavity in another profile (not shown). Third combination case, shown in FIG. 7: rise 8, main cavity 9 and cover 10, manufactured separately in three separate sections. Also, when one of the components is extruded separately, a set of flat tongue 18 and crevice 19, or curved tongue 20 and articulation hollows 21 is integrated in one or other of the profiles to connect, nest , or articulate these profiles with each other. These elements will be described a little further. Note that when the climb 8 and the main cavity 9 are connected together, in order to simplify the speech, this subassembly is called the installation base name 22.

Now let's describe the main profile. Figure 8 shows a ceramic tile surface on which and deposited a food source, for example biscuits. Although these cookies can mostly attract ants, if we replace these cookies with a source of C0 2 , it will be bed bugs that will be attracted to the tiling surface. In this figure, the main section 4 of the barrier is installed along the perimeter 23 of the surface to be protected 24. Note that this main section can be installed on all essentially flat surfaces, whether horizontal, inclined or vertical. On the other hand, the effectiveness of the barrier is maximum when the installation surface is horizontal and the installation of the barrier aims to capture insects without suction cups on their legs. In the situation shown in Figure 9, to prevent insects from passing below the barrier, and to provide crawling insects with a surface on which they can climb to enter the barrier, a foam tape is glued on the base of the barrier. installation 22 to seal, the passage of insects, the space between the entrance surface 1 1 and the installation surface 7. In fact, depending on the density of the foam, when the face of the foam tape, in contact with the installation surface, is compressed on the installation surface, this face wife, in large part, the shape of the installation surface 7 and thus prevents insects to pass easily under the barrier. Another possibility shown in Figure 10, the foam tape 25 is crimped between two fins 26 located in the rise 8. Also, in Figure 1 1, is shown a barrier installed on a soft surface type "carpet". In this configuration, the installation base 22 includes a flap foldable tongue 27, forming a foldable mount 8 ready to drive into the surface of a carpet. Moreover, the installation base 22 has a fin 28 located under the profile and projected towards the installation surface 7 to increase the seal of the underside of the barrier. Also, when the portion of the profile which serves as a rise is extruded with a flexible material, the rise 8 itself becomes a flexible tongue capable of conforming to the shape of the installation surface 7. With regard to the cover 10, the latter is used primarily to prevent foreign bodies from contacting the shallow surface 13. Thus, the width of the surface under the cover must be at least 75% of the width of the shallow surface to sufficiently prevent foreign bodies to come into contact with this shallow surface, and also to prevent observers from seeing too much of the insects present in the barrier. Below this percentage, foreign bodies such as hair and hair may be found more often on this shallow surface 5, which may reduce the effectiveness of the barrier by creating supports and bridges through which insects could come out. Now, referring to FIG. 12, in order to give the insects free access to the interior of the barrier 3, a minimum opening distance 29 is maintained between the entry surface 11 and the surface under the cover 14. There are six ways to create and maintain this minimum opening distance 29: either advantageously exploiting the stiffness of the materials, or by using two types of abutment mechanism, or by inserting spacers under the cover, or using the abutment effect of the body of a detachable tongue or using a ball and socket joint mechanism. Here is the description of these six ways.

In the first way, shown in Figure 12, the cover 10 is designed so that the rigidity thereof maintains a minimum opening distance 29 when the cover does not support any weight, other than himself. The lid is also designed so that when a weight 30, for example that of a foot, is applied to this lid, the elasticity of the lid allows the surface under the lid 14 to come into contact with the surface of the lid. 1 1 entry, and as soon as the weight is removed, the cover can go back to its initial half-open position, thus restoring the minimum opening distance 29 and again allowing the insects to enter the barrier 3. second way, shown in Figure 13, shows that the minimum opening distance 29 is maintained through the interaction of a tongue of the profile acting as a spring 31 with a surface of the profile serving as an abutment surface 32. In this situation, it is both the flexibility and elasticity properties of the material, which determine and maintain the minimum opening distance 29 when no weight is applied to the lid 10. The third way, represented by the 14, shows that the minimum opening distance 29 is maintained by the interaction of a tongue of the support profile 33 on a non-sticking surface 34 of the capture adhesive 5. In this situation, is both the flexibility and elasticity properties of the material, which determine and maintain the minimum opening distance 29 when no weight is applied to the lid 10. In the fourth way, shown in FIG. the minimum opening distance 29 is maintained by means of spacers 35 located between the surface under the cover 14 and the entry surface 11. These spacers 35 are positioned to permanently support the weight of the lid. In this figure, these spacers are self-adhesive on one side and are made from sheet materials such as foam sponge, styrofoam, polystyrene, felt, silicone or cork. In addition, when the insect barrier is installed between a mattress and a box spring (not shown), and that the bed frame serves as an installation surface, the spacers will be made of rigid materials and will be attached with an adhesive on the surface under the lid. Also, another way to fix these spacers is to crimp them into the surface under the lid.

The fifth way, shown in FIG. 16, is to use the abutment effect of a swiveled swivel tongue in a hinge recess 21. In this configuration, it is the stop position of the lid, determined by the abutment position of this curved tongue, which determines and maintains the minimum opening distance 29. Note that this joint is also used to open and close the lid 10.

The sixth and last way, represented by FIG. 17, is to abut the surface under the cover 14 against an angle tab 36, folded or extruded, serving to support the capture adhesive 5. This has the effect of preventing the The cover can be closed completely, while maintaining the minimum opening distance 29. Here again, a curved tongue 20 pivoting in a hinge recess 21 makes it possible to open and close the lid 10.

Another important object of the invention is the articulation of the components together. Returning to Figure 15, a first means of articulating the components is shown. It consists in incorporating into the main section 4 a section of more flexible material 37 than the rest of the main section, thus creating a foldable joint for opening and closing the cover 10. Represented in FIG. 16 and in FIG. 17, the components are extruded separately and it is by nesting a curved tongue 20, located on one of the parts, in a hinge recess 21, located on another part, that is connected and articulates these parts with each other. Also, shown in Figure 16 and Figure 17, the installation base 22 being extruded separately from the cover 10, and this cover is connected with the installation base by a hinge. In FIG. 16, the cover 10 has a hinge recess 21 imbricating a curved tongue 20 located in the installation base 22. In FIG. 17, the opposite is shown, namely, a curved tongue 20 located in the cover is nested in a hinge recess 21 located in the installation base 22. According to another particular embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 18, a reinforcement and / or decoration tab 38 is installed on the cover 10. Said tab thus modifies the shape of the lid, strengthens it and can change the visual appearance. This reinforcement and / or decoration tongue 38 is installed on the outer surface of the lid in two ways. The first way is to stick this tab directly on the outer surface of the cover 10. The second way, shown in Figure 19, is to nest this tab in retaining notches 39 on the cover or on the tongue. So, these notches hold back well in place this tongue of reinforcement and / or decoration 38 on the lid 10. This tongue is manufactured, optionally, from extruded materials namely: PVC, vinyl, rubber, ABS, acrylic, polystyrene, polyethylene and polypropylene. This tongue can also be made from a material made of paper tape, cardboard or fabric. All profiles described so far are made from extruded materials namely: PVC, vinyl, rubber, ABS, acrylic, polystyrene, polyethylene and polypropylene, aluminum, aluminum alloys aluminum or silicone. The choice of the extrusion process, the simple extrusion, the coextrusion and the tri-extrusion, depends on the complexity of the design and the desired rigidity of the profile. In the embodiment illustrated in the next two figures, we see two barrier configurations that intercept insects bi-directionally. The first figure, Figure 20, shows a main section made in two separate parts that intercepts insects on both sides. Note that this variant of device, consisting of an assembly of two independent sections, is interesting because two different materials are used. Indeed, in Figure 20, the upper portion 40 is made of rigid plastic, while the lower portion 41 is made of aluminum. This characteristic offers the possibility of varying the textures and the strength of the components, while allowing interchangeability thereof. In addition, another barrier version that intercepts insects bi-directionally is shown in Figure 21. This version is advantageous because the main section is manufactured in a single piece extrusion 42, less expensive to manufacture a barrier version consisting of two sections.

Another characteristic of the invention, shown in FIG. 20 and FIG. 21, is the adhesive installed at the bottom of each main cavity 9. As previously stated in the patent, these adhesives are called capture adhesives 5 and serve ultimately to immobilize Insects that enter the main cavity 9. Although not necessary for the barrier to effectively intercept the passage of insects without suction cups to the paws, the use of an adhesive in the main cavity is interesting because it also allows to slow the movement or even immobilize the insects in the main cavity. These adhesives are integrated into the device in several ways. Firstly, shown in FIG. 20, a liquid or paste adhesive glue, capable of capturing insects, hereinafter called capture glue 43, is deposited directly at the bottom of the main cavity 9 in solid lines, in spaced line or by point. Secondly, an adhesive tape, capable of capturing the insects, hereinafter referred to as capture tape 44, is applied directly to the bottom surface of the main cavity 9 in pelletized ribbon, continuous ribbon or spaced ribbon. Third as shown in FIG. 21, a pre-glued removable tongue 45 is deposited in the main cavity 9 with a liquid or paste capture adhesive 43. Then finally, fourth way, is installed in the main cavity 9, a removable tongue on which a double-sided adhesive tape 46 is applied beforehand. In the configuration shown in FIG. 21, the body of these tabs 47 is formed by folding from a material made of paper, cardboard or extruded strip from a material to be extruded, namely: PVC, vinyl, ABS, acrylic, polystyrene, polyethylene or polypropylene. Moreover, in FIG. 22 is shown a way to prevent the body of the tongue 47 from moving in the main cavity 9. In fact, in this figure is represented a fin, integrated in the profile, serving as a stop 48 for automatically trap the tongue when closing the cover 10. Of note, some embodiments may promote the use of the capture adhesive on any other surface located inside the main cavity. These variants would be quite functional provided that these adhesives slow down or immobilize crawling insects (not shown).

Another important object of the invention, shown in FIG. 20, FIG. 21 and FIG. 22, is the adhesive which serves to fix the barrier on the installation surface 7. This adhesive is called a fixing adhesive 6. Although the use of this fixation adhesive is not mandatory for the barrier to effectively intercept crawling insects, it is still interesting to use a fixing adhesive to prevent the barrier from moving on the installation surface . This fixing adhesive is placed on the surface of the main section used to install it on the installation surface. This surface is named fixing surface 49. The fixing adhesive 6 is integrated in the barrier in several ways. First way, shown in Figure 20, a liquid or paste adhesive adhesive, hereinafter called fixing adhesive 50, is deposited directly on the fastening surface 49 in solid lines, in spaced lines and points. Secondly, shown in Fig. 21, a double-sided adhesive tape 51 is applied directly to the fastening surface 49 in pellet ribbon, continuous ribbon and spaced ribbon. Note that in this figure, to increase the sealing of the underside of the barrier to the passage of insects, the body of this adhesive is foam tape, 52 because this foam matches the shape of the installation surface 7. The figure 22 shows the barrier fixed by a single-sided adhesive tape 53 placed along the seal 54 formed by the installation surface 7 and the bottom of the inlet surface 1 1. In this configuration, when this barrier is installed on a surface irregular, the tape placed on the seal 54 prevents insects to pass in the area below the rise 8. In addition, this tape is both itself a fixing adhesive and an input surface 1 1 by which the insects can climb inside the barrier. Finally, a final method of attachment is to install the barrier with an adhesive laid across holes (not shown) drilled for this purpose at the bottom of the main cavity. Note that when this adhesive is a double-sided adhesive tape and is placed through holes in the main cavity, this adhesive simultaneously performs the function of adhesive capture and the function of adhesive fixation. In addition, although the adhesive fastening means is preferred in this patent, some surfaces being less receptive to certain adhesives, such as the top of a carpet, nothing prevents the fixing adhesive from being replaced by nails, screws, or staples (not shown).

According to another particular embodiment of the invention, a taste and / or olfactory bait (not shown) is placed inside the perimeter delimited by the barrier. This bait is also insertable inside the profile itself, in the main cavity. This is to encourage the insects to approach the barrier, enter it and be trapped. Note that the human is the bait when it is located inside the perimeter delimited by the barrier. The human, indeed, becomes the bait, because its smell, its heat and the C0 2 of its respiration attract the bed bugs. At the same time, the bait may also be a substance with a sweet taste and / or odor containing sugar, glucose or fructose. This substance can also be a pheromone that attracts insects. Depending on the species of insect to be captured, these different substances will be deposited or incorporated in one or more of the adhesives, or on one or more of the surfaces constituting the barrier. Although not recommended in a context of pest management encouraging the non-use of pesticides, if absolutely necessary, an insecticide can be incorporated in one of the adhesives or deposited on the surface of one of these adhesives, or even simply applied directly on one or more of the surfaces constituting the barrier. According to another advantageous feature of the invention shown in FIG. 23, is the optional presence of the crimping notches 55, located below the cover 10. These notches are held by clamping, between two walls, the spacers 35. a notch 56 located on the top of the lid facilitates the opening of this lid with a finger.

Another original idea of the invention is to integrate two electrical conductors in the barrier. When these two conductors come into contact, this makes it possible to detect the clogging of the barrier by closing the loop of an electrical circuit which then activates an indicator light and / or an audible signal. Note that in normal situation, when no object or weight crushes the cover 10, the two electrical conductors do not come into contact with each other. At the same time, in the case where the distance between these two conductors is approximately equivalent to the height of the insect that strolls between these two conductors, these conductors would potentially undergo an electric shock to these insects, killing them by electrocution or discouraging at least those to cross the space between these two sons. A first way to integrate an electrical conductor is shown in Figure 24, it consists in partially crimping this electrical conductor, in the form of wire 57, in a crevice 58 located in the surface under the cover 14 of plastic. In its simplest form, said conductive wire 57 is a coil wire. This wire is optional, made of brass, copper, stainless steel, galvanized steel, aluminum or aluminum alloy. Also shown in this figure, a conductive metal profile 59 is used as a complementary electrical conductor. This said section being the rise 8 made of aluminum or aluminum alloy.

A second way of integrating an electrical conductor is shown in FIG. 25, it consists of applying a metal strip 60 on the surface under the plastic cover 14. Said metal strip 60 is optionally a brass, copper, copper or copper strip. stainless steel, aluminum or aluminum alloy. Here too, a conductive metal profile 59 is used as a complementary electrical conductor. This said section being the rise 8 of aluminum or aluminum alloy.

Another original idea of the invention, presented in FIG. 25, consists in integrating a light bar 61 into the barrier. In this figure, the light rope is applied on the side opposite the rise 8. Thus, when someone looks at the barrier, the light rope 61 diverts the attention of this observer. By the light it emits in the immediate environment, the light cord hides the barrier, making the person who looks at the barrier believe that it is, at first glance, a decorative element, rather than a barrier capturing bed bugs. This feature is a valuable asset when the product buyer wants the insect barrier to be as unobtrusive as possible. In other embodiments, this light string could very well be located on any other surface of the barrier, even within it, provided that at first glance the observer can notice the light emitted by the barrier when the light circuit is energized.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 26, an insect barrier version is shown that is installed on an installation surface 7 located under an object, for example, a bed base. In this version, the entrance surface 1 1 remains adjacent to the installation surface 7, and the cover 10 is rigid. Note also that the capture adhesive 5 is placed on a tongue body 47 easily removable. Indeed, this tongue has a flap for grasping with the fingers. In another embodiment shown in FIG. 27, the barrier shown is a version installed on a vertical installation surface 7, for example a wall. In this figure, the input surface 1 1 It remains adjacent to the installation surface 7, but the insects must enter the barrier through an inlet surface 11 accessible from the top. Again, the cover 10 is rigid and the capture adhesive 5 is placed on a tongue body 47 easily removable with the fingers.

Of course, it will be understood that these two last versions of the invention make it possible to intercept the insects with suction cups on the legs, namely the species of insects which are able to mount on perfectly smooth and vertical surfaces, such as ladybirds. and the majority of caterpillar species.

Before closing, we illustrate in Figure 28 an advanced version of the insect barrier. In this embodiment, the following elements of this patent have been integrated. Mounted 8 self-adhesive foam tape, double-sided tape 5 1, cover 1 0 hinged by a curved tongue 20 and a hinge recess 21, capture adhesive 5 placed on a detachable tongue body 47, serving fin clamp and stopper 48 which wedges the body of the detachable tongue, integration of a light cord 61, electrical conductor barrier clogging detection system in the form of a metal ribbon 60 bonded to the surface under the cover 14, and installation base 22 of aluminum conductor.

Finally, we illustrate in Figure 29 another advanced version of the insect barrier. In this version, another feature has been incorporated into the barrier. It is a crevice 62 which serves to crimp the light cord 61 in the surface of the installation base 22. Finally in this latter embodiment, the following elements of this patent have been integrated. Mounted 8 conductive aluminum, double-sided adhesive tape with foamed tape body 52, cover 1 0 hinged by a section of flexible material 37, capture adhesive tab 5 placed on a detachable tab body 47 pinched by a tongue support 33, integration of a light cord 61, electrocution means insects by electric conductor in the form of wire 57 crimped in a crevice 58 located in the surface under the cover 14, combined with a metal mounting, and tongue of reinforcement and / or decoration 38, placed on the lid and being embedded in notches 39.

Possibilities of industrial applications.

In order to make more obvious the possibilities of industrial applications of different insect barrier variants, here are some examples of products that are all feasible from combinations of features described in this patent.

- Creation of a protection perimeter on the ground, around a bed, to protect the host lying on the bed inside this perimeter, against bed bugs.

- Travel luggage protection against the infiltration of crawling insects from the surface on which luggage is deposited, forming, with the insect barrier, a waterproof perimeter around the luggage.

- Interception of the passage of insects on the ground, by installing the insect barrier along a common wall to slow down or block the spread of infestation of bed bugs in a building.

- Creation of a perimeter on the ground, to surround objects and quarantine them. This in order to intercept insects that want to get out of this perimeter.

- Interception and detection of insects who want to enter a building by installing the insect barrier on the walls forming the outer perimeter of the building.

- Installation of the insect barrier on a pantry shelf to surround and protect the food and thus prevent insects from accessing food and contaminating food.

- Installation of the insect barrier in a bed, on the periphery between the bed base and the mattress of this bed, to detect bed bugs that try to enter this bed.

Claims

Claims The embodiments of the invention, for which an exclusive right of ownership or privilege is claimed, are defined as follows:
1. Insect barrier, attached to a generally flat surface, intercepting crawling insect insects attempting to cross the perimeter portion of said facility surface protected by said barrier. This barrier is composed of at least one profiled body or an assembly of profiled bodies. Said section or this assembly of said sections forming said barrier comprises: a rise, an installation base, a main cavity, and a cover. In addition, said section or this assembly of said sections forming said barrier comprises four essential surfaces which are: the entrance surface, the cliff surface, the bottom surface and the surface surface under the cover. Also, said barrier is provided with at least one lateral opening located along the length of said barrier. Insects outside of said barrier enter the interior thereof through said aperture (s). These openings are located between said entrance surface and said cover surface. To be intercepted on said bottom surface, the crawling insects must successively come into contact with the following surfaces: from said installation surface, the insects pass over said entrance surface, then come into contact with said cliff surface, and then enter contact with said shallow surface, located in said main cavity. This said main cavity used to channel insects that can not go up by the cliff surface. In addition, at least one of the segments of said cliff surface forms a minimum delta angle of fifteen degrees with said installation surface. Finally, the width of the surface under said lid is at least seventy-ten percent of the width of the surface of said shallow floor.
 2. insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that said bottom surface is the non-adhesive surface, located in the main cavity, and on which insects can move.
 3. Insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that said bottom surface is the surface, exposed to the air, in the main cavity, an adhesive material with which the insects come in contact and by which their movements are slowed down or interrupted .
An insect barrier according to claim 3 characterized in that said adhesive material is a sticky substance in the form of a liquid or a paste.
5. Insect barrier according to claim 3 characterized in that said adhesive material is an adhesive tape.
An insect barrier according to claim 4 or 5, characterized in that said adhesive material is applied to a surface by a material deposition method selected from the group consisting of: continuous line, dotted line, dot, pellet ribbon , in continuous ribbon and ribbon spaced.
 An insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that said entrance surface, exposed to insect passage, to a rough or porous surface finish.
 Insect barrier according to claim 7, characterized in that said surface finish is obtained by installing, on said entrance surface, a ribbon selected from the group consisting of: foam tape, self-adhesive foam tape, self-adhesive paper tape, ribbon fabrics, self-adhesive fabric ribbon, felt-tape, self-adhesive felt-tape, cork tape, self-adhesive cork tape.
 9. Insect barrier according to claim 7, characterized in that said surface finish is obtained by modifying the state of the surface of the material of said entrance surface by a surface alteration method chosen from the group comprising sandblasting. knurling, grooving and stamping.
10. An insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that when no load external to said cover is applied thereto, said opening or openings, located between the surface under the cover and the input surface, are kept at a minimum opening distance of 1 mm from each other.
 1. An insect barrier according to claim 10 characterized in that said minimum opening distance is maintained by spacers fixed on said surface under the cover.
 12. Insect barrier according to claim 10 characterized in that said minimum opening distance is maintained by spacers fixed on said input surface.
 13. Insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that said profile or said profiles comprise a light cord.
 14. Insect barrier according to claim 13 characterized in that said light bar is fixed on one of the outer surfaces of the or a section constituting said barrier.
15. An insect barrier according to claim 13 characterized in that said light bar is fixed on one of the inner surfaces of the or a section constituting said barrier.
16. Insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that said surface under the cover comprises an electrically conductive surface.
 17. An insect barrier according to claim 1 characterized in that said input surface comprises an electrically conductive surface.
An insect barrier according to claims 16 and 17 characterized in that the electrically conductive surface of said surface under the cover, and the electrically conductive surface of said entrance surface, are part of the loop of a circuit that can be electrified.
PCT/CA2014/000453 2013-05-27 2014-05-26 Device for intercepting crawling insects WO2014190413A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CA 2817026 CA2817026A1 (en) 2013-05-27 2013-05-27 Detection and capture device for crawling insects
CA2,817,026 2013-05-27

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WO2014190413A1 true WO2014190413A1 (en) 2014-12-04

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Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4709504A (en) * 1986-03-24 1987-12-01 Andric Milos D Portable disposable insect trap
US5274950A (en) * 1992-07-01 1994-01-04 Roberts Ernest H Vermin barrier
US5926999A (en) * 1996-03-15 1999-07-27 Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada Portable trench barrier for insect pests in agriculture
JP2010142193A (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-07-01 Panasonic Electric Works Co Ltd Insect trap
US20120266519A1 (en) * 2011-04-22 2012-10-25 William Wright Luminous insect trap

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4709504A (en) * 1986-03-24 1987-12-01 Andric Milos D Portable disposable insect trap
US5274950A (en) * 1992-07-01 1994-01-04 Roberts Ernest H Vermin barrier
US5926999A (en) * 1996-03-15 1999-07-27 Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada Portable trench barrier for insect pests in agriculture
JP2010142193A (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-07-01 Panasonic Electric Works Co Ltd Insect trap
US20120266519A1 (en) * 2011-04-22 2012-10-25 William Wright Luminous insect trap

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