WO2014176206A2 - Surgical system with expandable shield - Google Patents

Surgical system with expandable shield Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2014176206A2
WO2014176206A2 PCT/US2014/034899 US2014034899W WO2014176206A2 WO 2014176206 A2 WO2014176206 A2 WO 2014176206A2 US 2014034899 W US2014034899 W US 2014034899W WO 2014176206 A2 WO2014176206 A2 WO 2014176206A2
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
tissue
surgical system
frame element
lumen
shield
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2014/034899
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2014176206A3 (en
Inventor
Roy H. Sullivan
Ronald D. Adams
Paul Dicesare
Jeffrey Radziunas
Danial Ferreira
Original Assignee
Hologic, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201361815360P priority Critical
Priority to US61/815,360 priority
Application filed by Hologic, Inc. filed Critical Hologic, Inc.
Publication of WO2014176206A2 publication Critical patent/WO2014176206A2/en
Publication of WO2014176206A3 publication Critical patent/WO2014176206A3/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320016Endoscopic cutting instruments, e.g. arthroscopes, resectoscopes
    • A61B17/32002Endoscopic cutting instruments, e.g. arthroscopes, resectoscopes with continuously rotating, oscillating or reciprocating cutting instruments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00535Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets pneumatically or hydraulically operated
    • A61B2017/00557Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets pneumatically or hydraulically operated inflatable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320016Endoscopic cutting instruments, e.g. arthroscopes, resectoscopes
    • A61B17/32002Endoscopic cutting instruments, e.g. arthroscopes, resectoscopes with continuously rotating, oscillating or reciprocating cutting instruments
    • A61B2017/320024Morcellators, e.g. having a hollow cutting tube with an annular cutter for morcellating and removing tissue
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/08Accessories or related features not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2090/0801Prevention of accidental cutting or pricking
    • A61B2090/08021Prevention of accidental cutting or pricking of the patient or his organs

Abstract

A tissue removal system includes a morcellator having a cannula comprising a proximal end portion, a distal end portion, a sidewall, and at least one lumen extending between the proximal end portion and the distal end portion. A cutting blade is disposed within a lumen of the cannula. Also included is a tissue shield that has an expandable frame element and a shield element attached to the expandable frame element, wherein the tissue shield serves to isolate non-target tissues from at least the cutting blade of the system so that such tissues remain unaffected by a surgical procedure conducted with the system.

Description

SURGICAL SYSTEM WITH EXPANDABLE SHIELD

RELATED APPLICATION DATA [0001] The present application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119 to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61/815,360, filed April 24, 2013. The foregoing application is hereby incorporated by reference into the present application in its entirety.

FIELD OF INVENTION [0002] The disclosed inventions relate to surgical systems that include shield elements to protect tissue from unwanted contact during a surgical procedure.

BACKGROUND

[0003] There are many situations in which it is desirable to remove unwanted tissue from a patient. Uterine fibroids and uterine polyps are two examples of such unwanted tissue. Uterine fibroids are well-defined, non-cancerous tumors that are commonly found in the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. Uterine polyps are masses that are commonly found extending from the inner lining of the uterus. In many instances, uterine fibroids and uterine polyps can grow to be several centimeters in diameter and may cause, for example, menorrhagia (prolonged or heavy menstrual bleeding), pelvic pressure or pain, and reproductive dysfunction. It is believed that uterine fibroids occur in a substantial percentage of the female population, perhaps in 20 to 40 percent of all women, and that uterine polyps occur in up to 10 percent of all women.

[0004] One type of treatment for uterine fibroids and uterine polyps is hysteroscopic resection. Hysteroscopic resection typically involves inserting a hysteroscope into the uterus through the vagina, i.e., transcervically, and then cutting away the unwanted tissue from the uterus using a device delivered to the unwanted tissue by the hysteroscope. Hysteroscopic resections typically fall into one of two varieties. In one variety, an electrocautery device in the form of a loop-shaped cutting wire is fixedly mounted on the distal end of the hysteroscope - the combination of the hysteroscope and the electrocautery device typically referred to as a resectoscope. The transmission of electrical current to the uterus with a resectoscope is typically monopolar, and the circuit is completed by a conductive path to the power unit for the device through a conductive pad applied to the patient's skin. In this manner, tissue is removed by contacting the loop with the part of the uterus wall of interest. Examples of such devices are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,906,615, which is incorporated herein by reference.

[0005] In another variety of hysteroscopic resection, an electromechanical cutter is inserted through a working channel in the hysteroscope. The electromechanical cutter, sometimes referred to as a morcellator, is a motor-driven instrument that typically includes (i) a tubular member having an end or window through which tissue may enter and (ii) a cutting instrument positioned within the tubular member for cutting the tissue that has entered the tubular member. Suction or surgical grasping instruments are employed to draw tissue into the tubular member, which includes a cutting instrument that is used to cut the tissue into smaller pieces or "morcels." Examples of the electromechanical cutter variety of hysteroscopic resection are disclosed in, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 7,226,459; U.S. Pat. No. 6,032,673; U.S. Pat. No. 5,730,752; U.S. Publication No. 2012/0172889 Al; U.S. Publication No. US 2009/0270898 Al; U.S. Publication No. 2009/0270812 Al; U.S. Publication No. US 2006/0047185 Al; and PCT International Publication No. WO 99/11184; each of which is incorporated herein by reference. In other procedures to treat uterine fibroids and uterine polyps, laparoscopic morcellators are employed in a laparoscopic (rather than hysteroscopic) procedure. Examples of laparoscopic morcellators are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,520,634 and 6,039,748, each of which is incorporated herein by reference.

[0006] It is generally desired to minimize the duration of surgical procedures such as hysterectomies. The tissue removal rates achievable with known morcellators and resection devices may be limited, thus resulting in surgical procedure durations that are longer than desired. Such devices may also be characterized by exposed cutting blades or surfaces, thus risking unintended tissue removal or damage. There is a need for surgical resection devices that provide a high rate of tissue removal while also protecting tissues that are not intended to be removed during a surgical procedure.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] The disclosed inventions are directed to tissue removal systems and methods that may be used, without limitation, for removing uterine fibroids or other gynecological tissues. The tissue removal (i.e., surgical) systems and methods include means for protecting tissue that is intended to be unaffected during a surgical procedure. [0008] In one embodiment, the tissue removal system includes a cannula comprising a proximal end portion, a distal end portion, a sidewall, at least one lumen extending between the proximal end portion and the distal end portion, and a cutting blade disposed within a lumen of the cannula. Also included is a tissue shield that includes an expandable frame element and a shield element attached to the expandable frame element. The tissue shield serves to protect non-target tissues from at least the cutting blade of the system so that such tissues are not contacted with the cutting blade during a surgical procedure conducted with the system.

[0009] The disclosed inventions further include a method of using a surgical tissue removal system in a resection procedure of target tissues. The system includes a cannula comprising a proximal end portion, a distal end portion, a sidewall, at least one lumen extending between the proximal end portion and the distal end portion, and a cutting blade within a lumen of the cannula. Also included is a tissue shield slideably coupled to the cannula, the shield, the tissue shield including an expandable frame element and a shield element attached to the expandable frame element. In one embodiment, a method according to the disclosed inventions includes the acts of expanding the expandable frame element to isolate non-target tissues from at least the cutting blade of the system with the shield element, and contacting target tissues with the cutting blade, while the expandable frame element is in an expanded configuration.

[0010] Additional aspects, features and advantages of the disclosed inventions are set forth in part in the description which follows, and will also in part be apparent from the description or may be learned by practice of the invention. In the description, reference is made to the accompanying drawings which form a part thereof and in which is shown by way of illustration various embodiments for practicing the disclosed inventions. Although the embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the disclosed inventions, it is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that structural changes can be made without departing from the scope of the inventions as defined by the claims appended hereto. The following detailed description is, therefore, for purposes of illustration, and is not to be taken in a limiting sense.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011] FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary surgical access and tissue removal system for use with the disclosed inventions. [0012] FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the distal end portion of a tissue removal device, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosed inventions.

[0013] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the distal end portion of a tissue removal device, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosed inventions.

[0014] FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the distal end portion of a tissue removal device with a tissue shield in an expanded configuration, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosed inventions.

[0015] FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the distal end portion of a tissue removal device with a tissue shield in a retracted configuration, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosed inventions.

[0016] FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the distal end portion of a tissue removal device, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosed inventions.

[0017] FIG. 7 is a bottom view of the distal end portion of a tissue removal device, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosed inventions.

[0018] FIG. 8 shows an embodiment of the disclosed inventions in which a fluid line extends beyond the distal end of the outer tubular member of the devices of the disclosed inventions.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION [0019] FIG. 1 schematically illustrates an exemplary surgical access and tissue removal system 100 for use with the current invention. As used herein, tissue "removal" is synonymous with tissue "resection" and generally refers to the surgical removal of tissue from a patient's body. A laparoscopic morcellator is used to illustrate the principles of the embodiments of the disclosed inventions. However, it will be understood that such principles apply equally to all types of surgical access devices, as well as to devices not necessarily limited to surgical access. Thus, the embodiments described with respect to a morcellator intended for gynecological procedures are illustrative only, and not intended to be limiting in any respect.

[0020] With further reference to FIG. 1, the exemplary laparosopic surgical access and tissue removal device 100 (i.e., a laparoscopic morcellator) may be considered a surgical access device 100 configured for gynecological procedures, such as a hysterectomy. In addition to the performance of one or more gynecological procedures described in detail herein, the systems, methods, apparatuses, and devices disclosed herein may be used to perform one or more additional procedures (for example, urological procedures or the like), including, but not limited to, access and tissue manipulation and/or tissue removal from any of a variety of organs and tissues, such as the bladder, breast, lung, stomach, bowel, esophagus, oral cavity, rectum, nasal sinus, Eustachian tubes, heart, gall bladder, spine, shoulder, knee, hip, brain, arteries, veins, and various ducts. Routes of access include but are not limited to trans-cervical; trans-vaginal-wall; trans-uteral; trans-vesicle; trans-urethral; trans-nasal; and other routes.

[0021] The exemplary surgical access and tissue removal device 100 illustrated in FIG. 1 is configured for removing tissue from the body, in this case fibroids and other abnormal tissue from the uterine cavity, or alternatively the uterus in its entirety. Tissue remove device 100 includes a housing 101 shown in cross-section. The housing 101 may comprise complementary left and right housing halves, each of which may be made of a rigid polymer or other suitable material, which are joined together, for example, with screws, adhesive, or other suitable means. The housing includes a handle 102 of any suitable size and shape to facilitate ease of use. Extending from the proximal end 103 of the housing 101 is a suction tube 104, and optional fluid line 106 and motor driver line 108. Extending from the distal end 105 of housing 101 is an outer tubular member 1024 having a lumen therein, which preferably terminates in a distal end 1030. Within the lumen of the outer tubular member 1024 is an inner tubular member 1028, as further described herein. In certain embodiments, a second lumen 260 extends at least partially along the outer tubular member 1024.

[0022] The suction tube 104 is preferably a flexible tube extending from a pump (not shown) or other vacuum source to the inner tubular member 1028. The suction tube 104 is in working fluid communication with the inner tubular member 1028 so that materials including solids, fluids and/or gases may be pulled through the inner tubular member 1028 and into the suction tube 104. In this manner, the vacuum source may be used to apply suction to the tissue removal device 100, and any withdrawn tissue, fluids, or other matter suctioned through the resection window 1026 of the tissue removal device 100 may be collected outside of the patient's body.

[0023] The fluid line 106 extends from a fluid source (not shown) into the housing 101. The purpose of the fluid line 106 is to deliver fluid, such as saline, to a surgical site. For example, the fluid may be delivered from the fluid line 106 into the space between the inner tubular member 1028 and the outer tubular member 1024, whereupon it flows towards the distal end 1030 of the outer tubular member 1024 and exits from the device 100 at the resection window 1026 described below. Alternatively, the fluid line 106 may continue as a separate lumen that extends within, or on the outside of, the tubular member 1024 and terminates at or near distal end 1030 of the outer tubular member 1024. Alternatively, the fluid line 106 extends through the outer tubular member and exits from (and extends beyond) the distal end 1030 of the outer tubular member 1024, as shown in FIG. 8. Alternatively, fluid is preferably delivered to a surgical site using methods and systems of the disclosed inventions with any suitable fluid delivery mechanism.

[0024] The optional delivery of fluid to a surgical site using the devices and systems of the disclosed inventions can result in many advantages. For example, some surgical procedures that make use of the systems and devices of the disclosed inventions are conducted within an insufflated cavity, such as a uterus. At the same time, such surgical procedures are conducted using suction to pull tissue through the resection window 1026 in the outer tubular member 1024, as shown in FIG. 3. The delivery of fluid to the surgical site creates a fluid environment in at least the area immediately surrounding the distal end 1030 of the outer tubular member 1024, thus creating a seal around the cut tissue that helps to facilitate such tissue withdrawal. Moreover, fluid delivery results in the lubrication of morcellated tissue, thus easing the movement of such tissue within the inner tubular member 1028.

[0025] In certain embodiments, the motor driver line 108 comprises an electrically conductive wire extending from a power supply (not shown) to a motor 110. Upon application of electrical current from the power supply, the motor 110 drives shaft 112 to rotate at a high rate of speed. Mounted on the drive shaft 112 is a first drive gear 114 having teeth that mesh with the teeth of second drive gear 116, which is mounted on the inner tubular member 1028. This configuration results in the rotation of the inner tubular member 1028 within the outer tubular member 1024. In certain embodiments, the second drive gear 116 extends along a length of the inner tubular member 1028 so that the inner tubular member 1028 may be moved in translation (i.e., parallel to a long axis thereof) while remaining engaged with the first drive gear 114. Such trans lational movement may be imparted manually by a pin 118 or other suitable structure extending within a longitudinal slot from the side of housing 101 and attached to a positioning component 120, within which the inner tubular member 1028 may freely rotate. Alternatively, translational movement may be imparted from the motor 110 using means known in the art. Alternatively, the inner tubular member 1028 rotates but does not otherwise move relative to the outer tubular member 1024. In the latter embodiment, target tissue may be brought into contact with an exposed, rotating blade. [0026] FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the distal end portion of the exemplary tissue removal device 100. Device 100 comprises an electromechanical cutting mechanism comprising an outer tubular member 1024 and an inner tubular member 1028, which may move rotationally and oscillate translationally relative to outer tubular member 1024. As shown, outer tubular member 1024 includes a resection window 1026.

[0027] When vacuum is applied to the inner tubular member 1028, the resection window 1026 may receive, capture, and/or draw in tissue, fluid, and/or other matter. The window 1026 may be located proximate to the distal end 1030, such as, for example, 0.25 inch from the distal end 1030. The window 1026 may be shaped to include a proximal end 1034 and a distal end 1032. The proximal end 1034 may slope gradually proximally, and the distal end 1032 may slope gradually distally. The proximal end 1034 of the resection window 1026 may be a radial end having a radius of curvature of, for example, 0.085 inches; however, other radius curvatures are possible. The distal end 1032 of resection window 1026 may be a radial end having a radius of curvature of, for example, 0.150 inches; however, other radius curvatures are possible. The slopes of the proximal and distal ends 1034, 1032 may allow or encourage tissue to enter the resection window 1026. In some embodiments, the slopes of the proximal and distal ends 1034, 1032 form cutting edges for tissue resection. The resection window 1026 may have a length of approximately 0.55 inches. However, other lengths are possible. The resection window 1026 may extend over a substantial portion of the circumference of the outer tubular member 1024, such as, for example, about 60% of the circumference; however, other percentages are possible.

[0028] The inner tubular member 1028 may include a proximal end, a distal end, and a longitudinal lumen. The distal end of the inner tubular member 1028 may be shaped to include an external bevel, such as, for example, an external bevel of approximately 20 degrees. Tubular members 1024 and 1028 may be arranged so that, when tubular member 1028 is in a fully retracted, proximal-most position, distal end of tubular member 1028 may be withdrawn sufficiently to permit tissue to enter window 1026 (such as with distal end of tubular member 1028 positioned proximal to window 1026), and so that, when tubular member 1028 is in a fully advanced, distal-most position, distal end of tubular member 1028 may be positioned distally of distal end 1032 of window 1026. In this manner, as tubular member 1028 is moved translationally and rotationally past window 1026, tissue within window 1026 may be sheared. To promote such a shearing of tissue, the outer diameter of inner tubular member 1028 may be just slightly less (e.g., about 0.002 inch) than the inner diameter of outer tubular member 1024. [0029]

[0030] All embodiments preferably include means for protecting non-target tissue, i.e., tissue that is intended to be unaffected by the surgical procedures described herein. For example, FIGS. 3-5 show a distal end portion 211 comprising the outer tubular member 1024 with the distal end portion 211 terminating in a closed distal end 1030. The outer tubular member 1024 has a lumen 215 extending therein between the distal end portion 211 and its proximal end 104 (shown in FIG. 1). The resection window 1026 is located in the sidewall of the outer tubular member 1024 within the distal end portion 211. The resection window 1026 exposes the lumen 215 to tissue located outside of the outer tubular member 1024, as previously discussed.

[0031] The tissue removal device 100 includes a cutting mechanism that includes a cutting blade 230 with a sharp edge, as is known in the art. The cutting blade 230 may be formed at the distal end of the inner tubular member 1028, as shown in FIG. 3, or may otherwise be an annular ring or other suitable configuration. The cutting blade 230 is slidably disposed within the lumen 215 such that it can move substantially between the proximal and distal ends 1034, 1032 of the resection window 1026. In addition, the cutting blade 230 may rotate as it moves laterally.

[0032] The embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5 includes a tissue shield 250, which comprises an expandable frame element 251 and a shield element 252 attached to the expandable frame element 251. The tissue shield 250 may be placed in a retracted configuration (as shown in FIG. 5) for delivery into a patient, and an expanded configuration (as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5) for use during resection. FIGS. 4 and 5 are bottom views of the tissue removal device 100, and FIG. 3 is a perspective top view.

[0033] The expandable frame element 251 may be made from a shape memory material such as nitinol or a shape memory polymer that expands to the expanded configuration when released from forces that hold it in the retracted configuration. Alternatively, the expandable frame element 251 is inflatable such that pressurized gas or fluid may be delivered through an inflation tube or the like to cause the expandable frame element 251 to assume its expanded configuration. The frame element 251 may be of unitary construction, or may comprise multiple parts. For example, the first and second portions or "legs" 255, 256 of the frame element 251 may be portions of a single loop structure, or they may be separate pieces that are positioned together to form the frame element 251.

[0034] The expandable frame element 251 is generally circular in shape, although it may be any suitable shape, such as triangular, square, rectangular, and so forth. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5, the frame element 251 extends from a second opening 261 of a second lumen 260 that extends along the outer tubular member 1024 to the distal end portion 211. The second opening 261 is proximal to the resection window 1026 along the length of outer tubular member 1024. In the event that the frame element 251 is made from a shape memory material, in one embodiment a pull wire or similar element extends within the second lumen 260 and is attached to the frame element 251 so that it may be manipulated by a user located at the proximal end portion of the system to selectively apply forces to the frame element so that it may be manipulated between its expanded and retracted configurations. In the event that the frame element 251 is inflatable, a pressurized gas or fluid may be delivered to the frame element 251 via second lumen 260 or an inflation tube extending within second lumen 260 so that the frame element 251 may be manipulated between its expanded and retracted configurations.

[0035] A shield element 252 is attached to the expandable frame element 251 by any suitable mechanism. For example, the shield element 252 may be adhered to the frame element 251 with the use of an adhesive or via mechanical attachment such as by sutures. Alternatively, the shield element 252 may be formed with an annular sleeve or similar opening around its circumference such that the frame element 251 is placed therein, or the shield element 252 may be formed as an expandable cover that is placed over the frame element 251.

[0036] The shield element 252 is made from any suitable material. For example, in one embodiment the shield element 252 is an elastomeric polymer that stretches with the frame element 251 as it expands from its retracted configuration of FIG. 5 to its expanded configuration of FIGS. 3 and 4. In another embodiment, the shield element 252 is a metallic mesh. In either event, the tissue shield can be resilient such that it assumes a reduced configuration when the frame element 251 is in a retracted configuration and expands with the frame element 251 when the frame element 251 is expanded. When the frame element 251 is in a fully expanded configuration, the shield element 252 can be substantially taut, meaning that the shield element 252 provides a surface with sufficient mechanical integrity so that it can effectively protect the tissue that it is placed against the bottom side of the shield element during a surgical procedure (such as the bowel) by preventing the non-target tissue from contacting the cutting blade 230 or other cutting surface. As such, non-target tissue held against the shield element 252 will be prevented from entering the window 1026 whereas tissue proximate the window 1026 may freely enter the window 1026 for the resection thereof. [0037] For embodiments of the disclosed inventions that include first and second openings (such as openings 1026 and 261 in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5), they may be spaced about 180 degrees apart from each other, as shown in FIGS. 3-5. In other embodiments, openings are spaced at various other angles with respect to each other, such as at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, or 165 degrees from each other.

[0038] Although the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5 includes a second lumen 260 that extends at least partially along the underside of outer tubular member 1024 (see FIGS. 4 and 5), other embodiments do not include more than a single lumen, and still other embodiments include multiple lumens that are separated or at least partially connected, in either case entirely within a single cannula. For example, like the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5, the embodiment shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 includes a cutting mechanism that includes cutting blade 230 at the distal end of a tubular element 1028, where the cutting mechanism is located within the lumen 215 of the outer tubular member 1024. Unlike the embodiment of FIGS. 3- 5, however, the tissue shield 250 of the embodiment of FIGS. 6 and 7 is positioned within the same lumen 215 as the cutting mechanism. This embodiment includes an opening 361 within the outer tubular member 1024, through which the tissue shield 250 may be advanced. In an embodiment, the tissue shield 250 is contained within an elongate tubular member 270 that extends within the lumen 215. The tubular member 270 may be either moveable or fixed with respect to the outer tubular member 1024. The tissue shield 250 is advanced within the tubular member 270, which retains it in a retracted configuration while the outer tubular member 1024 is delivered into a patient. The distal end 271 of tubular member 270 may be, for example, angled or curved towards the opening 361 so that the tissue shield 250 is directed through the opening 361 when it is extended towards its expanded configuration.

[0039] To use the system shown in FIGS. 1-8, the outer tubular member 1024 is introduced into a patient's body, preferably through a rigid shaft. The tissue shield 250 is then actuated by moving the expandable frame element 251 from its retracted configuration to an expanded configuration using a suitable actuation mechanism such as a pull wire in working arrangement with the housing 101. Such pull wires or similar triggering mechanisms are well known in the art. The expanded tissue shield 250 is placed into contact with tissue that is intended to be unaffected by the subsequent surgical procedure. Tissue intended to be resected is drawn into the window 1026, through the use of suction into the lumen 215 and/or by direct manipulation of the tissue. The tubular member 1024 may be repositioned as necessary to complete the surgical procedure and to resect all desired tissues. Once the procedure is complete, the expandable frame element 251 is moved to its retracted configuration, drawn into its delivery lumen and is thereafter removed from the patient.

[0040] The disclosed inventions provide tissue removal systems and related methods that may be used, without limitation, for removing tissue during laparoscopic surgery. The systems and methods make use of a tissue shield that serves to protect non-target tissues throughout the surgical procedure, thus enhancing safety and usability when compared with conventional devices. While aspects of the invention have been described with reference to example embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention as recited in the claims.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A surgical system, comprising:
a cannula comprising a proximal end portion, a distal end portion, a sidewall, a first lumen extending between the proximal end portion and the distal end, a second lumen extending between the proximal end portion and the distal end portion, a first opening in the sidewall in the distal end portion and extending into the first lumen, and a second opening in the distal end portion and extending into the second lumen;
a tissue cutter disposed within the first lumen; and
a tissue shield, the tissue shield comprising
an expandable frame element extending from the second opening, the expandable frame element having an expanded configuration in which the expandable frame element extends radially from the cannula and a collapsed configuration in which the expandable frame element does not extend radially from the cannula, and a shield element attached to the expandable frame element, such that the shield element is substantially taut when the expandable frame element is in the expanded configuration. 2. The surgical system of claim 1, wherein the second lumen terminates at a position proximal to the distal end of the cannula.
3. The surgical system of claim 2, wherein the first lumen terminates at a position distal of the second lumen.
4. The surgical system of any of claims 1-3, wherein the tissue cutter rotates.
5. The surgical system of any of claims 1-4, wherein the tissue cutter oscillates. 6. The surgical system of any of claims 1-5, wherein the expandable frame element is inflatable.
7. The surgical system of claim 6, further comprising an inflation tube attached to the expandable frame element and extending into the second lumen of the cannula.
8. The surgical system of any of claims 1-5, wherein the shield element comprises an elastomeric polymer. 9. The surgical system of any of claims 1-5, wherein the shield element comprises a metallic mesh.
10. The surgical system of any of claims 1-5, further comprising means for expanding the expandable frame element.
11. The surgical system of any of claims 1-5, wherein the expandable frame element comprises a shape memory material.
12. The surgical system of claim 11, wherein the shape memory material is nitinol.
13. The surgical system of claim 11, wherein the shape memory material is a polymer.
14. The surgical system of any of claims 11-13, wherein the shield element comprises an outer perimeter and a sleeve at least partially surrounding the perimeter.
15. The surgical system of claim 14, wherein the expandable frame element is at least partially located within the sleeve.
16. A surgical system, comprising:
a cannula comprising a proximal end portion, a distal end portion, a sidewall, a lumen extending between the proximal end portion and the distal end portion, a first opening in the sidewall in the distal end portion and extending into the lumen, and a second opening in the distal end portion and extending into lumen;
a cutting blade disposed within the lumen; and
a tissue shield, the tissue shield comprising:
an expandable frame element extending from the second opening, the expandable frame element having an expanded configuration in which the expandable frame element extends radially from the cannula and a collapsed configuration in which the expandable frame element does not extend radially from the cannula, and a shield element attached to the expandable frame element, such that the shield element is substantially taut when the expandable frame element is in the expanded configuration. 17. The surgical system of claim 16, wherein the first opening is located at a position distal of the second opening.
18. The surgical system of claim 16 or 17, wherein the expandable frame element is inflatable.
19. The surgical system of claim 16 or 17, wherein the shield element comprises an outer perimeter and a sleeve at least partially surrounding the perimeter.
20. The surgical system of claim 16, wherein the first and second openings are positioned approximately 180 degrees from each other in the side wall.
21. A method of removing tissue from a patient using a tissue removal device, the tissue removal device comprising a cutting cannula and an outer cannula, the outer cannula defining a resection window adjacent a closed distal end thereof and an outer cannula lumen, the cutting cannula defining an open distal end and a cutter lumen, the cutting cannula being slideably disposed within the outer cannula, the method comprising:
positioning the tissue removal device in a patient;
rotating the tissue removal device so that the resection window is adjacent a target tissue;
expanding the shield so that non-target tissue is held away from the resection window; and
cutting the target tissue using the cutting element.
22. The method of claim 21, further comprising applying vacuum to the cutter lumen so that the target tissue is drawn into the resection window.
23. The method of claim 21, further comprising inserting the tissue removal device through a laparoscopic incision.
The method of claim 21 , further comprising retracting the shield.
25. The method of claim 21, further comprising delivering fluid to the target tissue before cutting the target tissue
PCT/US2014/034899 2013-04-24 2014-04-22 Surgical system with expandable shield WO2014176206A2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361815360P true 2013-04-24 2013-04-24
US61/815,360 2013-04-24

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/782,867 US10342565B2 (en) 2013-04-24 2014-04-22 Surgical system with expandable shield

Publications (2)

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US10342565B2 (en) 2019-07-09
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