WO2013096403A1 - System, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization - Google Patents

System, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2013096403A1
WO2013096403A1 PCT/US2012/070536 US2012070536W WO2013096403A1 WO 2013096403 A1 WO2013096403 A1 WO 2013096403A1 US 2012070536 W US2012070536 W US 2012070536W WO 2013096403 A1 WO2013096403 A1 WO 2013096403A1
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Prior art keywords
system
component
accordance
motion
virtual
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PCT/US2012/070536
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French (fr)
Inventor
John M. GRIFFITH
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Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
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Priority to US201161578695P priority Critical
Priority to US61/578,695 priority
Priority to US13/466,522 priority
Priority to US201261644066P priority
Priority to US13/466,522 priority patent/US9799136B2/en
Priority to US61/644,066 priority
Application filed by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation filed Critical Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Publication of WO2013096403A1 publication Critical patent/WO2013096403A1/en

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06TIMAGE DATA PROCESSING OR GENERATION, IN GENERAL
    • G06T19/00Manipulating 3D models or images for computer graphics
    • G06T19/003Navigation within 3D models or images

Abstract

A system, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization are provided, including a motion capture component interfacing with wearable motion capture sensors; a virtual digital rendering component configured to receive the captured motion and re-create such motion in a three dimensional virtual space; a display component configured to display an output of the virtual digital rendering component; and a controller component, configured to interface with the virtual digital rendering component and allow a user to navigate within the three dimensional virtual space to control the visual aspects of one or more shots within the three dimensional virtual space.

Description

SYSTEM, METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR RAPID FILM PRE- VISUALIZATION

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] This invention relates generally to pre-visualization of film, e.g. feature films. More particularly, this invention relates to methods, systems and apparatuses for rapid, near realtime or real-time pre-visualization of films.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Pre-visualization is a technique whereby a script or storyline is rendered into one or more images representative of that script or storyline. Traditional methods involved the generation of comics, storyboards, proposed frame sketches, etc., by an artist reading the script in an attempt to capture a writer's or director's vision. More recently, computer animation, possibly even using motion capture technologies with an actor or stuntman, have been used to produce proposed pre- visualizations for later review by a director.

[0003] However, a common problem with all of these approaches is the fact that all of these pre-visualization activities are merely attempts by others to capture the vision (action, style of the shot, etc.) of a director on a scene by scene director. While a director or producer might review a script with a traditional pre-visualization team prior to generation of the pre- visualization materials, it is a common problem that the end result is not what a director or producer ultimately wants. This may be on the level of disliking one particular action sequence, not liking a series of pans or angles on some or all of the pre-visualization materials, or simply not liking the feel of the pre-visualization materials.

[0004] Dislike of the pre-visualization materials by a director or producer sends a pre- visualization team back to the drawing boards for generating second (or multiple) attempts to capture the vision of the director before the film can move forward. Accordingly, this process is expensive and inaccurate, involving many artists and/or animators over a several weeks or months, before further production can proceed. Additionally, because the creative vision of the producers and directors was not ongoing in the animators' process, all this work might be scrapped when the final product was shared with the Studio, exec producers or the director. [0005] Also, in general, motion capture of live performance in real time has also been extremely inefficient and expensive. For example, in the making of the film AVATAR, James Cameron's LightStorm production company developed a filming system and process requiring; costly, tethered light reflective mo-cap suits, a huge (warehouse sized) volume filled with IR cameras and HD cameras, and a heavy and bulky virtual hand-held, tethered camera wielded by the director (weighing approximately 35 lbs). The footage secured within that virtual camera was limited artistically to a camera lens view of the action, and the walking distance of the director. Additionally, the actual actors whose performances were necessary for the production spent months on call and on set to pre-capture their contributions to the film, thus further representing huge financial and time expenses. Because of these limitations, the captured footage was actual final film footage (which would have been captured after the pre-visualization stage).

[0006] Accordingly, there is a need in the art for an improved system, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization that avoids the above described problems and disadvantages.

SUMMARY

[0007] The above described and other problems and disadvantages of the prior art are overcome and alleviated by the present system, method and apparatus for rapid film pre- visualization, including a motion capture component interfacing with wearable motion capture sensors; a virtual digital rendering component configured to receive the captured motion and re-create such motion in a three dimensional virtual space; a display component configured to display an output of the virtual digital rendering component; and a controller component, configured to interface with the virtual digital rendering component and allow a user to navigate within the three dimensional virtual space to control the visual aspects of one or more shots within the three dimensional virtual space.

[0008] In exemplary embodiments, a user (e.g., a director) can navigate through the space in real time to generate pre- visualizations according to the user's preference or vision.

Exemplary embodiments allow for rough pre-visualizations, e.g. using MAYA as the virtual digital rendering component to output flat shaded blasts for approval. Other exemplary embodiments allow for more developed pre-visualzations, e.g., using an engine such as CRYENGINE 3 to provide development (e.g., virtual terrain, etc.) to the three dimensional virtual space defined by the pre-visualization process.

[0009] Also in exemplary embodiments, the controller may be a handheld device

incorporating a screen along with one or more hand controllers, wherein the hand controllers are configured to provide navigation in the three dimensional virtual space and to provide film camera controls, such as pan, tilt, zoom, etc. In one particular exemplary embodiment, at least one hand control includes a navigation control that provides six degrees of movement within the three dimensional virtual space (for reference, the "SpaceNavigator" from

3dConnexion provides six degrees of motion control). In exemplary embodiments, the controller's physical position and positional changes are tracked via a magnetic field, e.g., such as is done with the Razer Hydra system in video gaming, to provide additional navigation functionality to the controller. In other embodiments, rather than using a controller hand component similar the "SpaceNavigator", two hand controllers similar to the Razer Hydra controller may be interconnected by a bar. In any of the controller embodiments, a screen or viewfinder may or may not be used (e.g., mounted on a bar extending between left and right hand controller units), according to the preference of the user.

[0010] In other exemplary embodiments, the motion capture component utilizes plural radio frequency (RF) detectors in a motion grid (an exemplary motion grid may contain, e.g., nine RF detectors and head and foot tags, which facilitate removing drift inherent in the system). An exemplary system includes an XSENS system, including such a motion grid and MVN suits (which include accelerometers therein). An exemplary system for interfacing with the virtual digital rendering component (e.g., MAYA) includes an IKinema system, which generates 'stick figures' from the positional data emitted by accelerometers in the suit(s). In exemplary embodiments, the virtual digital rendering component (e.g., MAYA), provides the environment framework for generating characters in a virtual three dimensional space.

[0011] In other exemplary embodiments, a motion capture component detects the position of and motion of the face of a performer. In one such exemplary embodiment, a performer wears an infrared camera on a head rig pointing back at the face of the performer.

Information from the facial capture may be fed into a virtual digital rendering component (e.g., MAYA), either alone or in addition to the exemplary motion capture (utilizing performer worn suits) described above. Subsequent pre-visualization processing of the data may then be performed by a director or animator, either in real time with the motion capture or subsequent to any motion capture.

[0012] According to some or all of the above exemplary embodiments, the present invention thus provides systems, methods and apparatuses that provide fast pre-visualization for films utilizing control input, such as input from a director, to shape the pre-visualization. Thus, exemplary embodiments might provide a system where performers (actors, stuntmen, etc.) wearing wireless suits are choreographed in real time by a film's director. The director can sit in front of a display that shows the output of the captured motion in a three dimensional virtual environment and can both navigate and shape the visual shot within the three dimensional virtual environment according to the director's taste and vision. The pre- visualizations can be output in basic form (e.g., flat shaded blasts) or within a virtual world generated from an engine, such as the CRYENGINE 3, UNREAL engine, etc. The pre- visualizations can be generated on-set with the motion capture and with the director, in addition to the data being subsequently available (after motion capture) for off-set variations.

[0013] The above discussed and other features and advantages of the present invention will be appreciated and understood by those skilled in the art from the following detailed description and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014] Referring to the exemplary drawings wherein like elements are numbered alike in the several FIGURES.:

[0015] FIGURE 1 illustrates an exemplary flowchart for rapid film pre-visualization;

[0016] FIGURE 2 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary pre-visualization setup in accordance with the present disclosure;

[0017] FIGURE 3 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for data capture and processing of data into a three dimensional virtual environment;

[0018] FIGURE 4 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for data capture;

[0019] FIGURE 5 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for processing of data into a three dimensional virtual environment;

[0020] FIGURE 6 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for processing of data into a three dimensional virtual environment;

[0021] FIGURE 7 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for a director's environment and an environment for processing directed material;

[0022] FIGURE 8 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for a director' s environment;

[0023] FIGURE 9 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary setup for an environment for processing directed material;

[0024] FIGURE 10 illustrates an exemplary controller;

[0025] FIGURE 11 illustrates another exemplary controller including a virtual camera viewfinder screen;

[0026] FIGURE 12 illustrates a standard Razer Hydra controller; and [0027] FIGURE 13 illustrates an exemplary facial capture process. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0028] Detailed illustrative embodiments are disclosed herein. However, specific functional details disclosed herein are merely representative for purposes of describing example embodiments. Example embodiments may, however, be embodied in many alternate forms and should not be construed as limited to only the embodiments set forth herein.

[0029] Accordingly, while example embodiments are capable of various modifications and alternative forms, embodiments thereof are shown by way of example in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intent to limit example embodiments to the particular forms disclosed, but to the contrary, example embodiments are to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the scope of example embodiments. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout the description of the figures.

[0030] It will be further understood that, although the terms first, second, etc. may be used herein to describe various steps or calculations, these steps or calculations should not be limited by these terms. These terms are only used to distinguish one step or calculation from another. For example, a first calculation could be termed a second calculation, and, similarly, a second step could be termed a first step, without departing from the scope of this disclosure. As used herein, the term "and/or" includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.

[0031] As used herein, the singular forms "a", "an" and "the" are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms "comprises", "comprising,", "includes" and/or "including", when used herein, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

[0032] It will also be understood that the terms "photo," "photograph," "image," or any variation thereof may be interchangeable. Thus, any form of graphical image may be applicable to example embodiments. [0033] It will also be understood that the terms "audio," "audio tracks," "music," "music tracks," or any variation thereof may be interchangeable. Thus any form of audio may be applicable to example embodiments.

[0034] It will also be understood that the terms "film," "media," "multi-media," "video," or any variation thereof may be interchangeable. Thus any form of rich media may be applicable to example embodiments.

[0035] It should also be understood that other terms used herein may be applicable based upon any associated definition as understood by one of ordinary skill in the art, although other meanings may be applicable depending upon the particular context in which terms are used.

[0036] Therefore, the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of example embodiments. It should also be noted that in some alternative implementations, the functions/acts noted may occur out of the order noted in the figures. For example, two figures shown in succession may in fact be executed substantially concurrently or may sometimes be executed in the reverse order, depending upon the functionality/acts involved.

[0037] Further to the brief description provided above and associated textual detail of each of the figures, the following description provides additional details of example embodiments of the present invention.

[0038] As described herein, example embodiments of the present invention may include systems, methods and apparatus for rapid film pre- visualization, including a motion capture component interfacing with wearable motion capture sensors; a virtual digital rendering component configured to receive the captured motion and re-create such motion in a three dimensional virtual space; a display component configured to display an output of the virtual digital rendering component; and a controller component, configured to interface with the virtual digital rendering component and allow a user to navigate within the three dimensional virtual space to control the visual aspects of one or more shots within the three dimensional virtual space. [0039] In exemplary embodiments, a user (e.g., a director) can navigate through the space in real time to generate pre- visualizations according to the user's preference or vision.

Exemplary embodiments allow for rough pre- visualizations, e.g. using MAYA as the virtual digital rendering component to output flat shaded blasts for approval. Other exemplary embodiments allow for more developed pre-visualzations, e.g., using an engine such as CRYENGINE 3 to provide development (e.g., virtual terrain, etc.) to the three dimensional virtual space defined by the pre-visualization process.

[0040] Also in exemplary embodiments, the controller may be a handheld device

incorporating a screen along with one or more hand controllers, wherein the hand controllers are configured to provide navigation in the three dimensional virtual space and to provide film camera controls, such as pan, tilt, zoom, etc. In one particular exemplary embodiment, at least one hand control includes a navigation control that provides six degrees of movement within the three dimensional virtual space (for reference, the "SpaceNavigator" from

3dConnexion provides six degrees of motion control). In exemplary embodiments, the controller's physical position and positional changes are tracked via a magnetic field, e.g., such as is done with the Razer Hydra system in video gaming, to provide additional navigation functionality to the controller. In other embodiments, rather than using a controller hand component similar the "SpaceNavigator", two hand controllers similar to the Razer Hydra controller may be interconnected by a bar. In any of the controller embodiments, a screen or viewfinder may or may not be used (e.g., mounted on a bar extending between left and right hand controller units), according to the preference of the user.

[0041] In other exemplary embodiments, the motion capture component utilizes plural radio frequency (RF) detectors in a motion grid (an exemplary motion grid may contain, e.g., nine RF detectors and head and foot tags, which facilitate removing drift inherent in the system). An exemplary system includes an XSENS system, including such a motion grid and MVN suits (which include accelerometers therein). An exemplary system for interfacing with the virtual digital rendering component (e.g., MAYA) includes an IKinema system, which generates 'stick figures' from the positional data emitted by accelerometers in the suit(s). In exemplary embodiments, the virtual digital rendering component (e.g., MAYA), provides the environment framework for generating characters in a virtual three dimensional space. [0042] In other exemplary embodiments, a motion capture component detects the position of and motion of the face of a performer. In one such exemplary embodiment, a performer wears an infrared camera on a head rig pointing back at the face of the performer.

Information from the facial capture may be fed into a virtual digital rendering component (e.g., MAYA), either alone or in addition to the exemplary motion capture (utilizing performer worn suits) described above. Subsequent pre-visualization processing of the data may then be performed by a director or animator, either in real time with the motion capture or subsequent to any motion capture.

[0043] Exemplary facial capture procedures in accordance with the above follow: An exemplary process begins with an actor or stunt professional wearing a motion capture suit with an infrared camera on a head rig pointing back at the face of the actor or stunt professional. The infrared camera technology could be wireless or could have the camera wired into a computer that is configured to capture a performance as a file (e.g., as a Quick Time file). Additionally, the system could be configured to use facial markers for such capture (utilizing placement of key readable markers physically placed directly on the actors/stunt performers faces); or the system can be marker-less, e.g., similar to the Motek system illustrated at

http://www.motekentertainment.com/index.php?option=com content&task=view&id=17&Ite mid=67. Reference is also made to FIGURE 13, which illustrates an example of such facial capture utilized by the Motek Company.

[0044] In a further exemplary process, the actor or stunt performer runs through a broad range of facial expressions. This enables the software within the facial capture system to 'understand' the actor's or stunt performer's features. At this juncture, the facial expressions may be recorded in a convenient file format, e.g., a Quick Time video. This recording may be fed into a suitable virtual digital rendering component, e.g. a MAYA system, along with any information secured from the actor's or stunt performer's physical movements, e.g. as detected by mo-cap suits.

[0045] Additionally or alternately, information from a bone driven face rig may be fed into the virtual digital rendering component for the geometry and topography of the actor's or stunt performer's face. The movements of the facial features captured by the infrared camera and recorded as a video file may then be fed into a plug-in (i.e., a plug-in supporting such bone driven face rig that is configured to feed into the virtual digital rendering component) tied to the bone driven rig, so that the face appears within normal human parameters.

[0046] In exemplary embodiments, the data streams from both the mo-cap suit regarding the physical placement of the actor's or stunt performer's body in time and space and the data stream from the facial capture infrared camera which provides input about the facial expression upon the actor's or stunt performer's face during performance can be processed through the pre- visualization system described herein. These data streams enable the director or animator to effectively pre-visualize a scene from both the actor's or stunt performer's actions and facial expressions within an established environment in a cry- engine/sandbox. Utilizing the virtual camera and overall pre- visualization system, the dual data streams of physical movement, body placement in time and space and facial expression expressed during those movements can be edited and re-edited into a seamless action sequence.

[0047] While the above example describes pre-recording of an actor's performance, it should be recognized that such pre-recording is not necessary, if desired. In one such example, a performance can be fed from a camera directly to a bone based rig and driven in real time.

[0048] According to some or all of the above exemplary embodiments, the present invention thus provides systems, methods and apparatuses that provide fast pre- visualization for films utilizing control input, such as input from a director, to shape the pre-visualization. Thus, exemplary embodiments might provide a system where performers (actors, stuntmen, etc.) wearing wireless suits are choreographed in real time by a film's director. The director can sit in front of a display that shows the output of the captured motion in a three dimensional virtual environment and can both navigate and shape the visual shot within the three dimensional virtual environment according to the director's taste and vision. The pre- visualizations can be output in basic form (e.g., flat shaded blasts) or within a virtual world generated from an engine, such as the CRYENGINE 3, UNREAL engine, etc. The pre- visualizations can be generated on-set with the motion capture and with the director, in addition to the data being subsequently available (after motion capture) for off-set variations. Further, due to the relatively small size of various components, the present system provides a portable capture, processing and pre- visualization system that permits easy relocation and use in office type settings.

[0049] Hereinafter, example embodiments of the present invention are described in detail.

[0050] Turning to FIGURE 1, a flowchart of an exemplary system includes a motion capturing component 12, shown here as an XSENS system, including such a motion grid and MVN suits (which include accelerometers therein). The present inventors have also modified the suits with attachment points for harnesses via reinforced holes and reinforced

accelerometers.

[0051] An exemplary system for interfacing with the virtual digital rendering component 16 (e.g., MAYA) includes an IKinema system 14, which generates 'stick figures' from the positional data emitted by accelerometers in the suit(s). In exemplary embodiments, the virtual digital rendering component 16 (e.g., MAYA), provides the environment framework for generating characters in a virtual three dimensional space. While the following portions of the specification specifically refer to various specific systems, such as XSENS, IKinema, MAYA, CRYENGINE 3, Adobe, etc., it should be recognized that they are merely exemplary systems, and other systems may be used within the basic framework of the invention.

[0052] Referring still to FIGURE 1, in exemplary embodiments, a controller 18 acts as a virtual camera within the framework provided by MAYA 16 via a virtual camera plugin 18. Generated pre-visualization may then be output simply, e.g., as flat shaded blasts, for approval, or with additional detail, such as a virtual world provided by an engine 22 such as CRYENGINE 3. This additional detail may be provided with the MAYA or

MAYA/CINEBOX data for display to the director so that the director receives an immersive image (even to the level of detail representative of actual film production) for use of the virtual camera controller to direct action. Once a pre-visualization is considered satisfactory (at 20), it may further be exported as a known or common format for storage (at 24).

[0053] Referring now to FIGURE 2, an exemplary diagram of a set including exemplary aspects of the present invention is shown in perspective. An XSENS motion capture system is illustrated, including performers in motion sensing suits 26. The XSENS system includes RF detectors 28, which detect motion of the suits on a stage 30. Various terminals, shown generally at 32, are also illustrated for motion capture and three dimensional virtual environment rendering. An exemplary director's area 34 and exemplary directed image processing area 36 are also generally illustrated, but will be described in more detail below.

[0054] Referring now to FIGURE 3, an exemplary motion capture and virtual environment rendering terminals are generally shown at 32. A first exemplary terminal 36 (labeled as a MVN Studio) captures data from the suits 26. A second exemplary terminal 38 (labeled as MAYA TD) renders the captured data into a three dimensional virtual environment. A third exemplary terminal 40 (labeled as MAYA/CINEBOX AD) provides an optional image enhancement, such as rendering the captured motion for a given suit a specific character for viewing by the director or other user.

[0055] FIGURE 4 further shows exemplary capture of data within the MVN motion grid (including the RF detectors 28) of position and motion of the MVN suits 26 at the MVN Studio terminal 36.

[0056] FIGURE 5 further shows exemplary conversion of the "stick figure" information into character information at the MAYA TD terminal 38.

[0057] FIGURE 6 shows exemplary and optional additional shading or stereoscopic processing of the MAYA image at the MAYA/CINEBOX AD terminal 40.

[0058] FIGURE 7 shows an exemplary director's area 34 and an exemplary directed image processing area 36 together as a "virtual village." The exemplary director's area 34 includes a controller 18 that acts as a director's virtual camera in the virtual environment and a multi- panel set view 42 to immerse the director in the virtual environment while directing the camera action. The exemplary directed image processing area 36 (labeled in FIGURE 7 as Adobe Premiere) includes software to edit the director's virtual shots.

[0059] FIGURE 8 illustrates the director's area 34 in more detail, including the exemplary multi-panel set view 42 and an exemplary handheld controller 18 with an integrated screen 44 imitating a camera' s viewfinder.

[0060] FIGURE 9 similarly illustrates the directed image processing area 36 in more detail, showing an editing interface 46 and a display 48 showing the finished editing product. [0061] FIGURE 10 illustrates an exemplary controller 18 that acts as a virtual camera for a director. The exemplary controller includes a first handheld portion 50, which is configured with a navigation toggle 52 having six degrees of motion. The illustrated exemplary first handheld portion 50 is a modified controller with a toggle portion from a "SpaceNavigator" product made by 3dConnexion. A second handheld controller 54 is tethered to the first handheld controller 50 by an adjustable bar 56. The illustrated exemplary second handheld controller 54 is derived from a Razer Hydra control system (which is shown generally at 58 in FIGURE 12). In exemplary embodiments, the illustrated system would also make use of the magnetic Orb Controller (60 in FIGURE 12) from the Hydra kit.

[0062] FIGURE 11 shows another exemplary controller 18. This exemplary controller includes first 50 and second 54 handheld controllers (with the first optionally configured as a Razer Hydra controller), a connection bar 56, and a video screen 44 (also shown in FIGURE 8) that is configured to act as a virtual viewfinder for a director or user.

[0063] It should be emphasized that the above-described example embodiments of the present invention, including the best mode, and any detailed discussion of particular examples, are merely possible examples of implementations of example embodiments, and are set forth for a clear understanding of the principles of the invention. Many variations and modifications may be made to the above-described embodiment(s) of the invention without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, the present invention should not be construed as being limited to a pre- visualization setting, since it should be recognized that the ability to direct via the controller captured action in a three dimensional virtual environment may be equally applicable to capture of finished film shots as to capture of shots for pre-visualization of films. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of this disclosure and the present invention and protected by the following claims.

[0064] What is claimed is:

Claims

1. A system for rapid film pre-visualization, comprising: a motion capture component interfacing with wearable motion capture sensors; a virtual digital rendering component configured to receive the captured motion and re-create such motion in a three dimensional virtual environment; a display component configured to display an output of the virtual digital rendering component; and a controller component, configured to interface with the virtual digital rendering component and allow a user to navigate within the three dimensional virtual environment to control the visual aspects of one or more shots within the three dimensional virtual environment.
2. A system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said motion capture component is an RF motion capture component that detects accelerometers in a wearable suit within an RF grid.
3. A system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said motion capture component is facial capture component.
4. A system in accordance with claim 2, wherein said motion capture component also includes a facial capture component.
5. A system in accordance with claim 4, wherein said re-creation of motion includes recreation of aspects of facial expressions as well as aspects of movement measured by said wearable suit.
6. A system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said virtual digital rendering component comprises a MAYA platform.
7. A system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said controller is configured to act as a virtual camera in the three dimensional virtual environment.
8. A system in accordance with claim 7, wherein said virtual camera includes plural handheld remote components.
9. A system in accordance with claim 8, wherein at least one handheld remote component includes a toggle allowing for at least six degrees of motional control.
10. A system in accordance with claim 8, wherein at least one handheld remote component includes a handheld remote that is sensitive to a reference magnetic field to provide real time positional information about the remote control relative to the reference magnetic field.
11. A system in accordance with claim 8, wherein two handheld remote components are coupled together.
12. A system in accordance with claim 11, further comprising a view screen attached to said handheld remote components, the view screen configured to act as a virtual viewfinder for the virtual camera.
13. A system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said controller component is configured to navigate as a virtual camera in said three dimensional virtual environment in real time to provide pre- visualization for a film.
14. A system in accordance with claim 13, wherein said display comprises a multi-panel display configured to provide a user with immersive image data such that a user can navigate said virtual camera therein.
15. A system in accordance with claim 1, further comprising a virtual world component configured to provide the three dimensional virtual environment with realistic world detail.
16. A method for rapid film pre-visualization, comprising: capturing position and motion data of wearable position and motion capture sensors using a motion capture system including plural sensor detectors; digitally rendering said captured data and re-creating motion of the sensors in a three dimensional virtual environment; displaying an output of the motion in the three dimensional virtual environment; and providing a controller component that is configured to interface with the three dimensional virtual environment and allow a user to navigate within the three dimensional virtual environment to control a virtual camera within the three dimensional virtual space.
17. A method in accordance with claim 16, further comprising capturing facial expressions and digitally rendering at least portions of said facial expressions in said three dimensional virtual envirionment.
18. A method in accordance with claim 17, wherein said capturing of facial expressions utilizes an infra-red camera in a marker- less system.
PCT/US2012/070536 2011-12-21 2012-12-19 System, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization WO2013096403A1 (en)

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US201161578695P true 2011-12-21 2011-12-21
US61/578,695 2011-12-21
US201261644066P true 2012-05-08 2012-05-08
US13/466,522 US9799136B2 (en) 2011-12-21 2012-05-08 System, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization
US61/644,066 2012-05-08
US13/466,522 2012-05-08

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EP12860874.2A EP2795584A4 (en) 2011-12-21 2012-12-19 System, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization
HK15100962.7A HK1200581A1 (en) 2011-12-21 2015-01-28 System, method and apparatus for rapid film pre-visualization
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