WO2013024478A1 - Blood vessel recognition and printing system using diffuse light - Google Patents

Blood vessel recognition and printing system using diffuse light Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2013024478A1
WO2013024478A1 PCT/IL2012/050303 IL2012050303W WO2013024478A1 WO 2013024478 A1 WO2013024478 A1 WO 2013024478A1 IL 2012050303 W IL2012050303 W IL 2012050303W WO 2013024478 A1 WO2013024478 A1 WO 2013024478A1
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WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
according
blood vessel
bv
comprises
device according
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Application number
PCT/IL2012/050303
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Uzi Rahum
Ronen EINAT
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Uzi Rahum
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Priority to US201161523369P priority Critical
Priority to US61/523,369 priority
Application filed by Uzi Rahum filed Critical Uzi Rahum
Publication of WO2013024478A1 publication Critical patent/WO2013024478A1/en
Priority claimed from US14/179,796 external-priority patent/US9782078B2/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/48Other medical applications
    • A61B5/4887Locating particular structures in or on the body
    • A61B5/489Blood vessels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0059Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons using light, e.g. diagnosis by transillumination, diascopy, fluorescence
    • A61B5/0075Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons using light, e.g. diagnosis by transillumination, diascopy, fluorescence by spectroscopy, i.e. measuring spectra, e.g. Raman spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectroscopy

Abstract

A device for blood vessel (hereinafter referred to as BV) visualization or enhancement for the purpose of BV medical processes simplification presented. The method involves human or animal BV recognition followed by BV indication by printing onto the tested body surface. The system includes optical device that projects light over some portion of the body where the desired BV should be located at, such as the arm. Optical sensors such as imaging device or photo-detector captures and interpret the reflected light by data processing unit. The captured images might be enhanced by image processing methods in order to help distinguish the BVs from their surroundings. The captured image or the enhanced image is used for printing a matched pattern over the body part accurately to mark the required BVs. Those markings enables easy and safe BV medical procedures that involves BV visualization or localizing such as blood extraction and in-vein infusion.

Description

Blood Vessel Recognition and Printing System Using Diffuse Light

This application claims priority from previously filled provisional application US 61/523,369, entitled blood vessel recognition and printing system using diffuse light, filled on Aug. 14, 2011, all disclosures of which are hereby incorporated by reference

FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention is generally in the field of BV recognition and on-skin printing, aimed at improving Blood Vessel Medical Treatment (hereinafter referred to as BVMT) safety and efficiency. The invention is particularly useful for simplifying in- vein and BVs intrusion for medical treatment

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Processes of blood extraction and in- ein infusion for medical treatment are vastly used in modern medicine all over the world. Blood tests are very useful for measuring blood levels on various contents such as fat, RBC, oxygen content and so on. For a successful blood extraction the operator needs to be experienced and highly skillful, the BV must be visual to the operator. However, in many cases the BVs are not sufficiently visual to the operator because they are deep under the skin or they are very thin, making the needle intrusion procedure very difficult and risky, results in many cases false trials and multiple needle penetrations into the body and even for failures where the patient is required to return at later time for the blood extraction with an expert operator or other complex means for BV detection.

As reported by the InfraRed Imaging Systems, Inc. of Columbus, Ohio, vascular access procedures ranked as the most commonly performed, invasive, medical procedures in the U.S., with over 1.4 billions procedures performed annually. Those procedures also rank as the top patient complaint among clinical procedures. Medical literatures reports the following statistics: (1) a 28% first attempt In- Vein (IV) failure rate in normal adults; (2) a 44% first attempt IV failure rate in pediatrics; (3) 43% of pediatrics TVs required three or more insertion attempts; (4) a 23% to 28% incidence of extravasation/infiltration; (5) a 12% outright failure in cancer patients; (6) 25% of hospital in-patients beyond three days experience difficult vascular access. See Brown P., "An I.V. Specially team can mean saving for hospital and patient," Journal of the National Intravenous Therapy Association,

17(5):387-388 (1984); Frey A M., "Success rates for peripheral IV insertion in a children hospital," Journal of Intravenous Nursing 24(2): 113- 123 (2001): Lininger R., "Pediatric peripheral IV insertion success rates," Pediatric Nursing, 29(5):351-354 (2003); and Barton A. et al., "Improving patient outcomes through CQI: Vascular access planning," Journal of Nursing Care Quality. 13(2):77-85 (1998), The content of which incorporated herein by reference.

Currently there are number of available products for locating BVs. This include products utilizing (1 ) Ultrasonic imaging, such as the Bard Site-Ride® 5 Ultrasound system marketed by Bard Access Systems, INC. of Salt Lake City, Utha, (2) NIR Imaging, usch as the IRIS Vascular Viewer marketed by InfraRed Imaging Systems, INC and the Vein-Viwer Imaging systems marketed by Cristis (Luminetx)., (3) Liquid Crystal thermal surface temperature measurement patches, such as the K-4000 Vena-Vue® Thermographic Vein Evaluator manufactured by Biosynergy, Inc. of Elk Grove Village, III., (4) visible light illumination, such as the Venoscope® II Transilluminator/Vein Finder and the Neonatal Transilluminator marketed by Venoscope, L.L.C. of Lafayette, LA., and the VeinLite LED™, Veilite EMS™ and Veinlite PEDI™ manufactured by TransLite LLC of Sugar Land, Tex.

IR/NTR imaging is a relatively simple method for BV viewing that relays on the fact that BVs have low light reflection at the Infra Red (IR) wavelength range. At this wavelength range, the difference in reflection between BV and skin is very high. Thus an IR imaging system can obtain much better indication for the underneath BVs then the human eye. Those systems are known by the name of Vein- Viewers that projects the capture image back on the body surface, thus enabling the operator to easily locate the BV. Such systems are commercially available and they become more and more distributed in the world. It was proven that those tools dramatically improve the rate success of BV intrusion [1]. It is the intention of the presented method to simplifying those methods while reducing the cost and improving efficiency while keeping the system performance. An example of such a system is described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,969,754 and 6,556,858 incorporated herein by reference as well as a publication entitled "The Clinical Evaluation of Vein Contrast Enhancement". Luminetx is currently marketing such a device under the name "Veinviewer Imaging System" and information related thereto is available on its website, which is incorporated herein by reference. The Luminetx Vein Contrast Enhancer (hereinaf ter referred to as LVCE) utilizes an infrared light source for flooding the region to be enhanced with infrared light generated by an array of LEDs. A CCD imager is then used to capture an image of the infrared light reflected off the patient. The resulting captured image is then projected by a visible light projector onto the patient in a position closely aligned with the image capture system. Given that the CCD imager and the image projector are both two dimensional, and do not occupy the same point in space, it is relatively difficult to design and build a system that closely aligns the captured image and the projected image.

A further characteristic of the LVCE is that both the imaging CCD and the projector have fixed focal lengths. Accordingly, the patient must be at a relatively fixed distance relative to the LVCE. This necessitates that the LVCE be positioned at a fixed distance from the region of the patient to be enhanced.

BVMT procedures are common in medical institutes and they are performed in a daily routine. Insertion of a needle into a BV can be a hard task even for a pro and can involve damage to the tissue and vessels. This task is more difficult for the case where the BV is hiding under a fat layer or when the vessel is very thin. To simplify the way to locate the BV and simplifying needle intrusion treatment, an apparatus for finding the BVs and printing them on the skin is suggested by current application.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The method for BV recognition is by applying light to the object of interest, such as a patient arm. The diffused light from the object, which has different optical properties such as:

polarization absorption reflection or scattering for BV and skin, is than collected by optical sensor and the data is processed to distinguish the BVs from "surroundings" such skin, hair, scares, freckles, beauty spots, moles and other permanent marks on the skin (hereinafter referred to as V-noise). In one embodiment of the present invention the system comprise of a light source in the IR range that illuminate the inspected body part which is needed for BVMT, The light source can be any kind of source that has different absorption/reflection light properties when interacts with skin and BV. Light source with high polarization ratio enables better contrast for indentifying blood vessels than light with low polarization ratio. The diffused light from the object is collected by optical sensor(s). The Light Signal Collector (hereinafter referred to as LSC) can be a camera module; CCD, CMOS, line CCD, photo- detector or any type of detector that can collect the scattered light from the object. The IR LSC is positioned besides the light source and receives the reflected light. An IR band pass filter can be positioned in front of the LSC, restricts the collected light to the same wavelength of the light source. The use of the IR filter and/or polarizer enhances the captured signal quality since it rejects non useful reflected light. The filter is less significant when the device is opaque to ambient light. The captured signal can be processed by a computer in means of image filtering and enhancement. One prior art, called "Vein-Viewer" (Luminetx), projects the BV image back to the object with visual light.

This prior art systems must be designed for minimal alignment error between the projected image to the captured image. The error should be less then 0.25mm approximately, otherwise, the projected image contains higher alignment error that could lead to the operation of blood extraction to fail since the needle penetrates at misplaced position. Thus the alignment requirement between the camera and the projector might be done by the computer processing as well. This way the processor can modify the captured image in order to compensate for the relative alignment errors between the 2 components. Additional computer role is to convert image resolution, if needed. For example many cameras capture image in VGA resolution that is 640x480, however the projector might be QVGA, that is 320x240 pixels. One can understand that good calibration process should be used for the process of maintaining proper alignment. This calibration usually done per each system built in order to compensate for assembly variation between tools that are built in manufacturing line. Also the variation of the alignment between the camera and image projector must be verified. Otherwise the alignment error could increase by time due to temperature variation or mechanical shocks or vibrations the system suffers during its lifetime. Additional miss-alignment error caused by the different angle of sight between the receiving camera and the image projector. Since there is an angle between the camera and projector it generates a miss-alignment error that depends on the body object distance to the device. Thus the design of such system should minimize this angle. A different prior art system that addresses some of the problems discussed above comprises the same optical path for both the camera and the projector by the use of beam splitter optical component that is placed in this common optical system. There are several advantages for this design, one is the zero angle, other are the saving of optical components simplified design. However the miss-alignment isn't diminished in this case also, also the fact that both camera and projector use the same optical path a leakage of the projection light might incident into the camera and cause the reduction in performance.

It is important to notice that in such kind of vein viewing system a real time imaging is used where the tool is being used all the time of blood extraction. So the system throughput is equal to one user ability to extract blood. This limitation influences the cost effectiveness of the system and its return of investment form economical view point. It is clear that cost reduction of such vein viewing system and throughput increase of such system will increase its cost effectiveness and its use in medical institutes will increase. Thus, BVP is enabling much better BVMT process for the best of patients and medical centers by increasing BVMT efficiency, success rate, throughput and reduce its costs for the best for all involved.

In one embodiment suggested in present invention BVP station can be used for multiple BVMT operations done by multiple medical staff on parallel. For instance such vein visualization and marking station can be used as part of the preparation procedure of the patient for such BVMT at relatively short time. Then, the patient goes to one or more medical staff that uses the marks to easily find the required BV and apply said BVMT. The need for the real time diagnostic is eliminated. Also, low cost printers are commonly used in large variety of devices all over the world, such as cash register devices that is placed in almost every shop in the world. However several issues need to be resolved in order for such system to be sufficiently good.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to make a BVP that is cost effective to manufacture.

It is another object of the present invention to make a BVP that will allow a practitioner pinpoint a BV for BVMT.

It is still another object of the present invention to make a BVP that will reduce and/or diminish the amount of botched attempts to pierce a BV.

It is still another object of the present invention to improve BVMT at reduced cost

It is still a further object of the present invention to make a BVP that is easy to operate. It is another object of the present invention to make a BVP that may be disposed of after use.

It is yet another object of the present invention to make a BVP that may be hand held.

It is yet another object of the present invention to make a BVP that implements a Miniature Printer Head that operates in Real Time Mode.

It is another object of the invention to make a BVP that will be suitable to children medical treatment

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 Shows the BVP head main components.

FIG. 2A shows a wave form of the light source electrical power, a continues constant amplitude during operation

FIG. 2B shows a wave form of the light source electrical power driver, the mode of operation is duty cycled at certain frequency.

FIG. 2C shows a wave form of the light source electrical power driver, the mode of operation is arbitrary wave form where the variance are amplitude, frequency and wave form.

FIGS. 3 a top view of BVP method of operation is presented

FIG. 4 an example of several printing options for BVP

FIG. 4A an example of imaged BV

FIG. 4B an example of imaged BV printing with dashed of doted line FIG. 4C an example of imaged BV printing with colored thick line FIG. 4D an example of imaged BV printing boundary line

FIG. 5 is a desk fixed apparatus for BVMT

FIG. 6 is an object fixed apparatus for BVMT, arm case.

FIG. 7 is a mobile hand held apparatus for BVMT.

FIG. 8 is an example for optimal position for needle insertion printing

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The current application suggest a device and method that simplify the medical procedure, improves its throughput and simplifies and stabilizes the optical alignment requirements imposed by the prior art.

One embodiment of the BVP device is suggested by the current application, shown in FIG. 1, comprises a scanner and a printer. The scanner 1A scanning the object 4 and generate an image of the BV and location. The image is transferred for image processing IB to identify BV at the target area and distinguish between the BV and the V-notse. The clear BV image is transferred to the printer IC that prints the BV image upon the object , skin of said body part on top of the BV location. The BV detection and marking can be done at relatively short time. In FIG. 1 A a scanning device (dashed line) is shown followed by a printer 1C

The scanner 1A comprises illumination unit 1 - 3, and detection unit 5 - 7. The illumination unit generates a line pattern of light 3 which is projected on the object 4. The illumination line is generated from the light source 1 by optical element(s) 2. The light sourcel can be any kind of light source that has different optical properties such as absorption, scattering and reflection when interacts with skin and BV. Commonly used for light source are LEDs, Laser diodes and VCSELs. The light source can be driven by current or voltage drivers and it can be operated in continues wave (CW), pulsed or modulated modes.

In FIG. 2 three modes of light source operation are presented; FIG 2A, The light source is driven in CW mode and the Amplitude is set; FIG. 2B, the light source is operated in duty cycle mode where the Amplitude, Frequency and Duty Cycle are the parameters; FIG. 2C, the light source is operated in modulation mode where the signal is arbitrary wave form. There is a significant advantage for light source with high polarization ratio and narrow band wavelength such as Laser diodes and VCSELs or LED with a polarizer. The high coherency of laser diodes and VCSEL increases the phenomena of speckles. To minimize the speckles contrast that cause for reduce of performance the light source can be driven in modulation mode. Additional technique to reduce speckle contrast is by the use of vibrating or rotating diffuser. The radiating light from the light source is shaped to a form of a rectangular illumination line (hereinafter referred to as i-line) by optical element(s). The i-line beam shaping optical elements are very common in the optics industry. One methods to generate the i-line is done by diffractive optical elements, this method is commonly used in scanning technology where the use diffractive waveguide that generate a line of uniform spots. One case where the line generator optics is not required is where the light source is in a form of a line shaped source generated by array of light emitters, for example lxN LED source or lxN array of VCSEL emitters. The illumination light might include in its path polarization optics (polarizer) and/or filters to optimize the results of BV detection. The reflected light 5 in Fig. 1 from the object 4 surface is collected by the detection unit 7 which comprises an array of sensors. The sensor array can be composite from photodectors or a line CCD. The reflected light collection can be optimized by using optics 6 before the detection sensors. The reflected light incident the sensor might include polarization optics (polarizer) and/or filters to optimize the results of BV detection. The collected signals retrieved by the sensors are processes by computer or microprocessor IB to generate the clear image of the BV and its location. The processor can also suggest the optimal location for needle insertion. Two dimensional image of the BV is obtained by relative motion between the imaging system and the object. The printing unit comprises a plotter that prints a line on the skin that marks BV location follows the BV image. The printed line can be in a form of dashed, continues or colored line. For the case where the system suggests the optimal location for needle insertion the location can be marked with out printing the full image. The distance D between the i-line and the printing line enables for the printing head to paint the BV data on the object without obscuring the imaging optics also the time delay between the image capture of certain area to the printing time enables for the computer IB to process the image and prepare the image for printing back onto the object. For example if D = 3cm and the relative motion is 0.3m/sec the delay between the imaging and printing is 0.1 sec. That enables sufficient time for the computer to generate good quality image for printing. The scanning direction is not limited to one axes, the only restriction is that the printing line is following the illumination and imagine lines. The printer head 1C prints the image on the skin or spacer. The printer can be an inkjet printer or relief printer. The image can be generated by a mechanical element that paints the BV such as brush or Indian ink pen. In this case the pressure that in contact with the skin must be lower than the damage threshold for skin injury. For methods of B V visualization by ink, the ink should be biocompatible in contact with skin.

In FIG. 3 a top view of BVP 10 method of operation is presented where the imaged line 11 and the followed printed line 12 can be shown. An important feature of this design is that the i-line 13 area width can be larger than the imaging optics line. This design eliminate the need for perfect alignment between the illumination and collection (sensor) optics line. Said computer should extract also deviations from linear motion of said device from image sensor or any additional sensors and use that information to correct location of printed pattern on object 14, such that it will still be located on top of real BVs.

In FIG. 4, an example of several printing options for BVP. Example of imaged BV pattern 4A can be imaged on the object by dashed or dot line 4B, full BV coloring 4C or by BV boundary printing 4D.

In FIG. 5, one embodiment of the BVP device is shown. In this embodiment the body part such as forearm 15 is located and fixed to a mechanical housing 18 not to move during the scanning and printing process. The location where the body part is fixed will have a material that will enable easy cleaning and sanitization in between treatments. The cleaning procedure can be executed manually by the operator or automatically installed in the device. The device and the body part are set in place and they are not moving. Although in FIG. 5 the shown body part is a human arm the device can be designed to other human or animal body parts. This device consist the mechanical parts 18 that locating the arm 15 and used as the rails 22 base for sliding the BVP 19,20,21. The movement of the BVP device on the rails can be executed manually by operator or by using motorized stages. The BVP device consist the illumination head 19, the imaging line 20 and the printing head 21. Two parts of the arm are shown, the area that was scanned by the BVP 17 and where the BVs are marked and the part that was not scanned 16. The device housing can be shielded and opaque to ambient light to provide better performance.

In FIG. 6, another embodiment of the BVP device is shown. In this embodiment the BVP device 25 and rails 26 are attached to the body part 23, 24 by strips 27 or other technology that will locate and fix the device to the body part. This device consist the strips, BVP and rails. Two parts of the forearm are shown, the area that was scanned by the BVP 24 and where the BVs are marked and the part that was not scanned 23. The device housing can be shielded and opaque to ambient light to provide better performance. This device has the advantage of mobility and it is highly efficient for the case where the patient (object) unable or can not be moved from his location.

In FIG. 7, another embodiment of the BVP device is shown. In this embodiment the BVP device is a stand alone unit. This unit consist a handle 31 and the BVP head 32. The unit might include light indicators 33 and buttons 34 to operate the device and get real time information about the device operation and performance of the system and scanning results such hazard and messages. Two parts of the arm 28 are shown, the area that was scanned by the BVP 30 and where the BVs are marked and the part that was not scanned 29. The device housing can be shielded and opaque to ambient light to provide better performance. This device has the advantage of mobility and it is highly efficient for the case where the patient unable or can not be moved from his location. Another advantage is that this device can be used for locations where the accessibility is limited and small location such as backhand, groin and arm-pit.

In FIG. 8 shows a design feature that can be embedded in all BVP embodiments. In this application the microprocessor or SW will find the optimal position for needle insertion and than the recommended location will be marked 35 by the printer. The SW can take into account other parameters than the thickness of the BV such as V-noise, tattoos and patient preferences.

In another embodiment of current invention a disposable transparent spacer is used to separate between imaging device and the skin such that it can be replaced for every new patient and reduce the risk of any contamination between patients. Said transparent spacer may have an option to open the location for the printing head, so it can print the skin through that opening. Other option is to print the full image on the spacer and to expose the desired location for needle insertion by peeling off a part of the printed spacer.

Another design feature of the current invention deals with the printing method or the BV marking pattern. BV marking is printed on top of real BV location on the human skin. The simplest marking is printing a line on top of the BV, with the same thickness as the BV thickness. Another option is to have different color coding for BV thickness, such as res line for "good" BV and blue line for small BV. However, once the needle penetrated the skin it might insert undesired ink remains into the skin and cause infection. Thus the printing method might be adopted in order to avoid this infection danger. One method of doing this is to print dashed or dotted lines instead of solid lines. Figure 7 describes one such example of printing in dashed lines, this type of printing allow for the user to inject the needle between the dots. Another important advantage of this printing method is to allow for the user to validate the BV markings in between the dashed/dots marking. Other suggested solution is by using biocompatible ink.

Another design feature of the current invention deals with selective printing. In this feature the processed BV image is applied to a touch screen, the operator chooses the desired BVs or scanned area to be printed.

Another design feature of current invention is the use of wheels or rollers for sliding the BVP device. Those wheels can help avoiding friction between the device and skin. Moving the device over the body part might suffer by the skin friction and the wheels stretches the skin and provide better scanning and printing performance.

Another design feature of current invention deals with printing the B V in an ink that can be seen only in certain conditions such as when exposed to UV or Infrared light and viewed by suitable accessory. This feature enables the device to print one visual pattern such as cartoons or other picture and non-visual pattern that presents the BV location and can be seen only when it is exposed to UV or Infrared light and viewed by suitable accessory. This feature is especially suitable for children that have fear from medical treatment

CITATION LIST

Patent Literature

1. Micro Vein Enhancer US7,904,138 B2 Goldman et al. Mars, 2011

2. Imaging System Using Diffuse

InfraRed Light US7,239,909 B2 Zeman July, 2007

3. System and Method for Locating

and Accessing a Blood Vessel US 2005/0281445 Al Marcotte et al. Dec, 2005

4. Vein Locating Device for

Vascular Access Procedures US 2008/0147147 Al Griffiths et al. June, 2008

Claims

CLAIMS We claim:
1. A device for enhancing a blood vessel in a target area on a patient for blood vessel medical treatment comprising: a light source configured to selectively transmit light within at least one wavelength at the infrared spectrum; an optical sensor configured to be responsive to light at the at least one Infrared wavelength, said optical sensor further configured to receive the light reflected off said target area, said reflected light comprising a contrasted image being formed by at least a selective portion of said transmitted light of said light source being reflected from said target area, and by a remaining portion of said transmitted light source of said light source being absorbed by subcutaneous blood vessels of said target area; a data processing unit to distinguish between the blood vessel from surroundings target area; a printer to mark the blood vessel within said target area to reveal blood vessel locations therein and a position of; a locating apparatus to minimize or prevent relative movement between the scanner image and the printer head.
2. The device according to claim 1 wherein said light source transmits light at a
wavelength in the range of 650 nm to 940 nm.
3. The device according to claim 1 wherein said light source at least one wavelength is chosen such that said blood vessel and the surrounding tissue and skin of said target area has different optical properties at said at least one wavelength.
4. The device according to claim 1 wherein said light source transmits light at an optical power and wavelength properties that are according to eye safety standards.
5. The device according to claim 1 wherein said light source transmits light at an optical power and wavelength properties that are according to laser skin safety standards.
6. The device according to claim 1 wherein said light source is driven with a unique
electric signal to reduce effects of speckles.
7. The device according to claim 1 further comprising a display screen, and wherein said contrasted image is transmitted onto said display screen simultaneous with said printer of said contrasted image onto said target area.
8. The device according to claim 7 wherein said display screen comprises controls to
permit zooming of said contrasted image being transmitted thereon.
9. The device according to claim 7 the display screen comprises controls to permit
selection of said contrasted image being transmitted thereon.
10. The device according to claim 1 wherein said optical elements comprises a module of several optical elements or single optical element to generate a projected pattern to illuminate the target.
11. The projected pattern according to claim 10 is a line or rectangular shape
12. The optical element according to claim 10 can comprise a polarization element to
enhance the blood vessel recognition.
13. The optical element according to claim 10 can comprise a wavelength filter element to enhance the blood vessel recognition.
14. The device according to claim 1 wherein said data processing unit comprises a computer or microprocessor to a processor to identify blood vessel location below the skin according to sensed optical energy.
15. The data processing unit according to claim 1 wherein said data processing unit
comprises a computer or microprocessor to a processor to distinguish the blood vessel from surroundings according to sensed optical energy.
16. The device according to claim 1 wherein said printer comprises a printer head to print on the skin surface a visual pattern of the blood vessel.
17. The visual pattern according to claim 16 wherein said visual pattern comprises a visual line that identify the blood vessel on the skin surface.
18. The visual pattern according to claim 16 wherein said visual pattern comprises a visual dashed line that identify the blood vessel on the skin surface.
19. The visual pattern according to claims 16-18 wherein said visual pattern comprises a biocompatible ink that marks the blood vessel on the skin surface.
20. The visual pattern according to claims 16-18 comprises an ink that does not cause
irritation or inflammation of the skin
21. The visual pattern according to claims 16-18 comprises an ink that does not cause
contamination of the blood during blood vessel medical treatment.
22. The visual pattern according to claims 16-18 comprises an ink that does not influence the results of medical test of blood.
23. The visual pattern according to claims 16-18 comprises a spacer that the printer prints on and marks the blood vessel of the skin surface.
24. The visual pattern according to claims 16-18 comprises an ink that can be seen only when exposed to UV or IR light with suitable accessory
25. The printer according to claim 16 is a continues inkjet printer
26. The printer according to claim 16 is a thermal DOD inkjet printer
27. The printer according to claim 16 is a Piezoelectric DOD inkjet printer
28. The printer according to claim 16 is a relief technology printer
29. The device according to claim 1 wherein said locating apparatus minimizes the
movement between the scanner and the printing head to ensure that the blood vessel will be marked at correct location.
30. The device according to claim 1 wherein said locating apparatus comprises a stationary mechanical construction to prevent movement of the tested body part
31. The device according to claim 1 wherein said apparatus comprises a mobile mechanical construction that attached to the tested body part while still prevent the relative movement between the tested body part and the printer head
32. The device according to claim 1 can be a handheld mobile device
33. The device according to claim 1 comprises mechanical sliders such as wheels to enable smooth movement of the device and to prevent effects of friction of the tested body part during imaging and printing
PCT/IL2012/050303 2011-08-14 2012-08-12 Blood vessel recognition and printing system using diffuse light WO2013024478A1 (en)

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US14/179,796 US9782078B2 (en) 2011-08-14 2014-02-13 Device, system and method for blood vessel imaging and marking

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CN106580243A (en) * 2017-02-10 2017-04-26 青岛浦利医疗技术有限公司 PICC secondary light source and angiographic device
DE102016123974A1 (en) * 2016-12-09 2018-06-14 Leica Microsystems Cms Gmbh Lighting unit, a confocal microscope and confocal microscope

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