WO2012122980A1 - Solvent storage system for hplc systems with low flow rates - Google Patents

Solvent storage system for hplc systems with low flow rates

Info

Publication number
WO2012122980A1
WO2012122980A1 PCT/DE2012/100066 DE2012100066W WO2012122980A1 WO 2012122980 A1 WO2012122980 A1 WO 2012122980A1 DE 2012100066 W DE2012100066 W DE 2012100066W WO 2012122980 A1 WO2012122980 A1 WO 2012122980A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
solvent
hplc
gas
container
pump
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/DE2012/100066
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Gervin Ruegenberg
Original Assignee
Dionex Softron Gmbh
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N30/00Investigating or analysing materials by separation into components using adsorption, absorption or similar phenomena or using ion-exchange, e.g. chromatography or field flow fractionation
    • G01N30/02Column chromatography
    • G01N30/26Conditioning of the fluid carrier; Flow patterns
    • G01N30/28Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier
    • G01N30/32Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier of pressure or speed
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N30/00Investigating or analysing materials by separation into components using adsorption, absorption or similar phenomena or using ion-exchange, e.g. chromatography or field flow fractionation
    • G01N30/02Column chromatography
    • G01N30/26Conditioning of the fluid carrier; Flow patterns
    • G01N30/28Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier
    • G01N30/34Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier of fluid composition, e.g. gradient
    • G01N2030/342Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier of fluid composition, e.g. gradient fluid composition fixed during analysis
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N30/00Investigating or analysing materials by separation into components using adsorption, absorption or similar phenomena or using ion-exchange, e.g. chromatography or field flow fractionation
    • G01N30/02Column chromatography
    • G01N30/26Conditioning of the fluid carrier; Flow patterns
    • G01N30/28Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier
    • G01N30/36Control of physical parameters of the fluid carrier in high pressure liquid systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N30/00Investigating or analysing materials by separation into components using adsorption, absorption or similar phenomena or using ion-exchange, e.g. chromatography or field flow fractionation
    • G01N30/02Column chromatography
    • G01N30/60Construction of the column
    • G01N30/6095Micromachined or nanomachined, e.g. micro- or nanosize

Abstract

The invention relates to a method for supplying HPLC systems with at least one solvent (100, 100a, 100b), in which the solvent (100, 100a, 100b) is discharged from at least one storage container (1, 1a, 1b) that is closed off in a gas-tight manner, wherein the container volume decreases to the same extent as the solvent (100, 100a, 100b) leaves the container. The invention furthermore relates to an apparatus for carrying out this method, and to the use of a glass syringe (1, 1a, 1b) herefor.

Description

Solvent supply system for HPLC systems with low flow rates

The invention relates to a supply method and a supply system for systems in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the HPLC solvent are brought by a pump pressure and a separation column fed over the length of the printing degrades. Different solvent are mixed in the pump frequently in order to vary the solvent composition (gradient operation).

A known difficulty in HPLC is that usually a certain amount of dissolved gases in to the solvents used. These gases can come from the manufacturing or processing process of solvent or from the ambient air. During extended storage in conventional solvent bottles, for example, sets itself a diffusion equilibrium between the dissolved gases and airborne above the liquid level. This balance depends on the type of solvent, temperature, air pressure and the amount of available air.

The dissolved gas has the following serious adverse effects:

Dissolved gases increase the UV absorption of the fluid. This manifests itself as increased noise in the conventional use of UV absorbance detectors in HPLC systems.

In reducing the pressure (for example by intake negative pressure of the pump) can be dissolved gases again and form gaseous bubbles which impair the function of the pump.

At higher temperatures, as occurs for example in the chromatography column usually (by friction heat and possibly externa ßere heating), dissolved gas can be gaseous even at normal ambient pressure again and form bubbles. This results in virtually all common detection method to disturbances, such as noise peaks in the optical detector or spray instabilities in the mass spectrometer.

These problems are exacerbated if aqueous and organic solvent are mixed. In such mixtures, the solubility of gases is mostly borrowed considerable less than in the pure solvents. After mixing, the solvent is then supersaturated with gas, which extremely aggravated the tendency to blister. As long as the mixed solvent is under high pressure, the gas is still kept in solution when the pressure, however, approaches the ambient pressure produces bubbles.

Another problem in the HPLC is caused by the fact that the solvents are premixed or in many applications already prior to use mixed with additives. Since the individual components of such solvent mixtures having different high partial pressures, they evaporate at different rates (tive selective evaporation) so that the mixture ratio changes with time. This enables the chromatographic reproducibility, which is an important quality criterion in HPLC deteriorated. This is all the more problematic, the rarer the solvents are rescheduled. To degas liquids, thus reducing the amount of dissolved gas in the liquid, there are various known ways.

In HPLC widespread is the online vacuum degassing. In this case, the solvents to be degassed passes through a vacuum chamber in which the solvent is separated from the vacuum through a gas-permeable membrane or a gas-permeable hose. The dissolved gases can diffuse in contrast to the liquid through the membrane to the vacuum side. Thus, the solvent is removed from all the more dissolved gas, the longer it stays in the vacuum chamber. The basic method has long been known and is mentioned in the following patent specifications, which deal with specific embodiments: DE 4139735 C3, DE

4446270 C1, DE 69828594 T2, EP 1,529,560 B1.

A fundamental problem of vacuum degassing online is that not only dissolved gases, but also solvent vapors can pass through the membrane. This means that mainly volatile components of the solvent are extracted through the membrane (selective extraction). In pre-mixed solvents, the selective extraction causes an undesirable gradual change of the solvent composition, especially when the solvent remains a longer time in the vacuum chamber. This is especially the case when the HPLC operates at very low flow rates in the range of a few tens nl / min up to several μΙ / min (nano-HPLC). Nano-HPLC pumps new solvent usually soak only at long intervals, so that the solvent in the vacuum chamber is stationary most of the time. This leads to particularly strong selective extraction and fluctuations of solvent composition. Because of these problems is used in nano-HPLC is usually no online vacuum degassing.

From U.S. Pat. No. 4,133,767, a degassing process is known, wherein in the solvent bottle, a stream of fine bubbles of helium is passed through the solvent (helium sparging). The helium itself is only slightly soluble, but transported other dissolved gases from the liquid. This process is inefficient and relatively expensive because of the continuous helium demand, also volatile solvent components are also removed in addition to the dissolved gases here, which can lead to a change in the solvent composition similar to the online vacuum degassing. For these reasons, the helium sparging is only used in exceptional cases.

A preliminary degassing of solvents would be possible for example by heating, filtration, ultrasound treatment, vacuum treatment (vacuum degassing offline), or a combination of these methods. When the solvent is exposed to the solvent bottle again after the ambient air, but again diffuse gas into the liquid, to again set an equilibrium state. Because of this Wiederbegasung the effect of pre-degassing is not permanent, so the solvent must be freshly prepared in accordance frequently.

also to avoid problems due to selective evaporation, the solvent must be freshly prepared in accordance frequently. This additional causes chen effort.

The present invention therefore has for its object, for HPLC, particularly for nano-HPLC to provide a solvent supply system that is suitable for a continuous operating period of several days to weeks without the need for user interaction (such as renewing the solvent ).

This object is inventively achieved by a method having the features of patent claim 1, by an apparatus having the features of claim 7 and by the use of a syringe with the features of patent claim 12.

According to the invention the respective solvent is almost completed in the at least one reservoir from the ambient air, whereby air inclusions can be avoided already in the filling or eliminated after filling. can by reducing the container volume in the delivery (with corresponding increase in the container volume during filling) of situated therein solvent with simultaneous continuous gas-tight seal against the ambient air advantageously not only received a previously degassed solvent but also over said operating time before Wiederbegasung from the ambient air protection become.

Since the gas exchange between the solvent and the ambient air is inventively prevented in both directions, can be avoided advantageously not only a Wiederbegasung but also a selective evaporation.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the solvent is substantially discharged from the at least one storage container to a conveyor, in particular a pump of a HPLC system with no negative pressure or sucked in from the pump without requiring a negative pressure is created in the storage vessel or in connecting lines. In this way, in addition to above-mentioned advantages also avoided that by reducing the pressure (eg by negative suction pressure of the pump) dissolved gases are gaseous again and bubbles form, which may affect the operation of the pump.

The variability of the container volume can be realized in a simple manner with a rigid container body, preferably having a straight vessel wall or with a constant cross-sectional profile, for example, in which a movable cover or closure the container interior gas tight seal in each volume condition. In this case, the cover can for example be designed as a float or piston which with its ßenumfang Au engages in such a way however that it is freely movable, although, nonetheless largely gas-tight seal (fit with minimal clearance) to the inner periphery of the base body.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention the lid with a (low) pressure force can be pre-loaded, which can be applied for example, by spring or gravitational force. The thus built up in the tank pressure ensures, for example, that the pump also draws reliable solvent when the pump itself has not yet exhausted.

In a further embodiment it is also conceivable that catch between Deckelau ßenum- and the base body inner circumference is at least one elastic sealing element. This has the advantage that no gap exists practically, could diffuse through the gases into or out of the solvents. To achieve this advantage, the sealing element itself is also designed to be sufficiently diffusion-tight. Although some friction caused by the elastic sealing element, is sufficient for a sufficiently large piston area, a small negligible negative suction pressure within the permissible range to overcome this friction. Moreover, an above-described applied force (bias) to compensate for the friction at the seal for containers with a resilient sealing element.

In a particular embodiment of the invention the at least one reservoir is filled with air without solvent or vented by pressing out the air after the filling. The solvent, as appropriate for the application, pre-mixed in the usual way. In addition, the solvents can be pre-degassed by known methods before being used preferably. These preferably such degassing are on offer, which can be directly carried out in the solvent bottle, ie ultrasound, heat, off-line vacuum degassing or combinations of these methods.

In a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention, be used as a solvent reservoir syringes from substantially gas-impermeable material, such as glass. Suitable examples are so-called all-glass syringes in which both the cylinder and the piston are made of glass without further Dichtungselemen- te are needed. But of course it is also conceivable to use syringes with elastic sealing elements between the piston and cylinder. The vorentgasten solvents are filled into the syringes or raised by piston movement. Possibly in the syringes with trapped air can be forced out below. Furthermore, the syringes are connected via diffusion-tight gas connection hoses to the HPLC system.

The syringes as well as the aforementioned containers may be made of other materials such as metal, ceramic, gas-tight plastics, etc. instead of glass, of course, provided that they meet the requirements for chemical resistance and gas tightness. but it can also composite materials, such as metal-coated plastics are used. This offers the advantage that the positive properties of different materials, such as unbreakable and low gas permeability, can be combined. The effect of the invention can in principle also be achieved in that the solvent container, instead of movable lids in rigid containers basic bodies themselves wholly or partially resilient, eg in the form of bags or containers with deformable membranes. For the realization of such embodiments, plastics or elastomers offer which are not sufficiently diffusion-tight in general. Although the practical implementation of such

Embodiments, therefore, is difficult, it is with appropriate choice of materials (for example, metal-coated plastics, etc.) is not impossible. In a further embodiment of the invention, the effect is taken into account that the movement of the lid, in particular the piston of the syringe, is directly linked with the consumption of solvent. For this purpose, the position of the piston by attaching (an, in the container or in the vicinity of the container) covered by travel or position sensors, the known principles, for example optical, inductive, capacitive or magnetic sensors as well as mechanical switches o. ä. are usable. In this way, the level of the syringe and therefore the amount of solvent still available can be determined. In the simplest case, a signal is given only when falling below a certain level, for example, trigger an alarm, or may stop the pump. With more sophisticated sensors that measure the position of the piston within a working range, also a continuous monitoring is achievable. For example, based on a discrepancy between the solvent use and solvent delivery of the pump, the leakage rate of the pump can be determined.

In the case of solvents which must be protected from light to counteract growth of algae or chemical changes, the light-shielding colored or opaque by the use of containers, in particular spraying can, or be achieved by using a corresponding cover.

To ensure a solvent supply for an operating time of several days to weeks, it is in HPLC, in particular nano-HPLC, up to a few μΙ / min sufficient for use low flow rates in the range of some 10 nl / min, containers, in particular spraying, to be used with a useful volume of between about 10 ml and 250 ml, for example 100 ml. Thereby, the above are explained

achieved benefits over the entire service life called.

Further advantageous embodiments of the invention emerge from the subclaims. The invention is explained below with reference to the embodiment shown in the drawings embodiments. In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a schematic view of a nano-HPLC-pump with two reservoirs according to the invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged partial view of the structure of Fig. 1 and

Fig. 3 is a schematic partial view of two reservoirs according to the invention with additional filter elements.

Fig. 1 shows a preferred embodiment of the invention for a binary nano-HPLC-pump 3, which is a nano-HPLC-pump which operates with two different solvents 100a and 100b. The solvents 100a and 100b are located in the serving as the reservoir syringes 1 a and 1 b, preferably all-glass syringes with, for example, 100 ml nominal volume, which are connected via connecting lines 2a and 2b connected to the inputs 3a and 3b of the pump. 3 A solvent reservoir of 100 ml is sufficient for nano-HPLC systems for an operating time of several days to weeks, it being understood that smaller volumes of a few ml, for example 1 ml to 10 ml, or up to 50 ml, are suitable for this purpose. For systems with higher flow rates corresponding to larger volumes of for example 200 ml may be used to 500 ml.

For pumps with more or less than two solvents channels more or less spraying and connecting lines may be provided accordingly. The pump 3 mixes and dispenses the two solvents 100a and 100b as necessary for the particular application, and provides at its output 3c, the solvent mixture for the remainder of the HPLC system is available. This is indicated by the arrow. 4 As syringes 1 a and 1 b, as well as any other necessary spraying all-glass syringes can be used which are advantageously product available at low cost as mass preferably. Advantageously, glass syringes against customary in HPLC solvent resistant, easy to clean and give almost no foreign substances to the solvents from. The use of relatively large (1 ml to 10 ml, up to 50 ml and up to 100ml or even up to 250 ml) all-glass syringes has in addition to the advantages mentioned above, the further advantage that the piston cross-section is relatively large - for example, loading contributes the piston cross-section with a syringe volume of 100 ml several cm 2. If caused by dirt between piston and cylinder friction, this can be easily overcome by the externa ßeren air pressure due to the relatively large cross-section piston. Further, in sealless all-glass syringes the piston is very smoothly, so that the piston movement is not hindered by friction forces. Thus, when sucking no or no significant negative pressure.

The vertical arrangement shown in the drawings of the syringes 1 a, 1 b with the downwardly directed spigot 13, although convenient, but not absolutely necessary.

Hereinafter, the detailed operation of the invention and the structure of the syringes 1 a and 1 b with reference to FIG. 2 will be explained. Here, the following features 1, 2 and 1 1 b 100 correspond to the characteristics a,; 2a, 2b and 100a, 100b. The remaining features 10-14 shown in FIG. 2 are the in the syringes 1 a and 1 b of course also identical existing features.

The all glass syringe 1 (as an enlarged example of the syringes 1 a and 1 b) has a sufficiently large useful volume of for example 1 ml to 10 ml, or 10 ml to 250 ml, preferably 100 ml to a solvent supply for an operating time of an HPLC system take from several days to weeks. In the syringe 1 is the previously degassed solvent reservoir 100th

The syringe 1 has a directed downward in the drawing connection piece 13, which is connected to a gas-tight conduit. 2 This gas-tight conduit 2 leads to the to be supplied (shown in Fig. 1) Pump 3, wherein the flow direction of the solvent is indicated in line 2 100 by the arrow 20. The syringe 1 comprises a cylinder 10, whose interior is closed at the top by the likewise made of glass bulb 1. 1 Both parts are manufactured so that between the inner circumference of the cylinder 1 1 and Au ßenumfang the likewise cylindrical piston 1 1, only one externa tremely narrow circumferential sealing gap 12 and a cylindrical gap area is left (in the form of a formed in the non-illustrated cross-section of the annular gap), the or . which ensures the sealing action of the syringe 1. This gap 12 is shown excessively wide in Fig. 2 only for clarity.

The material of cylinder 10 and piston 1 1 and connected to the connector 13 connecting line are impermeable to gas, and therefore could be a gas exchange between solvent and ambient air at most along the sealing gap 12 between cylinder and piston take place. However, this circumferential sealing gap is as narrow as possible sized and therefore represents an extremely narrow and relatively long path between the solvent 100 and the ambient air. Thus, almost no gas exchange between the solvent 100 and the ambient air takes place. When the HPLC-pump sucks 3 solvent, reduces the solvent volume 100 within the syringe 1. In this way, the free-moving piston 1 1 is moved accordingly, as is indicated in FIG. 2 by arrow 14. Thus, no air occurs during this process into the syringe 1, and there is no or at least no significant negative pressure. The solvents 100 within the syringe 1 remains ßenluft completed by the Au.

In addition, the syringes 1 and 1 a and 1 b to prevent substantially the entry of dirt, for example dust, or liquid droplets from the ambient air to the solvents. This advantageously unwanted contaminations can the solvents NEN 100 or 100a and 100b avoided.

The filling of the syringes may be done manually in the simplest case by the connection piece 13 is held either directly or via a connecting line in the container with the solvent and then the desired vorentgasten solu- sungsmittelvolumen by actuating the plunger 1 1 is drawn. possible mitangesaugte air can be forced out of the syringe then if necessary, as they might otherwise move with the times back into solution. Thereafter, the communication line 2 is connected to the connection pipe 13 again. For a more convenient filling additional devices, such as shutoff valves and branching can be switched into the connecting line twentieth This makes it possible to prevent air is introduced during normal filling, such that a venting only for the initial filling is necessary. Similarly, the filling can take place via a pump.

In the HPLC are usually installed in the intake path of the pump filter elements, or to keep particles present in the solvent such as by the pump. Most of these filter elements are attached directly to the intake lines and thus hang in the solvent containers. This is not possible in the inventive solution easily.

Instead, as illustrated in Fig. 3, the filter elements 5a, 5b suitably between the syringes 1 a, 1 b and the pump 3 in the connecting lines 2a, 2b are inserted. In the illustrated in Fig. 3 solution, the filter elements are mounted, for example directly to the syringes and their connection ports 13.

But of course it is also conceivable already interpose filter when filling the syringes to not to allow any particles only reach the syringes. However, these must be eliminated or reversed in operation then, as the flow direction (shooting direction to the dispensing direction) then reverses.

Reference Signs List 1a, b all-glass syringes

2a, b interconnectors

Nano-HPLC-pump

c output

Arrow pointing towards remainder of the HPLC Systemsa, filter elements b

0 cylinder

1 piston

2 sealing gap

3 connection pieces

0 arrow for the flow direction of the Lösungsmittels00, 100a, 100b solvent

Claims

claims
1 . Method of supplying HPLC-systems with at least one solvent (100, 100a, 100b), characterized in that from at least one sealed gas-tight storage container (1, 1 a, 1 b), the solvent (100, 100a, 100b) is discharged, wherein the container volume decreases in proportion as the solvent (100, 100a, 100b) comes out of the container.
2. The method according to claim 1, characterized in that the solvent (100, 100a, 100b) of the at least one reservoir (1, 1 a, 1 b) to a conveyor (3) of a HPLC system is given substantially without negative pressure ,
3. The method of claim 1 or 2, characterized in that the vessel volume decreases by a in a rigid container body (10) movable lid (1 1) moves in the direction of the container interior.
4. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the at least one reservoir (1, 1 a, 1 b) is filled without air or vented by pressing out the air after the filling.
5. The method of claim 3 or 4, characterized in that the movable cover (1 1) is biased to a low pressure force in the direction to the container interior.
6. The method according to any one of claims 3 to 5, characterized in that the movement of the lid (1: 1) is detected to monitor the filling level and / or the Entleerund / or filling process.
7. A device for performing the method according to any one of the preceding claims with at least one reservoir (1, 1 a, 1 b), characterized in that the at least one reservoir (1, 1 a, 1 b) is gas-tightly closed and from which at least a reservoir (1, 1 a, 1 b) contained therein solvent (100, 100a, 100b) can be dispensed, wherein the container volume decreases in proportion as the solvent (100, 100a, 100b) from the container (1, 1 a, 1 b) emerges.
8. Apparatus according to claim 7, characterized in that the at least one reservoir (1, 1 a, 1 b) made of a rigid container body (10), in which is located a the container interior final and the container volume variable movable lid (1: 1) located.
is formed 9. Device according to claim 8, characterized in that the container body as a cylinder (10) and the lid as a piston (1 1) or float.
10. The apparatus of claim 8 or 9, characterized in that the cover (1 1) is biased with a small pressing force acting to the container interior.
1. 1 Device according to one of claims 8 to 10, characterized in a sensor is arranged at least to detect the movement of the lid (1 1) that on or in the at least one reservoir (b 1 1, 1 a,).
12. Use of a syringe (1, 1a, 1b), with at least one cylinder (10) of glass, as reservoir (1, 1a, 1b) according to one of claims 7 to. 11
PCT/DE2012/100066 2011-03-15 2012-03-14 Solvent storage system for hplc systems with low flow rates WO2012122980A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE102011001270.2 2011-03-15
DE201110001270 DE102011001270A1 (en) 2011-03-15 2011-03-15 Solvent supply system for HPLC systems with low flow rates

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2012122980A1 true true WO2012122980A1 (en) 2012-09-20

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Country Status (2)

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DE (1) DE102011001270A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2012122980A1 (en)

Citations (9)

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US4133767A (en) 1977-06-14 1979-01-09 Spectra-Physics, Inc. Chromatographic apparatus and method
US4228922A (en) * 1978-10-23 1980-10-21 Ryuzo Takeshita Apparatus for injecting a desired volume of liquid in liquid and gas-liquid chromatography
US5234587A (en) * 1986-03-10 1993-08-10 Isco, Inc. Gradient system
DE4139735C2 (en) 1990-11-30 1994-02-24 Uniflows Co degassing
DE4446270C1 (en) 1994-12-23 1996-02-29 Hewlett Packard Gmbh Liquid chromatography de-gasifier
US20040092033A1 (en) * 2002-10-18 2004-05-13 Nanostream, Inc. Systems and methods for preparing microfluidic devices for operation
EP1510255A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-02 Syrris Limited A microfluidic system
DE69828594T2 (en) 1998-07-17 2005-06-16 Agilent Technologies Inc., A Delaware Corp., Palo Alto An apparatus for degassing liquids
EP1529560B1 (en) 2003-10-10 2010-06-02 ERC Inc. Vacuum control system

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1994010445A1 (en) * 1992-10-28 1994-05-11 Herbert Funke High pressure pump for accurate dosing of liquids
US5656034A (en) * 1995-03-31 1997-08-12 Perkin Elmer Corp High-pressure micro-volume syringe pump
JP4276827B2 (en) * 2002-10-18 2009-06-10 株式会社日立ハイテクノロジーズ Pump and operation method thereof for liquid chromatograph
JP2004150402A (en) * 2002-11-01 2004-05-27 Hitachi High-Technologies Corp Pump for liquid chromatography
DE10354216B3 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-05-25 Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH Injection pump used in a research laboratory for analysis purposes comprises an HPLC pump connected to a chamber via a connection

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4133767A (en) 1977-06-14 1979-01-09 Spectra-Physics, Inc. Chromatographic apparatus and method
US4228922A (en) * 1978-10-23 1980-10-21 Ryuzo Takeshita Apparatus for injecting a desired volume of liquid in liquid and gas-liquid chromatography
US5234587A (en) * 1986-03-10 1993-08-10 Isco, Inc. Gradient system
DE4139735C2 (en) 1990-11-30 1994-02-24 Uniflows Co degassing
DE4446270C1 (en) 1994-12-23 1996-02-29 Hewlett Packard Gmbh Liquid chromatography de-gasifier
DE69828594T2 (en) 1998-07-17 2005-06-16 Agilent Technologies Inc., A Delaware Corp., Palo Alto An apparatus for degassing liquids
US20040092033A1 (en) * 2002-10-18 2004-05-13 Nanostream, Inc. Systems and methods for preparing microfluidic devices for operation
EP1510255A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-02 Syrris Limited A microfluidic system
EP1529560B1 (en) 2003-10-10 2010-06-02 ERC Inc. Vacuum control system

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