WO2011115771A2 - Method and system for shot tracking - Google Patents

Method and system for shot tracking Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2011115771A2
WO2011115771A2 PCT/US2011/027415 US2011027415W WO2011115771A2 WO 2011115771 A2 WO2011115771 A2 WO 2011115771A2 US 2011027415 W US2011027415 W US 2011027415W WO 2011115771 A2 WO2011115771 A2 WO 2011115771A2
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
signal
battery
microprocessor
mode
power
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2011/027415
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2011115771A3 (en
Inventor
Joseph Balardeta
Scott Denton
Original Assignee
Callaway Golf Company
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US12/728,056 priority Critical patent/US7801575B1/en
Priority to US12/728,056 priority
Priority to US12/756,034 priority
Priority to US12/756,034 priority patent/US7911186B1/en
Priority to US12/768,642 priority patent/US7883428B1/en
Priority to US12/768,642 priority
Priority to US12/779,281 priority patent/US7899408B1/en
Priority to US12/779,281 priority
Priority to US12/780,767 priority
Priority to US12/780,767 priority patent/US7927225B1/en
Priority to US12/782,544 priority patent/US7883427B1/en
Priority to US12/782,544 priority
Priority to US12/796,384 priority patent/US7804404B1/en
Priority to US12/796,384 priority
Priority to US12/826,350 priority patent/US7922606B2/en
Priority to US12/828,350 priority
Priority to US12/837,136 priority
Priority to US12/837,136 priority patent/US8142302B2/en
Application filed by Callaway Golf Company filed Critical Callaway Golf Company
Publication of WO2011115771A2 publication Critical patent/WO2011115771A2/en
Publication of WO2011115771A3 publication Critical patent/WO2011115771A3/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/24Constructional details thereof, e.g. game controllers with detachable joystick handles
    • A63F13/245Constructional details thereof, e.g. game controllers with detachable joystick handles specially adapted to a particular type of game, e.g. steering wheels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
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    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0003Analysing the course of a movement or motion sequences during an exercise or trainings sequence, e.g. swing for golf or tennis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
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    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0021Tracking a path or terminating locations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
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    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
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    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/46Measurement devices associated with golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like for measuring physical parameters relating to sporting activity, e.g. baseball bats with impact indicators or bracelets for measuring the golf swing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
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    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
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    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
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    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/30Interconnection arrangements between game servers and game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game servers
    • A63F13/33Interconnection arrangements between game servers and game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game servers using wide area network [WAN] connections
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    • A63F13/50Controlling the output signals based on the game progress
    • A63F13/53Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game
    • A63F13/537Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game using indicators, e.g. showing the condition of a game character on screen
    • A63F13/5375Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving additional visual information provided to the game scene, e.g. by overlay to simulate a head-up display [HUD] or displaying a laser sight in a shooting game using indicators, e.g. showing the condition of a game character on screen for graphically or textually suggesting an action, e.g. by displaying an arrow indicating a turn in a driving game
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/02Power saving arrangements
    • H04W52/0209Power saving arrangements in terminal devices
    • H04W52/0251Power saving arrangements in terminal devices using monitoring of local events, e.g. events related to user activity
    • H04W52/0254Power saving arrangements in terminal devices using monitoring of local events, e.g. events related to user activity detecting a user operation or a tactile contact or a motion of the device
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    • A63B2069/3602Player's game information devices
    • A63B2069/3605Golf club selection aids informing player of his average or expected shot distance for each club
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    • A63B2102/32Golf
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
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    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
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    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
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    • A63F2300/406Transmission via wireless network, e.g. pager or GSM
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
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    • Y02D70/14Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE] networks
    • Y02D70/142Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE] networks in Wireless Local Area Networks [WLAN]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
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    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
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    • Y02D70/164Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in other wireless communication networks in Satellite Navigation receivers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/10Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT]
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    • Y02D70/166Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in other wireless communication networks in Radio Frequency Identification [RF-ID] transceivers

Abstract

A circuit for transmitting a RFID signal while conserving the battery power for a circuit in continuous operation is disclosed herein. The circuit includes a RFID component, a microprocessor, an accelerometer and a battery. The battery preferably has no more than 225 milliamp hours of power. The accelerometer is preferably a multiple axis accelerometer. The circuit is preferably utilized with a device for shot tracking.

Description

Title

METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR SHOT TRACKING

Technical Field

The present invention relates to shot tracking. More specifically, the present invention relates to a method and circuit for transmitting a RFDD signal while conserving battery power.

Background Art

Reducing power consumption in most portable electronic devices is important but it is especially important in electronic devices that are not rechargeable or have replaceable batteries, and are operated continuously, that is, the device is always active in some mode. Such devices are essentially consumables since once the battery power is exhausted the device is no longer useful. An obvious solution would be to, if possible, program the electronic device with sufficient intelligence to activate and deactivate as needed. However, many modern electronic devices require more sophistication than simple activation and deactivation, and the act of activating a device after deactivation may only add to the power depletion. Further, many modern electronic devices include various components that have varying power requirements in order to function properly in continuous operation.

The prior art is lacking in a circuit to conserve battery power while sensing for motion and then transmitting the information pertaining to the sensed motion using a radiofrequency component. Summary of the Invention

The present invention is novel in that the observation of the relative motion does not depend on near visible light and uses a coherent pattern to capture the position of the club relative the ground antenna

transmitter/receiver. This fixed device also includes a display, computing capability and recording device. This information, when processed, enables the display of the swing and uses data on the club head and ball to calculate the flight of the ball. This invention is a club shaft that can be installed in a club head permanently or can be installed in clubs with interchangeable shaft features. The invention is the measurement device that enables the capturing of the speed and motion of the swing. The invention uses two antennas, one transmitting and one receiving. The power of the radar wave is low. The wavelength will be on the order of a millimeter. The antennas' shapes are designed to improve the accuracy of measurement of location as a function of time. One antenna is designed to conform to the shaft or reside in the shaft. Material substitutions in the shaft can be utilized to improve the antenna function. In the first embodiment, the antenna in the shaft shall be attached to a power source, battery and a simple electronic circuit. The second antenna, the transmitting/receiver, will reside off the club and will receive the transmissions of the shaft antenna. The second embodiment will have a shaft antenna that does not rely on a battery, but reflects an electromagnetic field back to the transmitting/receiving antenna. In either case, the interactions of characteristic three dimensional amplitude variations in the antennas, their patterns, allow the measurement of relative positions over time.

The invention enables the accurate measurement and capture of the swing, produces a display of the impact and ball flight and thus improves the training and practice results for the golfer.

Brief Description of the Drawings FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf club head of the present invention.

FIG. 1 A is a front view of a golf club of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 2A is a front view of the club head of FIG. 1 illustrating a plurality of preferred hit locations.

FIG. 3 is a heel side view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3A is a heel side view of the club head of FIG. 1. FIG. 4 is a toe side view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a rear plan view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6A is a top plan view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a bottom plan view of the club head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of a club head of the prior art.

FIG. 9 is a bottom plan view of the club head of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the golf club head of the present invention.

FIG. 1 1 is a front view of the club head of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a heel side view of the club head of FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 is a toe side view of the club head of FIG, 10.

FIG. 14 is a rear plan view of the club head of FIG. 10.

FIG. 15 is a top plan view of the club head of FIG. 10.

FIG. 16 is a bottom plan view of the club head of FIG. 10.

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of a club head of the present invention illustrating the wall angles relative to each other.

FIG. 18 is a bottom plan view of a club head of the present invention illustrating the wall angles relative to each other.

FIG. 19 is a bottom plan view of a club head of the present invention illustrating the wall angles relative to each other.

FIG. 20 is a top plan view of a club head of the present invention illustrating the wall angles relative to each other.

FIG. 21 is a top plan view of a club head of the present invention illustrating the wall angles relative to each other.

FIG. 22 is a front view of an alternative embodiment of a golf club head of the present invention.

FIG. 23 is a top plan view of the club head of FIG. 22.

FIG. 24 is a bottom plan view of the club head of FIG. 22.

FIG. 25 is a rear plan view of the club head of FIG. 22. FIG. 26 is a heel side view of the club head of FIG. 22.

FIG. 27 is a toe side view of the club head of FIG. 22.

FIG. 28 is a front view of another alternative embodiment of a golf club head of the present invention.

FIG. 29 is a top plan view of the club head of FIG. 28.

FIG. 30 is a bottom plan view of the club head of FIG. 28.

FIG. 31 is a rear plan view of the club head of FIG. 28.

FIG. 32 is a heel side view of the club head of FIG. 28.

FIG. 33 is a toe side view of the club head of FIG. 28,

FIG. 34 is a front view of still another alternative embodiment of a golf club head of the present invention.

FIG. 35 is a top plan view of the club head of FIG. 34.

FIG. 36 is a bottom plan view of the club head of FIG. 34.

FIG. 37 is a rear plan view of the club head of FIG. 34.

FIG. 38 is a heel side view of the club head of FIG. 34.

FIG. 39 is a toe side view of the club head of FIG. 34.

FIG. 40 is an isolated interior view of a face component for a golf club head of the present invention.

FIG. 41 is an isolated bottom plan view of the face component of FIG. 40.

FIG. 42 is an isolated toe side view of the face component of FIG. 40.

Best Mode(s) for Carrying Out the Invention The present invention generally comprises a method for dynamic collision avoidance of graphical and textual elements on a display. The method comprises displaying an aerial image of a portion of the golf course on a viewport of golf GPS device, the portion of the golf course including a plurality of elements and the plurality of elements including at least one element of texts, wherein the GPS device comprises a GPS component, a memory for storing a plurality of aerial images of a golf course, a user input for inputting a plurality of location points on an aerial image of the plurality of aerial images of the plurality of aerial images displayed on the display and a processor. The method further comprises determining the location of the at least one element of texts on the display in positional relation to the plurality of elements on the display and determining if there is a collision of elements on the display and adjusting the texts element to avoid collision.

Referring to FIG. 1, a schematic block diagram of the major electronic components of a golf GPS device 10 according to one embodiment of the present invention will be described. The golf GPS device 10 comprises a microprocessor 12 which is operably coupled to a GPS chipset 14, a user input device 16, an LCD display 18; a program memory 20, a voice recognition module 22, an audio output 24, a data transfer interface 26, and a battery and power management unit 28. As understood by one of ordinary skill in the art, the device 10 also comprises other electronic components, such as passive electronics and other electronics configured to produce a fully functional GPS device as described herein. In addition, the device 10 comprises various firmware and software configured to control the operation of the device 10 and provide the device functionality as described in more detail below.

The microprocessor 12 is preferably an ARM based microprocessor, such as one of the MX line of processors available from Freescale

Semiconductor, but may be any other suitable processor. The microprocessor 12 executes instructions retrieved from the program memory 20, receives and transmits data, and generally manages the overall operation of the GPS device 10.

The GPS chipset 14 is preferably an integrated circuit based GPS chipset which includes a receiver and microcontroller. The GPS chipset may be a single, integrated microchip, or multiple microchips such as a processor and a separate receiver which are operably coupled to each other (for example, on a printed circuit board ("PCB")). For instance, the GPS chipset 14 may be a NJ1030 GPS chipset available from Nemerix, Inc., or any other suitable GPS chipset or microchip. The GPS chipset includes a GPS receiver, associated integrated circuit(s), firmware and/or software to control the operation of the microchip, and may also include one or more correction signal receiver(s) (alternatively, the correction signal receiver(s) may be integrated into a single receiver along with the GPS receiver). As is well known, the GPS unit 14 receives signals from GPS satellites and/or other signals such as correction signals, and calculates the positional coordinates of the GPS unit 14. The GPS device 10 utilizes this positional data to calculate and display distances to features or selected locations on a golf course, as described in more detail below.

The display 18 may be any suitable graphic display, but is preferably a high resolution (e.g. 320 pixels by 240 pixels, QVGA or higher resolution), full color LCD. The display 18 is preferably the largest size display that can be fit into the form factor of the overall device 10, and preferably has a diagonal screen dimension of between about 1.5 inches and 4 inches. For example, for the form factor described below with reference to FIG. 2, the display may be a 2.2" diagonal, QVGA, full color LCD. In addition, since the display 18 is intended to be used outside under sunlit conditions, the display 18 should provide good visibility under brightly lit conditions, such as with a transflective LCD.

The program memory 20 stores at least some of the software and data used to control and operate the device 10. For example, the program memory 20 may store the operating system (such as LINUX or Windows CE), the application software (which provides the specific functionality of the device 10, as described below), and the golf course data. The program memory 20 broadly includes all of the memory of the device 10, including memory contained on the microprocessor, memory in a non-volatile memory storage device such as flash memory, EPROM, or EEPROM, memory on a hard disk drive ("hdd"), SD Card(s), USB based memory devices, other types of flash memory, or other suitable storage device, including one or more electronic memory devices on the golf GPS device, including an additional removable memory unit 30.

The user input device 16 may comprise a plurality of buttons, a touch screen, a keypad, or any other suitable user interface which allows a user to select functions and move a cursor. Referring to the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, an example of a user input device comprises a directional pad 16a and plurality of buttons 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e and 16f. The device 10 is configured such that directional pad 16a may be used to move a cursor around the display, while the buttons 16b-16f may be used to make selections and/or activate functions such as activating the voice recognition or switching between modes (as described in more detail below).

In order to provide portability, the golf GPS device 10 is preferably battery powered by a battery and power management unit 28. The battery may be any suitable battery, including one or more non-rechargeable batteries or rechargeable batteries. For instance, a rechargeable, lithium-ion battery would work quite well in this application, as it provides relatively long life on a single charge, it is compact, and it can be re-charged many times before it fails or loses significant capacity. The power management unit controls and distributes the battery power to the other components of the device 10, controls battery charging, and may provide an output representing the battery life. The power management unit may be a separate integrated circuit and firmware, or it may be integrated with the microprocessor 12, or other of the electronic components of the device 10.

The voice recognition unit 22 comprises electronics and software (the term "software" as used herein shall mean either software or firmware, or any combination of both software and firmware) configured to receive voice or other sounds and convert them into software commands and/or inputs usable by the main application software. The voice recognition unit 22 may comprise a separate integrated circuit, electronics and/or software, or it may be integrated into the main microprocessor 12. The voice recognition unit 22 includes a microphone 32. The voice recognition unit 22 is configured to detect voice and/or other sound inputs from a user of the device 10, and convert the sound inputs into electrical signals. The voice recognition unit 22 then digitizes the analog electrical signals and computes a command or other input representative of the digitized signal. For example, a command for switching between Pro Mode and Basic Mode may be input using the voice recognition unit 22 by speaking the term "Pro Mode" or "Basic Mode" into the microphone 32. Of course, the main application software must also be configured to receive the inputs from the voice recognition unit 22. The hardware and software for the voice recognition unit are relatively complex, but packaged solutions are available, such as the products available from Texas Instruments, Inc. or Wolfson Micro, Inc.

The audio output 24 comprises electronics and software to convert digital signals from the device into electrical signals for driving a speaker or headphones. The audio output 24 may comprise a phone jack 34 (also shown in FIG, 2) and/or a speaker 36. The audio output 24 typically includes a digital-to-analog converter, a power amplifier, and may also include software for converting information or data into audible sounds. For instance, the audio output 26 may be configured to convert distances measured by the device 10 into an audibly replicated voice of the distance in words, such as "one-hundred fifty." Additionally, the device 10 may be configured to also play digital music files (such as MP3 audio files) or digital video files (such as MPEG files), with the audio being output using the audio output 24.

The voice recognition unit 22 and audio output 24 may be integrated together into a software and hardware unit. For example, such integrated products are available from Texas Instruments, Inc. and Wolfson Micro, Inc.

The data transfer interface 26 is configured to send and receive data from a computer or other electronic device (e.g. another golf GPS device 10). The interface 26 may be a physical connection such as a USB connection, a radio frequency connection such as Wi-Fi, wireless USB, or Bluetooth, an infra-red optical link, or any other suitable interface which can exchange electronic data between the GPS device 10 and another electronic device. As shown in one preferred embodiment in FIG, 2, the interface 26 comprises a USB connection having a USB connector 26a.

The electronic components of the golf GPS device 10 are preferably assembled onto a PCB, along with various other electronic components and mechanical interfaces (such as buttons for the user input device 16), thereby providing the electronic connections and operability for a functional electronic GPS device 10.

Turning to FIG. 2 now, the golf GPS device 10 preferably comprises a housing 40 which houses the electronic components such that the entire device has a very compact, thin, and lightweight form factor, The housing 40 may be formed of any suitable material, but is preferably a plastic material which is substantially transparent to radio frequency signals from GPS satellites, Indeed, the golf GPS device is preferably handheld and small enough to fit comfortably in a pocket of a user's clothing. One example of the form factor for the GPS device 10 with dimensions is shown in FIG. 2. In one preferred form, the GPS device 10 may have the following dimensions: a height 44 of about 4 inches or less, a width 46 of 1.9 inches or less and a thickness 42 of 0.6 inches or less. More preferably, the height 44 is 3.9 inches or less, the width 46 is 1.8 inches or less, and the thickness 42 is 0.55 inches or less. The entire golf GPS device 10 may weigh about 3.5 ounces or less, including the battery 28.

An application software program is stored in the program memory 12. The application software program is configured to operate with the microprocessor 12 and the other electronic components to provide the golf GPS device 10 with the functionality as described herein. Most generally, the hardware and software of the portable golf GPS device 10 are configured to determine, track, and display useful golf related information, before, during and after a round of golf. The GPS device 10 is configured to store golf course data for a particular golf course of interest which is loaded onto the GPS device 10 through the data transfer interface 26,

The golf courses are mapped to create the golf course data using any suitable method, such as ground survey, or more preferably, by using geo- referenced satellite or aerial images. The mapping process produces golf course data which can be used by the GPS device 10 to determine the coordinates of golf course features of interest, such as the greens, bunkers, hazards, tees, pin positions, other landmarks, and the like. Generally, the perimeter of the golf course features will be mapped so that distance to the front and back of the feature may be determined. The mapping process can be done quickly and easily by displaying the geo-referenced images of the golf course on a computer and then using a script (or other software) each feature of interest is traced (or a series of discrete points on the perimeter may be selected). The captured data is then used to create a data set comprising the coordinates for a plurality of points on the perimeter of the feature, or a vector- map of the perimeter, or other data, which can be used to calculate the distance to such feature from the location of the GPS device 10. The golf course data preferably also includes golf hole data such as par, handicap, daily tee and hole locations, etc. In addition, for use with the "Pro Mode" as described below, the golf course data may include geo-referenced photographic course images, such as satellite or aerial photographs and/or video images. Indeed, the golf course data package for operating the device 10 in the Pro Mode and the Basic Mode is substantially the same, except that the Pro Mode data package includes the graphical images of the golf course. In other words, the golf course data related to the feature locations is exactly the same for both the Pro Mode and the Basic Mode, and the GPS device 10 is configured to utilize this data with or without the graphical images. Thus, advantageously, creation of the Pro Mode data package also creates the Basic Mode data set.

With reference now to FIGS. 3-1 1, the operation and functionality of GPS device 10 according to one embodiment will be described, Referring to FIG. 3, a "Main Menu" screen is displayed on the display 18. The "Main Menu" screen has two options, "Play Golf or "Settings." The choices on the Main Menu screen (or any of the other menus and screen displays described herein) can be selected by changing the highlighted option using the up and down arrows on the directional pad 16a of the user input device 16. The button 16b may function as an "Enter" key to make a selection. If a touch screen input device 16 is utilized, the user can simply touch the selection on the display 18.

Selecting "Settings" will bring up a "Settings" menu which allows the user to set various device and player settings and preferences, For example, the "Settings" menu may allow the user to set such user preferences as system units (e.g. yards or meters), preferred display settings (e.g. text size, Pro Mode vs, Basic Mode, screen brightness and contrast), turning on/off functions (such as score keeping, voice recognition, shot tracking, etc.), and other device settings.

Selecting the "Play Golf mode brings up a "Golf Menu" as shown in

FIG. 4 for initializing the GPS device 10 for use during a round of golf. The course being played may be selected by selecting "Select Course" which may bring up a list of courses currently stored on the device 10. The list of courses shown can be determined based on the location of the device as determined by the GPS device 10, for example, a list of the two or three courses closest to the location of the device. Alternatively, the list can be generated as a simple alphabetical list, a list of favorites, or other suitable listing method. The "Golf Menu" also allows the user to choose the starting hole, for instance, if a player is going to start on a hole other than the 1st hole, such as starting on the 10th hole (the "back nine"),

Once the course and starting hole have been selected, GPS device 10 determines the location of the device 10 using the GPS chipset 14, and then displays various golf hole information on the display. Turning to FIG. 5, in this described embodiment, the GPS device 10 is configured to display the hole number 50, the current time 52 (the device 10 may include a clock function which can be provided by the microprocessor 12, the GPS chipset 14, or other electronic device), the par for the hole 54, a battery charge indicator 56, and a GPS signal strength indicator 58. The GPS device 10 further calculates the distance between the determined location of the device 10 and the front, middle and back of the green and displays the distance to the front 60, the middle 62 and the back 64 of the green. As the device 10 is moved, the location of the device 10 is continually updated, and the distances (such as the front 60, middle 64, and back 64 of green) displayed are updated accordingly.

The GPS device 10 may also be configured to display a video flyover of the hole being played using a satellite or aerial photographic images of the hole. The GPS device 10 may be configured to automatically display the flyover when the device 10 detects that the GPS device 10 is approaching or has reached a particular hole, and/or the user can select to display the flyover using the menu-driven selections.

The golf GPS device 10 also may display the distances from the location of the device 10 to hazards and other features of interest as shown in FIG. 6. As an example, the user may select the "Hazard" selection on the display shown in FIG. 5 using the button 16d to bring up the screen as shown in FIG. 6. The screen shown in FIG. 6 displays the "Hazard" information in what is referred to herein as "Basic Mode." Basic Mode displays the "Hazard" information in a list using icons or text and respective measured distances. The example of FIG. 6 shows an icon for a right fairway bunker 66 and the distance to the front side of the bunker is 248 yards and the distance to carry the bunker is 264 yards. Similarly, the screen shows that the distance to the left greenside bunker 68 is 455 yards to reach and 472 yards to carry. Instead of easy to read icons, the features can alternatively be displayed using text, such as "Right Fairway Bunker" or using an abbreviation such as RtFwyBnkr, or the like.

As described above, the GPS device 10 may be configured to display the golf hole information in two distinct operating modes. The first mode is the Basic Mode which displays the distances and features in a text and/or icon format. In the second mode, referred to herein as the Pro Mode, the distances and features are shown on the display on a graphical image of a relevant area (also referred to as a "viewport") of the golf course. Examples of the Pro Mode showing the same information as the display shown in FIG. 6 are shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. The graphical image is preferably a photographic image generated from geo-referenced (e.g. coordinates are available for substantially any location on the image) satellite or aerial digital photographs, or geo- referenced, generated images. In Pro Mode, the images of the features, such as bunkers, the green, water hazards, etc. are displayed in the photographic image and the distances are overlaid onto the image. A distance marker 70, such as a red dot or other small but easily viewable symbol, is placed on the feature at the exact point of measurement, and the distance number is displayed in close proximity to the marker 70. Referring to the example of FIG. 7, the right fairway bunker 66 is 248 yards to reach and 264 yards to carry. This is exactly the same distance information shown in the display depicted in FIG. 6.

Likewise, as shown in FIG. 8, the left greenside bunker 68 is 455 yards to the front and 472 yards to the back.

As explained above, the golf course data for both the Pro Mode and the Basic Mode is the same, except that the golf course images are required for the Pro Mode. Thus, if the Pro Mode course data has been loaded onto the device, the device is configured such that it can toggle back and forth between the Pro Mode display and the Basic Mode display. One of the buttons, such as button 16e or 16f (see FIG. 2), may be set up to toggle between the Pro Mode and the Basic Mode. However, if only the Basic Mode course data has been loaded onto the device, only the Basic Mode information may be displayed.

While viewing a list of features in Basic Mode, a feature may be selected, such as by scrolling through the list of features as shown in FIG. 6, and the user may select to view the Pro Mode display of such feature simply by selecting the feature from the list and selecting the Pro Mode. Of course, this feature would only be available if the Pro Mode course data has been loaded onto the device.

In order to optimize the viewability of the golf course images and displayed distances in the Pro Mode on a relatively small display 18, the golf GPS device 10 may include a automatic, dynamic, viewport generation method. The ability to miniaturize the size of the device 10 is in many ways limited by the size of the display 18, the major tradeoff being the desire to maximize the size of the display 18 in order to be able to display as much information and images at an easily viewable scale, while at the same time keeping the overall size of the device 10 as small as possible. Intelligent generation of the of the images and numbers being displayed can help to display the most relevant section of the golf hole being played with distances displayed at a font size that is easily readable.

The viewport generation may include one or more methods to determine the displayed viewport. First, the viewport generation method may include a method of determining the location and scale of the image of the golf course to be displayed based on the location of the device (and therefore the location of play) and the characteristics of the golf hole. For example, the method of viewport generation method displays the section of the golf hole that will be most relevant to the golfer from the current location, which may be a yardage range such as the fairway which is between 150 and 250 yards from the current location. As one specific example, FIG. 7 shows a viewport which might be displayed if the user is on the tee box of the displayed hole. The viewport displays the fairway and area surrounding the fairway from about 200 yards to 375 yards from the tee. The graphic image is automatically scaled (i.e. the zoom level is set) to display the relevant section of the hole so that it will fit on the display while maintaining viewability of relevant features (e.g. the bunkers) and distance to the fairway bunker. If the hole happens to be a par 3, or there is less than a certain distance (e.g. 250 yards) to the end of the hole, then the viewport generation method may display the rest of the hole at a maximum zoom level that can fit the rest of the hole on the display (see e.g. FIG. 8).

In another method of viewport generation, the distances displayed may be adjusted to avoid overlapping. This method may also be referred to as collision management. At certain zoom levels, for example very low zoom levels, many features as displayed on the display may be very close together such that if all of the distances to these features are displayed the numbers will overlap and the readability of the information will be compromised. To avoid this, the method will not display some of the distances so as to avoid any overlapping distances. The determination of the distances which will not be displayed, so as to avoid overlap, may be determined based on a hierarchy of the features, a random determination, a predetermination contained in the course data, an algorithm which determines the most important distances, some other criteria, or a combination of these methods. In another aspect of this feature, the method can be configured such that the user may select to display some or all of the non-displayed distances in which case the previously displayed distances which overlap these non-displayed distances are turned off. This selection may be a toggle, so that the user can toggle back and forth between the distances displayed. If there are more than two distances which would conflict with each other if displayed simultaneously, this user selection can advance through each of the non-displayed distances until all of the distances can be displayed sequentially, while the other conflicting distances are turned off.

The GPS device 10 may also pan and zoom the displayed graphical images of the golf course with the distance overlays in Pro Mode, Referring to FIG. 8, an example of a green view at a low zoom level is shown. The device 10 is shown in "Zoom" mode which is indicated by the "Zoom/Pan" toggle selection at the bottom left corner of the display 18. To zoom "in" on the image being displayed, the "up" arrow on the directional pad 16a is pushed, as shown in FIG. 9. To zoom "out", the "down" arrow on the directional pad 16a is pushed. The device 10 may be configured such that holding down the "up" or "down" arrow will continue to zoom "in" or "out," respectively. To switch to "Pan" mode as shown in FIG. 9, the button 16d is pushed. The user can pan the displayed image by pressing the desired direction of pan on the directional pad 16a. When zooming or panning, the distances again remain overlaid at the correct locations next to their respective features (or feature marker) and at the pre-set font size.

The golf GPS device 10 may also be configured to measure the distance between locations on the golf course using the images displayed on the display. In order to measure a distance from the location of the device to a location as viewed on image on the display, the "Meas" button 16c is selected (see FIG. 9), to enter "Measure" mode as shown in FIG. 10. A cursor 70 (such as a "+") and a marker 72 (such as the star shown in FIG. 10) will appear at the current location of the device 10. The marker 70 indicates the current location of the device 10, and the cursor indicates the point being measured to. At the outset, the marker 70 and cursor 72 are at the same location, so the distance is displayed as "0". The directional pad is then used to move the cursor 72 to the location of interest. As the cursor 72 is moved, the distance between the cursor 72 and the marker 70 is calculated and displayed. As the cursor 72 reaches the edge of the display in the direction of interest, the display may automatically pan (and/or zoom), as shown in FIG. 11. When the cursor is located at the location of interest, the desired distance will be displayed, as shown in the example of FIG. 11. In a similar manner, the device 10 may also be configured to measure the distance between two locations of interest selected on display. The user simply selects the "Meas" mode. The cursor 72 is then positioned at a first point of interest, the button 16b is pushed to set the first point of interest, and then the cursor 72 is moved to a second point of interest. As in the example above, the distance between selected first point of interest and the location of the cursor will be updated and displayed as the cursor is moved. The distance between a first location for the device 10 and a second location of the device 10 may also be measured by simply entering the "Meas" mode and then moving the device 10 to a new location. As the device 10 is moved, the distance between the original location of the device 10 and the new location of the device 10 will be calculated and displayed. The pan and zoom functions may be utilized automatically or manually during any of the above described measurement modes in order to select a location of interest. In other words, as the cursor reaches the edge of the viewing area, the image will pan (and/or zoom "out") to display a portion of the image that was previously outside the viewing area.

In order to improve the accuracy of the device, the golf GPS device 10 also includes a calibration method which corrects for local errors in the GPS system. Because the golf course images utilized on the device 10 are accurately geo-referenced with global coordinates, every discernable feature on the golf course images is a potential calibration point. To perform the calibration, referring to FIG. 4, the "Calibrate GPS" mode is selected. The use then locates a physical feature at the golf course which can also be fairly accurately identified and located on a graphical image of the same physical feature shown on the display of the GPS device 10. As examples, the calibration feature may be a cart path intersection, a distinctive shape of a bunker, a manhole cover, or a permanent tee marker. The GPS device 10 is then placed at the physical feature, and then the user places a cursor shown on the display of the device onto the image of the same physical feature. It may be helpful to zoom in to a high zoom level or even the maximum zoom level of the physical feature to improve the precision of the location of the cursor. The device 10 then determines the offset between the apparent location measured by the GPS device 14 and the location of the physical feature on the displayed image. The resultant offset is then used to correct all the GPS readings for the round of golf.

The golf GPS device 10 of the present invention may also be configured to present a pre-round preview of a golf course. The golf GPS device 10 allows the user the load a desired golf course and then navigate around the course, such as hole by hole. The preview may include a display of each hypothetical shot which might be take for each hole and/or suggested strategy for playing each hole and/or shot. For instance, the preview mode may display pre-loaded hypothetical shots which are automatically generated or contained within a golf course data package; or the preview mode may use distances typical of the user's club distances, or a distance as selected by the user for each shot, to perform a shot-by-shot preview. A golf game may be implemented on the golf GPS device 10, in which the user can play a game of golf on the desired golf course, similar to other golf video games like "Tiger Woods PGA Tour" or "Mario Golf, in which the game will be played on the actual golf course images stored on the device 10.

Similar to the pre-round preview feature, the golf GPS device 10 may be configured to track each shot taken by the user during a round of golf, including the club used for each shot and other shot information (such as quality and condition of lie, degree of swing such as full shot, half shot, etc., quality of contact, ball flight, etc.). At each ball position during a round of golf, the device 10 is configured to receive an input of the shot information and store the shot information referenced to the location of the device 10. With this stored information, the device 10 may also be configured to play back a round of golf which was tracked using the device, and/or download the tracked round to a computer or other device for playback and/or analysis.

In order to facilitate the entry of commands and information into the device, the golf GPS device 10 may include voice recognition/navigation utilizing the voice recognition unit 22. Indeed, voice recognition for inputting commands and information can be absolutely critical in enabling the timely use of many advanced features, such as shot tracking and score keeping, for example. Without voice recognition, such advanced features would be far too cumbersome and time consuming on a golf course. Moreover, voice recognition also enables the small form factor of the present invention because it avoids the need for a larger, more complicated input device, which might otherwise be necessary to quickly access and use certain advanced functions. For instance, additional input buttons and/or menus may be required to provide fast and easy use of advanced features which can have many options and/or possible input data.

Several examples of the use of the voice recognition capability follow. The golf GPS device 10 may be configured to allow a user to enter shot information while using the shot tracking mode using vocal inputs, or to enter scores on each hole. For instance, when entering a club selection for shot tracking, the user simply enters the voice mode and speaks into the device, "seven iron" or "driver", or whatever club is being used. For score keeping, the device 10 can be configured to recognize a player's name vocally input into the device, and then the score for a hole for such player. Thus, a user need only activate the voice recognition, then state the player's name and score in order to input the score for a player (e.g. "John, six;" Jerry, four"). The device 10 determines the name and score from the voice input, and then stores the data. The score data can then be displayed on the display 18. The voice recognition feature may also be used to audibly enter commands, such as switching between Basic Mode and Pro Mode, navigating through the devices menus, changing the settings, or any other command within the devices menus. Voice recognition facilitates the use of more advanced features, such as shot tracking, by reducing the amount of inputs that must be made using the input device, The use of voice recognition can also allow faster, and simpler access to certain commands/functions by bypassing menus that might normally be encountered when accessing such commands/functions. For example, a screen brightness setting might require going to the "Settings" menu, and then a submenu for "Display" settings, and then a selection of a "Screen Brightness" setting. Instead, the device 10 may be configured to recognize a voice command, such as "Screen Brightness" spoken into the device 10, in which case the device 10 will skip directly to the "Screen Brightness" setting. Of course, the device 10 could be configured to directly perform any of the functions of the device 10 using a voice command.

The golf GPS device of the present invention may include any one or more of the features and functions described above, or any combination of such features and functions which are not by their nature mutually exclusive.

The viewport on the device can be considered to be in one of three different states: normal, zoom-out and zoom-in, In the zoom-in state, there are no collisions to avoid so there is no need for the collision avoidance function of the device in the zoom-in state.

hi the normal pan state, there are some boundary conditions descriptions for handling which are shown in FIGS. 14-17. If the coordinate position where the text is to be displayed is at the right edge of the screen, such as shown in FIG. 12, such that the entire text string length cannot be accommodated then this co-ordinate has to be shifted to the left by amount of pixels so that the text can be completely displayed such as shown in FIG. 13. The first coordinate position to be plotted will not have any problem w.r.t text collision. This co-ordinate position will be stored for future reference. When the next coordinate position is checked, there is a check for text rectangle overlap of the current text and the previous text. If there is no overlap then display the current text at the same coordinate position. If there is overlap then check the direction in which there is minimum overlap - x or y direction. Move the current text by a pixel distance (the overlap + 1 - 2 pixels) in this minimum overlap direction. After the display this coordinate will again be stored.

FIG. 14 illustrates the collision avoidance when the minimal distance is on the x-axis and the shift is to the right side.

FIG. 15 illustrates the collision avoidance when the minimal distance is on the x-axis and the shift is to the left side.

FIG. 16 illustrates the collision avoidance when the minimal distance is on the y-axis and the shift is to the top. FIG. 17 illustrates the collision avoidance when the minimal distance is on the y-axis and shift is to the bottom.

FIG. 18 is an isolated view of a display on a viewport of a device in a zoom-out state.

If the collision occurs at the top-right corner or bottom-left corner or bottom-right corner or at top-left corner, wherein it cannot accommodated, the current text after new position calculation (resolving the collision) omits the text display and will only display the marker image in a different color for this overlay point. If the user pans in the appropriate direction the text will be displayed at the new position.

When moving to display the next text, check for collisions with the previous texts that have already been displayed. This will be carried out for all text coming in for display.

In the zoom-out state, collision avoidance is also necessary. At the 20 % zoom where in the entire golf image will be on the screen, all the data points will be marked with a marker image in a different color and there will be no text display.

When moving to the next zoom level (ex. 30 %) then show only some text and omit the rest for which collisions cannot be resolved - these will be shown with the marker image in a different color. The above will be repeated as the user zooms out further such as 40 %, then to 50%, etc.

A flow chart for method 1000 is shown in FIG. 19. At block 1001, start the method. At block 1002, initialization. At block 1003, get the pixel position (x,y) of the marker. At block 1004, get the height and width of the marker. At block 1005, the data is stored. At block 1006, get the text details (x,y, width). At block 1007, check and resolve collisions. At block 1008, end the method,

As shown in FIG. 20, at block 2001, the device checks for the right boundary. At decision block 2002, an inquiry is made to determine if there is a collision. If yes, then at block 2003 the device resolves for the right boundary. At block 2004, the device checks for the overlap of rectangles. If no at decision block 2002, then the device also checks for overlap of rectangles. At decision block 2005, an inquiry is made to determine if the rectangles overlap. At block 2006, the device checks for all the rectangles and resolve collisions. At block 2007 Resolved? At block 2008 Return Failure. At block 2009 Check for the Upper Boundary. At block 2010 Exceed Upper Image boundary? At block 201 1 Resolve for the upper boundary. At block 2012 Resolved? At block 2013 Return Failure. At block 2014 Check for the Lower Boundary, At block 2015 Exceeds Lower Image boundary. At block 2016 Resolve for the lower boundary. At block 2017 Resolved? At block 2018 Return Failure. At block 2019 Return Success.

A system for shot tracking is illustrated in FIG 21. A golfer 45 strikes a golf ball with a golf club 50. The golf club 50 includes a device 20 preferably positioned within a grip. The device 20 includes a circuit 25 for transmitting a RFID signal while conserving the battery power of the device 20. The RFID signal 62 is preferably transmitted to a receiver 60 attached to a golf bag 61. As discussed in greater detail below, the RFID signal preferably comprises the golf club 50 used by the golfer and golf swing information.

The receiver 60 is preferably a GPS device such as disclosed in Balardeta et ah, U.S. Patent Publication Number 20090075761 for a Golf GPS Device And System, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Alternatively, the receiver is a personal digital assistant (PDA), "smart phone", mobile phone, or other similar device, However, those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize that the receiver may be any type of receiver capable of receiving and storing signals from the device 20.

FIG. 22 illustrates the device 20 including the main body 22a and a projection 22b. The projection 22b preferably is placed within an aperture of a grip (not shown) of a golf club 50. The projection body 22b preferably has a length that ranges from lmillimeter ("mm") to 5mm. The main body 22a preferably has a diameter, D, that ranges from 20mm to 25 mm. The interior components of the device 20 are illustrated in FIG. 22A. The interior components are preferably held within a housing 22 of the device 20. The interior components comprise a battery 28, a circuit board 49 having an accelerometer 29, a microprocessor 30a and a RFID component 30b.

Preferably the housing 22 is composed of a rubberized material formed around the battery 28 and the circuit board 49. In an alternative embodiment, the housing 22 is composed of an epoxy material formed around the battery 28 and the circuit board 49.

FIG. 23 illustrates a circuit diagram of a preferred embodiment of the present invention. A circuit 25 includes a battery 28, an accelerometer 29, a microprocessor 30a and an RFK) component 30b, The battery 28 is preferably a CR2032 lithium battery having 225 milliamp hours of power. In a device 20, under continuous operation, the battery 28 should provide power for an estimated five years of normal use of the device 20. The microprocessor 30a is preferably a MC9S08QG8/4 microprocessor from Freescale

Semiconductor. The accelerometer 29 is preferably a LIS3DH ultra low- power high-performance 3-axes nano accelerometer from ST Microelectronics, which has a 32 first in first out (FIFO) buffer. The RFID component is preferably an RF24L01 single chip 2.4 gigaHertz transceiver from Nordic Semiconductor,

A method 3000 for conserving power for the circuit 25 is set forth in FIG. 24. At block 3001, the microprocessor 30a is activated from a sleep mode to a sampling mode. A preferred time period for the sleep mode is between ten to fifteen seconds. The circuit 25 preferably consumes less than 600 nano-amps during the sleep mode. The time period for the sleep mode is sufficiently long enough to provide power savings for the battery 28 but short enough to capture any activity for the circuit 25. At block 3002, during the sampling mode, the microprocessor 30a activates the accelerometer 29. The circuit 25 preferably consumes less than 15 micro-amps during the sampling mode. During the sampling mode, the accelerometer 29 is determines if there is any movement or change from the last sampling mode. At block 3003, the accelerometer determines if there is motion activity during an analysis mode. The circuit 25 preferably consumes less than 50 micro-amps during the analysis mode. At block 3004, the accelerometer monitors the motion activity during a monitoring mode and communicates the motion activity to the microprocessor 30a. The circuit 25 preferably consumes less than 200 micro- amps during the monitoring mode. At block 3005, the radiofrequency component 30b transmits a signal during a transmission mode. The signal comprises data related to the motion activity monitored by the accelerometer 28. The radiofrequency component 30b preferably operates at 2.4 giga-Hertz and the power for the radiofrequency component 30b is drawn from the battery 24. The circuit 25 preferably consumes less than 12 milli-amps during the transmission mode. At block 2006, the circuit 25 returns to a sleep mode.

FIG 25 illustrates the power consumption of the device 20 when there is no motion detected. In a preferred embodiment, this is when a golf club 50 is in a golf bag and not in use. As shown in FIG. 6, the device 20 transitions from a sleep mode to a sampling mode wherein during the sleep mode less than 600 nano-amps are consumed by the device 20 since the only component operating is the microprocessor 30a, which is operating at a minimal activity. During the sampling mode, the microprocessor 30a becomes more active and the accelerometer 29 is activated to determine if there is any movement or change from the last sampling mode. During the sampling mode, less than 15 micro-amps of power is consumed by the device 20. As shown in this graph, no motion is detected and the device 20 transitions again to the sleep mode.

FIG. 26 illustrates the power consumption of the device 20 when there is motion detected. In a preferred embodiment, this is when a golf club 50 is used to strike a golf ball during a round of golf at a golf course. As discussed in reference to FIG. 6, the power consumption begins at the sleep mode and transitions to the sampling mode. However, unlike the scenario in FIG. 25, motion is detected by the accelerometer 29 during the sampling mode. The motion is at least more than a zero g reading by the accelerometer 28. Based on the detected motion, the device 20 transitions to an analysis mode, which consumes less than less than 50 micro-amps of power, During the analysis mode, the microprocessor 30a with input from the accelerometer 29 determines the type of motion. In a preferred embodiment, the device 20, based on the accelerometer readings, determines if the golfer is only taking a practice swing, if the golf club 50 has been removed from the golf bag 61 and is no longer in motion, or more importantly if the golfer is about to strike a golf ball. If the device 20 determines that the golfer is about to strike a golf ball, the device 20 transitions to the monitoring mode which consumes less than 200 micro-amps of power. In a preferred embodiment, during the monitoring mode the device 20 monitors the golfer's swing with the accelerometer 28 fully operable. Once the monitoring mode is completed, which in a preferred embodiment is when the accelerometer 28 has detected the striking of the golf ball, the device 20 transitions to a transmission mode which consumes less than 12 milli-amps. During the transmission mode, the radiofrequency component 30b transmits a signal, The signal comprises data related to the motion activity monitored by the accelerometer 28. Once the transmission mode is completed, the device 20 again returns to the sleep mode and minimal power consumption.

In a most preferred embodiment, in order to conserver power, the microprocessor 30a is configured to deactivate transmissions of the signal when a threshold number of signals are transmitted by the device 20 and a receipt signal is not received by the device 20. The threshold number of signals preferably ranges from 5 to 50, more preferably from 15 to 30 and is most preferred to be 20. Each signal transmitted consumes approximately 2 milliamps of power.

The microprocessor 30a is in electrical communication with the radiofrequency component 30b, wherein a signal 62 is transmitted from the radiofrequency component 30b and a confirmation signal is received at the radiofrequency component 30b, wherein the radiofrequency component 30b preferably operates at 2.4 giga-Hertz. A peak current of transmission of the signal is limited to 2 milliamps.

A method 4000 for shot tracking during a round of golf at a golf course is illustrated in FIG. 27. At block 4001, a golf club 50 is swung to impact a golf ball during a round of golf. At block 4002, at least one signal is transmitted from a RFID component 30b of a shot tracking device 20 attached to a golf club 50 to indicate that the golf club 50 has been used to strike a golf ball during a round of golf. At block 4003, the signal is received at a receiver 60, which is preferably a GPS device as discussed above. At block 4004, the receiver/GPS device 60 determines the geographical location of the golfer on the golf course and stores the golf club 50 used at that location. For example, if the golfer was teeing off at the first hole with a driver, the receiver/GPS device 60 would record the location as the first hole, the golf club used as a driver, and any other swing performance information provided by the device 20, When the golfer next strikes the golf ball, the device 20 transmits a signal to the receiver/GPS device 60 that the golfer struck the golf ball using a subsequent golf club, for example a six iron. The receiver/GPS device 60 determines the location on the golf course and from that location determines the distance of the previous shot by the golfer. The process continues for the entire round of golf. Once the round is finished, at block 4005, the receiver/GPS unit 60 uploads the data from the round to a Web site for further processing and display on a personal Web page where the golfer can compare the latest round against previous rounds.

The golf club 50 is any golf club of a set, and preferably every golf club in a golfer's golf bag 61 has a device 20 attached thereto. Further, a resolution of the accelerometer 29 is set to each particular golf club 50. For example, a putter requires a higher resolution than a driver since the movement of the putter during a golf swing is much less than the movement of a driver during a golf swing. In this manner, the device 20 for a putter has an accelerometer 29 set at a high resolution.

In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the circuit 25 for transmitting a FID signal 62 while conserving battery power comprises a battery 28 having no more than 225 milliamp hours of power, a

microprocessor 30(a) in electrical communication with the battery 28, the microprocessor 30(a) operating during a sleep mode, a sampling mode, an analysis mode, a monitoring mode and a transmission mode. The circuit further comprises a multi-axis accelerometer 30(e) for determining movement, monitoring movement and communicating the movement to the

microprocessor 30(a). The multi-axis accelerometer 30(e) is in electrical communication with the microprocessor 30(a). The power for the multi-axis accelerometer 30(e) is drawn from the battery 28. The multi-axis

accelerometer 30(e) is only active during the sampling mode, the analysis mode and the monitoring mode. The circuit further comprises a radiofrequency component 30(b) in electrical communication with the microprocessor 30(a), the radiofrequency component 30(b) operating at 2.4 giga-Hertz. The power for the radiofrequency component 30(b) is drawn from the battery 28. The radiofrequency component 30(b) is only operable during a transmission mode, transmitting a signal 62 from the radiofrequency component 30(b) during the transmission mode. The signal 62 comprises data related to the movement monitored by the multi-axis accelerometer 30(e). The circuit is in continuous operation. The circuit consumes less than 600 nano-amps during the sleep mode, the sleep mode having a time period ranging from 10 seconds to 30 seconds. The circuit consumes less than 15 micro-amps during the sampling mode. The circuit consumes less than 50 micro-amps during the analysis mode. The circuit consumes less than 200 micro-amps during the monitoring mode and the circuit consumes less than 12 milli-amps during the transmission mode.

In an alternative embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 28-29, the device 20 comprises a power source 28, a shock switch 53 and a RFID component 30b. The impact of a golf club 50 of the plurality of golf clubs 50 closes the shock switch 53 to provide an electrical current from the power source 28 to the RFID component 30b for transmission of a signal 62, The signal 62 comprises the type of golf club 50 impacted. The power source 52 comprises a battery 28, a resistor 30d and a capacitor 30b. The RFID component 30b comprises a RFID transponder and a processor 30b A receiver 60 for receiving the signal 62 from the RFID component 30a is also a part of the system . The receiver 60 is a GPS unit and the receiver 60 stores data for each shot by the golfer 45 for a round of golf. The receiver 60 is attached to a golf bag 61, however, those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize that the receiver 60 may be attached to any pertinent device including the golfer 45, or may stand alone.

Signals 62 may be transmitted via one or more antennas. Transmitted signals 62 may be formatted according to one or more system standards, including various examples detailed herein. Signals 62 may be transmitted on one or more frequencies (which may be selectable), or may be transmitted on multiple frequencies simultaneously (i.e. in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems. A data source provides data for transmission. The data source may be any type of data source or application, examples of which are well known in the art. Examples of components that may be included in a transceiver (or transmitter) are amplifiers, filters, digital-to- analog (D/A) converters, radio frequency (RF) converters, and the like. A transceiver or transmitter may also comprise modulators, spreaders, encoders, interleavers, equalizers and other functions. Data and/or control channels may be formatted for transmission in accordance with a variety of formats. RF transmission techniques are well known in the art and may include

amplification, filtering, upconversion, mixing, duplexing, etc. Infrared formats (i.e. IrDA) or other optical formats may require additional components for transmitting optical signals 62. Various components may be configured to support a single communication format, or may be configurable to support multiple formats. Those of skill in the art will recognize myriad combinations of transmission components to support one or more communication formats in a plug-in network appliance in light of the teaching herein.

As shown in FIGS. 28-29, a circuit 49 of the device 20 preferably comprises a power source 28, such as a battery 28, a resistor 30d, a capacitor 30c, a shock switch 53 or in an alternative embodiment a load switch, an enabler 30e, and a RFID component 30b. The components of device 10 are preferably designed so as to reduce capacitor 30c leakage and conserve battery 28 power. The circuit 49 is designed with a resistor 30d located in series, following the battery 28 and prior to the capacitor 30c, to minimize the pace at which the electrical current flows, allowing the capacitor 30c to reach the complete level of capacitance at a measured pace without quickly draining the battery28. The benefits of coupling a resistor 30d with a capacitor 30c result in preventing the battery 28 from completely draining once the capacitor 30c is drained, as would happen if the capacitor 30c were directly connected to the battery28. The capacitor 30c is preferably charged at a controlled rate from the battery 28.

FIG. 28 shows the circuit 49 for the device 20 prior to impact of the golf club 50 with a golf ball. FIG. 28 is an illustration of the circuit 49 of the device 11 subsequent to impact of a golf club 50 with a golf ball. As shown in FIG. 28, prior to the impact of the golf club 50 with the golf ball, the shock switch 53 is in an open position, preventing the electrical current from the power source 28 from reaching the RFID component 30a. In this pre-impact state, the active RFID component is in a powerless dormant state. The capacitor 30c is fully charged awaiting for closure of the shock switch 53 in order to complete the circuit.

As shown in FIG. 29, subsequent to impact of the golf club 50 with the golf ball, the shock switch 53 is closed, which allows the electrical current from capacitor 30c to power the RFID component 30a, activating the RFID component to generate a signal 62, for transmission to the receiver 60, without input from the golfer 59. The signal 62 comprises the type of golf club 50 struck by the golfer 59.

FIG. 30 is a flow chart of a method 5000 for shot tracking. At block 3001, a golfer 59 swings a club and impacts a golf ball. At block 5002, the impact force transmits to the shock switch 53. At block 5003, the shock switch is temporarily closed from the force of the impact. At block 5004, the active RFID transponder is powered by the power source. At block 5005, the active RFID transponder transmits at least one signal containing data about the golf club. At block 3006, the signal is received at a receiver.

Claims

Claims
1. A circuit for transmitting a RFID signal while conserving battery power, the circuit comprising:
a battery in electrical communication with a resistor, wherein the batteiy is a three volt battery and the resistor controls the rate at which a capacitor is charged from the battery;
the resistor in electrical communication with the capacitor and a load switch, wherein the capacitor is a one micro-Faraday capacitor;
the load switch in electrical communication with a microprocessor, wherein when the load switch is closed, current drawn from the capacitor is allowed to flow to the microprocessor,
the microprocessor in electrical communication with a radiofrequency component, wherein a signal is transmitted from the radiofrequency component and a confirmation signal is received at the radiofrequency component, wherein the radiofrequency component operates at 2.4 giga-Hertz; and
a peak current of transmission of the signal which is limited to
2 milliamps.
2. A device for tracking a golfer's shot during a round of golfer, the device comprising:
a housing composed of a polymer material, the housing having a main body and a projection body extending from the main body, the projection body having a length ranging from 1mm to 5mm and a diameter ranging from 20mm to 25mm;
a battery positioned within the housing;
a microprocessor positioned within the housing, the microprocessor in electrical communication with the battery;
a multi-axis accelerometer for determining movement, monitoring movement and communicating the movement to the
microprocessor, the multi-axis accelerometer positioned within the housing, the multi-axis accelerometer in electrical communication with the microprocessor; and
a radiofrequency component positioned within the housing, the radiofrequency component in electrical communication with the
microprocessor, the radiofrequency component operating at 2.4 giga-Hertz, , the radiofrequency component transmitting a signal comprising data related to the movement monitored by the multi-axis accelerometer.
3. A system for automatically tracking a golf club swung by a golfer, the system comprising:
a plurality of golf clubs, each of the plurality of golf clubs comprising a device attached to a grip which is attached to a shaft which is attached to a golf club head, the device comprising a power source, a shock switch and a RFID component, wherein impact of a golf club of the plurality of golf clubs swung by the golfer closes the shock switch to provide an electrical current from the power source to the RFH) component for transmission of a signal comprising a type of golf club impacted, the power source comprising a battery, a resistor and a capacitor, the RFID component comprising a RFID transponder and a processor;
a receiver for receiving the signal from the RFID component, wherein the receiver is a GPS unit, wherein the receiver stores data for each shot swung by the golfer for a round of golf.
4. A circuit for conserving power for a shot tracking device attached to a grip of a golf club, the circuit comprising:
a battery having no more than 75 milliamps of power;
a resistor in electrical communication with the battery, wherein the resistor controls the rate at which a capacitor is charged from the battery;
a capacitor in electrical communication with the resistor, wherein the capacitor is a one micro-Faraday capacitor;
a load switch in electrical communication with the capacitor, the load switch maintained in an open state until an impact transitions the load switch to a closed state;
a microprocessor in electrical communication with the load switch, wherein when the load switch is in a closed state, current drawn from the capacitor is allowed to flow to the microprocessor; and
a radiofrequency component in electrical communication with a microprocessor, wherein when the load switch is in a closed state a signal is transmitted from the radiofrequency component and a confirmation signal is received at the radiofrequency component, wherein the radiofrequency component operates at 2.4 giga-Hertz, wherein a peak current of transmission of the signal which is limited to 2 milliamps.
5. A method for dynamic collision avoidance of graphical and textual elements on a display, the method comprising:
displaying an aerial image of a portion of the golf course on a viewport of a golf GPS device, the portion of the golf course including a plurality of elements and the plurality of elements including at least one element of texts, wherein the GPS device comprises a GPS component, a memory for storing a plurality of aerial images of a golf course, a user input for inputting a plurality of location points on an aerial image of the plurality of aerial images displayed on the display, and a processor;
determining the location of the at least one element of texts on the display in positional relation to the plurality of elements on the display;
determining if there is a collision of elements on the display; and
adjusting the texts element to avoid collision.
6. A method for transmitting a RFID signal while conserving battery power of a circuit, the method comprising:
charging a capacitor using a battery, the battery in electrical communication with a resistor, the resistor in electrical communication with a capacitor and a load switch, the load switch in electrical communication with an enabler and a microprocessor, the microprocessor in electrical
communication with a radiofrequency component, wherein the resistor controls the rate at which the capacitor is charged from the battery in order to conserve power;
closing the load switch to power the microprocessor and the radiofrequency component, the power drawn from the capacitor;
transmitting a signal from the radiofrequency component, wherein a peak current of transmission of the signal is limited to 2 milliamps;
receiving a confirmation signal at the radiofrequency component, wherein the radiofrequency component operates at 2.4 giga-Hertz;
opening the load switch; and
recharging the capacitor at a controlled rate;
wherein in order to conserve battery power, the radiofrequency component transmits a signal until the confirmation signal is received or until a threshold number of signals are sent from the radiofrequency component without a confirmation signal, the threshold number of signals ranging from 5 to 50 ,
7. A system for automatically tracking a golf club swung by a golfer, the system comprising:
a golf club comprising a shaft and a golf club head, the golf club having a an accelerometer in electrical communication with an active RFK) transponder, the accelerometer temporarily closing a switch during impact with a golf ball to provide power from a power source to the RFID transponder for transmission of a signal, the signal containing data for the specific golf club;
a receiver for receiving the signal from the RFID transponder.
8. A method for shot tracking, the method comprising:
impacting a golf ball with a golf club;
activating an accelerometer positioned on the golf club;
closing a switch for a set time period, the switch positioned between a power source and an active RFID transponder;
powering the active RFID transponder with power from the power source;
transmitting a signal from the active RFID transponder, the signal comprising golf club data; and
receiving the signal at a receiver,
9. A system for automatically tracking a golf club swung by a golfer, the system comprising:
a golf club comprising a shaft and a golf club head, the golf club having a an accelerometer switch in electrical communication with an active RFID transponder, the accelerometer switch temporarily closing during impact with a golf ball to provide power from a power source to the RFID transponder for transmission of a signal, the signal containing data for the specific golf club;
a receiver for receiving the signal from the RFID transponder.
10. A device for tracking a golfer's shot during a round of golf, the device comprising:
a housing;
a battery having no more than 225 milliamp hours of power, the battery positioned within the housing;
a microprocessor positioned within the housing, the microprocessor in electrical communication with the battery, the
microprocessor operating during a sleep mode, a sampling mode, an analysis mode, a monitoring mode and a transmission mode;
a multi-axis accelerometer for determining movement, monitoring movement and communicating the movement to the microprocessor, the multi-axis accelerometer positioned within the housing, the multi-axis accelerometer in electrical communication with the microprocessor, the power for the multi- axis accelerometer drawn from the battery, the multi-axis accelerometer only active during the sampling mode, the analysis mode and the monitoring mode;
a radiofrequency component positioned within the housing, the radiofrequency component in electrical communication with the
microprocessor, the radiofrequency component operating at 2.4 giga-Hertz, the power for the radiofrequency component drawn from the battery, the radiofrequency component only operable during a transmission mode, transmitting a signal from the radiofrequency component during the transmission mode, the signal comprising data related to the movement monitored by the multi-axis accelerometer;
wherein the circuit is in continuous operation; wherein the device consumes less than 600 nano-amps during the sleep mode, the sleep mode having a time period ranging from 10 seconds to 30 seconds;
wherein the device consumes less than 15 micro-amps during the sampling mode;
wherein the device consumes less than 50 micro-amps during the analysis mode;
wherein the device consumes less than 200 micro-amps during the monitoring mode; and
wherein the device consumes less than 12 milli-amps during the transmission mode.
11. A circuit for transmitting a RPID signal while conserving the battery power for the circuit, the circuit comprising:
a battery having no more than 225 milliamp hours of power; a microprocessor in electrical communication with the battery, the microprocessor operating during a sleep mode, a sampling mode, an analysis mode, a monitoring mode and a transmission mode;
a multi-axis accelerometer for determining movement, monitoring movement and communicating the movement to the
microprocessor, the multi-axis accelerometer in electrical communication with the microprocessor, the power for the multi-axis accelerometer drawn from the battery, the multi-axis accelerometer only active during the sampling mode, the analysis mode and the monitoring mode;
a radiofrequency component in electrical communication with the microprocessor, the radiofrequency component operating at 2.4 giga-Hertz, the power for the radiofrequency component drawn from the battery, the radiofrequency component only operable during a transmission mode, transmitting a signal from the radiofrequency component during the transmission mode, the signal comprising data related to the movement monitored by the multi-axis accelerometer;
wherein the circuit is in continuous operation; wherein the circuit consumes less than 600 nano-amps during the sleep mode, the sleep mode having a time period ranging from 10 seconds to 30 seconds;
wherein the circuit consumes less than 15 micro-amps during the sampling mode;
wherein the circuit consumes less than 50 micro-amps during the analysis mode;
wherein the circuit consumes less than 200 micro-amps during the monitoring mode; and
wherein the circuit consumes less than 12 milli-amps during the transmission mode.
12. A method for transmitting a RFE) signal while conserving battery power of a circuit, the method comprising:
charging a capacitor using a battery, the battery having at least 75 milliamps of power,_the battery in electrical communication with a resistor, the resistor in electrical communication with the.capacitor and a load switch, the load switch in electrical communication with an enabler and a
microprocessor, the microprocessor in electrical communication with a radiofrequency component, and wherein the capacitor is a 1 micro-Farad capacitor;
closing the load switch to power the microprocessor and the radiofrequency component_upon an impact, the power drawn from the capacitor, wherein the microprocessor and the radiofrequency component only receive power when the load switch is closed;
transmitting a signal from the radiofrequency component, wherein a peak current of transmission of the signal is limited to 2 milliamps;
receiving a confirmation signal at the radiofrequency component, wherein the radiofrequency component operates at 2,4 giga-Hert^ wherein the radiofrequency component continues to transmit a signal until a predetermined event;
opening the load switch thereby removing power from the microprocessor and the radiofrequency component; and
recharging the capacitor at a controlled rate, wherein the resistor allows for charging of the capacitor from the battery at the controlled rate.
PCT/US2011/027415 2009-06-05 2011-03-07 Method and system for shot tracking WO2011115771A2 (en)

Priority Applications (18)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/728,056 US7801575B1 (en) 2010-03-19 2010-03-19 Method and system for shot tracking
US12/728,056 2010-03-19
US12/756,034 2010-04-07
US12/756,034 US7911186B1 (en) 2010-04-07 2010-04-07 Method and system for shot tracking
US12/768,642 2010-04-27
US12/768,642 US7883428B1 (en) 2010-04-27 2010-04-27 Shot tracking
US12/779,281 US7899408B1 (en) 2010-05-13 2010-05-13 Circuit for transmitting a RFID signal
US12/779,281 2010-05-13
US12/780,767 2010-05-14
US12/780,767 US7927225B1 (en) 2010-05-14 2010-05-14 Device for shot tracking
US12/782,544 2010-05-18
US12/782,544 US7883427B1 (en) 2010-05-18 2010-05-18 Device for shot tracking
US12/796,384 2010-06-08
US12/796,384 US7804404B1 (en) 2010-06-08 2010-06-08 Circuit for transmitting a RFID signal
US12/828,350 2010-06-29
US12/826,350 US7922606B2 (en) 2009-06-05 2010-06-29 GPS device
US12/837,136 US8142302B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2010-07-15 Method and system for shot tracking
US12/837,136 2010-07-15

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WO2011115771A2 true WO2011115771A2 (en) 2011-09-22
WO2011115771A3 WO2011115771A3 (en) 2012-02-23

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Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6073086A (en) * 1998-01-14 2000-06-06 Silicon Pie, Inc. Time of motion, speed, and trajectory height measuring device
US6441745B1 (en) * 1999-03-22 2002-08-27 Cassen L. Gates Golf club swing path, speed and grip pressure monitor
US20100045443A1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2010-02-25 Steeves Wayne E Method and System for Networking Radio Tags in a Radio Frequency Identification System

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6073086A (en) * 1998-01-14 2000-06-06 Silicon Pie, Inc. Time of motion, speed, and trajectory height measuring device
US6441745B1 (en) * 1999-03-22 2002-08-27 Cassen L. Gates Golf club swing path, speed and grip pressure monitor
US20100045443A1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2010-02-25 Steeves Wayne E Method and System for Networking Radio Tags in a Radio Frequency Identification System

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