WO2011083409A1 - Medical skin-contact sensor device - Google Patents

Medical skin-contact sensor device Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2011083409A1
WO2011083409A1 PCT/IB2011/050001 IB2011050001W WO2011083409A1 WO 2011083409 A1 WO2011083409 A1 WO 2011083409A1 IB 2011050001 W IB2011050001 W IB 2011050001W WO 2011083409 A1 WO2011083409 A1 WO 2011083409A1
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WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
sensor
sensor device
contact
housing
skin
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/IB2011/050001
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Harsh Dhand
Jithendra Vepa
Nagaraju Bussa
Chetan Mittal
Original Assignee
Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/04Detecting, measuring or recording bioelectric signals of the body or parts thereof
    • A61B5/0402Electrocardiography, i.e. ECG
    • A61B5/0408Electrodes specially adapted therefor
    • A61B5/04082Electrodes specially adapted therefor attached by means of suction
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/02Detecting, measuring or recording pulse, heart rate, blood pressure or blood flow; Combined pulse/heart-rate/blood pressure determination; Evaluating a cardiovascular condition not otherwise provided for, e.g. using combinations of techniques provided for in this group with electrocardiography or electroauscultation; Heart catheters for measuring blood pressure
    • A61B5/0205Simultaneously evaluating both cardiovascular conditions and different types of body conditions, e.g. heart and respiratory condition
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/68Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient
    • A61B5/6801Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient specially adapted to be attached to or worn on the body surface
    • A61B5/683Means for maintaining contact with the body
    • A61B5/6834Means for maintaining contact with the body using vacuum
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B7/00Instruments for auscultation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2560/00Constructional details of operational features of apparatus; Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • A61B2560/04Constructional details of apparatus
    • A61B2560/0443Modular apparatus
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2560/00Constructional details of operational features of apparatus; Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • A61B2560/06Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2562/00Details of sensors; Constructional details of sensor housings or probes; Accessories for sensors
    • A61B2562/02Details of sensors specially adapted for in-vivo measurements
    • A61B2562/0204Acoustic sensors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2562/00Details of sensors; Constructional details of sensor housings or probes; Accessories for sensors
    • A61B2562/06Arrangements of multiple sensors of different types
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2562/00Details of sensors; Constructional details of sensor housings or probes; Accessories for sensors
    • A61B2562/18Shielding or protection of sensors from environmental influences, e.g. protection from mechanical damage
    • A61B2562/187Strain relief means

Abstract

The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) for retrieving two different types of signals comprises a housing (10), a first sensor (20) for retrieving a first kind of signals and a second sensor (30) for retrieving a second type of signals. The first sensor (20) is rigidly attached to the housing (10), such that the first sensor (20) is in contact with the skin (2) of a patient when the sensor device (1) is applied to the patient. The second sensor (30) is attached to the housing (10) via at least one spring (35), such that the second sensor (30) is pressed to the skin (2) of the patient when the sensor device (1) is applied.

Description

Medical skin-contact sensor device

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to the field of medical sensors, and in particular to a medical skin-contact sensor device for retrieving two different types of signals

simultaneously.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Medical sensors are used for retrieving physiological parameters of patients in medical care. Among these sensors, skin-contact sensors that are attached to the skin of patients are widely used, since they are non- invasive and easy to apply. Sensors can utilize measurements of electrical, acoustical and optical properties in order to determine physiological parameters.

Combined sensor devices comprise two or more different types of sensors for measuring different kinds of signals. They enable the measurement of body signals simultaneously and can be used for finding out physiological patterns that are otherwise difficult to observe. Combination sensors require less effort in handling than two separate sensors and are less spacious. Furthermore, they reduce the complexity of the wiring necessary for transmitting the retrieved signals to a monitoring device. A common combination of sensors in a combined sensor device comprises the measurement of the pulse rate and heart sound by an acoustic sensor and the measurement of heart related electric signals (ECG-Electro Cardiogram) by an electrode as an electrical sensor.

An example of a combined acoustical/electrical sensor device is described in the patent document US 4,362,164. The sensor device comprises a chest bell with an electrode structure mounted in the rim of the chest bell and microphone mounted in the cavity of the chest bell. A disadvantage is that variations in the pressure, with which the electrode structure is pressed onto the skin of a patient, produces a pressure variation in the cavity of the chest bell, which in turn is picked-up as a noise signal by the microphone.

Furthermore, the different contact conditions that different types of sensors require (for example with or without contact gel; different contact pressures) makes it difficult to achieve the optimum contact condition for each sensor in a combined sensor device. As a result, interference is a common problem in known types of combined skin- contact sensor devices.

It would therefore be advantageous to achieve a medical skin-contact sensor device with less interference between the different types of sensors comprised by the combined sensor device.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present application contemplates a medical skin-contact sensor device for retrieving two different types of signals, which addresses the abovementioned objects.

According to the invention, a medical skin-contact sensor device comprises a housing and a first sensor for retrieving a first type of signals and a second sensor for retrieving a second type of signals. The first sensor is rigidly attached to the housing, such that the first sensor is in contact with the skin of a patient when the sensor device is applied to the patient. The second sensor is attached to the housing via at least one spring, such that the second sensor is pressed to the skin of the patient when the sensor device is applied.

The direct attachment of the first sensor to the housing allows for a variation of the contact pressure of the first sensor by a variation of the force or pressure applied to the entire device. The spring that is used to attach the second sensor to the housing leads to a mechanical decoupling of the second sensor from the housing and accordingly from the first sensor. This way, interference between the two sensors is minimized and the contact pressure of the second sensor to the patient's skin is in first order independent of the contact condition of the first sensor to the patient's skin.

In a preferred embodiment of the medical skin-contact sensor device, the first sensor is an electric sensor comprising an electrode for retrieving electrical signals, in particular ECG-signals. In a further preferred embodiment, the second sensor is an acoustic sensor comprising a pick-up unit for retrieving acoustic signals, in particular acoustic heart signals.

In another preferred embodiment of the medical skin-contact sensor device, the first sensor is shaped as a ring, such that a central opening is present that is surrounded by the ring-shaped structure of the first sensor. Further preferred, the second sensor contacts the skin in the area of the opening of the ring-shaped first sensor. This way, due to the positioning of the two sensors with respect to each other, a compact sensor device is created that can accordingly be easily attached to the body of a patient. In a further preferred embodiment of the medical skin-contact sensor device, the housing comprises at least one spring guide for determining a lateral position of the at least one spring. In a yet further preferred embodiment of the medical skin-contact sensor device, at least one suction ball is provided for creating a vacuum in a cavity of the housing and the suction ball is connected to the spring guide that thus acts as an air conduct. By using the spring guide for guiding the spring and as an air conduct, space is saved and an even more compact sensor device is built.

Further advantageous embodiments are provided in the respective dependent claims. Still further advantages and benefits of the present invention will become apparent from and elucidated with reference to the embodiments described hereinafter in connection with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 shows a perspective schematic drawing of an embodiment of a medical skin-contact sensor device;

Fig. 2 shows a sectional view of the embodiment of Fig. 1, cut along the xz- plane;

Fig. 3 shows a sectional view of the embodiment of Fig. 1, cut along the xz- plane;

Fig. 4 shows an explosion view of the embodiment of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 shows a top view of the embodiment of a medical skin-contact sensor device according to Fig. 1; and

Fig. 6 shows a an explosion view of an acoustic sensor for use in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

With reference to Fig. 1, a medical skin-contact sensor device 1 is placed on a skin 2 of the patient.

The sensor device 1 comprises a housing 10 that carries a first sensor 20, of which in this figure only a narrow rim is visible where the sensor device is in contact with the skin 2. The housing 10 carries a second sensor 30 positioned concentric with respect to the first sensor 20. The second sensor 30 contacts the patient's skin 2 in a central part of the sensor device 1 and is therefore not visible in the figure. At a side of the housing 10, electrical connectors 24 and 36 for connecting the first sensor 20 and the second sensor 30, respectively, are provided. Two suction balls 40 are mounted on opposite sides of the upper part of the housing 10. The top of the housing 10 is completed with a cover 16.

For the following, the plane with which the sensor device 1 contacts the skin 2 is defined to be the xy-plane, while the z-axis is perpendicular to this plane with positive z- numbers pointing away from the skin, as indicated by the coordinate axes depicted in the upper left part of Fig. 1.

The medical skin-contact sensor device 1 as shown in Fig. 1 is described in more detail in the following. Elements and features having the same or comparable functions are denoted by the same reference numerals in all figures.

Fig. 2 is a centered sectional view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, cut along the xz-plane. This figure particularly explains the arrangement and position of the first sensor 20 and the second sensor 30 with respect to each other and to the housing 10.

The housing 10 is airtight sealed against the environment, except for the opening in the lower part, where the second sensor 30 contacts the skin, and except for connections to the suction balls 40. The connection to the suction balls 40 is described in more detail in connection with Figs. 3 and 4. In its lower part, i.e. towards the skin, the housing 10 has a fit for receiving the first electrode 20. The fit comprises a circumferential nose 11 that interacts with a respective groove 23 in the first sensor 20. The nose 11 and the groove 23 provide a snap-fit for the first sensor 20 in the housing 10. In connection with the fit, the nose 11 and the groove 23 additionally seal the inner cavity of the housing 10 against the environment. Alternative mounting options, like a screw fastening, are possible as well.

In the embodiment shown, the first sensor 20 is an electrical sensor for retrieving for example electro cardiogram (ECG) signals. By way of example, the first sensor 20 is therefore also referred to as the ECG- sensor 20. The ECG- sensor 20 comprises a ring- shaped electrode 21 and a circular support ring 22 that matches the fit in the lower part of the housing 10. The electrode 21 and, if appropriate, also the support ring 22 are made from an electrically conductive material, for example a metal. Alternatively, either can consist of a non-conductive material, for example plastics, with an added conductive surface layer where needed and appropriate. The electrode 21 is in electrical contact with the electrical connector 24, either directly or via the support ring 22. In the latter case, the support ring 22 is at least partially conductive. The electrical connector 24 itself is mounted in a side wall of the housing 10 in an airtight manner. By way of example, the second sensor 30 is an acoustic sensor in the embodiment shown. In the following, it is therefore also referred to as the acoustic sensor 30. It comprises a pick-up unit 31 that is clamped in a support structure 32. The pick-up unit 31 includes the electrically active parts, for example an acoustic transducer. The support structure 32 is basically cylindrical in shape with a circumferential rim 33. The rim 33 interacts with a guide 12 that is part of the housing 10. The guide 12 provides a guidance of the sensor 30 in a vertical direction, i.e. along the z-axis. The guide 12 is equipped with a stop hook 13 that also interacts with the rim 33 and limits the movement of the acoustic sensor 30 in the z-direction towards the skin. That way, the acoustic sensor 30 is prevented from being pushed out of the housing 10 if the sensor device 1 is not applied to a patient's skin.

The first and the second sensors 20, 30 are positioned concentric to each other. Due to its ring-shaped form, the ECG-sensor 20 provides a central opening through which the acoustic sensor 30 contacts the skin.

The support structure 32 has two pins 34 formed on its top surface. Springs 35 are put on the pins 34 and connect support structure 32 and thus the acoustic sensor 30 to the housing 10. In the sectional view, only one of the two pins 34 and springs 35 used in this embodiment is visible. Generally, any number of pins 34 and springs 35 can be used.

Furthermore, the pins 34 help to fix the lateral position of the springs 35 on the support structure 32. Any other suitable means could be used for this purpose alternatively, for example a circular groove. Dependent on the geometry and the material of the springs 35, means for fixing the lateral position on the support structure 32 could also be omitted. In connection with the guide 12 of the housing 10, the springs 35 provide a degree of freedom for a movement in the z-direction. The springs 35 furthermore define a predetermined contact force between the acoustic sensor 30 and the skin. In first order approximation, the contact force is constant independent of the force with which the sensor device 1 is pressed onto the skin of the patient, even if ECG-sensor 20 dents the skin.

As in case of the electrical connector 24 for the ECG-sensor 20, the electrical connector 36 for the acoustic sensor 30 is also mounted in a side wall of the housing 10, preferably in the vicinity of the electrical connector 24 in order to minimize the complexity of the external wiring. The electrical connector 36 can be connected to the acoustic sensor 30 by a flexible wiring. However, it is preferred that the electrical connector 36 comprises elastic contact elements for connecting respective contact areas of the acoustic sensor 30. In both embodiments, the electrical connector 36 allows to maintain the electrical connection even if the acoustic sensor 30 moves in the vertical direction, and does not detain the vertical movement of the acoustic sensor 30. The latter embodiment has the additional advantage that the acoustic sensor 30 can be easily removed for maintenance or cleaning.

The suction balls 40 are connected to the cavity of the housing 10. They are provided with integrated valves 41, such that air is sucked in from the cavity of the housing 10 and discharged to the environment if the suction balls 40 are squeezed and released again. As a result, a vacuum is created in the cavity of the housing 10 and accordingly, the sensor device 1 is fixed to the patient's skin. The vacuum created surrounds the acoustic sensor 30 and therefore does not applies forces on the sensor 30 that would result in a movement of the sensor with respect to the housing 10. In other words, independent of the vacuum created in the cavity of the housing 10, the force with which the acoustic sensor 30 is pressed onto the patient's skin is constant and defined by the springs 35. In an alternative embodiment, valves could be provided within air ducts of the housing 10, and accordingly, suction balls without integrated valves can be used. In yet another embodiment of a medical skin-contact sensor device, alternative means for attaching the sensor device to the skin of a patient can be provided for. Such means include, but are not limited to elastic bands or medical grade adhesives.

Fig. 3 is a schematic sectional view of the embodiment of the medical skin- contact sensor device 1 as shown in Fig. 1, cut along the yz-plane, i.e. in a plane

perpendicular to the view shown in Fig. 2. This view particularly shows the guidance and movability of the acoustic sensor 30 in the vertical direction.

As apparent from the figure, the springs 35 are positioned on the pins 34 of the support structure 32 of the acoustic sensor 30 and guided in the spring guides 14 of the housing 10. The spring guides 14 are tube-like and closed at their tops, thereby defining a hard stop for the springs 35. For enhanced clarity and a simplification of the figure, a spring 35 is depicted only in the spring guide 14 on the right hand side of the figure. In order to apply for symmetric forces on the support structure 32, springs 35 are present in both spring guides 14 and pins 34 are provided on both sides of the support structure 32.

Besides the guiding function, the spring guides 14 also serve as air conducts between the cavity of the housing 10 and the suction balls 40. For this reason, a nozzle 15 branches sideways of each spring guide 14, basically pointing towards the positive and negative x-direction. In the sectional view of Fig. 3, only the inlet of the nozzle attached to the spring guide 14 on the right hand side of the figure is visible. Using the spring guides 14 both for guiding the springs and as air conducts allows a very compact design. The compact design not only makes handling of the sensor device 1 easier, but also leads to a firm attachment of the sensor device 1 on the patient's skin. The small dimension of the sensor device 1 in the z-direction advantageously results in small static and dynamic forces acting on the contact area. Advantageously, the housing 10 can be made in one piece with integrally formed spring guides 14 and nozzles 15, for example by a plastic injection molding process.

Fig. 4 is an explosion view of the sensor device 1 that illustrates how the pickup unit 31 fits into the support structure 32, and how the springs 35 are positioned over the pins 34 of the support structure 32. In addition, the arrangement of the nozzles 15 with respect to the spring guides 14 is illustrated in this figure. The suction balls 40 each have a connection port 42 with an opening that fits over the respective nozzle 15. The nozzles are provided with a structured surface, for example a grooved surface, for a secure fit of the suction balls 40. The figure further shows that the top part of the housing 10, as well as the cover 16 are equipped with ribs on their inner surfaces for enhanced stability. The cover 16 has snap fits attached to the rips, so that it can be easily attached and detached to and from the housing 10. The housing 10 and/or the cover 16 can furthermore provide shell like formed support surfaces for the suction balls 40. Forces applied to the suction balls 40 when squeezing them in operation are absorbed by the supporting surfaces and accordingly do not act on the nozzles 15 and the spring guides 14.

Fig. 5 is a top view of the sensor device 1 with removed cover 16. Fig. 5 particularly shows the positioning of the spring guides 14 and the suction balls 40. A compact arrangement of the two suction balls 40 is achieved by mainly two features.

First, the axis of symmetry of the suction balls is slanted with respect to the x- axis, which is an axis of symmetry for the outer appearance of the sensor device 1. Due to the sphere-like shape of the suction balls 40, the slant of the symmetry axis is not visible when the cover 16 is attached. Furthermore, when the sensor device 1 is gripped between two fingers, for example the thump and the index finger, and the suction balls 40 are operated like a pair of pincers, no torque that would lead to a rotation around the z-axis is applied on the sensor device 1. Second, the centers of the spring guides 14 are not positioned along the y- axis of the sensor device. This way, the suction balls can be positioned even closer together in the x-direction.

Fig. 6 shows an advantageous embodiment of a pick-up unit 31, for example for use in the embodiment described above. The pick-up unit 31 comprises a lower ring 31a and an upper ring 31e that clasp three inner components, namely a membrane 31b, a fixing ring 31c and a transducer 3 Id. Both lower ring 31a and upper ring 31e are threaded so that the whole pick-up unit 31 can be mounted and dismounted by screwing the two parts together or unscrewing them. The membrane 31b is positioned in the lower ring 31a and fixed by the fixing ring 31c that snap fits into the lower ring 31a. The transducer 31b is then sandwiched between the lower ring 31a (with mounted membrane 31b and fixing ring 31c) and the upper ring 31e. The upper ring 31e is open at its top and comprises an opening in the side wall. The openings allow for a pressure equalization in the inner part of the pick-up unit 31, which is important since otherwise different forces due to different air pressures would act on the two sides of the membrane 31b and eventually destroy the membrane 31b if the sensor device 1 is attached to the skin when operating the suction balls 40. The openings in the upper ring 31e furthermore allow to establish an electrical contact between the transducer 3 Id and the electrical connector 36 mounted in the housing 10.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, such illustration and description are to be considered illustrative or exemplary and not restrictive; the invention is not limited to the disclosed embodiments. Other variations to the disclosed embodiments can be understood and effected by those skilled in the art in practicing the claimed invention, from a study of the drawings, the disclosure, and the appended claims. In the claims, the word "comprising" does not exclude other elements or steps, and the indefinite article "a" or "an" does not exclude a plurality. The mere fact that certain measures are recited in mutually different dependent claims does not indicate that a combination of these measures cannot be used to advantage. Any reference signs in the claims should not be construed as limiting the scope.

Claims

CLAIMS:
1. A medical skin-contact sensor device (1) for retrieving two different types of signals representative of physiological parameters, comprising
a housing (10);
a first sensor (20) for retrieving a first type of signals, the first sensor (20) being rigidly attached to the housing (10), such that the first sensor (20) is in contact with the skin (2) of a patient when the sensor device (1) is applied to the patient; and
a second sensor (30) for retrieving a second type of signals, the second sensor (30) being attached to the housing (10) via at least one spring (35), such that the second sensor (30) is pressed to the skin (2) of the patient when the sensor device (1) is applied.
2. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claim 1, wherein the first sensor (20) is an electric sensor comprising an electrode (21) for retrieving electrical signals, in particular ECG-signals.
3. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 or 2, wherein the second sensor (30) is an acoustic sensor comprising a pick-up unit (31) for retrieving acoustic signals, in particular acoustic heart signals.
4. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the first sensor (20) is shaped as a ring with a central opening surrounded by the ring.
5. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claim 4, wherein the second sensor (30) contacts the skin (2) in the area of the opening of the ring-shaped first sensor (20).
6. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claim 5, wherein the second sensor (30) is basically cylindrical in shape and positioned concentric with respect to the first sensor (20).
7. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 to 6 wherein the housing (10) and/or the first sensor (20) are provided with means (11, 23) for a snap-fit of the first sensor (20) to the housing (10).
8. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 to 7, wherein the housing (10) comprises at least one guide (12) for guiding the second sensor (30) in a direction transverse, and in particular perpendicular, to the skin (2).
9. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 to 8, wherein the housing (10) comprises at least one spring guide (14) for determining a lateral position of the at least one spring (35).
10. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claim 9, wherein the spring guide (14) is shaped as a tube that at least partially surrounds the at least one spring
(35).
11. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 to 10, wherein at least one suction ball (40) is provided for creating a vacuum in a cavity of the housing (10).
12. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claims 10 and 11, wherein the suction ball (40) is connected to the spring guide (14) and wherein the spring guide (14) acts as an air conduct.
13. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claim 12, wherein the spring guide (14) is provided with a nozzle (15) for connecting to the suction ball (40), and wherein the spring guide (14) and the nozzle (15) are arranged transverse, in particular perpendicular, to each other.
14. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to one of claims 1 to 13, wherein electrical contacts (24, 36) for contacting the first sensor (20) and/or the second sensor (30) are mounted air tight in the housing (10).
15. The medical skin-contact sensor device (1) according to claim 14, wherein the electrical contact (36) of the second sensor (30) comprises elastic contact members for maintaining a connection independent of the vertical position of the second sensor within the housing (10).
PCT/IB2011/050001 2010-01-07 2011-01-03 Medical skin-contact sensor device WO2011083409A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP10150206.0 2010-01-07
EP10150206 2010-01-07

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2015183844A1 (en) * 2014-05-30 2015-12-03 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Ring-shaped skin sensor

Citations (7)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2214847B1 (en) * 1972-03-27 1973-10-18 Rose, Ewald, 5500 Trier
US4362164A (en) 1980-09-11 1982-12-07 Hughes Aircraft Company Electronic pick-up device for transducing electrical energy and sound energy of the heart
US20020038089A1 (en) * 2000-09-25 2002-03-28 Raymond Watrous Handheld sensor for acoustic data acquisition
US6757392B1 (en) * 1995-07-06 2004-06-29 Artemio Granzotto Electronic stethoscope
US20050124902A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2005-06-09 Inovise Medical, Inc. Electrical and audio anatomy-signal sensor system
US20050273015A1 (en) * 2002-03-14 2005-12-08 Inovise Medical, Inc. Heart-activity monitoring with low-pressure, high-mass anatomy sensor contact
US20060047215A1 (en) * 2004-09-01 2006-03-02 Welch Allyn, Inc. Combined sensor assembly

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2214847B1 (en) * 1972-03-27 1973-10-18 Rose, Ewald, 5500 Trier
US4362164A (en) 1980-09-11 1982-12-07 Hughes Aircraft Company Electronic pick-up device for transducing electrical energy and sound energy of the heart
US6757392B1 (en) * 1995-07-06 2004-06-29 Artemio Granzotto Electronic stethoscope
US20020038089A1 (en) * 2000-09-25 2002-03-28 Raymond Watrous Handheld sensor for acoustic data acquisition
US20050273015A1 (en) * 2002-03-14 2005-12-08 Inovise Medical, Inc. Heart-activity monitoring with low-pressure, high-mass anatomy sensor contact
US20050124902A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2005-06-09 Inovise Medical, Inc. Electrical and audio anatomy-signal sensor system
US20060047215A1 (en) * 2004-09-01 2006-03-02 Welch Allyn, Inc. Combined sensor assembly

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2015183844A1 (en) * 2014-05-30 2015-12-03 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Ring-shaped skin sensor
US9833164B2 (en) 2014-05-30 2017-12-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Ring-shaped skin sensor

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