WO2011041667A1 - Light emitting diode (led) based lamp - Google Patents

Light emitting diode (led) based lamp Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2011041667A1
WO2011041667A1 PCT/US2010/051109 US2010051109W WO2011041667A1 WO 2011041667 A1 WO2011041667 A1 WO 2011041667A1 US 2010051109 W US2010051109 W US 2010051109W WO 2011041667 A1 WO2011041667 A1 WO 2011041667A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
diffuser
light emitting
set forth
emitting apparatus
led
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2010/051109
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Gary R. Allen
David C. Dudik
Boris Kolodin
Joshua I. Rintemaki
Bruce R. Roberts
Michael J. Macdonald
Original Assignee
GE Lighting Solutions, LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US12/572,480 priority Critical patent/US8593040B2/en
Priority to US12/572,480 priority
Priority to US12/572,339 priority
Priority to US12/572,339 priority patent/US9103507B2/en
Priority to US29/359,239 priority
Priority to US29/359,239 priority patent/USD658788S1/en
Priority to US32897410P priority
Priority to US61/328,974 priority
Application filed by GE Lighting Solutions, LLC filed Critical GE Lighting Solutions, LLC
Priority claimed from EP10821324.0A external-priority patent/EP2483596A4/en
Publication of WO2011041667A1 publication Critical patent/WO2011041667A1/en
Priority claimed from AU2015203255A external-priority patent/AU2015203255B2/en

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/60Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air
    • F21V29/67Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air characterised by the arrangement of fans
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/232Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings specially adapted for generating an essentially omnidirectional light distribution, e.g. with a glass bulb
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/60Optical arrangements integrated in the light source, e.g. for improving the colour rendering index or the light extraction
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/60Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air
    • F21V29/63Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air using electrically-powered vibrating means; using ionic wind
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/60Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air
    • F21V29/67Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air characterised by the arrangement of fans
    • F21V29/677Cooling arrangements characterised by the use of a forced flow of gas, e.g. air characterised by the arrangement of fans the fans being used for discharging
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • F21V29/74Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with fins or blades
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • F21V29/74Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with fins or blades
    • F21V29/77Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with fins or blades with essentially identical diverging planar fins or blades, e.g. with fan-like or star-like cross-section
    • F21V29/773Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with fins or blades with essentially identical diverging planar fins or blades, e.g. with fan-like or star-like cross-section the planes containing the fins or blades having the direction of the light emitting axis
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V3/00Globes; Bowls; Cover glasses
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V3/00Globes; Bowls; Cover glasses
    • F21V3/02Globes; Bowls; Cover glasses characterised by the shape
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/85Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems characterised by the material
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2105/00Planar light sources
    • F21Y2105/10Planar light sources comprising a two-dimensional array of point-like light-generating elements
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2115/00Light-generating elements of semiconductor light sources
    • F21Y2115/10Light-emitting diodes [LED]

Abstract

A light emitting apparatus comprises: an LED-based light source; a spherical, spheroidal, ovoid, egg-shaped, or toroidal diffuser generating a Lambcrtian light intensity distribution output at any point on the diffuser surface responsive to illumination inside the diffuser: and a base including a base connector. The LED based light source, the diffuser, and the base are secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket. The base is operatively connected with the LED based light source in the unitary LED lamp to electrically power the LED based light source using electrical power received at the base connector.

Description

LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) BASED LAMP

[0001] This is a continuation-in-part application of Application No. 12/572,339 filed October 2, 2009. This is a continuation-in-part application of Application No. 12/572,480 filed October 2, 2009. This is a continuation-in-part application of Design Application No. 29/359,239 filed April 7, 2010. This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/328,974 filed April 28, 2010.

[0002] Application No. 12/572,339 filed October 2, 2009 is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Application No. 12/572,480 filed October 2, 2009 is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Design Application No. 29/359,239 filed April 7, 2010 is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/328,974 filed April 28, 2010 is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0003] The following relates to the illumination arts, lighting arts, solid-state lighting arts, and related arts.

[0004] Integral incandescent and halogen lamps are designed as direct "plug-in" components that mate with a lamp socket via a threaded Edison base connector (sometimes referred to as an "Edison base" in the context of an incandescent light bulb), a bayonet-type base connector (i.e., bayonet base in the case of an incandescent light bulb), or other standard base connector to receive standard electrical power (e.g., 110 volts a.c, 60 Hz in the United States, or 220V a.c, 50 Hz in Europe, or 12 or 24 or other d.c. voltage). The integral lamp is constructed as a unitary package including any components needed to operate from the standard electrical power received at the base connector. In the case of integral incandescent and halogen lamps, these components are minimal, as the incandescent filament is typically operable using the standard 1 10V or 220V a.c, or 12V d.c, power, and the incandescent filament operates at high temperature and efficiently radiates excess heat into the ambient. In such lamps, the base of the lamp is simply the base connector, e.g. the Edison base in the case of an "A"-type incandescent light bulb.

[0005] Some integral incandescent or halogen lamps are constructed as omni -directional light sources which are intended to provide substantially uniform intensity distribution versus angle in the optical far field, greater than 5 or 10 times the linear dimension of the light source, or typically greater than about 1 meter away from the lamp, and find diverse applications such as in desk lamps, table lamps, decorative lamps, chandeliers, ceiling fixtures, and other applications where a uniform distribution of light in all directions is desired.

[0006] With reference to FIGURE 1 , a coordinate system is described which is used herein to describe the spatial distribution of illumination generated by a lamp intended to produce omnidirectional illumination. The coordinate system is of the spherical coordinate system type, and is described in FIGURE 1 with reference to a lamp L, which in this illustrated embodiment is an "A"-type incandescent light bulb with an Edison base EB, which may for example be an E25, E26, or E27 lamp base where the numeral denotes the outer diameter of the screw turns on the base EB, in millimeters. For the purpose of describing the far field illumination distribution, the lamp L can be considered to be located at a point L0, which may for example coincide with the location of the incandescent filament. Adopting spherical coordinate notation conventionally employed in the geographic arts, a direction of illumination can be described by an elevation or latitude coordinate Θ and an azimuth or longitude coordinate φ. However, in a deviation from the geographic arts convention, the elevation or latitude coordinate Θ used herein employs a range [0°, 180°] where: θ=0° corresponds to "geographic north" or "N". This is convenient because it allows illumination along the direction θ=0° to correspond to forward-directed light. The north direction, that is, the direction from the point L0 through geographic north, θ=0°, is also referred to herein as the optical axis. Using this notation, θ=180° corresponds to "geographic south" or "S" or, in the illumination context, to backward-directed light. The elevation or latitude 6=90° corresponds to the "geographic equator" or, in the illumination context, to sideways-directed light. [0007] With continuing reference to FIGURE 1, for any given elevation or latitude Θ an azimuth, or longitude coordinate, φ can also be defined, which is everywhere orthogonal to the elevation or latitude Θ. The azimuth or longitude coordinate ψ has a range [0°, 360°], in accordance with geographic notation. At precisely north or south, that is, at 0=0° or at 0=180" (in other words, along the optical axis), the azimuth or longitude coordinate has no meaning, or, perhaps more precisely, can be considered degenerate. Another "special" coordinate is 0=90° which defines the plane transverse to the optical axis which contains the light source (or, more precisely, contains the nominal position of the light source for far field calculations, for example the point L0 in the illustrative example shown in FIGURE 1 ). Achieving uniform light intensity across the entire longitudinal span φ=[0°, 360°] is typically not difficult, because it is straightforward to construct a light source with rotational symmetry about the optical axis (that is, about the axis θ=0°). For example, the incandescent lamp L suitably employs an incandescent filament located at coordinate center L0 which can be designed to emit substantially omnidirectional light, thus providing a uniform illumination distribution respective to the azimuth <J> for any latitude. A lamp that provides uniform illumination distribution respective to the azimuth φ for any latitude is sometimes referred to as providing an axially symmetrical light distribution.

[0008] However, achieving ideal omnidirectional illumination respective to the elevational or latitude coordinate Θ is generally not practical. For example, the "A" type incandescent light bulb L includes the Edison base EB which lies on the optical axis "behind" the light source position L0, and blocks backward illumination so that the incandescent lamp L does not provide ideal omnidirectional light respective to the latitude coordinate Θ exactly up to 0=180°. Nonetheless, commercial incandescent lamps can provide illumination across the latitude span θ=[0", 135°] which is uniform to within about +20% as specified in the proposed Energy Star standard for Integral LED Lamps (2nd draft, May 9, 2009; hereinafter "proposed Energy Star standard") promulgated by the U.S. Department of Energy. This is generally considered an acceptable illumination distribution uniformity for an omnidirectional lamp, although there is some interest in extending this span still further, such as to a latitude span of θ=[0°, 150°] with and possibly with a better +10% uniformity. Such lamps with substantial uniformity over a large latitude range (for example, about θ-[0°, 120°] or more preferably about θ=[0°, 135°] or still more preferably about 0=[0°, 150°]) are generally considered in the art to be omnidirectional lamps, even though the range of uniformity is less than [0°,180°].

[0009] There is interest in developing omnidirectional LED replacement lamps that operate as direct "plug-in" replacements for integral incandescent or halogen lamps. However, substantial difficulties have heretofore hindered development of LED replacement lamps with desired omnidirectional intensity characteristics. One issue is that, compared with incandescent and halogen lamps, solid-state lighting technologies such as light emitting diode (LED) devices are highly directional by nature. For example, an LED device, with or without encapsulation, typically emits in a directional Lambertian spatial intensity distribution having intensity that varies with cos(G) in the range 0=[0°, 90°] and has zero intensity for θ>90°. A semiconductor laser is even more directional by nature, and indeed emits a distribution describable as essentially a beam of forward-directed light limited to a narrow cone around 0=0°.

[0010] Another issue is that unlike an incandescent filament, an LED chip or other solid state lighting device typically cannot be operated efficiently using standard 1 10V or 220V a.c. power. Radier, on-board electronics are typically provided to convert the a.c. input power to d.c. power of lower voltage amenable for driving the LED chips. As an alternative, a series string of LED chips of sufficient number can be directly operated at 110V or 220V, and parallel arrangements of such strings with suitable polarity control (e.g., Zener diodes) can be operated at 1 10V or 220V a.c. power, albeit at substantially reduced power efficiency. In either case, the electronics constitute additional components of the lamp base as compared with the simple Edison base used in integral incandescent or halogen lamps.

[0011] Heat sinking is yet another issue for omnidirectional replacement LED lamps. Heat sinking is employed because LED devices are highly temperature-sensitive as compared with incandescent or halogen filaments. The LED devices cannot be operated at the temperature of an incandescent filament (rather, the operating temperature should be around 100°C or preferably lower). The lower operating temperature also reduces the effectiveness of radiative cooling. In a usual approach, the base of the LED replacement lamp further includes (in addition to the Edison base connector and the electronics) a relatively large mass of heat sinking material positioned contacting or otherwise in good thermal contact with the LED device(s).

[0012] The combination of electronics and heat sinking results in a large base that blocks "backward" illumination, which has heretofore substantially limited the ability to generate omnidirectional illumination using an LED replacement lamp. The heat sink in particular preferably has a large volume and also large surface area in order to dissipate heat away from the lamp by a combination of convection and radiation.

BRIEF SUMMARY

[0013] In some embodiments disclosed herein as illustrative examples, a light emitting apparatus comprises: an LED-based light source; a spherical, spheroidal, ovoid, egg-shaped, or toroidal diffuser generating a light intensity distribution output responsive to illumination inside the diffuser; and a base including a base connector. The LED based light source, the diffuser, and the base are secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket. The base is operatively connected with the LED based light source in the unitary LED lamp to electrically power the LED based light source using electrical power received at the base connector.

[0014] In some embodiments disclosed herein as illustrative examples, a light emitting apparatus comprises: a light assembly including an LED-based light source optically coupled with and arranged tangential to a spherical, spheroidal, ovoid, or egg-shaped diffuser; and a base including a base connector, the base configured to electrically power the LED based light source using electrical power received at the base connector. The light assembly and base are secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket. [0015] In some embodiments disclosed herein as illustrative examples, a light emitting apparatus comprises: a light assembly including a ring shaped LED-based light source optically coupled with a toroidal diffuser; and a base including a base connector and configured to electrically power the ring shaped LED based light source using electrical power received at the base connector. The light assembly and base are secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016] The invention may take form in various components and arrangements of components, and in various process operations and arrangements of process operations. The drawings are only for purposes of illustrating preferred embodiments and are not to be construed as limiting the invention.

[0017] FIGURE 1 diagrammatically shows, with reference to a conventional incandescent light bulb, a coordinate system that is used herein to describe illumination distributions.

[0018] FIGURE 2 diagrammatically shows a side view of an omnidirectional LED-based lamp employing a planar LED-based Lambertian light source and a spherical diffuser.

[0019] FIGURE 3 diagrammatically shows the omnidirectional LED-based lamp of FIGURE 2 with the spherical diffuser lifted away to reveal the planar LED-based lambertian light source.

[0020] FIGURE 4 diagrammatically illustrates using ray tracing diagrams how the omnidirectional LED-based lamp of FIGURES 2 and 3 generates a substantially omnidirectional illumination distribution.

[0021] FIGURES 5 and 6 show side views of two illustrative LED-based lamps employing the principles of the lamp of FIGURES 2-4 and each further including an Edison base enabling installation in a conventional incandescent lamp socket. [0022] FIGURE 7 diagrammatically illustrates a side view of a variation on the embodiment of FIGURES 2-4 in which the light source emits a prolate-distorted Lambertian intensity distribution, and the diffuser is a prolate spheroidal diffuser having a shape matching the light source intensity distribution.

[0023] FIGURE 8 diagrammatically illustrates a side view of a variation on the embodiment of FIGURES 2-4 in which the light source emits a oblate-distorted Lambertian intensity distribution, and the diffuser is a oblate spheroidal diffuser having a shape matching the light source intensity distribution.

[0024] FIGURE 9 illustrates impact of position of the LED-based light source relative to a spherical diffuser on the blocking angle.

[0025] FIGURE 10 plots the impact on the latitudinal range of light uniformity of the ratio of a spherical diffuser diameter to the LED-based light source size.

[0026] FIGURE 1 1 shows a side perspective view of a retrofit LED-based light bulb substantially similar to the lamp of FIGURE 5 but further including fins.

[0027] FIGURE 12 plots intensity versus latitude for two actually constructed embodiments of the retrofit LED-based light bulb of FIGURE 1 1.

[0028] FIGURES 13 and 14 diagrammatically illustrate side and perspective side views, respectively, of a light source employing principles disclosed herein with a toroidal diffuser. FIGURE 14A depicts a variant embodiment.

[0029] FIGURES 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 show perspective, alternative shaded perspective, side, top, and bottom views, respectively, of an LED-based light bulb.

[0030] FIGURES 20 and 21 show the diffuser of the lamp of FIGURES 15-19 including a side view and a shaded side sectional view revealing the interior of the diffuser, respectively.

[0031] FIGURES 22 and 23 show a side view of the diffuser with the fins, and an exploded view of same, respectively. [0032] FIGURES 24, 25, and 26 compare the ovoid diffuser of the embodiment of FIGURES 15-23 with a spherical diffuser, with FIGURE 25 showing differences in incident ray lengths for the ovoid versus spherical diffuser, and FIGURE 26 showing scattering distributions for light passing out of the ovoid diffuser.

[0033] FIGURES 27-30 show additional illustrative ovoid diffuser embodiments.

[0034] FIGURES 31 and 32 show embodiments of the lamp of FIGURES 15-23 which further include selected auxiliary optical components.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0035] With reference to FIGURES 2 and 3, an LED-based lamp includes a planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 and a light-transmissive spherical diffuser 10. The planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 is best seen in the partially disassembled view of FIGURE 3 in which the diffuser 10 is pulled away and the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 is tilted into view. The planar LED- based Lambertian light source 8 includes a plurality of light emitting diode (LED) devices 12, 14, which in the illustrated embodiment include first LED devices 12 and second LED devices 14 having respective spectra and intensities that mix to render white light of a desired color temperature and CRI. For example, in some embodiments the first LED devices 12 output white light having a greenish rendition (achievable, for example, by using a blue- or violet-emitting LED chip that is coated with a suitable "white" phosphor) and the second LED devices 14 output red light (achievable, for example, using a GaAsP or AlGalnP or other epitaxy LED chip that naturally emits red light), and the light from the first and second LED devices 12, 14 blend together to produce improved white rendition. On the other hand, it is also contemplated for the planar LED-based Lambertian light source to comprise a single LED device, which may be a white LED device or a saturated color LED device or so forth. The LED devices 12, 14 are mounted on a circuit board 16, which is optionally a metal core printed circuit board (MCPCB). Optionally, a base element 18 provides support and is also thermally conductive so that the base element 18 also defines a heat sink 18 having a substantial thermal conductance for heat sinking the LED devices 12, 14.

[0036] The illustrated light-transmissive spherical diffuser 10 is substantially hollow and has a spherical surface that diffuses light. In some embodiments, the spherical diffuser 10 is a glass element, although a diffuser of another light-transmissive material such as plastic or other material is also contemplated. The surface of the diffuser 10 may be inherently light-diffusive, or can be made light-diffusive in various ways, such as: frosting or other texturing to promote light diffusion; coating with a light-diffusive coating such as enamel paint, or a Soft-White or Starcoat™ diffusive coating (available from General Electric Company, New York, USA) of a type used as a light-diffusive coating on the glass bulbs of some incandescent or fluorescent light bulbs; embedding light-scattering particles in the glass, plastic, or other material of the spherical diffuser 10; various combinations thereof; or so forth.

[0037] The diffuser 10 optionally may also include a phosphor, for example coated on the spherical surface, to convert the light from the LEDs to another color, for example to convert blue or ultraviolet (UV) light from the LEDs to white light. In some such embodiments, it is contemplated for the phosphor to be the sole component of the diffuser 10. In such embodiments, the phosphor should be a diffusing phosphor, in other contemplated embodiments, the diffuser includes a phosphor plus an additional diffusive element such as frosting, enamel paint, a coating, or so forth.

[0038] The light-transmissive spherical diffuser 10 includes an aperture or opening 20 sized to receive or mate with the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 such that the light-emissive principle surface of the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 faces into the interior of the spherical diffuser 10 and emits light into the interior of the spherical diffuser 10. The spherical diffuser is large compared with the area of the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 so that the light source 8 is arranged at a periphery of the substantially larger spherical diffuser 10; in the illustrated embodiment, the spherical diffuser 10 has a diameter dD while the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 (or, equivalently, the mating aperture or opening 20) has a circular area of diameter dL where dD > dL. The planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 is mounted at or in the aperture or opening 20 with its planar light-emissive surface arranged tangential to the curved surface of the spherical diffuser 10. It will be appreciated that exact tangency is achieved only for the ideal case of dL/dD approaching zero, but the tangency becomes closer to exact as the ratio dL/dD increases, that is, as the size of the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 decreases respective to the size of the spherical diffuser 10.

[0039] With continuing reference to FIGURES 2 and 3, and with further reference to FIGURE 4, the LED-based lamp is also dcscribable using the spherical coordinates system of FIGURE 1 , where the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 defines the coordinate system. Thus, the forward beam of the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 along the optical axis is in the north direction (θ=0°), where the intensity is maximum (denoted here as I0). In accordance with a Lambertian distribution, the intensity decreases with increasing elevation or latitude (using the spherical coordinate convention of FIGURE 1 ) away from the optical axis, so that the intensity at a latitude Θ is I = I0 cos(9). It should be noted that the LED-based lamp of FIGURES 2-4 is rotationally symmetric about the optical axis and so there is no intensity variation respective to the azimuthal or longitudinal coordinate φ.

[0040] With particular reference to FIGURE 4, the LED-based lamp of FIGURES 2-4 generates omnidirectional illumination over an elevational or latitudinal range substantially greater than θ=[0°, 90°]. Two points are recognized herein. First, with the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 placed tangentially to the spherical diffuser 10, the Lambertian illumination output by the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 is uniform over the entire (inside) surface of the spherical diffuser 10. In other words, the flux (lumens/area), typically measured in units of lux (lumens/m2), of light shining on the (inside) surface of the spherical diffuser 10 is of the same value at any point on the spherical diffuser 10. Thus, the inside surface of the diffuser coincides with an isolux surface of the LED light source. Qualitatively, this can be seen as follows. The forward-directed beam of the Lambertian light source has a maximum value I0 at 0=0°; however, this forward-directed portion of the beam having intensity I0 also travels the furthest before impinging on the (inside) surface of the spherical diffuser 10. The intensity decreases with the square of distance, and so the intensity is proportional to I d (where exact tangency of the light source 8 and the curvature of the diffuser 10 is here assumed as a simplification). At an arbitrary latitude Θ, the intensity from the source is lower, namely lo cos(θ); however, the distance traveled d = dD-cos(θ) before impinging on the spherical diffuser 10 is lower by an amount cos(θ) and the projected surface area on which the intensity is received at the spherical diffuser is also reduced by the factor cos(θ). Thus, the flux density at the surface at any latitude Θ is proportional to (Io cos(θ)-cos(θ))/(dD-cos(θ))2 - constant, which is the same as at θ=0. Thus, for the case of a Lambertian intensity distribution emitted by the LED light source, the inside surface of a spherical diffuser having the LEDs positioned tangentially on the surface of the spherical diffuser is coincident with an isolux contour surface of the intensity distribution of the LEDs.

[0041] The second point recognized herein is that the diffuser 10 (assuming ideal light diffusion) emits a Lambertian light intensity distribution output at any point on its surface responsive to illumination inside the diffuser 10 by the LED-based light source 8. In other words, the light intensity output at a point on the surface of the diffuser 10 responsive to illumination inside the spherical or spheroidal diffuser scales with cos( Φ ) where φ is the viewing angle respective to the diffuser surface normal at that point. This is diagrammatically illustrated in FIGURE 4 by showing the ray tracing diagrams for seven direct rays emitted by the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8. At the point where each direct ray impinges on the surface of the light-transmissive spherical diffuser 10, it is diffused into a Lambertian output emitted from the (outside) surface of the spherical diffuser 10. As is known in the optical arts, a surface emitting light in a Lambertian distribution appears to have the same intensity (or brightness) regardless of viewing angle, because at larger viewing angles respective to the surface normal the Lambertian decrease in output intensity is precisely offset by the smaller perceived viewing area due to the oblique viewing angle. Since the entire surface of the spherical diffuser 10 is illuminated with the same intensity (the first point set forth in the immediately preceding paragraph) the result is that an outside viewer observes the spherical diffuser 10 to emit light with uniform intensity at all viewing angles, and with spatially uniform source brightness at the surface of the diffusing sphere.

[0042] In embodiments in which the diffuser 10 comprises a wavelength-converting phosphor, the phosphor should be a diffusing phosphor, that is, a phosphor that emits the wavelength-converted light in a Lambertian (or nearly Lambertian) pattern as illustrated in FIGURE 4, independent of the angle-of-incidence of the direct (excitation) illumination. The diffusing nature of the phosphor is controlled by parameters such as phosphor layer thickness, phosphor particle size and reflectivity (which affects the performance of the phosphor as a light scatterer), and so forth. If the phosphor layer is insufficiently scattering, then the phosphor can be combined with additional diffusion components such as frosting of the glass or other substrate, including an enamel paint layer, or so forth.

[0043] At the same time, the spherical diffuser 10 provides excellent color mixing characteristics through the light diffusion process, without the need for multiple bounces through additional optical elements, or the use of optical components that result in loss or absorption of the light. Still further, since the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 is designed to be small compared with the spherical diffuser 10 (that is, the ratio dD/dL should be large) it follows that the backward light shadowing is greatly reduced as compared with existing designs employing hemispherical diffusers, in which the planar LED-based Lambertian light source is placed at the equatorial plane θ=90° and has the same diameter as the hemispherical diffuser (corresponding to the limit in which dD d[ =l).

[0044] The configuration of the base 18 also contributes to providing omnidirectional illumination. As illustrated in FIGURE 2, the spherical diffuser 10 illuminated by the LED-based Lambertian light source 8 can be thought of from a far-field viewpoint as generating light emanating from a point Po. In other words, a far-field point light source location Po is defined by the omnidirectional light assembly comprising the light source 8 and diffuser 10. The base 18 blocks some of the "backward"-directed light, so that a latitudinal blocking angle OCB can be defined by the largest latitude Θ having direct line-of-sight to the point Po. FIGURE 2 illustrates this. For viewing angles within the blocking angle OIB, the base 18 provides substantial shadowing and consequent large decrease in illumination intensity. It should be appreciated that the concept of the latitudinal blocking angle C<B is useful in the far field approximation, but is not an exact calculation - this is shown in FIGURE 2, for example, in that a light ray Rs does illuminate within the region of the blocking angle e. The light ray Rs is present because of the finite size of the spherical diffuser 10 which is only approximated as a point light source Po at in the far field approximation. The base also reflects some of the backward-directed light, without blocking or absorbing it, and redirects that reflected light into the light distribution pattern of the lamp, adding to the light distribution in the angular zone just above the blocking angle. To accommodate the effect on the light distribution pattern due to reflection of light from the surface of the heat sink and base, the shape of the spherical diffuser may be altered slightly near the intersection of the spherical diffuser and the LED light source in order to improve the uniformity of the distribution pattern in that zone of angles.

[0045] In view of the foregoing, the omnidirectionality of the illumination at large latitude angles is seen to be additionally dependent on the size and geometry of the base 18 which controls the size of the blocking angle αB. Although some illumination within the blocking angle αB can be obtained by enlarging the diameter dD of the spherical diffuser 10 (for example, as explained with reference to light ray Rs), this diameter is typically constrained by practical considerations. For example, if a retrofit incandescent light bulb is being designed, then the diameter dD of the spherical diffuser 10 is constrained to be smaller than or (at most) about the same size as the incandescent bulb being replaced. As seen in FIGURE 2, one suitable base design has sides angled to substantially conform with the blocking angle α,β. A base design having sides angled at about the blocking angle otB provides the largest base volume for that blocking angle CIB, which in turn provides the largest volume for electronics and heat sinking mass.

[0046] By way of review and expansion, approaches are disclosed herein for designing LED based omnidirectional lamps. In disclosed embodiments of these approaches, the small light source 8 is arranged to emit light of a substantially Lambertian distribution in a 2-π steradian half-space above the light source 8. The spherical (or, more generally, spheroidal) diffusing bulb 10 has the small optical input aperture 20 at which the small light source is mounted. At each point on the surface of the diffuser bulb 10 the direct illumination is scattered to generate a substantially Lambertian output light intensity distribution at the exterior of the diffusing bulb 10. This provides a uniformly lit appearance on the surface of the bulb 10, and provides a nearly uniform intensity distribution of light emitted into 4 steradians surrounding the bulb in all directions, except in the backward direction along the optical axis (θ~180°) where the illumination is shadowed by the light engine 8 by the heat sink and electronics volumes.

[0047] Several aspects of such designs are considered in turn. The first aspect is the generally Lambertian distribution of light intensity from a typical LED device or LED package, such as for example the LED light source 8, such that the light intensity is nearly constant along the locus of the spherical diffuser 10 having the LED light source 8 placed at any single position on or near the surface of the sphere (e.g., at the small opening 20). The second aspect of the design is to intercept the Lambertian light distribution pattern with the light diffuser 10 whose diffusion occurs along the locus of nearly constant light flux, by placing the spherical or nearly spherical light diffuser 10 adjacent to the LED light source 8 such that the LED light source 8 is on or near the surface of the spherical diffuser 10, with the LED light source 8 directing its forward illumination along the optical axis (θ=0) to an opposite point of the spherical diffuser 10 that is most distant from the optical input aperture 20. This arrangement ensures that the illuminance (lumens per surface area) of light shining onto the spherical light diffuser 10 is nearly constant across the entire (inside) surface of the spherical diffuser 10. The third aspect is a substantially Lambertian scattering distribution function of the light diffuser 10, such that a nearly Lambertian distribution of intensity versus angle is emitted from each (exterior) point on the light diffuser 10. This ensures that the light intensity (lumens per steradian) is nearly constant in all directions. The fourth aspect is that the maximum lateral dimension di, of the LED light source 8 should be substantially smaller than the diameter dD of the spherical light diffiiser 10 in order to preserve the near-ideality of the first, second, and third aspects. If the LED light source 8 is too large relative to the spherical diffuser 10, then the first aspect will be compromised such that the illuminance on the surface of the light-diffusing sphere will deviate significantly from perfect uniformity. Further, if the LED light source 8 is too large relative to the spherical diffuser 10, then the third aspect will be compromised and the LED light source 8 will block a significant fraction of the potential 4π steradians into which an ideal spherical light diffuser would otherwise emit light. (Or, in other words, if the LED light engine 8 is too large it will block an undesirably large portion of the backward directed light). The fifth aspect is that the base 18 should be designed to minimize the blocking angle α» and to provide a base volume large enough to provide adequate heat sinking and space for electronics.

[0048] With reference to FIGURES 5 and 6, embodiments of this design are illustrated which are configured as a unitary LED lamp suitable for replacing a conventional incandescent or halogen light bulb. Each of the LED-based lamps of FIGURE 5 and 6 includes an Edison-type threaded base connector 30 that is formed to be a direct replacement of the Edison base of a conventional incandescent lamp. (More generally, the base connector should be of the same type as the base of the incandescent or halogen lamp to be replaced - for example, if the incandescent or halogen lamp employs a bayonet base then the Edison base connector 30 is suitably replaced by the requisite bayonet base connector). The unitary LED lamp of FIGURE 5 (or FIGURE 6) is a self-contained omnidirectional light emitting apparatus that does not rely upon the lighting socket for heat sinking. As such, the unitary LED lamp of FIGURE 5 (or FIGURE 6) can be substituted for a conventional integral incandescent or halogen lamp without concern about thermally overloading the socket or associated hardware, and without modifying the electrical configuration of the socket. The LED lamps of FIGURES 5 and 6 include respective spherical or spheroidal diffusers 32, 34 and respective planar LED-based light sources 36, 38 arranged tangentially to a bottom portion of the respective spherical diffuser 32, 34. The LED-based light sources 36, 38 are configured tangentially respective to the spherical or spheroidal diffusers 32, 34, and include LED devices 40. In FIGURE 5, the LED-based light source 36 includes a small number of LED devices 40 (two illustrated), and provides a substantially Lambertian intensity distribution that is coupled with the spherical diffuser 32. in FIGURE 6 the LED-based light source 38 includes a relatively larger number of LED devices 40 (five illustrated). The light source 38 produces a light output distribution that is a distorted Lambertian distribution in that it is relatively more spread out in the plane of the LED-based light source 38 as compared with an exact Lambertian distribution. To accommodate this distortion from the exact Lambertian distribution, the diffuser 34 of FIGURE 6 is spheroidal, that is, deviates from perfect spherical. In the illustrated example of FIGURE 6, the distorted Lambertian distribution output by the LED-based light source 38 can be described as a Lambertian distribution with oblate distortion, and is suitably captured by the diffuser 34 having an oblate spheroidal shape. Such accommodation of inexact Lambertian light distributions is further discussed with reference to FIGURES 7 and 8.

[0049] With continuing reference to FIGURES 5 and 6, an electronic driver 44 is interposed between the planar LED light source 36 and the Edison base connector 30, as shown in FIGURE 5. Similarly, an electronic driver 46 is interposed between the planar LED light source 38 and the Edison base connector 30, as shown in FIGURE 6. The electronic drivers 44, 46 are contained in respective lamp bases 50, 52, with the balance of each base 50, 52 (that is, the portion of each base 50, 52 not occupied by the respective electronics 44, 46) being preferably made of a heat-sinking material so as to define the heat sink. The electronic driver 44, 46 is sufficient, by itself, to convert the a.c. power received at the Edison base electrical connector 30 (for example, 1 10 volt a.c. of the type conventionally available at Edison-type lamp sockets in U.S. residential and office locales, or 220 volt a.c. of the type conventionally available at Edison-type lamp sockets in European residential and office locales, or 12 volt or 24 volt or other voltage d.c.) to a form suitable for driving the LED-based light source 36, 38. In embodiments in which the LED light source is configured to be operated directly from the 1 10 volt or 220 volt a.c. (for example, if the LED-based light source includes a series string of LED devices numbered to operate directly from the a.c, optionally with Zener diodes to accommodate the a.c. polarity switching), the electronic drivers 44, 46 are suitably omitted.

[0050] It is desired to make the base 50, 52 large in order to accommodate a large electronics volume and in order to provide adequate heat sinking, but is preferably configured to minimize the blocking angle OCB. Moreover, the heat sinking is not predominantly conductive via the Edison base 30, but rather relies primarily upon a combination of convective and radiative heat dissipation into the ambient air - accordingly, the heat sink defined by the base 50, 52 should have sufficient surface area to promote the conductive and radiative heat dissipation. On the other hand, it is further recognized herein that the LED-based light source 36, 38 is preferably of small diameter due to its tangential arrangement respective to the diffuser 32, 34. These diverse considerations are accommodated in the respective bases 50, 52 by employing a small receiving or mating area for connection with the LED-based light source 36, 38 which is sized approximately the same as the LED-based light source 36, 38, and having angled sides 54, 56 with angles that are about the same as the blocking angle αβ. The angled base sides 54, 56 extend away from the LED-based light source 36, 38 for a distance sufficient to enable the angled sides 54, 56 to meet with a cylindrical base portion of diameter dbase which is large enough to accommodate the electronics 44, 46.

[0051] The base geometry design is thus controlled by the blocking angle αB, which in turn is controlled by the desired latitude range of substantially omnidirectional illumination. For example, if it is desired to have substantially omnidirectional illumination over a range θ=[0°, 150°], then the blocking angle αβ should be no larger than about 30°, and in some such designs the blocking angle is about 30° in order to maximize the base size for accommodating heat sinking and electronics. Said another way, the light assembly generates illumination with uniformity variation of +30% or less (e.g., more preferably +20%, or more preferably +10%) over at least a latitudinal range θ=[0ο,Χ] where X is a latitude and X>120°. The base 50, 52 does not extend into the latitudinal range θ=[0ο,Χ], but is preferably made large with substantial surface area. This can be achieved by constructing the base 50, 52 with sides 54, 56 lying along the latitude X.

[0052] Said yet another way, the blocking angle is kept small by ensuring that the base is smallest at its connection with the lighting assembly comprising the diffuser and the LED-based light source, and flares out or increases in cross-sectional area (e.g., diameter) as it extends away from the lighting assembly in order to provide a sufficient volume and surface area for convective and radiative heat sinking, and optionally also for accommodation of electronics. In some embodiments, such as those of FIGURES 5 and 6, the base 50, 52 at its connection with the lighting assembly is sized to have area about the same as the area of the LED-based light source 36, 38, and the sides 54, 56 are angled out at the maximum allowable angle (that is, at an angle about equal to the blocking angle αB) in order to place the maximum volume of heat sinking material adjacent the LED-based light source 36, 38 while respecting the blocking angle design constraint.

[0053] As seen in FIGURES 5 and 6, the lamp base 50, 52 includes a heat-sinking portion immediately adjacent the LED-based light source 36, 38 and between the LED-based light source 36, 38 and its driving electronics 44, 46. Accordingly, an electrical path 58 is provided through the heat sinking portion of the base to electrically connect the electronics 44, 46 and the light source 36, 38. On the other hand, the electronic unit 44, 46 is directly adjacent (or, in an alternative viewpoint, extends to include) the Edison base connector 30.

[0054] With reference to FIGURE 7, in some embodiments the light source may generate something other than a Lambertian intensity distribution. In the illustrative example of FIGURE 7, a light source 100 generates a substantially distorted Lambertian intensity distribution 102. The intensity distribution 102 has similarity with a Lambertian intensity distribution in that it is strongest in the forward direction (i.e., along the optical axis or along θ=0°) and decreases with increasing latitude Θ with zero intensity for θ>90°. However, the intensity distribution 102 is substantially distorted respective to a true Lambertian distribution in that a substantially greater fraction of the total intensity is in the forward direction, as diagrammatically indicated by ray traces in FIGURE 7. The type of distortion exhibited by the Lambertian intensity distribution 102 shown in FIGURE 7 is sometimes referred to as a prolate distortion. For such embodiments, the ratio dD dL discussed with reference to spherical diffuser embodiments (e.g., FIGURES 2-4) is suitably replaced by the ratio dPMA/dL where dPMA is the minor axis of the prolate-distorted spheroidal diffuser as shown in FIGURE 7.

[0055] With reference to FIGURE 8, as another example a light source 110 generates a distorted Lambertian intensity distribution 112 that has a substantial oblate distortion. The substantially oblate-distorted Lambertian intensity distribution 112 is distorted respective to a true Lambertian distribution in that a substantially lesser fraction of the total intensity is in the forward direction, as diagrammatically indicated by ray traces in FIGURE 8. An oblate spheroidal diffuser 114 is arranged to diffuse the oblate-distorted Lambertian intensity distribution 112. For such embodiments, the ratio dD/dL discussed with reference to spherical diffuser embodiments (e.g., FIGURES 2-4) is suitably replaced by the ratio dOMA dL where dOMA is the major axis of the oblate-distorted spheroidal diffuser as shown in FIGURE 8.

[0056] I" general, distortions from an ideally spherical (Lambertian) distribution may be described as a spheroidal shape, such as an elongated prolate spheroidal distribution 102 (FIGURE 7) or a flattened oblate spheroidal distribution (FIGURE 8). The design principles set forth herein are readily extended to such situations. With illustrative reference back to the embodiment of FIGURES 2-4, the spherical diffuser 10 is chosen because the Lambertian light source 8 illuminates the spherical diffuser 10 uniformly across its entire (inside) surface. In other words, the spherical diffuser 10 conforms with an isolux curve of the Lambertian light source 8. Generalizing this observation, as long as the light-transmissive diffuser is selected to conform with an isolux surface respective to the light source, it is assured that the entire surface of the diffuser will be illuminated with uniform intensity by the light source. Additionally, because the diffuser provides Lambertian scattering as illustrated by way of example in FIGURE 4, light emanating from each point of the (outside of the) diffuser surface has a Lambertian distribution Thus the resulting lamp output intensity will be substantially omnidirectional. Some deviation from ideal omnidirectional ity may be observed in the case of the prolate or oblate spheroidal diffusers 104, 114 due to these shapes deviating from ideally spherical; however, this deviation is relatively small for light source intensity distributions that do not deviate too far from a Lambertian distribution.

[0057] Applying these generalized design principles to the embodiment of FIGURE 7, the spherical diffuser 10 of the embodiment of FIGURES 2-4 is replaced in the embodiment of FIGURE 7 by the prolate spheroidal diffuser 104 which matches an isolux surface of the prolate-distorted Lambertian intensity 102 generated by the light source 100. Qualitatively, this prolate spheroidal diffuser 104 can be seen as compensating for the higher intensity fraction in the forward (0=0) direction of the output intensity 102 by moving the diffuser surface along the forward (0=0) direction further away from the light source 100.

[0058] In the case of the embodiment of FIGURE 8, the spherical diffuser 10 of the embodiment of FIGURES 2-4 is replaced in the embodiment of FIGURE 10 by the oblate spheroidal diffuser 114 which matches an isolux surface of the oblate-distorted Lambertian intensity 112 generated by the light source 110. Qualitatively, this oblate spheroidal diffuser 114 can be seen as compensating for the lower intensity fraction in the forward (0=0) direction of the output intensity 112 by moving the diffuser surface along the forward (0=0) direction closer to the light source 110.

[0059] More generally, it will be appreciated that substantially any light source illumination distribution can be similarly accommodated, by choosing a diffuser whose surface corresponds with an isolux surface of the light source. Indeed, variation in the azimuthal or longitudinal direction φ can be accommodated in this same way, by accounting for the variation in the azimuthal or longitudinal direction φ in defining the isolux surface. As previously noted, the light distribution can also be affected by secondary factors such as reflection from the base. Such secondary distortions can be accommodated by slight adjustment of the diffuser shape. In some embodiments, for example, the light distribution pattern generated by the light source may be Lambertian with very slight prolate distortion, but in view of the secondary affect of base reflection a spherical diffuser with a slight oblate shape distortion may be selected as providing the optimal lamp intensity distribution.

[0060] Having described some illustrative embodiments with reference to FIGURES 2-8, some further disclosure along with description of actual reduction to practice and characterization thereof is next set forth.

[0061] The following omnidirectional LED lamp design aspects are set forth herein. A first design aspect relates to the distribution of light intensity emitted by the LED light source. The distribution for most typical LED light sources is Lambertian, although other distributions exist for LED light sources, such as distorted Lambertian (e.g., FIGURES 7 and 8). The intensity distribution from an LED light source is typically uniform, or nearly uniform, in the azimuthal or longitudinal (φ) direction (that is, the intensity distribution is expected to be substantially axially symmetric). The first design aspect entails identifying the intensity distribution of the LED light source, so that the transparent diffuser can be constructed to conform with an isolux surface of the LED light source. For the Lambertian intensity distribution, the intensity versus latitude angle (Θ) is proportional to cos(θ), where Θ is the angle measured from the optical axis as shown in FIGURE 1. An ideal Lambertian distribution is uniform in the φ direction, and the distribution in the Φ direction is in practice usually nearly uniform for a typical LED light source. The resulting isolux surface is spherical. Some typical distortions from the ideal Lambertian distribution include a prolate distortion having relatively more intensity in the forward direction (as illustrated in FIGURE 7) or an oblate distortion having relatively less intensity in the forward direction (as illustrated in FIGURE 8). The prolate distortion results in a prolate spheroidal isolux surface, while the oblate distortion results in an oblate spheroidal isolux surface. In the case of having relatively more intensity in the forward direction (prolate distortion, as illustrated in FIGURE 7) the long axis of the spheroid aligns with the optical axis. In the case of having relatively less intensity in the forward direction (oblate distortion, as illustrated in FIGURE 8), the short axis of the spheroid aligns with the optical axis. [0062] A second design aspect of the design is to construct the light-transmissive diffuser conforming with an isolux surface. If the intensity distribution of the LED light source is exactly Lambertian, then the isolux surface (and hence the diffuser) is spherical, and the ideal location of the light-emitting surface of the LED light source is at a location tangential to the surface of the spherical diffuser. Tn a physical LED light source, especially one employing multiple LED chips or multiple LED packages, the individual LED devices are usually mounted on a planar circuit board, and the LEDs may be encapsulated, either individually or as an array, with an index-matching substance to enhance the efficiency of light extraction from the LED semiconductor material. The LED light source may also be surrounded by reflective, refractive, scattering, or transmissive optical elements to enhance the uniformity of the light flux or its color from the light engine. To accommodate such a spatially extended LED light source, the exit aperture (that is, the light output surface) of the LED light source is suitably located tangential to the surface of the light diffuser so that the light diffuser may receive uniform illuminance.

[0063] If the intensity distribution of the LED light source deviates substantially from a pure Lambertian distribution, then the diffuser is not an exact sphere, but rather is a shape that matches the shape of the light intensity distribution so that the illuminance [lumens/area] is constant at every location on the surface of the diffuser, and the light-emitting surface of the LED light source is at a location tangential to the surface of the diffuser. For example, if the intensity distribution 102 of the LED light source 100 is concentrated in a forward lobe (stretched along the optical axis, as illustrated in FIGURE 7) then the diffuser 104 should be elongated along the optical axis to match the shape of the intensity distribution.

[0064] Although surface diffusers are illustrated herein, a volume diffuser can also be employed. In a volume diffuser the light diffusion occurs throughout the volume of the diffuser, rather than being concentrated at the surface. In this case the shape of the diffuser should also take into account changes in the intensity distribution due to scattering occurring within the volume of the diffuser. [0065] A third design aspect is to provide Lambertian or nearly Lambertian scattering of the light by the light diffuser. An ideal Lambertian scatterer results in a Lambertian intensity distribution at the output for any possible input distribution, even in the extreme case of a collimated beam of light as the input. Where the input intensity distribution of the light to the diffuser is a Lambertian or approximately Lambertian distribution relative to the optical axis of the LED light source, the function of the diffuser is to redirect that intensity distribution into a Lambertian distribution relative to the normal (that is, perpendicular unit vector) to the surface of the diffuser. A Lambertian scatterer, or a relatively strong near-Lambertian scatterer, is generally sufficient to accomplish this. Various materials that are typically used in existing omnidirectional lamps, such as transparent or translucent glass, quartz, ceramic, plastic, paper, composite, or other optically transmissive material having low optical absorption, can provide Lambertian, or sufficiently strong, scattering. The scattering can be produced by a roughening or frosting of the surface of the scattering medium (for example by chemical etching, or mechanical abrasion, or cutting with a mechanical tool or a laser, or so forth). Additionally or alternatively, the scattering can be produced by a scattering coating or paint or laminate applied to the surface, or by scattering within the bulk medium by suspension of scattering particles in the medium, or by grain boundaries or dopants within the medium (in the case of a heterogeneous medium), or by other scattering mechanisms or combinations thereof.

[0066] A fourth design aspect is to minimize the deviation of the actual intensity distribution from that of the ideal uniform, isotropic distribution that would result from the ideal application of the first three aspects. A principle source of deviation from the ideal lamp configuration is the arrangement of the light source at other than precisely tangential respective to a surface of the transparent diffuser. This nonideality can be limited by considering the ratio of the size of the diffuser to the size of the LED light source, for example as set forth by the ratio dD/d|_ in the embodiment of FIGURES 2-4. From the results of an optical ray tracing model, and confirmation by measurements on prototype lamps that are generally intended to replace incandescent light bulbs of the A1 size, having a lamp diameter of about 2-3/8" or about 60 mm, a desired range has been quantified for a model and corresponding prototypes in which the LED light source comprises a symmetric array of a large number of closely space LEDs on a relatively small circular circuit board having the diameter dL in a range of 10 to 20 mm, placed at the "south pole" (that is, at 0=180°) of a spherical glass bulb having the diameter dD, that is coated with a Lambertian scatterer on its inside surface.

[0067] With reference to FIGURES 9 and 10, the ratio of dD/dL primarily determines the range of latitude angles over which the intensity distribution may be held constant. (Note that in FIGURE 9, the symbol "D" denotes the dimension dL of the planar LED-based Lambertian light source 8 and the symbol "S" denotes the dimension dD of the diffiiser 10. In FIGURE 10, the ratio dD/dL is indicated as DD DL). AS dL increases to become comparable to dD (and hence deviates more strongly from exact tangency) the location of the LED light source should be moved away from the south pole of the spherical diffuser toward the equator (that is, the plane defined by 0=90°) and the range over which the intensity distribution is uniform is reduced from 0° to 180° to 0° to 90°. Another way of looking at this is that for perfect tangency the light source would meet with the spherical or spheroidal diffuser at a single point. For the light source 8 of finite dimension dL, however, this "point" of meeting becomes a chord of length dL respective to the spherical or spheroidal diffuser 10. Thus, the length of the chord d|. respective to the diameter dD of the diffuser 10 (or the inverse ratio thereof) is a measure of closeness to ideal tangency. By way of example, if dD/dL< 1.15 then the maximum possible range of uniform intensity distribution is about θ=[0°, 120°]; or if dD dL< 1.5 then the maximum possible range of uniform intensity distribution is about θ=[0°, 138°]. In order to provide uniform intensity over the range of θ=[0°, 150°], the ratio should be increased to dD dL>2.0. Even with dD/dL=2.0, the intensity distribution is not uniform at angles approaching 150° because the distribution is missing the contribution of light that would have been emitted from the surface of the sphere over the latitudes in the range of 150° to 180°. To provide nearly uniform intensity distribution over the range of 0° to 150°, dD/dL should exceed 2.0 by an amount that depends on the scattering distribution function of the spherical diffuser, and that depends on the reflective properties of the lamp components that are place below the LED light engine, such as the heat spreader, the heat fins, and the electronics. In experiments actually performed for an LED replacement lamp for incandescent applications, it was found that drVdL > 2.5 is generally suitable in order to provide intensity uniformity within +/- 10% of the average intensity over the range of 0° to 150°. If uniform intensity is desired only over the range of 0° to 135°, and/or a larger tolerance of +/- 20% is deemed acceptable (such as for compliance with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed Energy Star specification), then do/d > 1.41 is required from FIGURE 10, and it would be preferred in a practical lamp embodiment for dD dL > 1.6.

[0068] A fifth design aspect is to minimize the impact of the base. Initially, one might expect this can be accomplished by employing a small base - however, this negatively impacts heat sinking which in turn limits light output intensity, and also can negatively impact the space available for lamp electronics. As disclosed herein, an improvement is to have the base narrow at its juncture with the lighting assembly comprising the LED light source and spherical or spheroidal diffuser (with the base at this juncture preferably having about the same cross-sectional area as the generally planar LED-based light source) and having angled sides whose angles are less than or about the same as a blocking angle α,β chosen based on the desired latitudinal range of omnidirectional illumination. For example, if the desired latitudinal range θ=[0°, 150°], then the blocking angle as should be no larger than about 30°, and in some such designs the blocking angle is about 25° in order to maximize the base size for accommodating heat sinking and electronics. The angled sides of the base should then have an angle of no more than about 30°, and preferably about 25° in order to provide maximal base volume for heat sinking proximate to the LED-based light source.

[0069] With returning reference to FIGURES 5 and 6, the heat sinking of the illustrated is passive, relying upon conduction of heat from the LED-based light source 36, 38 to the adjacent base 50, 52 and then radiating and convecting into the air or other surrounding ambient via the surface of the heat sink defined by the base 50, 52. The heat dissipation by convection and radiation can be enhanced by providing additional heat management devices such as a heat pump or thermo-electric cooler, or by adding active cooling, for example using fans synthetic jets, or other means to enhance the flow of cooling air. The heat dissipation by convection and radiation can also be enhanced by increasing the surface area of the heat sink. One way to do this is to corrugate or otherwise modify the surface of the base heat sink element (which is the base 50, 52 in the embodiments of FIGURES 5 and 6). Fins or other heat dissipation elements can also be added to the base, but these may interfere with the light output if they extend outward beyond the blocking angle αβ.

[0070] With reference to FIGURE 1 1, a variant embodiment is disclosed, which comprises the embodiment of FIGURE 5 with the addition of heat-dissipating fins 120 that enhance radiative and convective heat transfer from the base 50 to the air or other surrounding ambient. Said another way, the heat sink of the base 50 includes the aforementioned base heat sink element disposed within the latitudinal blocking angle as (within or coextensive with the base 50 in the illustrative embodiment of FIGURE 5) and heat dissipating elements comprising illustrated fins 120 that are in thermal communication with the base heat sink element and that extend over the spheroidal diffuser 32 to further enhance heat dissipation into the ambient air by convection and radiation. That is, heat conducts from the LED chips of the LED based lighting unit 36 located at position 36' indicated in FIGURE 1 1 to the base heat sink element and conductively spreads to the heat-dissipating fins 120 where the heat is transferred to the ambient by convection and/or radiation. The fins 120 of the lamp of FIGURE 1 1 extend latitudinally almost to θ=0°, and hence the fins 120 extend well beyond the extent of the blocking angle OIB. However, the fins 120 have substantially limited extent in the longitudinal (φ) direction; accordingly, the fins 120 do not significantly impact the omnidirectional illumination distribution generated by the lamp of FIGURE 1 1. In other words, each fin lies substantially in a plane of constant longitude φ and hence does not substantially adversely impact the omnidirectional nature of the illumination distribution. More generally, so long as the heat-dissipating elements extend outward and are oriented transverse to the surface of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser, they do not substantially adversely impact the omnidirectional nature of the illumination distribution. The fins 120 are also shaped to comport with the desired form (that is, the outward shape) of an "A"-type incandescent light bulb. Such outward shaping is optional, but can be advantageous as consumers are familiar with the conventional "A"-type incandescent light bulb. The improved heat sinking provided by the fins 120 enables further reduction in the size of the planar LED-based light source, which in turn enables design to further enhance the omnidirectionality of the output light intensity distribution.

[0071] With reference to FIGURE 12, embodiments of the retrofit LED-based lamp shown in FIGURE 1 1 , including six fins 120, were actually constructed and their longitudinal intensity distribution measured. The actually-constructed retrofit LED-based lamps were constructed in accordance with the A19 lamp standard. The blocking angle αB was 23°. The fins 120 were 1 .5 mm thick and aligned to lie within a constant longitude (constant φ) plane as shown in FIGURE 1 1. One embodiment (Lamp A) employed a G12 enamel lamp globe (available from General Electric Company, New York, USA) as the diffuser, whereas a second embodiment (Lamp B) employed a 40 mm plastic sandblasted sphere as the diffuser. Both lamps had the Edison base connector 30 as shown in FIGURE 1 1. The far-field output intensity measured as a function of latitude respective to the far-field point light source location Po defined by the omnidirectional light assembly 32, 36 is plotted in FIGURE 12, using a solid line for Lamp A and a dashed line for Lamp B. For Lamp A which used the enamel lamp globe as the diffuser, the intensity in the latitude span θ=[0, 150°] was measured to be 35 ± 7 cd which corresponds to uniformity within a ± 20% variation, with even better uniformity for the latitude span Θ=[0,135Η]. The azimuthal (φ) was also good, with about ±15% intensity variation, so that omnidirectional illumination over the latitude span θ=[0,150°] was achieved.

[0072] On the other hand, Lamp B shows substantially inferior uniformity over the latitude span θ=[0,150°]. This is attributable to the sandblasted plastic providing inadequate light diffusion. In other words, with brief reference back to FIGURE 4, the light emanating from each incident ray was not itself a Lambertian distribution as shown in FIGURE 4 for the case of Lamp B, but rather had a strong bias toward continuing in the direction of the incident ray. This produces a relatively higher fraction of light in the forward (9=0°) direction as indicated in FIGURE 12 for Lamp B. Said another way, the inadequate diffusion provided by the sandblasted plastic of Lamp B failed to remove the strong forward illumination bias of the source light 36 in the case of Lamp B.

[0073] The illustrated fins 120 or other heat dissipating elements are readily incorporated into other unitary LED lamps, such as the LED replacement lamp of FIGURE 6. The use of such fins facilitates making the connection of the base with the lighting assembly (LED-based light source and spherical or spheroidal diffuser) small, which in turn facilitates a large d^/di ratio which further promotes omnidirectionality over a large span of latitude angles such as the latitude span θ=[0,150°]. Further, by keeping the fins planar and lying in constant longitude (constant φ) planes, the impact of the fins on longitudinal intensity uniformity is small. More generally, the heat dissipating elements should extend outward away from the surface of the diffuser and be oriented transverse to the diffuser surface.

[0074] To obtain a higher light output intensity, a substantial number of higher-power LED devices are preferable. This, however, conflicts with the desire to keep the ratio of dD dL large so as to provide a large range of latitude angles over which the intensity distribution may be held constant, because more LED devices tends to increase the LED-based light source cross-sectional dimension dL. Moreover, the additional heat generated by higher-power LED devices, and larger numbers of such devices, may in some specific embodiments be too large to accommodate using passive heat sinking.

[0075] A linear lamp embodiment is next described with reference back to the spherical embodiment of FIGURES 2-4. This spherical embodiment can be modified to be a straight linear lamp by removing the rotational symmetry about the north (0=0°) axis. In this linear embodiment, FIGURE 4 can be viewed as a cross-sectional view taken along the linear axis of a linear lamp: the diffuser 10 is a cylinder in this variant embodiment whose cylinder axis is transverse to the drawing sheet, and the light source 8 is an elongated LED-based light source extending parallel with the cylinder axis of the (cylindrical) diffuser 10 and positioned tangential to the surface of the (cylindrical) diffuser 10. The Lambertian light intensity distributions illustrated in FIGURE 4 are, in this linear lamp variant embodiment, Lambertian only in one-dimension, that is, Lambcrtian in the plane of the drawing sheet if the LEDs are spaced suitably close together. Thus, the Lambertian intensity pattern put out by the (elongate) LED-based light source 8 is suitably captured by the (cylindrical) diffuser 10 which follows the cylindrical isolux surface of the Lambertian intensity output by the (elongate) LED-based light source. To use this embodiment to provide a uniformly illuminated, isotropic cylindrical light source, the LED devices 40 should be relatively closely spaced in the direction perpendicular to the drawing, for example by an amount comparable to the diameter of the diffuser cylinder.

[0076] With reference to FIGURES 13 and 14, yet another embodiment is disclosed. This embodiment is not a linear lamp, but rather is an LED lamp suitable for replacing an incandescent light bulb and including the Edison base connector 30 facilitating use of the lamp as a retrofit incandescent bulb. A ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 is arranged on a cylindrical former or chimney 152 so as to emit light outward from the cylindrical former or chimney 152. This amounts to taking the linear lamp described herein and wrapping it around the cylinder of the chimney 152 in order to form a ring. Illumination intensity 154 generated by the ring-shaped light source 150 has a Lambertian distribution in any plane that is perpendicular to the annular path of the ring (as shown in FIGURE 13) and therefore produces a toroidal isolux surface having a circular cross-section, if the LEDs are spaced suitably close together. A toroidal diffuser 156 having a circular cross-section (best seen in FIGURE 13) is arranged to coincide with the toroidal isolux surface of the illumination intensity 154. (Note that in FIGURE 14 the toroidal diffuser 156 is diagrammatically shown in phantom in order to reveal LED-based light source 150).

[0077] The ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 is arranged tangential to the inside surface of the toroidal diffuser 156 and emits its Lambertian illumination intensity into the toroidal diffuser 156. The toroidal diffuser 156 preferably has a Lambertian-diffusing surface as diagrammatically illustrated in FIGURE 13, so that at each point on the surface the incident illumination 154 is diffused to produce a Lambertian intensity output pattern emanating externally from that point on the surface of the toroidal diffuser 156. As a consequence, the lighting assembly comprising the ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 and the toroidal diffuser 156 of circular path cross-section generates light that is substantially omnidirectional both latitudinally and longitudinally.

[0078] In FIGURES 13 and 14, the toroidal diffuser 156 has a circular cross-section for any point along its annular path, so that the toroidal diffuser 156 is a true torus. By analogy to FIGURES 7 and 8, if the ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 has its Lambertian intensity pattern substantially distorted in a prolate or oblate fashion, then the circular cross-section of the toroidal diffuser 156 is suitably correspondingly made prolate or oblate circular in order to coincide with an isolux surface.

[0079] The illustrated chimney 152 of FIGURES 13 and 14 has a circular cross-section, and the ring-shaped light source 150 accordingly follows a circular path. With reference to FIGURE 14A, in other embodiments, the chimney 152 has a polygonal cross-section, such as a triangular, square, hexagonal or octagonal cross section (not illustrated), in which case the ring-shaped light source suitably follows a corresponding polygonal (e.g., triangular, square, hexagonal or octagonal) path that is suitably made of three adjoined planar circuit boards (for triangular), four adjoined planar circuit boards (for square), six adjoined planar circuit boards (for hexagonal) or eight adjoined planar circuit boards (for octagonal) or more generally N adjoined planar circuit boards (for an N-sided polygonal chimney cross-section). For example, FIGURE 14A shows a chimney 152' having a square cross-section, and a ring-shaped light source 150' following a square path that is made of four circuit boards adjoined at 90° angles to form a square ring conforming with the rectangular cross-section of the chimney 152'. A corresponding toroidal diffuser 156' (again shown diagrammatically in phantom to reveal light source 150') is also approximately four-sided, but includes rounded transitions between adjoining sides of the four-cited toroid to facilitate manufacturing and smooth light output.

[0080] With returning reference to FIGURES 13 and 14, the lamp includes a base 160 that includes or supports the chimney 152 at one end and the Edison base connector 30 at the opposite end. As shown in the sectional view of FIGURE 13, the base 160 contains electronics 162 including electronics for energizing the ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 to emit the illumination 154. As further shown in the sectional view of FIGURE 13, the chimney 152 is hollow and contains a heat sink embodied as a coolant circulating fan 166 disposed inside the chimney 152. The electronics 162 also drive the coolant circulating fan 166. The fan 166 drives circulating air 168 through the chimney 152 and hence in close proximity to the ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 to cool the ring-shaped light source 150. Optionally, heat-dissipating elements 170 such as fins, pins, or so forth, extend from the ring-shaped LED-based light source 150 into the interior of the hollow chimney 152 to further facilitate the active cooling of the light source. Optionally, the chimney includes air inlets 172 (see FIGURE 14) to facilitate the flow of circulating air 168.

[0081] The active heat sinking provided by the coolant fan 166 can optionally be replaced by passive cooling, for example by making the chimney of metal or another thermally conductive material, and optionally adding fins, pins, slots or other features to increase its surface area. In other contemplated embodiments, the chimney is replaced by a similarly sized heat pipe having a "cool" end disposed in a metal slug contained in the base 160. Conversely, in the embodiments of FIGURES 5 and 6 and elsewhere, the depicted passive heat sinking is optionally replaced by active heat sinking using a fan or so forth. Again, it is contemplated for the base heat sink element in these embodiments to be an active heat sink element such as a cooling fan, or another type of heat sink element such as a heat pipe.

[0082] The lamp depicted in FIGURES 13 and 14 is a unitary LED replacement lamp installable in a lighting socket (not shown) by connecting the base connector 30 with the lighting socket. The unitary LED replacement lamp of FIGURES 13 and 14 is a self-contained omnidirectional LED replacement lamp that does not rely on the socket for heat sinking, and can be driven by 110V or 220V a.c, or 12V or 24V or other voltage d.c. supplied from a lamp socket via the Edison base connector 30.

[0083] To achieve omnidirectional illumination over a large latitudinal span, such as over the latitude span θ=[0°,150°], it is advantageous for the base 160 to be relatively narrow, such as in the case of the cylindrical base 160 illustrated in FIGURES 13 and 14. The active heat sinking via the fan 166 and hollow chimney 152 facilitates making the base 160 relatively narrow while still providing adequate heat dissipation. Moreover, FIGURE 13 illustrates that the toroidal diffuser 156 extends outwardly in the plane transverse to the axis of the cylindrical chimney 152, and this further promotes illumination into larger angles, e.g. angles approaching θ=180°.

[0084] The LED replacement lamp of FIGURES 13 and 14 (with optional modifications such as that illustrated in FIGURE 14A) is particularly well-suited for retrofitting higher-wattage incandescent bulbs, such as incandescent bulbs in the 60W to 100W or higher range. Operation of the active cooling fan 166 is expected to use about one to a few watts or less, which is negligible for these higher-wattage lamps, while the active heat sinking is capable of heat transfer and dissipation at levels of tens of watts so as to enable use of high-power LED devices operating with driving currents in the ampere to several ampere range. The cooling of the lamp of FIGURES 13 and 14 does not rely predominantly upon conduction of heat into the lamp socket via the Edison base connector 30, and so the LED replacement lamp of FIGURES 13 and 14 can be used in any standard threaded light socket without concern about thermal loading of the socket or adjacent hardware. The toroidal arrangement of the light assembly also facilitates using a higher number of LEDs by spreading the LEDs out along the ring-shaped path of the ring-shaped light source 150.

[0085] With reference to FIGURES 15-30, some further embodiments are disclosed for shaping and arranging the diffuser respective to the LED based light source in the unitary LED lamp to provide uniform omnidirectional illumination from the LED based light source. These embodiments take into account the optical effects of the heat sinking fins.

[0086] With reference to FIGURES 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19, an illustrative example of one lamp embodiment is shown, which is suitable for use as an LED-based light bulb. The lamp includes a diffuser 200, a finned heat sink 202, and a base 204 (which is an Edison base in the illustrated embodiment, although a GU, bayonet-type or other type of base is also contemplated). FIGURES 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 show perspective, alternative perspective, side, top, and bottom views, respectively. FIGURES 20, 21, and 22 show a side view of the diffuser 200 alone, a side sectional view of the diffuser 200 revealing its interior 206, and a side view of the diffuser 200 with fins 202, respectively. The fins are part of a heat sink, and extend over a portion of the ovoid diffuser 200. The heat sink also includes a body portion 208 that houses power conditioning electronics (not shown) that convert 1 10V AC input electrical power (or 220 V AC, or other selected input electrical power) to electrical power suitable for driving LEDs that input light into an aperture 210 of the diffuser 200.

[0087] As labeled in FIGURE 20, the diffuser 200 has an ovoid shape with a single axis-of-symmetry 212, which lies along the elevation or latitude coordinate 0=0 corresponding to "geographic north" or "N". (See FIGURE 1 and related text for further description of the illustrative coordinate system employing the elevation or latitude coordinate Θ). The ovoid diffuser 200 has rotational symmetry about the axis-of-symmetry 212. In some embodiments the rotational symmetry is continuous, that is, the diffuser cross-section transverse to the axis-of-symmetry is circular (as illustrated). In other embodiments, the rotational symmetry of the ovoid diffuser is N-fold, that is, the ovoid diffuser cross-section transverse to the axis-of-symmetry is (by way of some illustrative examples) hexagonal (N=6), or octagonal (N=8), or so forth, optionally with rounding at the N vertices. N-fold symmetry with a low value of N has the disadvantage of potentially introducing an N-fold variation respective to azimuth or longitude (i.e., coordinate φ as defined herein with reference to FIGURE 1). However, employing an N-fold symmetry may have certain advantages in terms of manufacturing or ease of handling and installation of the LED light bulb. The diffuser 200 is referred to herein as an ovoid diffuser even if it has N-fold rotational symmetry. In some N-fold rotationally symmetric diffuser embodiments the corresponding heat sink also includes N fins that are aligned with the N-fold rotational symmetry of the diffuser.

[0088] The aperture 210 is centered on the axis-of-symmetry 212 at one end of the ovoid diffuser 200. (Note that the aperture 210 may in some embodiments comprise a plurality of sub-apertures 210SUB as shown in the inset of FIGURE 20 which views the aperture 210 along the axis-of-symmetry 212. For example, there may be one sub-aperture 210si B for each LED device. In such cases, as shown in the inset the aperture 210 denotes or approximates the cumulative or total area spanned by these sub-apertures 210SUB)- The term "aperture" denotes an area through which light is input into the ovoid diffuser 200 from the LED-based light source (e.g., a Lambertian or approximately Lambertian light source in some embodiments). The aperture 210 may be a physical opening receiving or aligned with the LED-based light source, or may be a transparent window, a light-diffusing plate, or the like.

[0089] As shown in FIGURE 21, the illustrative ovoid diffuser 200 comprises an ovoid shell 220 having or defining the hollow interior 206. The hollow ovoid diffuser 200 is suitably manufactured of glass, transparent plastic, or so forth. Alternatively, it is contemplated for the ovoid diffuser to be a solid component comprising a light-transmissive material such as glass, transparent plastic, or so forth. The ovoid diffuser 200 may also optionally include a wavelength-converting phosphor disposed on or in the diffuser 200, or in the interior 206 of the diffuser 200. The ovoid shell 220 is made light diffusive by any suitable approach, such as surface texturing, and/or light-scattering particles dispersed in the material of the ovoid shell 220, and/or light-scattering particles disposed on a surface of the ovoid shell 220, or so forth.

[0090] With reference to FIGURES 20-22, the ovoid diffuser 200 optionally includes a neck region 222 for mounting the diffuser 200 to the lamp body (e.g., to the heat sink 202, 208 in the illustrative embodiment, as best seen in FIGURE 22). In the neck region 222 the ovoid diffuser 200 deviates from its ovoid shape. The neck region 222 in some embodiments is recessed into a cavity 224 of the lamp body 208 (see FIGURES 22 and 23) and hence does not emit light (or, emits light that is absorbed by the heat sink lamp body 208 and hence does not contribute to the omnidirectional illumination). Alternatively, the neck region may extend partially or wholly outside of the lamp body so as to be partially or wholly light emissive to contribute to the omnidirectional illumination.

[0091] With continuing reference to FIGURE 20, the ovoid diffuser 200 has an egg shape which includes a relatively narrower proximate section of length X along the axis-of-symmetry 212, and a relatively broader distal section of length Y along the axis-of-symmetry 212. By "proximate" and "distal", it is meant that the proximate section of length X is relatively more proximate to the aperture 210 while the distal section of length Y is relatively more distal from the aperture 210. The illustrative ovoid diffuser 200 has a maximum diameter Dinax transverse to the axis-of-symmetry 212 at the joining or meeting of the proximate and distal sections or portions of respective lengths X and Y. It is also contemplated for the transverse plane of largest diameter Dmax, also referred to herein as the equatorial plane 230, to be located above or below the joining or meeting of the proximate and distal sections or portions. The intersection of the axis-of-symmetry 212 and the equatorial plane 230 of maximum diameter Dmax is referenced herein as the origin 232. Said another way the ovoid diffuser 200 has its maximum diameter Dmax transverse to the axis-of-symmetry 212 for the transverse equatorial plane 230 containing the origin 232.

[0092] The total length of the ovoid diffuser 200 in (that is, along) the direction of the axis-of-symmetry 212 is X+Y. In some embodiments the following conditions hold: X>Y and X+Y>Dmax. For the illustrative ovoid diffuser 200, the proximate portion of length X has a truncated prolate hemi-ellipsoid shape while the distal portion of length Y has an oblate hemi-ellipsoid shape. More generally, it is advantageous for X>Y. In some embodiments Χ>1.5·Υ. In some embodiments X>2 Y. In some embodiments X>3 Y.

[0093] As best seen in FIGURES 22 and 23, the fins 202 of the heat sink 202, 208 are not re-entrant, by which it is meant that the tips of the fins 202 do not bend inward toward the axis-of-symmetry 212. By employing fins that are not re-entrant, the ovoid diffuser 200 and the heat sink 202, 208 can be manufactured separately and assembled. The non-re-entrant fins of the heat sink 202, 208 allow the ovoid diffuser 200 to be inserted inside the fins 202 until the neck 222 mates with the recessed cavity 224 of the heat sink 202, 208. This has manufacturing advantages in that the diffuser 200 and the heat sink 202, 208 can be manufactured separately, and optionally be made of different materials, so as to optimize the ovoid diffuser 200 for its light transmissive and light scattering or diffusing properties and the heat sink 202, 208 for its thermal (and optionally light reflective) properties.

[0094] The fins 202 produce relatively less optical losses for the distal section as compared with the proximate section. Because the fins 202 of the heat sink 202, 208 have substantially limited extent in the longitudinal (φ) direction, the fins 202 are expected to not strongly impact the omnidirectional illumination distribution in the longitudinal direction. However, measurements performed by the inventors indicate that the fins 202 do produce some reduction in light output, especially at angles below the equatorial plane 230. Without being limited to any particular theory of operation, these optical losses are believed to be due to light absorption, light scattering, or a combination thereof caused by the fins 202. Moreover, the body portion 208 of the heat sink 202, 208 (or, more generally, the body portion of the lamp) further limits the amount of omnidirectional illumination below the equatorial plane 230.

[0095] With reference to FIGURES 24, 25, and 26, the optical loss caused by the fins is mitigated or eliminated by the prolate/oblate design of the ovoid diffuser 200. FIGURE 24 shows a comparison of the outline of the ovoid diffuser 200 with the outline 240 of an ideal spherical diffuser. The ovoid diffuser 200 is a truncated prolate hemi-ellipsoid below the equatorial plane 230 and an oblate hemi-ellipsoid above the equatorial plane 230. FIGURE 25 shows a comparison of the ray lengths from the LED array to the surface of the ideal spherical diffuser 240 to that of the ovoid diffuser 200. FIGURE 26 shows identification of the normal angles to the surface of the ovoid diffuser 200. The scattered light from a point on the surface is maximum at an angle normal to the surface if the scatterer is ideally Lambertian in angular distribution. It will be noticed in FIGURE 26 that omnidirectional illumination below the equatorial plane 230 is mostly from the proximate portion having length X, whereas the distal portion having length Y contributes mostly to the omnidirectional illumination above the equatorial plane 230. Thus, the effect of relatively increasing the length X of the prolate proximate portion is to increase the fraction of light emitted below the equatorial plane 230 so as to compensate for optical loss below the equatorial plane 230 due to the fins 202 and/or body portion 208 of the heat sink. For a (truncated) prolate hemi-ellipsoidal proximate portion and an oblate hemi-ellipsoidal distal portion, more than 50% of the total light-emissive surface area of the ovoid diffuser 200 is located below the equatorial plane 230.

[0096] The distal portion of length Y has comparatively less effect on the light distribution at angles below the equatorial plane 230. Rather, the oblateness of the oblate distal portion can be adjusted to control the light distribution at angles above the equatorial plane 230. For example a flatter oblate distal portion of the diffuser 200 can enhance the light intensity at angles near the geographic north N (that is, near θ=0). The oblateness can also be adjusted for other reasons such as to ensure that the total length of the light bulb falls within any maximum length specified by the applicable standard (e.g., the A- 19 light bulb standard). The total length of the LED light bulb includes: (1) the summed length X+Y of the ovoid diffuser 200, plus (2) the length of the body portion 208 of the heat sink along the axis-of-symmetry 212 direction, and (3) the length of the Edison base 204 along the axis-of-symmetry 212 direction. Of these, the length of the Edison base 204 is fixed by the applicable electrical connector standard, while the length of the body portion 208 of the heat sink is determined at least in part by a minimum size for accommodating the power conditioning electronics. Thus, the summed length X+Y of the ovoid diffuser 200 is a primary adjustable parameter for tuning the overall length of the LED light bulb.

[0097] In some embodiments, the ovoid diffuser geometry has X+Y>Dma and X>Y. In some embodiments X>1.5 Y, and in some embodiments X>2 Y, and in some embodiments X>3 Y. This can also be expressed in term of the surface area ratio. Denoting the surface area of the proximate portion of length X as Aprox and the surface area of the distal portion of length Y as Adist and the total surface area as Atotai it is advantageous for Apm /Atotai^O-S, and in some embodiments Aprox/AU)tai>0.65, and in some embodiments Aprox/Atotai>0.75. Said more generally, the ovoid diffuser 200 is preferably egg-shaped with a broader end distal from the aperture 210 tapering to a narrower end proximate to the aperture 210. The proximate end may be truncated by the aperture 210, as illustrated, but it is also contemplated for the aperture to be sufficiently small for such truncation to be negligible or absent.

[0098] In the diffuser 200, to compensate for optical loss due to the heat fins 202 and/or body portion 208 of the heat sink, the prolate proximate portion of the diffuser 200 increases the luminous flux that is directed below the equatorial plane 230 from the ovoid diffuser 200. The oblate distal portion is chosen to tailor the light distribution at angles above the equatorial plane 230, and/or to preserve or set a desired overall height of the diffuser 200 (or, of the LED light bulb as a whole) which in some applications is constrained by applicable standards such as ANSI regulations for A- 19 type light bulbs. The ovoid diffuser 200 provides a greater surface area having angles normal to the surface that point below the equatorial plane 230 relative to the surface area having angles normal to the surface that point above the equatorial plane 230. This compensates for the absorption and scattering of light by the heat fins 202 which is more substantial for light emitted below the equatorial plane 230 than for light emitted above the equatorial plane 230.

[0099] The ovoid diffuser 200 has a geometry in which the proximate portion of length X has a truncated prolate hemi-ellipsoid shape while the distal portion of length Y has an oblate hemi-ellipsoid shape. Ovoid diffusers with numerous variations on this shape are contemplated. Although the shape of the diffuser sections are shown in FIGURES 24, 25, and 26 as portions of prolate and oblate ellipsoids resulting in an ovoid shape, more generally the proximate section of the diffuser is characterized by having a gradually increasing diameter, or lateral dimension as a function of distance away from the LED light source, along the axis of symmetry 212, reaching a maximum diameter Dmax at the equatorial plane 230, and the diffuser is characterized by having a gradually decreasing diameter, or lateral dimension as a function of distance away from the LED light source above the equatorial plane 230, along the axis of symmetry 212 to the most distant location at the top of the diffuser. The actual shapes of the surfaces of the proximate and distal sections of the diffuser do not have to match the geometry of an ellipse, either prolate or oblate, or hemispherical, or spherical.

[00100] FIGURES 27, 28, 29, and 30 show some illustrative examples of some such variations. FIGURE 27 shows an ovoid diffuser 200a having the same prolate hemi-ellipsoid proximate portion as the diffuser 200, but in which the oblate hemi-ellipsoid distal portion is replaced by a hemispherical distal portion. FIGURE 28 shows an ovoid diffuser 200b having the same oblate hemi-ellipsoid distal portion as the diffuser 200, but a differently shaped proximate portion. The proximate portion of the ovoid diffuser 200b is divided into two parts: a more proximate part having a truncated conical shape of length XI along the axis-of-symmetry 212; and a less proximate portion having a prolate shape of length X2 along the axis-of-symmetry 212. FIGURE 29 shows an ovoid diffuser 200c having the same (truncated) prolate hemi-ellipsoid proximate portion and the same oblate hemi-ellipsoid distal portion as the diffuser 200, but which further includes a transition region having a cylindrical shape and height (or thickness) dtransition disposed between the proximate and distal portions, in this embodiment the equatorial plane 230 is suitably replaced by an thin equatorial "slab" 230' having the thickness dlnmSj,j0n. FIGURE 30 shows an ovoid diffuser 200d having the same (truncated) prolate hemi-ellipsoid proximate portion as the diffuser 200, but having an oblate distal portion of length Y that is less than a full oblate hemi-ellipsoid. As a consequence, the ovoid diffuser 200d has an abrupt discontinuity at the joining or meeting of the proximate and distal sections or portion of respective lengths X and Y at the equatorial plane 230.

[00101] Substantially omnidirectional illumination over a large latitudinal range of interest θ=[0υ, θηΐ2Χ] where Q nax may be 120°, or 135°, or so forth (the largest latitudinal angle GmaX of interest may, for example, be determined by the illumination standard with which the lamp is expected to be in compliance) is obtainable for a given LED-based light source by suitable adjustment of the geometry of the ovoid diffuser, for example using one of the diffusers 200, 200a, 200b, 200c, 200d with suitably selected dimensions X, Y, dmax, (and, depending upon the template geometry, one or more additional dimensions such as dtransiiion for the diffuser 200c or the sub-lengths XI and X2 for the diffuser 200b), and specific curvatures for the relatively more elongate proximate and relatively more flattened distal portions or sections. In this way, a lamp with high omnidirectional light output is achieved, which is also made of relatively few parts. For example, the lamp components may include four principal components: (1) the diffuser 200; (2) the heat sink 202, 208 (the heat sink body 208 and fins 202 being suitably formed as a single unit); (3) an electronics module; and (4) a light engine comprising one or more LED devices mounted on a circuit board or other support.

[00102] However, depending upon the specific light engine and tolerances of the manufacturing process, as well as the tolerances specified in the illumination standard with which the lamp is to comply, it may be difficult to obtain a high yield of standard-compliant lamps using only the diffuser 200 for achieving omnidirectional illumination distribution. In such cases, the ovoid diffuser 200, 200a, 200b, 200c, 200d may be combined with one or more auxiliary optical components to achieve the desired omnidirectional illumination distribution with a high yield in a mass productions setting.

[00103] With reference to FIGURE 31, in one approach an auxiliary optical element is provided. The illustrative approach is based on the lamp of FIGURES 15-23 and includes the ovoid diffuser 200 and the finned heat sink 202, 208. FIGURE 31 also diagrammatically illustrates a suitable light engine 250 comprising a circuit board with one or more LED devices (not shown) disposed thereon. An auxiliary optical element comprises a reflective or refractive or transmissive light-scattering post 252 extending upward from the light engine 250 along the axis-of-symmetry 212, and optionally also includes a reflective or refractive or transmissive light-scattering cap 254 at the end of the post 252 distal from the light engine 250. In some embodiments, the light engine 250 includes a central mounting hole for securing the light engine 250 in the lamp, in which case the post 252 can be embodied as a threaded shaft that also serves to secure (or assist in securing) the light engine 250 in the lamp. The light- scattering post 252 has the effect of reflecting or refracting or transmissively scattering some portion of the light that would otherwise be directed at or close to the "north" latitude (that is, θ~0υ) into larger latitudinal angles. The optional reflective or refractive or transmissively light-scattering cap 254 further serves to scatter such light into larger angles, especially into angles greater than 90". In embodiments in which the assembly 252, 254 is a fastening element for securing (or helping to secure) the light engine 250, the cap 254 may also serve as a bolt head, screwhead or other useful component of the fastener. The sides of the post 252 and/or cap 254 may be angled or otherwise shaped to adjust the light distribution.

[00104] With reference to FIGURE 32, in an alternative approach an auxiliary optical element may be integrated with the light engine. The illustrative approach is again based on the lamp of FIGURES 15-23 and includes the ovoid diffuser 200 and the finned heat sink 202, 208, and also includes the light engine 250 comprising a circuit board with one or more LED devices (not shown) disposed thereon. The light engine 250 in the embodiment of FIGURE 32 also includes (or, viewed alternatively, the lamp also includes) a light-scattering remote dome 260 disposed over the LED devices of the light engine, and optionally having an open perimeter secured to the circuit board of the light engine 250. The dome 260 may be air filled, or may be partially or wholly filled with silicone or another encapsulant. The dome 260 is optionally roughened or otherwise configured to provide optical diffusion, and/or may optionally include a remote phosphor disposed on an inner or outer surface of the dome or embedded in the material of the dome. Some suitable light engines incorporating one or more LED devices covered by a dome mounted on a circuit board are described in: Aanegola et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,224,000 which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety; Aanegola ct al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,800,121 which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety; Soules et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,479,662 which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety; and Reginelli et al., U.S. Pub. No. 2008/0054280 Al which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Some suitable light engines incorporating one or more LED devices covered by a dome mounted on a circuit board also include the Vio* high-brightness LED light engines available from the General Electric Company. The dome 260 provides shaping of the light distribution additional to that provided by the ovoid diffuser 200. For example, while a light engine comprising one or more Lambertian-emitting LED chips disposed on a planar circuit board has substantially no light intensity at 9=90°, in contrast the Vio* high-brightness LED light engine has a substantial light intensity distribution component at θ=90υ, which cooperates with the ovoid diffuser 200 in providing an omnidirectional illumination distribution closer to an ideal omnidirectional distribution.

[00105] The auxiliary optical components 252, 254, 260 shown in FIGURES 31 and 32 are illustrative examples. One or more of the illustrative auxiliary optical components 252, 254, 260 or other auxiliary optical components may be incorporated w ith one of the illustrative ovoid diffusers 200, 200a, 200b, 200c, 200d, or with a spherical or ellipsoidal diffuser (e.g., as shown in FIGURES 5-8 or 1 1), to provide omnidirectional illumination distribution closer to an ideal omnidirectional distribution. By way of further illustrative example, a cap or other additional coating or diffuser may be included to provide further shaping of the light distribution. [00106] The preferred embodiments have been illustrated and described. Obviously, modifications and alterations will occur to others upon reading and understanding the preceding detailed description. It is intended that the invention be construed as including all such modifications and alterations insofar as they come within the scope of the appended claims or the equivalents thereof.

Claims

1. A light emitting apparatus comprising:
an LED-based light source;
an ovoid diffuser generating a light intensity distribution output responsive to illumination inside the diffuser; and
a base including a base connector;
the LED-based light source, the ovoid diffuser, and the base being secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket;
the base being operatively connected with the LED-based light source in the unitary LED lamp to electrically power the LED-based light source using electrical power received at the base connector.
2. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein the ovoid diffuser has a single axis of rotational symmetry.
3. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 2, wherein the ovoid diffuser has continuous or N-fold rotational symmetry about the single axis of rotational symmetry.
4. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein the ovoid diffuser is hollow and has an axis of rotational symmetry and an aperture centered on the axis of rotational symmetry, the LED based light source arranged to illuminate inside the ovoid diffuser through the aperture.
5. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 4, wherein the ovoid diffuser includes a proximate portion that is proximate to the aperture and has a length X along the axis of rotational symmetry and a distal portion that is distal from the aperture and has a length y along the axis of rotational symmetry, wherein X>Y.
6. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 5, wherein X>1.5Y.
7. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 5, wherein X>2Y.
8. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 5, wherein X>3Y.
9. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 4, wherein the ovoid diffuser includes a proximate portion having a first shape that is proximate to the aperture and a distal portion having a second shape that is distal from the aperture, wherein the first and second shapes are different.
10. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein the proximate portion has a larger surface area than the distal portion.
11. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein a ratio of a surface area of the proximate portion to a total light emissive surface area of the diffuser is at least 0.65.
12. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein a ratio of a surface area of the proximate portion to a total light emissive surface area of the diffuser is at least 0.75.
13. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein the ovoid diffuser is egg-shaped with an aperture optically coupled with the LED-based light source disposed at a narrower end of the egg shape and a broader end of the egg shape distal from the aperture.
14. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein the ovoid diffuser has an aperture optically coupled with the LED-based light source, a proximate portion disposed proximate to the aperture, and a distal portion disposed distal from the aperture, the proximate and distal portions having different shapes.
15. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 14, wherein the proximate portion has a prolate shape.
16. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 15, wherein the proximate portion has a shape of a truncated prolate semi-ellipsoid.
17. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 14, wherein the distal portion has an oblate shape.
18. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 17, wherein the distal portion has a shape of an oblate semi-ellipsoid.
19. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 14, wherein the distal portion has a spherical shape.
20. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 19, wherein the distal portion has a hemispherical shape.
21. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 14, wherein the ovoid diffuser has an axis of symmetry about which both the proximate portion and the distal portion have rotational symmetry.
22. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 21, wherein the ovoid diffuser has a largest dimension transverse to the axis of symmetry at an equatorial plane or slab at the intersection of or disposed between the proximate and distal portions.
23. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 22, wherein the ovoid diffuser is smoothly continuous across an equatorial plane at the intersection of the proximate and distal portions.
24. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 22, wherein the ovoid diffuser is discontinuous across an equatorial plane at the intersection of the proximate and distal portions.
25. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 22, wherein the ovoid diffuser further includes a transition region at an equatorial slab disposed between the proximate and distal portions.
26. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 25, wherein the transition region at the equatorial slab has a cylindrical shape.
27. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 14, further comprising:
heat sink elements extending over the proximate portion disposed proximate to the aperture.
28. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 27, wherein the heat sink elements are fins.
29. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 27, wherein the heat sink elements do not extend over the distal portion.
30. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 27, wherein the heat sink elements are part of a unitary heat sink that is separate from the ovoid diffuser, and the ovoid diffuser is sized and the heat sink elements are shaped such that the ovoid diffuser can be secured to the unitary heat sink while lying inside the heat sink fins.
31. A light emitting apparatus comprising:
an LED-based light source;
a base including a base connector, the base configured to electrically power the LED-based light source using electrical power received at the base connector; and
a diffuser having an aperture, the LED-based light source arranged to input light into the light input aperture, the diffuser including (i) a first portion arranged proximate to the aperture having an outside surface area and having an increasing maximum lateral dimension moving away from the input aperture and (ii) second portion arranged distal from the aperture having an outside surface area and having a decreasing maximum lateral dimension moving away from the input aperture and
[111] and a mid-plane location at which the maximum lateral dimension equals or exceeds that of the first and second portions;
wherein the outside surface area of the first portion exceeds the outside surface area of the second portion; and
wherein the LED-based light source, the base, and the diffuser shell being secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket.
32. An apparatus comprising an egg shaped diffuser including a light input aperture at a narrower end of the egg shaped diffuser.
33. The apparatus as set forth in claim 32, further comprising an LED- based light source optically coupled into the light input aperture at the narrower end of the egg shaped diffuser.
34. A light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 33, further comprising a post disposed in the egg shaped diffuser extending away from and along the optical axis of the LED-based light source.
35. A light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 33, further comprising a dome-shaped light-transmissive diffuser or remote phosphor disposed over the LED-based light source and inside the egg shaped diffuser.
36. A light emitting apparatus comprising:
an LED-based light source;
a spherical, spheroidal, or toroidal diffuser generating a light intensity distribution output responsive to illumination inside the diffuser; and
a base including a base connector; the LED-based light source, the diffuser, and the base being secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket;
the diffuser being shaped and arranged respective to the LED-based light source in the unitary LED lamp to conform with an isolux surface of the LED-based light source; and
the base being operatively connected with the LED-based light source in the unitary LED lamp to electrically power the LED-based light source using electrical power received at the base connector.
37. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 36, wherein the spherical, spheroidal, or toroidal diffuser generates a Lambertian light intensity distribution output at any point on the diffuser surface responsive to illumination inside the diffuser.
38. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 36, wherein the diffuser is a spherical or spheroidal diffuser.
39. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 38, wherein the conformance of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser with an isolux surface of the LED-based light source is effective for the spherical or spheroidal diffuser to generate illumination with uniformity variation of +30% or less over an omnidirectional illumination latitudinal range spanning at least θ=[0°, 120°] responsive to illumination inside the spherical or spheroidal diffuser by the LED-based light source.
40. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 39, wherein the base is arranged outside of the omnidirectional illumination latitudinal range in the unitary LED lamp.
41. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 39, wherein the base has a relatively smaller size proximate to the diffuser and a relatively larger size distal from the diffuser.
42. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 36, wherein the LED-based light source is ring-shaped and the diffuser is a toroidal diffuser.
43. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 42, wherein the base includes a base portion on which the ring-shaped LED-based light source is disposed.
44. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 43, wherein the base portion is a hollow chimney containing a heat sink.
45. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 44, wherein the heat sink comprises a cooling fan synthetic jet, or other active cooling element.
46. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 43, wherein the base portion has a polygonal cross section with N sides where N is an integer greater than or equal to three and the ring-shaped LED-based light source comprises N adjoined planar circuit boards forming the ring shape.
47. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 36, further comprising:
a heat sink including a base heat sink element disposed in the base.
48. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 47, wherein the heat sink further comprises:
flat planar, curved planar, or linear heat dissipating elements disposed on and extending away from the spherical or spheroidal diffuser.
49. A light emitting apparatus comprising:
a light assembly including an LED-based light source optically coupled with and arranged tangential to a spherical or spheroidal diffuser; and
a base including a base connector, the base configured to electrically power the LED-based light source using electrical power received at the base connector; and the light assembly and base being secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket.
50. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the base connector receives electrical power of at least 100 volts a.c, and the base further comprises:
an electronic driver configured to convert the electrical power of at least 100 volts a.c. received at the base connector to lower voltage d.c. power for electrically driving the LED-based light source.
51. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the light assembly generates illumination with uniformity variation of +30% or less over a latitudinal range θ=[0ο,Χ] where latitude X >120° and the base does not extend into the latitudinal range θ=[0ο,Χ].
52. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 51, wherein the base has sides lying along the latitude X.
53. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 51, wherein the light assembly generates illumination with uniformity variation of +20% or less over the latitudinal range θ=[0ο,Χ].
54. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 51, wherein the light assembly generates illumination with uniformity variation of +10% or less over the latitudinal range θ=[0υ,Χ].
55. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the light assembly generates illumination with uniformity variation of +30% or less over at least a latitudinal range θ=[0°,135°] and the base does not extend into the latitudinal range θ=[0°,135ο].
56. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the light assembly generates illumination with uniformity variation of +30% or less over at least a latitudinal range θ=[0°,150°] and the base does not extend into the latitudinal range 0=[0°, l50°].
57. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the LED-based light source comprises a planar light source arranged tangentially to the spherical or spheroidal diffuser.
58. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein:
the LED-based light source is of dimension dL and is arranged tangential to the spherical or spheroidal diffuser, and
a ratio of the diameter or major axis or minor axis of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser to the dimension dL is greater than 1.4.
59. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 58, wherein the ratio of the diameter or major axis or minor axis of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser to the dimension dL is greater than 2.0.
60. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 58, wherein the ratio of the diameter or major axis or minor axis of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser to the dimension dL is greater than 2.5.
61. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, further comprising:
a heat sink including a base heat sink element disposed in the base.
62. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 61, wherein the heat sink further comprises:
heat-dissipating elements in thermal communication with the base heat sink element and extending outward from and oriented transverse to the surface of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser.
63. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 62, wherein the heat dissipating elements comprise fins oriented in planes of constant longitude.
64. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the base connector comprises a threaded Edison base connector.
65. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the base lies within a far field latitudinal blocking angle of 60° or less and has angled sides with angles that are about the same as the blocking angle.
66. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the base lies within a far field latitudinal blocking angle of 45° or less and has angled sides with angles that are about the same as the blocking angle.
67. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 49, wherein the spherical or spheroidal diffuser generates a Lambertian light intensity distribution output at any point on the diffuser surface responsive to illumination by the LED-based light source.
68. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 67, wherein the spherical or spheroidal diffuser conforms with an isolux surface of the LED-based light source with conformance effective for the light assembly to generate illumination with uniformity variation of +30% or less over a latitudinal range of at least θ=[0°, 120°].
69. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 68, wherein the spherical or spheroidal diffuser conforms with a spherical or spheroidal isolux surface of the LED-based light source with conformance effective for the light assembly to generate illumination with uniformity variation of +20% or less over a latitudinal range of at least θ=[0°, 150°].
70. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 67, wherein: the LED-based light source emits an intensity
distribution selected from a group consisting of (i) a Lambertian distribution, (ii) a prolate-distorted Lambertian distribution, and (iii) an oblate-distorted Lambertian distribution, and
the spherical or spheroidal diffuser has a shape
substantially matching the intensity distribution emitted by the LED-based light source.
71. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 70, wherein the shape of the spherical or spheroidal diffuser further accommodates an effect on the intensity distribution of reflection by a surface of the base.
72. A light emitting apparatus comprising:
a light assembly including a ring-shaped LED-based light source optically coupled with a toroidal diffuser; and
a base including a base connector and configured to electrically power the ring-shaped LED-based light source using electrical power received at the base connector;
the light assembly and base being secured together as a unitary LED lamp installable in a lighting socket by connecting the base connector with the lighting socket.
73. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 72, wherein the base connector comprises a threaded Edison base connector.
74. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 72, wherein the ring-shaped LED-based light source is arranged tangential to the toroidal diffuser.
75. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 72, further comprising: a cylindrical former or chimney supporting the ring-shaped light assembly and securing the light assembly with the base as said unitary LED lamp.
76. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 72, further comprising:
a heat sink at least one of (i) disposed on the cylindrical former or chimney (ii) disposed in the cylindrical former or chimney and (iii) defining the cylindrical former or chimney.
77. The light emitting apparatus as set forth in claim 76, wherein the heat sink comprises:
an active cooling element disposed inside the cylindrical former or chimney.
PCT/US2010/051109 2009-10-02 2010-10-01 Light emitting diode (led) based lamp WO2011041667A1 (en)

Priority Applications (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/572,480 US8593040B2 (en) 2009-10-02 2009-10-02 LED lamp with surface area enhancing fins
US12/572,480 2009-10-02
US12/572,339 2009-10-02
US12/572,339 US9103507B2 (en) 2009-10-02 2009-10-02 LED lamp with uniform omnidirectional light intensity output
US29/359,239 USD658788S1 (en) 2009-10-02 2010-04-07 Light emitting diode (LED)-based light bulb
US29/359,239 2010-04-07
US32897410P true 2010-04-28 2010-04-28
US61/328,974 2010-04-28

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2010300448A AU2010300448B8 (en) 2009-10-02 2010-10-01 Light emitting diode (LED) based lamp
CN2010800547564A CN102695913A (en) 2009-10-02 2010-10-01 Light emitting diode (LED) based lamp
EP10821324.0A EP2483596A4 (en) 2009-10-02 2010-10-01 Light emitting diode (led) based lamp
KR1020187028878A KR20180116428A (en) 2009-10-02 2010-10-01 Light emitting diode (led) based lamp
AU2015203255A AU2015203255B2 (en) 2009-10-02 2015-06-05 Light emitting diode (LED) based lamp

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2011041667A1 true WO2011041667A1 (en) 2011-04-07

Family

ID=43826667

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2010/051109 WO2011041667A1 (en) 2009-10-02 2010-10-01 Light emitting diode (led) based lamp

Country Status (4)

Country Link
KR (1) KR20180116428A (en)
CN (2) CN102695913A (en)
AU (1) AU2010300448B8 (en)
WO (1) WO2011041667A1 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2012139845A1 (en) * 2011-04-12 2012-10-18 Osram Ag Lighting device
CN102759032A (en) * 2012-04-28 2012-10-31 重庆雷士实业有限公司 Semiconductor illuminating device and light control method thereof
CN103148365A (en) * 2011-12-07 2013-06-12 台湾积体电路制造股份有限公司 Led Light
WO2014036815A1 (en) * 2012-09-05 2014-03-13 深圳市众明半导体照明有限公司 Illuminator

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104218136A (en) * 2013-06-05 2014-12-17 新世纪光电股份有限公司 Light-emitting device
US20150085498A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-03-26 Huizhou Light Engine Ltd. Illuminating apparatus with large view angle
TW201641877A (en) * 2015-05-18 2016-12-01 Unity Opto Technology Co Ltd LED light bulb for emitting light in axial symmetry
US9657916B2 (en) * 2015-05-28 2017-05-23 Technical Consumer Products, Inc. Lighting device including multiple diffusers for blending light

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040228131A1 (en) * 2003-05-13 2004-11-18 Light Prescriptions Innovators, Llc, A Delaware Limited Liability Company Optical device for LED-based light-bulb substitute
US20050127543A1 (en) * 2001-12-24 2005-06-16 Reitter & Schefenacker Gmbh & Co. Kg Method for producing light-guiding led bodies in two spatially and temporally separate steps
US20080278955A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2008-11-13 Boyer John Delmore Led lamp device and method to retrofit a lighting fixture
US20090129102A1 (en) * 2007-11-21 2009-05-21 Fu Zhun Precision Industry (Shen Zhen) Co., Ltd. Led lamp with a heat sink
US20090135595A1 (en) * 2007-11-23 2009-05-28 Taiming Chen Light bulb with light emitting elements for use in conventional incandescent light bulb sockets
US20090174302A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2009-07-09 George Davey Durable Super-Cooled Intelligent Light Bulb

Family Cites Families (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6305821B1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2001-10-23 Gen-Home Technology Co., Ltd. Led lamp having ball-shaped light diffusing modifier
US6746885B2 (en) * 2001-08-24 2004-06-08 Densen Cao Method for making a semiconductor light source
JP5566564B2 (en) * 2003-05-05 2014-08-06 ジーイー ライティング ソリューションズ エルエルシー Led use bulbs
CN100452424C (en) * 2003-05-13 2009-01-14 光处方革新有限公司 Optical device for LED-based light-bulb substitute
JP2005108700A (en) * 2003-09-30 2005-04-21 Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp Light source
US20060098440A1 (en) * 2004-11-05 2006-05-11 David Allen Solid state lighting device with improved thermal management, improved power management, adjustable intensity, and interchangable lenses
JP2006156187A (en) * 2004-11-30 2006-06-15 Mitsubishi Electric Corp Led light source device and led electric bulb
WO2006104553A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2006-10-05 Five Star Import Group L.L.C. Led light bulb
CN200955687Y (en) * 2006-07-07 2007-10-03 祝子荣 High-power single-body semiconductor lamp-bulb
EP2227925B1 (en) * 2008-01-10 2017-06-28 Feit Electric Company, Inc. Led lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
WO2009100160A1 (en) * 2008-02-06 2009-08-13 C. Crane Company, Inc. Light emitting diode lighting device
CN102007337A (en) * 2008-04-17 2011-04-06 皇家飞利浦电子股份有限公司 Led based light source

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050127543A1 (en) * 2001-12-24 2005-06-16 Reitter & Schefenacker Gmbh & Co. Kg Method for producing light-guiding led bodies in two spatially and temporally separate steps
US20040228131A1 (en) * 2003-05-13 2004-11-18 Light Prescriptions Innovators, Llc, A Delaware Limited Liability Company Optical device for LED-based light-bulb substitute
US20080278955A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2008-11-13 Boyer John Delmore Led lamp device and method to retrofit a lighting fixture
US20090174302A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2009-07-09 George Davey Durable Super-Cooled Intelligent Light Bulb
US20090129102A1 (en) * 2007-11-21 2009-05-21 Fu Zhun Precision Industry (Shen Zhen) Co., Ltd. Led lamp with a heat sink
US20090135595A1 (en) * 2007-11-23 2009-05-28 Taiming Chen Light bulb with light emitting elements for use in conventional incandescent light bulb sockets

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
See also references of EP2483596A4 *

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2012139845A1 (en) * 2011-04-12 2012-10-18 Osram Ag Lighting device
CN103148365A (en) * 2011-12-07 2013-06-12 台湾积体电路制造股份有限公司 Led Light
TWI500882B (en) * 2011-12-07 2015-09-21 Taiwan Semiconductor Mfg Co Ltd Lighting device
US9970603B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2018-05-15 Epistar Corporation Energy star compliant LED lamp
CN102759032A (en) * 2012-04-28 2012-10-31 重庆雷士实业有限公司 Semiconductor illuminating device and light control method thereof
WO2014036815A1 (en) * 2012-09-05 2014-03-13 深圳市众明半导体照明有限公司 Illuminator

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
KR20180116428A (en) 2018-10-24
AU2010300448A8 (en) 2015-10-29
AU2010300448B8 (en) 2015-10-29
AU2010300448B2 (en) 2015-07-02
AU2010300448A1 (en) 2012-05-24
CN102695913A (en) 2012-09-26
CN107035977A (en) 2017-08-11

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
CN102203494B (en) Lighting device, heat transfer structure and heat transfer element
RU2446348C2 (en) Method and apparatus for formation of uniform projection illumination
JP5478575B2 (en) Solid lamp
EP2636942B1 (en) Bulb-type lamp and illuminating device
US8292468B2 (en) Solid state light source light bulb
KR101921339B1 (en) Compact light-mixing led light engine and white led lamp with narrow beam and high cri using same
US9310030B2 (en) Non-uniform diffuser to scatter light into uniform emission pattern
US9217542B2 (en) Heat sinks and lamp incorporating same
US7722220B2 (en) Lighting device
EP2553332B1 (en) Inside-out led bulb
JP5518074B2 (en) Light emitting diodes (of led) illumination device
US9062830B2 (en) High efficiency solid state lamp and bulb
EP2529421B1 (en) Light emitting diode device having a wide angular distribution
US8337030B2 (en) Solid state lighting devices having remote luminescent material-containing element, and lighting methods
US8016443B2 (en) Remote-phosphor LED downlight
KR101579220B1 (en) Led lighting module and lighting lamp using the same
US20110215345A1 (en) Solid state lamp with thermal spreading elements and light directing optics
US20120300455A1 (en) Illumination Device
US20110096552A1 (en) Remote phosphor light engines and lamps
JP5511837B2 (en) The semiconductor light emitting device and a method of assembling comprises an elongated hollow wavelength conversion tube
US9057511B2 (en) High efficiency solid state lamp and bulb
US9243758B2 (en) Compact heat sinks and solid state lamp incorporating same
US8764224B2 (en) Luminaire with distributed LED sources
US8845137B2 (en) Lighting device having heat dissipation element
US8089207B2 (en) Lighting using solid state device and phosphors to produce light approximating a black body radiation spectrum

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 10821324

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2010300448

Country of ref document: AU

Ref document number: 2010821324

Country of ref document: EP

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 20127011454

Country of ref document: KR

Kind code of ref document: A

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 2010300448

Country of ref document: AU

Date of ref document: 20101001

Kind code of ref document: A

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: BR

Ref legal event code: B01A

Ref document number: 112012011011

Country of ref document: BR

ENPW Started to enter nat. phase and was withdrawn or failed for other reasons

Ref document number: 112012011011

Country of ref document: BR