WO2010117882A2 - Improved touch sensor panel design - Google Patents

Improved touch sensor panel design Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2010117882A2
WO2010117882A2 PCT/US2010/029698 US2010029698W WO2010117882A2 WO 2010117882 A2 WO2010117882 A2 WO 2010117882A2 US 2010029698 W US2010029698 W US 2010029698W WO 2010117882 A2 WO2010117882 A2 WO 2010117882A2
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WO
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Prior art keywords
plurality
sections
lines
touch sensor
sensor panel
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PCT/US2010/029698
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French (fr)
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WO2010117882A3 (en )
Inventor
Sueng Jae Hong
Martin Paul Grunthaner
Steven Porter Hotelling
Lynn Youngs
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Apple Inc.
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/03Arrangements for converting the position or the displacement of a member into a coded form
    • G06F3/041Digitisers, e.g. for touch screens or touch pads, characterised by the transducing means
    • G06F3/044Digitisers, e.g. for touch screens or touch pads, characterised by the transducing means by capacitive means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F2203/00Indexing scheme relating to G06F3/00 - G06F3/048
    • G06F2203/041Indexing scheme relating to G06F3/041 -G06F3/045
    • G06F2203/04111Cross over in capacitive digitiser, i.e. details of structures for connecting electrodes of the sensing pattern where the connections cross each other, e.g. bridge structures comprising an insulating layer, or vias through substrate
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F2203/00Indexing scheme relating to G06F3/00 - G06F3/048
    • G06F2203/041Indexing scheme relating to G06F3/041 -G06F3/045
    • G06F2203/04112Electrode mesh in capacitive digitiser: electrode for touch sensing is formed of a mesh of very fine, normally metallic, interconnected lines that are almost invisible to see. This provides a quite large but transparent electrode surface, without need for ITO or similar transparent conductive material

Abstract

A touch sensor panel including a plurality of drive lines crossing a plurality of sense lines, forming an array. The plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines are formed by interconnecting sections of at least one conductive material having a truncated diamond shape or formed of interconnected conductive lines. At least one conductive dummy region may be disposed in an area of the touch sensor panel around the truncated diamond shape sections or interconnected conductive lines of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines. One or more lines may be formed overlapping the interconnected sections of each of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines.

Description

IMPROVED TOUCH SENSOR PANEL DESIGN

Field

[0001] This relates generally to touch sensor panels, and in particular, to touch sensor panel designs that can improve touch sensitivity and reduce negative optical artifacts.

Background

[0002] Many types of input devices are presently available for performing operations in a computing system, such as buttons or keys, mice, trackballs, joysticks, touch sensor panels, touch screens and the like. Touch screens, in particular, are becoming increasingly popular because of their ease and versatility of operation as well as their declining price. Touch screens can include a touch sensor panel, which can be a clear panel with a touch-sensitive surface, and a display device such as a liquid crystal display (LCD) that can be positioned partially or fully behind the panel so that the touch-sensitive surface can cover at least a portion of the viewable area of the display device. Touch screens can allow a user to perform various functions by touching the touch sensor panel using a finger, stylus or other object at a location dictated by a user interface (UI) being displayed by the display device. In general, touch screens can recognize a touch event and the position of the touch event on the touch sensor panel, and the computing system can then interpret the touch event in accordance with the display appearing at the time of the touch event, and thereafter can perform one or more actions based on the touch event.

[0003] Mutual capacitance touch sensor panels can be formed from a matrix of drive and sense lines of a substantially transparent conductive material such as Indium Tim Oxide (ITO), often arranged in rows and columns in horizontal and vertical directions on a substantially transparent substrate. Drive signals can be transmitted through the drive lines, which can result in the formation of static mutual capacitance at the crossover points (sensing pixels) of the drive lines and the sense lines. The static mutual capacitance, and any changes to the static mutual capacitance due to a touch event, can be determined from sense signals that can be generated in the sense lines due to the drive signals.

[0004] The touch sensing pixels can be varied in size and/or spacing to enable touch sensitivity in large panels without increasing the number of drive and sense lines which can otherwise increase the processing burden and can cause negative optical artifacts when viewing the display device through the touch panel. However, increasing the size and/or spacing of the touch sensing pixels can negatively impact the resistance and capacitance (RC) time constant per pixel, thereby hindering touch sensitivity of the touch panel and limiting the speed at which the touch panel can operate.

Summary

[0005] This relates to a touch sensor panel including a plurality of shaped drive lines and a plurality of shaped sense lines formed on the same layer and utilizing conductive jumpers in crossover locations, according to one embodiment. The plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines can be formed by interconnecting sections of at least one conductive material having a truncated diamond shape to reduce parasitic capacitance, although other shapes can also be used. Either the sections of the plurality of drive lines or the sections of the plurality of sense lines can be interconnected with one or more conductive cross-overs, which can be an opaque metal or other conductive material. A black mask or other opaque covering can be layered over the one or more conductive cross-overs to minimize visual artifacts. Also, at least one conductive dummy region can be disposed in an area of the touch sensor panel around the truncated diamond shaped sections of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines to improve optical uniformity and enhance the touch detection capabilities of the touch sensor panel. One or more metal lines can be formed overlapping and electrically connected to the interconnected sections of each of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines in order to further reduce resistance.

[0006] In an alternate embodiment, the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines can be formed by interconnecting sections of interconnected conductive lines. According to an embodiment, the interconnected conductive lines are formed of sections of at least one conductive material having an interdigitated comb design. The sections can be formed from a substantially transparent conductive material such as ITO, for example. Alternatively, the interconnected conductive lines may be thin metal lines in a web-like formation, without the substantially transparent conductive material.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0007] The present disclosure, in accordance with one or more various embodiments, is described in detail with reference to the following figures. The drawings are provided for purposes of illustration only and merely depict exemplary embodiments of the disclosure. These drawings are provided to facilitate the reader's understanding of the disclosure and should not be considered limiting of the breadth, scope, or applicability of the disclosure. It should be noted that for clarity and ease of illustration these drawings are not necessarily made to scale.

[0008] FIG. 1 illustrates an example computing system according to various embodiments.

[0009] FIG. 2(a) illustrates an exemplary arrangement of drive and sense lines on the same side of a single substrate according to various embodiments.

[0010] FIG. 2(b) illustrates an exemplary pixel generated from diamond- shaped drive and sense lines on the same side of a single substrate according to various embodiments.

[0011] FIG. 3(a) illustrates an exemplary diamond-shaped section with thin arms according to various embodiments.

[0012] FIG. 3(b) illustrates an exemplary truncated diamond-shaped section with thin arms according to various embodiments. [0013] FIG. 3(c) illustrates an exemplary diamond-shaped section with thick arms according to various embodiments.

[0014] FIG. 3(d) illustrates an exemplary truncated diamond-shaped section with thick arms according to various embodiments. [0015] FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary array of interconnected truncated diamond-shaped sections according to various embodiments.

[0016] FIG. 5(a) illustrates a close-up view of interconnected truncated diamond-shaped sections according to various embodiments. [0017] FIG. 5(b) illustrates a close-up view of interconnected truncated diamond-shaped sections with angled arms according to various embodiments

[0018] FIG. 6 an exemplary array of interconnected truncated diamond- shaped sections and dummy sections according to various embodiments.

[0019] FIG. 7 illustrates exemplary touch screen stackup according to various embodiments.

[0020] FIG. 8(a) illustrates a close-up view of interconnected truncated diamond-shaped sections with zigzagged metal traces according to various embodiments.

[0021] FIG. 8(b) illustrates a close-up view of interconnected truncated diamond-shaped sections with a conductive pattern on each section according to various embodiments.

[0022] FIG. 8(c) illustrates a close-up view of interconnected patterns without truncated diamond-shaped sections according to various embodiments.

[0023] FIG. 8(d) illustrates a close-up view of interconnected truncated diamond-shaped sections with disjointed conductive patterns on each section according to various embodiments.

[0024] FIG. 9 illustrates exemplary columns of interdigitated comb design sections according to various embodiments.

[0025] FIG. 10 illustrates exemplary drive lines of interdigitated comb design sections according to various embodiments.

[0026] FIG. 11 illustrates exemplary dummy sections according to various embodiments.

[0027] FIG. 12 illustrates a close-up view of connected interdigitated comb sections and dummy sections according to various embodiments. [0028] FIG. 13(a) illustrates an exemplary mobile telephone that can include a touch sensor panel according to the various embodiments described herein.

[0029] FIG. 13(b) illustrates an exemplary digital media player that can include a touch sensor panel according to the various embodiments described herein. [0030] FIG. 13(c) illustrates exemplary personal computer that can include a touch sensor panel according to the various embodiments described herein

Detailed Description

[0031] In the following description of embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings which form a part hereof, and in which it is shown by way of illustration specific embodiments that can be practiced. It is to be understood that other embodiments can be used and structural changes can be made without departing from the scope of the disclosed embodiments.

[0032] This relates to the formation of touch sensor panels, and in some embodiments, larger-size touch sensor panels. A touch sensor panel, according to various embodiments, can include a plurality of drive lines crossing a plurality of sense lines, forming an array. The plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines can be formed by interconnecting sections of at least one conductive material having a truncated diamond shape in order to reduce parasitic capacitance, although other shapes can also be used. At least one conductive dummy region can be disposed in an area of the touch sensor panel around the truncated diamond shape sections of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines, in order to provide visual uniformity and to further reduce parasitic capacitance. One or more metal lines (or lines formed from other conductive material) may be formed overlapping and in electrical contact with the interconnected sections of each of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines, in order to further reduce resistance.

[0033] In an alternate embodiment, the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines can be formed by interconnecting sections of interconnected conductive lines. According to an embodiment, the interconnected conductive lines are formed of sections of at least one conductive material having an interdigitated comb design. The sections can be formed from a substantially transparent conductive material such as ITO, for example. Alternatively, the interconnected conductive lines may be thin metal lines in a web-like formation, without the substantially transparent conductive material. [0034] Although embodiments may be described and illustrated herein in terms of mutual capacitance touch sensor panels, it should be understood that the various embodiments are not so limited, but can be additionally applicable to self- capacitance sensor panels, single and multi-touch sensor panels, and other sensors in which multiple simultaneous stimulation signals are used to generate a composite sense signal. Furthermore, it should be understood that various embodiments are also applicable to various touch sensor panel configurations, such as configurations in which the drive and sense lines are formed in non-orthogonal arrangements, on the back of a cover glass, on the same side of a single substrate, or integrated with display circuitry. [0035] FIG. 1 illustrates example computing system 100 that can utilize multi-touch controller 106 with integrated drive system according to various embodiments. Touch controller 106 can be a single application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that can include one or more processor subsystems 102, which can include, for example, one or more main processors, such as ARM968 processors or other processors with similar functionality and capabilities. However, in other embodiments, the processor functionality can be implemented instead by dedicated logic, such as a state machine. Processor subsystems 102 can also include, for example, peripherals (not shown) such as random access memory (RAM) or other types of memory or storage, watchdog timers and the like. Touch controller 106 can also include, for example, receive section 107 for receiving signals, such as touch sense signals 103 from the sense lines of touch sensor panel 124, other signals from other sensors such as sensor 111, etc. Touch controller 106 can also include, for example, a demodulation section such as multistage vector demod engine 109, panel scan logic 110, and a drive system including, for example, transmit section 114. Panel scan logic 110 can access RAM 112, autonomously read data from the sense channels and provide control for the sense channels. In addition, panel scan logic 110 can control transmit section 114 to generate stimulation signals 116 at various frequencies and phases that can be selectively applied to the drive lines of touch sensor panel 124.

[0036] Charge pump 115 can be used to generate the supply voltage for the transmit section. Stimulation signals 116 (Vstim) can have amplitudes higher than the maximum voltage the ASIC process can tolerate by cascoding transistors.

Therefore, using charge pump 115, the stimulus voltage can be higher (e.g. 6V) than the voltage level a single transistor can handle (e.g. 3.6 V). Although FIG. 1 shows charge pump 115 separate from transmit section 1 14, the charge pump can be part of the transmit section. [0037] Touch sensor panel 124 can include a capacitive sensing medium having a plurality of drive lines and a plurality of sense lines. The drive and sense lines can be formed from a transparent conductive medium such as Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) or Antimony Tin Oxide (ATO), although other transparent and non- transparent materials such as copper can also be used. In some embodiments, the drive and sense lines can be perpendicular to each other, although in other embodiments other non-Cartesian orientations are possible. For example, in a polar coordinate system, the sensing lines can be concentric circles and the driving lines can be radially extending lines (or vice versa). It should be understood, therefore, that the terms "drive lines" and "sense lines" as used herein are intended to encompass not only orthogonal grids, but the intersecting traces of other geometric configurations having first and second dimensions (e.g. the concentric and radial lines of a polar-coordinate arrangement). The drive and sense lines can be formed on, for example, a single side of a substantially transparent substrate.

[0038] At the "intersections" of the traces, where the drive and sense lines can pass adjacent to and above and below (cross) each other (but without making direct electrical contact with each other), the drive and sense lines can essentially form two electrodes (although more than two traces could intersect as well). Each intersection of drive and sense lines can represent a capacitive sensing node and can be viewed as picture element (pixel) 126, which can be particularly useful when touch sensor panel 124 is viewed as capturing an "image" of touch. (In other words, after touch controller 106 has determined whether a touch event has been detected at each touch sensor in the touch sensor panel, the pattern of touch sensors in the multi- touch panel at which a touch event occurred can be viewed as an "image" of touch (e.g. a pattern of fingers touching the panel).) The capacitance between drive and sense electrodes can appear as a stray capacitance when the given row is held at direct current (DC) voltage levels and as a mutual signal capacitance Csig when the given row is stimulated with an alternating current (AC) signal. The presence of a finger or other object near or on the touch sensor panel can be detected by measuring changes to a signal charge Qsig present at the pixels being touched, which is a function of Csig.

[0039] Computing system 100 can also include host processor 128 for receiving outputs from processor subsystems 102 and performing actions based on the outputs that can include, but are not limited to, moving an object such as a cursor or pointer, scrolling or panning, adjusting control settings, opening a file or document, viewing a menu, making a selection, executing instructions, operating a peripheral device connected to the host device, answering a telephone call, placing a telephone call, terminating a telephone call, changing the volume or audio settings, storing information related to telephone communications such as addresses, frequently dialed numbers, received calls, missed calls, logging onto a computer or a computer network, permitting authorized individuals access to restricted areas of the computer or computer network, loading a user profile associated with a user's preferred arrangement of the computer desktop, permitting access to web content, launching a particular program, encrypting or decoding a message, and/or the like. Host processor 128 can also perform additional functions that may not be related to panel processing, and can be coupled to program storage 132 and display device 130 such as an LCD display for providing a UI to a user of the device. In some embodiments, host processor 128 can be a separate component from touch controller 106, as shown. In other embodiments, host processor 128 can be included as part of touch controller 106. In still other embodiments, the functions of host processor 128 can be performed by processor subsystem 102 and/or distributed among other components of touch controller 106. Display device 130 together with touch sensor panel 124, when located partially or entirely under the touch sensor panel, can form touch screen 118. [0040] Note that one or more of the functions described above can be performed, for example, by firmware stored in memory (e.g., one of the peripherals) and executed by processor subsystem 102, or stored in program storage 132 and executed by host processor 128. The firmware can also be stored and/or transported within any computer-readable medium for use by or in connection with an instruction execution system, apparatus, or device, such as a computer-based system, processor-containing system, or other system that can fetch the instructions from the instruction execution system, apparatus, or device and execute the instructions. In the context of this document, a "computer-readable medium" can be any medium that can contain or store the program for use by or in connection with the instruction execution system, apparatus, or device. The computer readable medium can include, but is not limited to, an electronic, magnetic, optical, electromagnetic, infrared, or semiconductor system, apparatus or device, a portable computer diskette (magnetic), a random access memory (RAM) (magnetic), a read-only memory (ROM) (magnetic), an erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) (magnetic), a portable optical disc such a CD, CD-R, CD-RW, DVD, DVD-R, or DVD-RW, or flash memory such as compact flash cards, secured digital cards, USB memory devices, memory sticks, and the like.

[0041] According to an embodiment of the present disclosure, the drive and sense lines of touch sensor panel 124 may be formed of diamond-shaped or truncated diamond-shaped sections of ITO, for example, that are interconnected. FIG. 2a illustrates exemplary arrangement 200 of diamond-shaped drive and sense lines on the same layer and side of a single substrate. Note that the spatial density of pixels in the arrangement can be made similar to previously disclosed sensor panels, as spatial density can be dependent on the geometry of the diamond-shaped drive and sense lines. Note also that FIG. 2a shows diamond-shaped drive lines 202 and diamond-shaped sense lines 204 separately and superimposed at 200; however, drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 can be disposed on the same layer. In FIG. 2a, each drive line 202 can be formed from areas of substantially transparent ITO 206 ("sections" 206) connected at adjacent facing points by necked-down area 208, although conductive material other than ITO can also be used. Each sense line 204 can be similarly formed from areas of substantially transparent ITO 210 ("sections" 210) or other conductive material connected at adjacent facing points by interconnect area 212 (described in greater detail below), which "jump over" the interconnected drive lines sections 206 at necked-down area 208. Sense lines 204 can be connected to a pre-amplifier held at a virtual ground of, for example, 1.5 V, and one or more drive lines 202 can be stimulated with the others held at direct current (DC) voltage levels.

[0042] FIG. 2b illustrates exemplary pixel 230 generated from diamond- shaped drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 on the same side of a single substrate according to various embodiments. If drive lines 202 is stimulated with a stimulation signal Vstim 220, a static mutual capacitance can be formed at intersection 216 of the necked-down areas. The static mutual capacitance at intersection 216 can be undesirable because a finger may not be able to block many of the fringing fields. Accordingly, in this embodiment the necked-down areas are made as small as possible; however, alternate arm designs of the diamond sections are described below with reference to other embodiments. [0043] A fringe mutual capacitance 218 can also be formed between the diamonds in the stimulated drive lines and the adjacent sense line diamonds. Fringe mutual capacitance 218 between adjacent diamonds can be of roughly the same order as the mutual capacitance formed between drive and sense lines separated by a substrate. Fringe mutual capacitance 218 between adjacent row and column diamonds can be desirable because a finger or other object may be able to block some of the fringing electric field lines and effect a change in the mutual capacitance that can be detected by the analog channels connected to the rows. As shown in FIG. 2b, there can be four "hot spots" of fringing mutual capacitance indicated at 218 that can be blocked by a finger or other object, and the more that a finger blocks, the greater the change in the mutual capacitance.

[0044] FIGS. 3(a)-3(d) show exemplary ITO section architectures of drive lines sections 206 and sense line sections 210 that may be interconnected to form drive lines 202 and/or sense lines 204, although it should be understood that conductive materials other than ITO may also be used. Each section may include a variable size arm 300, which can connect to another arm 300 of an adjoining section or may be electrically connected to interconnect 212, which in turn can be connected to arm 300 of another sense line section 210, for example (e.g., to form sense line 204).

[0045] As shown in FIGS. 3(a)-3(d), drive line sections 206 and sense line sections 210 may be truncated (as shown in FIGS. 3(b) and 3(d)), which can reduce 5 parasitic capacitance therein. In general, reducing the surface area of a section at its widest point (e.g., chopping off the corners of the diamond) where the sheet resistance in Ohms per square is lowest can reduce parasitic mutual capacitance without significantly increasing the overall resistance of the section. In addition, through RC time constant simulations, it has been determined that increasing the 0 width of arm 300 as much as possible, with the truncated diamond shape of the drive lines sections 206 and sense line sections 210, can increase conductance C, thus reducing resistance R, as compared to narrower arms 300 with the truncated diamond shape (i.e., FIG. 3(b)). Resistance R simulations of the sections provided in FIGS. 3(a)-(d) are shown in Table 1 below: 5

Figure imgf000012_0001

Table 1

[0046] Thus, using a section 206/210 design as shown in FIG. 3(d), for example, parasitic capacitance may be reduced without a significant increase in 0 resistances Rx and Ry.

[0047] FIG. 4 shows an exemplary array of drive lines 202 and sense lines

204 formed of interconnected sections 206/210 as shown in FIG. 3(d), according to various embodiments. Drive lines 202 can be formed from connected truncated diamond-shaped sections 206. Sense lines 204 can be formed by interconnecting 5 truncated diamond-shaped sections 210 using interconnects 212, for example, which can connect individual sections 210 by crossing or jumping over sections 206 at their connection point. That is, interconnects 212 can connect individual sections 210 over or under the connection point of sections 206. Interconnects 212 may be any conductive material, such as an opaque metal or ITO.

[0048] FIG. 5(a) is a close-up view of the connections of drive line sections

206 and sense line sections 210, using interconnects 212. Before interconnect 212 is formed, insulating material 214 can be applied over the conductive material (e.g., ITO) layer forming drive and sense lines 206 and 210. Interconnect 212, which can be made of metal or other conductive material, can then be applied over insulating material 214, extending beyond the insulating material to short together sense line sections 210. In alternative embodiments, the process of forming the ITO layer, insulating layer, and metal layer can be reversed, with the metal layer deposited first. In either embodiment, an optional layer of black mask (or other nonreflective material) can be applied over interconnect 212 to reduce negative visual artifacts. As can be seen in FIG. 5(a), arms 300 can be made as wide as possible in order to increase capacitance C, thus reducing resistances Rx and Ry. Arms 300 shown in FIG. 5(a) are merely exemplary arm 300 designs, and variations of arms 300 can be employed without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. For example, in one alternative embodiment, the narrowest arm portion of sections 210, along with the necked-down areas between sections 206, can be formed in an angled manner at sides 301 as shown in FIG. 5b to lower the overall resistance of the sense line sections 210. According to an embodiment, the portion of arm 300 that is interconnecting to another arm 300 can be as narrow as possible, while each arm 300 increases in width as much as possible from the point of interconnecting in order to decrease resistance.

[0049] Isolated "dummy" sections can be formed between drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 according to various embodiments. FIG. 6 shows an exemplary array of drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 formed of interconnected sections 206/210 as shown in FIG. 3(d), in which dummy sections 600 and 602 are formed therebetween, according to various embodiments. In particular, generally rectangular dummy sections 600 of the same composition (e.g., ITO) as sections 206 and 210 can be formed between drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 on the same layer as drive lines 202 and sense lines 204. In addition, generally arrow-shaped diagonal dummy sections 602 of the same composition (e.g., ITO) as sections 206 and 210 can be formed between drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 on the same layer as the drive and sense lines. Because of dummy sections 600, almost all areas of the substrate can be covered (i.e. substantially covered) with the same material, providing optical uniformity. In FIG. 6, repeating patterns of four isolated dummy sections 600 and four isolated dummy sections 602 are illustrated for exemplary purposes; however, one of skill in the art would realize that any number of dummy sections 600 and 602 of any number of shapes may be formed on the substrate between drive lines 202 and sense lines 204.

[0050] A large parasitic mutual capacitance can be formed between stimulated drive line 202, for example, and dummy sections 600 and 602, but because dummy sections 600 and 602 are isolated, their voltage potential can move along with stimulated drive line 202 and can have minimal or no negative impact on touch detection. Reducing the size of each dummy section 600 and 602 in a particular area, thus increasing the number of dummy sections 600 and 602, can further reduce parasitic mutual capacitance.

[0051] Dummy sections 602 can also have a beneficial impact on touch detection. Because drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 can be formed on the same layer on the same side of a substrate, a large static mutual capacitance can be created between them. However, only a relatively small number of the electric field lines between drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 (those that extend beyond the cover of the touch sensor panel) are capable of being influenced by a finger or other object. Most of the electric field lines remain within the confines of the cover and are generally unaffected by a touch event. Therefore, a touch event may only cause a small change in the large static mutual capacitance, making it difficult to detect the touch event. However, with dummy sections 602 in place, instead of having static mutual capacitance form between drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 within the confines of the cover, parasitic mutual capacitance will instead be formed between the drive lines 202 and the dummy sections 602. Removal of static mutual capacitance unaffected by a touch event can improve the touch detection capabilities of the panel, because a higher percentage of the remaining static mutual capacitance can be influenced by a touch event. [0052] FIG. 6 also provides exemplary measurements for sections 206 and

210, arms 300, dummy sections 600 and empty space therebetween. However, it is noted that these measurements are merely used for exemplary purposes and are not intended to limit the sizes or dimensions of components of the touch sensor display. [0053] FIG. 7 illustrates an exemplary touch screen stackup 700 according to various embodiments. It should be understood, however, that the various touch pixel embodiments disclosed herein can also be implemented in other configurations including, but not limited to, on the back side of a cover glass, the back side of the touch panel (TP) glass, or integrated within a display module (e.g., OLED or LCD). In FIG. 7, black mask (or a mask of any color) 702 can be formed on a portion of the back side of cover 704, and an optional smoothing coat 706 can be applied over the black mask and back side of the cover. According to certain embodiments, the black mask may be formed to cover the metal interconnects 212 interconnecting the ITO truncated diamond-shaped sections 210, for example. Accordingly, visual artifacts caused by light reflecting from the metal interconnects 212 may be mitigated.

Touch panel 708 of the type described above, with drive lines, sense lines, insulating material and metal jumper (at area 709 in FIG. 7) formed on the same layer on the same side of a glass substrate, can be bonded to the cover with pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) 710. An unpatterned layer of ITO 712 can optionally be formed on the bottom of the glass to act as a shield. Anti-reflective film 714 can then be deposited over unpatterned ITO 712. LCD module 716 can then be placed beneath the glass substrate, optionally separated by air gap 718 for ease of repair.

[0054] FIG. 8(a) illustrates an embodiment in which truncated diamond- shaped sections 206 and 210 are interconnected as described above with reference to FIG. 5. However, in the embodiment depicted in FIG. 8(a), metal lines (or traces) 800 (or lines of other conductive material) are electrically connected substantially in parallel to at least one drive line 202 and/or sense line 204. Metal traces 800 can be formed on the same layer and from the same material as interconnect 212. Metal traces 800 electrically connected to sense line sections 210 can be directly connected to interconnect 212, while in some embodiments metal traces 800 electrically connected to drive line sections 206 can be terminated at the end of arm area 300 as shown in FIG. 8(a). However, in other embodiments, metal traces 800 electrically connected to drive line sections 206 can be connected together in an unbroken fashion, separated from interconnect 212 by insulating material 214. The metal traces 800 can have a significantly lower resistance as compared to the ITO sections 206 and 210 (ITO sheet resistance may be -140 Ohms, while metal sheet resistance may be ~0.3 Ohms). Thus, adding the lower-resistance metal traces 800 can result in a lower resistance drive lines 202 and sense lines 204.

[0055] In the depicted embodiment, the metal traces are zigzagged in order to minimize visual artifacts when viewing the LCD, for example, through the touch panel sensor 124. The zigzag pattern can avoid Moire or other negative visual effects that can result from the metal traces being in alignment with the LCD structures. Alternatively, the pattern can be designed to be aligned over the black mask areas of the LCD to minimize blocking of the displayed image. However, the traces 800 may be straight or in any zigzag pattern without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. The metal traces 800 can be connected to metal interconnect 212, according to an embodiment. The metal traces 800 may be connected or disconnected between sections 206, for example. In addition, although FIG. 8(a) only shows a single metal line 800 for each section 206 or 210, in other embodiments any interconnected conductive pattern 810, made up of one or more traces of one or more conductive materials) may be formed in electrical contact with each of the sections to lower the resistance of those sections, as shown in FIG. 8(b). In some embodiments, these patterns 810 can be made uniform to minimize the negative visual artifacts created by the addition of the metal traces. In still further embodiments, sections 206 and 210 can be entirely replaced by interconnected conductive patterns 810, as shown in FIG. 8(c). [0056] It is noted that the multiple conductive patterns 810 are not limited to any particular pattern 810, and one of skill in the art would realize that various patterns 810 can be formed within the scope of the present disclosure. For example, FIG. 8(d) shows an embodiment where disjointed conductive patterns 820 are disposed in one or more random orientations. Disjointed conductive patterns 820 provide lower resistance drive lines 202 and sense lines 204, as well as being optically uniform at a distance, to make the disjointed conductive patterns 820 less visible. Any number of disjointed conductive patterns 820 can be included, and various different disjointed conductive patterns 820 may be formed in each of drive lines 202 and sense lines 204. While the embodiment depicted in FIG. 8(a) can optimize conductance (potentially better than the embodiment of FIG. 8(d)) wire visibility can be reduced with disjointed conductive patterns 820, as in FIG. 8(d). Referring to FIG. 8(d), insulating material 214 can be included (as described above) when the conductive patterns 820 happen to fall where they cross between sections 206 and/or 210, in order to avoid shorting between sections 206 and/or 210. Of course, all or portions of each of the embodiments of FIGS. 8(a)-8(d) may be used alone or in combination without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

[0057] In an alternate embodiment, the entire array of drive lines 202 and sense lines 204 can be rotated a predetermined amount (e.g., 15, 30 or 60 degrees) relative to the display module 716, for example, in order to minimize visual artifacts caused by the metal lines 800. [0058] Alternative designs for sections 206 and 210 and dummy sections can be used in order to maintain touch sensitivity while minimizing negative visual artifacts. FIGS. 9-11 respectively show exemplary columns 204, rows 202 and dummy sections 1100 that may be combined to form a touch sensor panel, according to an embodiment. Of course, it is noted that the rows 202, columns 204 and dummy sections 1100 can be formed during a single deposition and patterning step, while interconnects 212 can be formed separately (either before or after the single deposition and patterning step). FIG. 9 shows an example of interdigitated comb design sections 900 interconnected by interconnects 212 to form sense lines 204. The embodiment depicted in FIG. 9 shows sections 900 with three extending digits on either side of each section 900. However, three extending digits are merely depicted as an example, and any number or size of extending portions can be used.

[0059] FIG. 10 depicts an example of interdigitated comb design sections

1000 to form drive lines 202. This particular shape of sections 1000 can be chosen because of its correspondence with the chosen comb design of sections 900 in sense lines 204 of FIG. 9; however, one of ordinary skill in the art would realize that various designs of sections 900 in combination with sections 1000 can be used. It should be understood that the interlocking extending digits of sections 900 and 1000 can result in an increased amount of static mutual capacitance and increased touch detection capabilities.

[0060] Sections 900 and 1000 can be formed of a substantially transparent conductive material, such as ITO. Alternatively, sections 900 and/or 1000 can be made up of thin opaque metal lines in an interconnected web design to form rows 202 and columns 204. The web design of sections 900 and/or 1000 can include any number of digits disposed in various directions, and each digit can include any number of sub-digits branching therefrom.

[0061] FIG. 11 shows an example array of dummy sections 1100, which can be disposed in the empty area of the substrate 708 that is not covered by sections 900 and 1000. As noted above, dummy sections 1100 can be formed of the same conductive material as sections 900 and 1000 (e.g., ITO), and provide uniformity on the substrate, thereby reducing visual artifacts and parasitic capacitance. Dummy sections 1100 can also improve the touch detection capabilities of the panel by eliminating static mutual capacitance that is incapable of being influenced by a touch event.

[0062] FIG. 12 is a close-up view of interconnected row sections 1000, as well as column sections 900 interconnected using an insulator 214 and metal interconnect 212. As shown in FIG. 12, dummy sections 1 100 can substantially fill the empty space between sections 900 and 1000.

[0063] FIG. 13(a) illustrates an example mobile telephone 1336 that can include touch sensor panel 1324 and display device 1330, the touch sensor panel including a touch pixel design according to one of the various embodiments described herein. [0064] FIG. 13(b) illustrates an example digital media player 1340 that can include touch sensor panel 1324 and display device 1330, the touch sensor panel including a touch pixel design according to one of the various embodiments described herein.

[0065] FIG. 13(c) illustrates an example personal computer 1344 that can include touch sensor panel (trackpad) 1324 and display 1330, the touch sensor panel and/or display of the personal computer (in embodiments where the display is part of a touch screen) including a touch pixel design according to the various embodiments described herein.

[0066] Accordingly, in some embodiments, a touch sensor panel is disclosed, comprising: a plurality of drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material having a truncated diamond shape; a plurality of sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material having a truncated diamond shape on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors.

[0067] In some embodiments, the touch sensor panel comprises one or more traces overlapping and in electrical contact with the interconnected sections of each of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines, wherein the one or more traces are formed up a conductive material with a lower resistance than the first conductive material, wherein the one or more traces are disposed in a zigzag pattern

[0068] In some embodiments, the touch sensor panel includes an opaque mask layered over a plurality of insulating interconnect sections.

[0069] In some embodiments, the touch sensor panel comprises arms extending from the truncated diamond shapes of the plurality of drive and sense lines for connecting the truncated diamond shapes, the arms configured for minimizing a resistance of the connected truncated diamond shapes. In some embodiments, the arms are further configured with angled edges extending outward from an area where the truncated diamond shapes are connected for further minimizing the resistance of the connected truncated diamond shapes.

[0070] In some embodiments, a touch sensor panel is disclosed, comprising: a plurality of drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns; a plurality of sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors. In some embodiments, the first conductive material is ITO.

[0071] In some embodiments, a method of forming a touch sensor panel is disclosed, comprising: forming a plurality of substantially transparent drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material; forming a plurality of substantially transparent sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and forming a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors, wherein at least one of the sections of the plurality of drive lines and the sections of the plurality of sense lines are formed by reducing an original width of the sections where resistance thereof is lowest.

[0072] In some embodiments, the one or more traces are disposed in a zigzag pattern.

[0073] In some embodiments, the method further comprises at least partially overlaying the touch sensor panel with a display device to form a touch screen.

[0074] In some embodiments, the display device is rotated relative to the touch sensor panel. [0075] In some embodiments, the plurality of insulating interconnect sections are formed from an opaque metal.

[0076] In some embodiments, the method further comprises layering an opaque mask over the plurality of insulating interconnect sections.

[0077] In some embodiments, a method of forming a touch sensor panel is disclosed, comprising: forming a plurality of drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns; forming a plurality of sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and forming a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors. [0078] In some embodiments, the first conductive material is ITO.

[0079] In some embodiments, first conductive material is an opaque metal, and the one or more conductive patterns of at least one of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines form one or more web-like patterns. [0080] While various embodiments have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, and not by way of limitation. Likewise, the various diagrams may depict an example architectural or other configuration for the disclosure, which is done to aid in understanding the features and functionality that can be included in the disclosure. The disclosure is not restricted to the illustrated example architectures or configurations, but can be implemented using a variety of alternative architectures and configurations. Additionally, although the disclosure is described above in terms of various exemplary embodiments and implementations, it should be understood that the various features and functionality described in one or more of the individual embodiments are not limited in their applicability to the particular embodiment with which they are described. They instead can be applied alone or in some combination, to one or more of the other embodiments of the disclosure, whether or not such embodiments are described, and whether or not such features are presented as being a part of a described embodiment. Thus the breadth and scope of the present disclosure should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A touch sensor panel, comprising: a plurality of drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material having a truncated diamond shape; a plurality of sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material having a truncated diamond shape on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors.
2. The touch sensor panel of claim 1, further comprising: at least one conductive dummy region disposed in an area of the touch sensor panel around the truncated diamond shape sections of at least one of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines.
3. The touch sensor panel of claim 1, further comprising: one or more traces overlapping and in electrical contact with the interconnected sections of each of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines, wherein the one or more traces are formed up a conductive material with a lower resistance than the first conductive material.
4. The touch sensor panel of claim 3, further comprising a display device at least partially overlaying the touch sensor panel to form a touch screen.
5. The touch sensor panel of claim 1, wherein the plurality of insulating interconnect sections are formed from an opaque metal.
6. The touch sensor panel of claim 1, further comprising arms extending from the truncated diamond shapes of the plurality of drive and sense lines for connecting the truncated diamond shapes, the arms configured for minimizing a resistance of the connected truncated diamond shapes.
7. The touch sensor panel of claim 6, the arms further configured with angled edges extending outward from an area where the truncated diamond shapes are connected for further minimizing the resistance of the connected truncated diamond shapes.
8. The touch sensor panel of claim 1, wherein the touch sensor panel is incorporated within a computing system.
9. A touch sensor panel, comprising: a plurality of drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns; a plurality of sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors.
10. The touch sensor panel of claim 9, wherein the one or more conductive patterns of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines form an interdigitated comb shape.
11. The touch sensor panel of claim 9, wherein the first conductive material is an opaque metal, and the one or more conductive patterns of at least one of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines form one or more web- like patterns.
12. The touch sensor panel of claim 9, further comprising: at least one conductive dummy region disposed in an area of the touch sensor panel around the one or more conductive patterns of at least one of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines.
13. The touch sensor panel of claim 9, wherein the touch sensor panel is incorporated within a computing system.
14. A method of forming a touch sensor panel, comprising: forming a plurality of substantially transparent drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material; forming a plurality of substantially transparent sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and forming a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors, wherein at least one of the sections of the plurality of drive lines and the sections of the plurality of sense lines are formed by reducing an original width of the sections where resistance thereof is lowest.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein at least one of the sections of the plurality of drive lines and the sections of the plurality of sense lines have a truncated diamond shape.
16. The method of claim 14, further comprising: forming at least one conductive dummy region disposed in an area of the substrate around the sections of at least one of the substantially transparent drive lines and the substantially transparent sense lines.
17. The method of claim 14, further comprising: overlapping the interconnected sections of each of the substantially transparent drive lines and the substantially transparent sense lines with one or more traces, wherein the one or more traces are formed up a conductive material with a lower resistance than the first conductive material.
18. The method of claim 14, wherein the plurality of insulating interconnect sections are formed from an opaque metal.
19. The method of claim 14, further comprising: extending arms from the sections of the plurality of drive and sense lines for connecting the sections, the arms configured for minimizing a resistance of the connected sections.
20. The method of claim 19, wherein the arms are further configured with angled edges extending outward for further minimizing the resistance of the connected sections.
21. The method of claim 14, wherein the touch sensor panel is at least partially overlaid with a display device to form a touch screen that is incorporated within a computing system.
22. A method of forming a touch sensor panel, comprising: forming a plurality of drive lines formed by interconnecting sections of a first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns; forming a plurality of sense lines formed by interconnecting sections of the first conductive material forming one or more conductive patterns on a same layer as the plurality of drive lines; and forming a plurality of insulating interconnect sections of a second conductive material configured for enabling the plurality of drive and sense lines to cross over each other to form an array of capacitive touch sensors.
23. The method of claim 22, wherein the one or more conductive patterns of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines form an interdigitated comb shape.
24. The method of claim 22, further comprising: forming at least one conductive dummy region disposed in an area of the touch sensor panel around the one or more conductive patterns of at least one of the plurality of drive lines and the plurality of sense lines.
25. The method of claim 22, wherein the touch sensor panel is incorporated within a computing system.
PCT/US2010/029698 2009-04-10 2010-04-01 Improved touch sensor panel design WO2010117882A3 (en)

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GB2469386B (en) 2011-09-28 grant

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