WO2009065271A1 - Apparatus and process for pyrolysis of scrap tyres and the like - Google Patents

Apparatus and process for pyrolysis of scrap tyres and the like Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2009065271A1
WO2009065271A1 PCT/CN2007/071106 CN2007071106W WO2009065271A1 WO 2009065271 A1 WO2009065271 A1 WO 2009065271A1 CN 2007071106 W CN2007071106 W CN 2007071106W WO 2009065271 A1 WO2009065271 A1 WO 2009065271A1
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Prior art keywords
reaction chamber
pyrolysis
further characterized
reaction
chambers
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PCT/CN2007/071106
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French (fr)
Inventor
Wai Tak Chu
Chi Wai Hui
Bai Ru He
Zhi Qiang Wu
King Lung Lee
Chin Man Lee
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Global Power And Energy Company Limited
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Priority to PCT/CN2007/071106 priority Critical patent/WO2009065271A1/en
Publication of WO2009065271A1 publication Critical patent/WO2009065271A1/en

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G5/00Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor
    • F23G5/006General arrangement of incineration plant, e.g. flow sheets
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08JWORKING-UP; GENERAL PROCESSES OF COMPOUNDING; AFTER-TREATMENT NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C08B, C08C, C08F, C08G or C08H
    • C08J11/00Recovery or working-up of waste materials
    • C08J11/04Recovery or working-up of waste materials of polymers
    • C08J11/10Recovery or working-up of waste materials of polymers by chemically breaking down the molecular chains of polymers or breaking of crosslinks, e.g. devulcanisation
    • C08J11/12Recovery or working-up of waste materials of polymers by chemically breaking down the molecular chains of polymers or breaking of crosslinks, e.g. devulcanisation by dry-heat treatment only
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10BDESTRUCTIVE DISTILLATION OF CARBONAGEOUS MATERIALS FOR PRODUCTION OF GAS, COKE, TAR, OR SIMILAR MATERIALS
    • C10B47/00Destructive distillation of solid carbonaceous materials with indirect heating, e.g. by external combustion
    • C10B47/02Destructive distillation of solid carbonaceous materials with indirect heating, e.g. by external combustion with stationary charge
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10BDESTRUCTIVE DISTILLATION OF CARBONAGEOUS MATERIALS FOR PRODUCTION OF GAS, COKE, TAR, OR SIMILAR MATERIALS
    • C10B53/00Destructive distillation, specially adapted for particular solid raw materials or solid raw materials in special form
    • C10B53/07Destructive distillation, specially adapted for particular solid raw materials or solid raw materials in special form of solid raw materials consisting of synthetic polymeric materials, e.g. tyres
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10BDESTRUCTIVE DISTILLATION OF CARBONAGEOUS MATERIALS FOR PRODUCTION OF GAS, COKE, TAR, OR SIMILAR MATERIALS
    • C10B57/00Other processes not covered before; Features of destructive distillation processes in general
    • C10B57/02Multi-step carbonising or coking processes
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10GCRACKING HYDROCARBON OILS; PRODUCTION OF LIQUID HYDROCARBON MIXTURES, e.g. BY DESTRUCTIVE HYDROGENATION, OLIGOMERISATION, POLYMERISATION; RECOVERY OF HYDROCARBON OILS FROM OIL-SHALE, OIL-SAND, OR GASES; REFINING MIXTURES MAINLY CONSISTING OF HYDROCARBONS; REFORMING OF NAPHTHA; MINERAL WAXES
    • C10G1/00Production of liquid hydrocarbon mixtures from oil-shale, oil-sand, or non-melting solid carbonaceous or similar materials, e.g. wood, coal
    • C10G1/10Production of liquid hydrocarbon mixtures from oil-shale, oil-sand, or non-melting solid carbonaceous or similar materials, e.g. wood, coal from rubber or rubber waste
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G5/00Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor
    • F23G5/02Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor with pretreatment
    • F23G5/027Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor with pretreatment pyrolising or gasifying stage
    • F23G5/0276Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor with pretreatment pyrolising or gasifying stage using direct heating
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G5/00Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor
    • F23G5/08Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor having supplementary heating
    • F23G5/14Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor having supplementary heating including secondary combustion
    • F23G5/16Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor having supplementary heating including secondary combustion in a separate combustion chamber
    • F23G5/165Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor having supplementary heating including secondary combustion in a separate combustion chamber arranged at a different level
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G7/00Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals
    • F23G7/12Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals of plastics, e.g. rubber
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08JWORKING-UP; GENERAL PROCESSES OF COMPOUNDING; AFTER-TREATMENT NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C08B, C08C, C08F, C08G or C08H
    • C08J2300/00Characterised by the use of unspecified polymers
    • C08J2300/30Polymeric waste or recycled polymer
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08JWORKING-UP; GENERAL PROCESSES OF COMPOUNDING; AFTER-TREATMENT NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C08B, C08C, C08F, C08G or C08H
    • C08J2319/00Characterised by the use of rubbers not provided for in groups C08J2307/00 - C08J2317/00
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08JWORKING-UP; GENERAL PROCESSES OF COMPOUNDING; AFTER-TREATMENT NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C08B, C08C, C08F, C08G or C08H
    • C08J2321/00Characterised by the use of unspecified rubbers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G2206/00Waste heat recuperation
    • F23G2206/10Waste heat recuperation reintroducing the heat in the same process, e.g. for predrying
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02PCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE PRODUCTION OR PROCESSING OF GOODS
    • Y02P20/00Technologies relating to chemical industry
    • Y02P20/141Feedstock
    • Y02P20/143Feedstock the feedstock being recycled material, e.g. plastics
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02WCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO WASTEWATER TREATMENT OR WASTE MANAGEMENT
    • Y02W30/00Technologies for solid waste management
    • Y02W30/50Reuse, recycling or recovery technologies
    • Y02W30/62Plastics recycling; Rubber recycling

Abstract

Apparatus and process for pyrolysis of scrap tyres and the like are provided, wherein the apparatus includes a reactor (107) comprising at least a first reaction chamber (401) and a second reaction chamber (405), the first reaction chamber (401) receives the materials for pyrolysis, and the second reaction chamber (405) receives treated materials from the first reaction chamber (401) for subsequent pyrolysis, and the reactor (107) includes a three-way valve (407) for directing the gaseous pyrolysis products from the second reaction chamber (405) to one of three pathways, each to a different destination.

Description

Apparatus and Method for Pyrolysis of Scrap Tyres and the like
Field of the Invention
This invention relates to an apparatus and method for the pyrolysis treatment of solid carbonizable plastic, rubber material and the like, in which the main constituents of the materials are of different pyrolysis temperatures. Taking waste tyres as an example, the natural rubber of the waste tyres pyrolyzes and/or cyclized at around 623K, the cyclized constituents, polybutadiene rubber (PBR) and styrene butadiene (SBR) of waste tyres pyrolyzes/cyclized at around 723K, and nearly all the organic volatiles gasify at a temperature below 873K. Carbon black and steel wires of waste tyres will not undergo pyrolysis and remain as solid residue after the pyrolysis process.
Description of Prior Art A number of apparatus are known for production of pyrolysis oils and other products by the pyrolysis of waste plastics, waste tyres and the like. U.S. Patent Application Publication No. US 2002/0159931 Al and European Patent Publication No. EP 1,207,190 A2 provide information on how the process parameters can affect the products of pyrolysis. Besides, academic researches, including "Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under fast heating conditions", R. Aguado et al. / J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis 73 (2005) 290-298, 'Optimization of pyrolysis conditions of scrap tires under inert gas atmosphere", M. M. Barbooti et al. / J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis 72 (2004) 165-170, "Mass spectrometry validation of a kinetic model for the thermal decomposition of tyre wastes", J. A. Conesa et al. / J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis 43 (1997) 83-96, and "Characterization of the liquid products obtained in tyre pyrolysis", M. R Laresgoiti et al. / J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis 71 (2004) 917-934 also discuss the effects of pyrolysis feed properties, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis products and kinetics.
U.S. Patent No. 4,030,984 discloses a method and apparatus by which the whole tyres are suspended in hot gases, and then carbonaceous material of the waste tyres are melted and converted into pyrolysis products. U.S. Patent No. 3,890,141 discloses a method to treat scrap tyres to produce a fluid material which, in turn, is burned to produce heat energy. The ash in the flue gases is collected by high efficiency air cleaning devices for recovery, and the ash is further processed to recover zinc and titanium therein. U.S. Patent No. 3,823,223 discloses a method to produce char from the destructive distillation of scrap synthetic rubber for using in rubber enforcement.
U.S. Patent No. 3,582,279 discloses a method and apparatus for oxidative distillation of vulcanized rubber by partial combustion of waste rubber, using air throughout the still or retort. U.S. Patent No. 4,983,278 discloses a two-stage treatment apparatus mainly for the treatment of oil shale and tar sand in which the feed undergoes distillation in the first stage and then pyrolysis in the second stage. U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/204620 discloses a large volume pyrolysis reactor with two reacting chambers of similar size for pyrolyzing tyres in a higher energy efficiency.
European Patent Publication No. EP 1,207, 190A2 discloses a reactor in which combustion and pyrolysis take place in a same pyrolysis unit, in which the heat produced from the combustion can be used directly to provide energy for the pyrolysis in the same pyrolysis unit.
US Patent Application Publication No. 2002/0159931 discloses a batch pyrolysis facility in which char formed in the pyrolysis reactor is treated in subsequent treatment vessels in which a lower temperature is used to remove the VOCs remains in the residues of the pyrolysis reactor. International Patent Application Publication No. WO02/31082 discloses an apparatus for vacuum pyrolysis of rubber and/or other hydrocarbon material. The apparatus includes tandem batch feed hoopers operated sequentially under vacuum to continuously feed the pyrolysis reactor, and tendem batch collection bins operated in sequence under vacuum to collect the reaction product from the reactor.
Summarizing the existing art, there is no pyrolysis apparatus with pyrolysis chambers of different sizes to cater for the decreasing size of pyrolyzing materials. Neither does any prior art apparatus cater for the possibility of treating waste tyres and the like under different conditions, including high temperature pyrolysis, low temperature pyrolysis and partial combustion. Such conventional apparatus and methods are thus less than satisfactory in terms of flexibility in operation, efficient use of energy, or production cost.
It is thus an objective of the present invention to provide a pyrolysis apparatus and method in which the aforesaid shortcomings are mitigated, or at least to provide a useful alternative to the trade and public. Summary of the Invention
According to a first aspect of the present invention, there is provided an apparatus for pyrolysis of carbonizable plastic and rubber materials, including at least a first reaction chamber and a second reaction chamber, wherein said first reaction chamber is adapted to receive said materials for pyrolysis, and wherein said second reaction chamber is adapted to receive treated materials from said first reaction chamber for subsequent pyrolysis, characterized in including means adapted to direct gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to at least two different destinations.
According to a second aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method for pyrolysis of carbonizable plastic and rubber materials, including steps of (a) feeding said materials to a first reaction chamber; (b) carrying out pyrolysis of said material in said first reaction chamber; (c) conveying the treated material from said first reaction chamber to a second reaction chamber; (d) carrying out pyrolysis of said material in said second reaction chamber; characterized in including a step (e) of directing gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to at least two different destinations.
Brief Description of the Drawings A preferred embodiment of the present invention will now be described, by way of an example only, in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals designate like parts throughout, in which:
Fig. 1 shows the percentage loss of mass of pyrolysing waste tyres with respect to the pyrolysis temperature; Fig. 2 is a schematic diagram of a plant and the process flow diagram of a method incorporated with a pyrolysis reactor according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
Fig. 3 is a schematic diagram of the structure and arrangement of the pyrolysis reactor of the plant shown in Fig. 2; and Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the pyrolysis reactor shown in Fig. 3.
Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment
It should be noted that a main object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus and method which are flexible in tackling the problem of pyrolyzing different sources of hydrocarbon wastes to different target product specifications in different target energy efficiency by using a pyrolysis reactor with a plurality of independently operable reaction chambers.
Fig. 1 shows the result of a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiment on percentage loss of mass of waste tyres undergoing pyrolysis. It can be seen that natural rubber of the waste tyres pyrolyzes and/or cyclized at around 35O0C, cyclized constituents, polybutadiene rubber (PBR) and styrene butadiene (SBR) of waste tyres pyrolyzes/cyclized at around 45O0C, and nearly all the organic volatiles gasify at a temperature below 6000C. The carbon black and steel wires in the waste tyres will not undergo pyrolysis and will remain as solid residue after the pyrolysis process. By considering the pyrolysis temperatures of the main constituents of waste tyres, a novel multi-stage pyrolysis reactor is provided for pyrolyzing the waste tyres to convert same into valuable end products, including combustible gases, liquid hydrocarbons and solid carbonaceous residues. It should also be noted that after 4000C, the mass of waste tyres remaining after pyrolysis is about half of the original feed mass, and this invention takes into account the specific pyrolysis temperatures and mass change during the pyrolysis process.
As shown in Fig. 2, a pyrolysis reactor (107) according to the present invention can be incorporated into a larger system and plant, generally designated as (100), for converting shredded waste tyres into pyrolysis oil and other useful by-products, including carbon black as well as fuel gas.
In particular, whole tyres are first loaded to an automatic shredder (101) of the plant (100) by the use of a belt conveyor (102). The solid shredded tyres are then transferred into screw conveyors (104, 105) at atmospheric pressure. The number of screw conveyors (104,
105) may be varied according to the target pyrolysis rate. The screw conveyors (104, 105) are tilted upward and the rate of inputting shredded tyres into the screw conveyers (104, 105) is set such that the shredded tyres fill up the void spaces of the screw conveyors (104, 105) so as to prevent air from leaking into a two-stage reactor (107), as excess air can lead to combustion which decreases the quantity of tyres undergoing pyrolysis inside the reactor
(107). The shredded tyres are then fed to the two-stage reactor (107). As the feed is fed at atmospheric pressure, so the reactor (107) also operates at atmospheric pressure. The reactor (107) is heated up by hot air produced from burners (106, 117). One of the burners (106) is a liquid fuel burner, and the burner (117) is a gas burner. Based on the theory that combustion temperature is always above 100OK, the control logic is set by choosing the flue gas flow rate as the control variable and the oil consumption rate as the manipulate variable. The oil consumption rate is controlled by operating a control valve (202). Thus, if the combustion of the pyrolysis gases is capable of producing the required hot air volumetric flow, no oil needs be consumed.
Solid residues from the reactor (107) are collected by a hopper collecting to a screw conveyor (111) and transferred to a storage tank (114) for further treatment. For pyrolysis of tyres, the solid residue contains steel wires and carbon black with small amount of sulfur. For pyrolysis of rubber or plastic, the residues are mainly carbon black.
The pyrolysis gases can exit the two-stage pyrolysis reactor (107) either via streams (311, 312), to be cooled down to room temperature, i.e. around 298K, using two condensers (109), or via a stream (316) which is connected to the gas burner (117) for the purpose of combusting the pyrolysis gases.
Condensate from a later stage (313) is transported to a two-way valve (203) through which the condensate is transported to different destinations according to the user preference. One possible destination is an oil-gas separating tank (119) through which non-condensable vapors generated from the condensate are directed to a gas storage tank (112) and the remaining condensate in the oil-gas separating tank (119) is transported to a diesel storage tank (116).
Another possible option is to mix the condensate from the later stage (313) with another stream (314) of condensate. The mixed condensate is then transported to a fractional distillation column (113), in which non-condensable gases, light fraction of the condensate and heavy fraction of condensate are separated into different streams. The non-condensation gases stream (315) is connected to a gas storage tank (112), the light fraction is collected in a petrol storage tank (115), and the heavy fraction of the condensate is stored in a separate diesel storage tank (116).
The gases stored in the gas storage tank (112) are transported to the gas burner (117) by a compressor (118). The constituents in any stream collected to the gas burner (106, 107) will be burnt for supplying heat to the reactor (107). Some of the pyrolysis oil collected in the oil storage tanks (115, 116) is transported to an oil supply tank (108) to act as fuel for the liquid fuel burner (106). The kind of oil transported to the oil supply tank (108) can be set according to user preferences by using a valve (201). As mentioned earlier, the liquid fuel burner (106) need not operate as long as the non-condensable pyrolysis gases produced throughout the pyrolysis process can sustain the flue gas temperature of IOOOK and the required flue gas volumetric flow rate.
Referring to Fig. 3, a pyrolysis reactor (107) according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention comprises a number of reaction chambers (401, 405), each including a mechanical stirrer for stirring the content in the respective reaction chambers (401, 405). Smaller reaction chambers (401) constitute an earlier stage of the reactor (107) and a larger reaction chamber (405) constitutes a later stage. The actual size of each chamber is carefully designed so as to fit the actual sizes of the pyrolysing masses.
It can be seen that the reaction chambers (401) are arranged in parallel with one another, and the reaction chambers (401) are all arranged in series with the reaction chamber (405), such that treated materials from the reaction chambers (401) can be conveyed via screw conveyers (403, 405) to the reaction chamber (405).
With such an arrangement, scaling of the reactor (107) is relatively easy. Adding new reaction chambers (401) in the earlier stage can be a simple solution for scaling up the amount of feed; stopping operation of one or more of the reaction chambers (401) in the earlier stage can be a simple solution for scaling down the pyrolysis. If the pyrolysis volume is required to be increased or decreased significantly, increasing or reducing the number of stages of reaction chambers can solve the problem correspondingly. One of the main advantages of this invention is that the number of chambers and stages can be freely added to or removed from the reactor (107) to tackle different pyrolysis feed volume. It should thus be appreciated that the specific arrangement of the number of the reaction chambers (401) and stages of the reactor (107) as shown and discussed here is for illustration purposes only.
With this arrangement, the heat transfer area to heating volume ratio is larger as compared with conventional designs. The results are better heat transfer and higher energy efficiency. It should be noted that the volume of the chambers (401, 405) is relatively small, and so it is easier to operate mechanical stirrers inside the chambers (401, 405), whereas convention designs make the operation of mechanical stirrer more difficult, as very large power is required to move the stirrer when the pyrolysis volume goes up to 5 tons. Another problem of convention apparatus tackled here is that the present invention makes continuous process possible with the mechanical stirrer operating. Stirring of pyrolysis feed in conventional designs will mix the fed tyres and the solid residue, so that most conventional vertical cylindrical pyrolysis apparatus are designed for batch process, while most apparatus can be used for continuous process if and only if there is no stirrer inside. In the present apparatus, the problem is solved as the feed is fed to the earlier stage, i.e. the reaction chambers (401), in which about 50% of pyrolyzable parts are pryrolyzed, the remaining pyrolyzable parts are then completely pyrolyzed in the later stage, i.e. the reaction chamber (405). Thus, although there is mixing of the feed and the pyrolyzed residue, the solid output from the reactor (107) contains no or very little feed, depending on the operations.
The smaller reacting chambers (401) are connected in parallel in the earlier stage, in which a low temperature pyrolysis takes place at around 200°C-400°C. The gaseous products of that stage are cooled to room temperature later to yield pyrolysis oil, whereas the non-condensable gases may eventually be directed to the gas burner (117) for combustion to supply energy for the reactor (107). The solid pyrolysis products and the liquid pyrolysis products from the earlier stage are transferred to the later stage through screw conveyors (403, 404). The screw conveyors (403, 404) break down the residues from the earlier stage by mechanical shear and impaction, so as to enhance heat transfer in the later stage, due to larger surface area to volume ratio of the pyrolysing mass.
The later stage comprises a reacting chamber (405) with a size chosen, having taken into account the decreased masses and a relatively higher pyrolysis temperature of around 400°C-800°C, compared to the pyrolysis chambers (401) of the earlier stage. It should be noted that this chamber (405) operates independently from the chambers (401) and can serve for other purposes different from the pyrolysis process. The gaseous pyrolysis products in that later stage can go into three different pathways, each to a different destination, by adjusting a three-way valve (407). The three different pathways are condensation to yield pyrolysis oil (Pathway 1), combustion to provide energy for the pyrolysis in the reactor (107) (Pathway 2), and pyrolyzing in the earlier stage reacting chambers (401) to yield lighter hydrocarbon chain (Pathway 3).
The three different ways can be adjusted or selected to fit specific process requirement. The residue of the later stage chamber (405) egresses from a screw conveyor. During pyro lysis of waste tyres, the products generated by the reactor (107) are pyrolysis oil, carbon black and steel wire. There are two choices for Pathway 2, the first choice being that only the pyrolysis gases are transported to the gas burner (117) for combustion, and the second choice is to combust the gases, liquid and solid residues inside the later stage chamber (405) directly. In the case of direct combustion inside the chamber (405), a ball valve (409) is manipulated and blower (406) is opened for supplying air for combustion. Only limited oxygen is provided for the combustion inside the later stage chamber (405) so as to ensure no combustion takes place in the earlier stage chambers (401). The hot air produced by the combustion inside the later stage chamber (405) will be transported in the flue gas pathway of the earlier stage by manipulating a ball valve (408), i.e., bypassing the gas burner (117). The screw conveyor of the later stage chamber will operate periodically to egress the incombustible residue in the case of direct combustion inside the chamber (405).
The whole reactor (107) is sealed by liners to prevent any air leaking into the reacting chambers (401, 405). The reactor (107) is perimetrically enclosed by an insulated housing, and heating zones interpose between the housing and the liners for heating the materials inside the liners.
It should be noted that the pyrolysis temperatures are different for each of the stages. As mentioned in many literatures, different pyrolysis temperature yields different kinds of products. Typically, a lower pyrolysis temperature yields hydrocarbons with lower sulfur contents, vice versa. Thus, separate treatments for the pyrolysis oil from different pyrolysis temperatures implies an easier treatment scheme afterwards.
The hot air produced by the gas burner (117) and the liquid fuel burners (106) enters the later stage of the reactor (107) before going into the earlier stage of the reactor (107), resulting in a higher pyrolysis temperature in the chamber (405) and a lower pyrolysis temperature in chambers (401) of the earlier stage. This arrangement can better utilize the heat energy of the hot air. Fig. 4 shows the overall layout of the two-stage pyrolysis reactor (107). The smaller reaction chambers (401) are positioned higher than the larger chamber (405). The size of the chambers (401, 405) should take into account the decrease of mass of the pyrolysing materials. The inter-stage connection(s) are achieved by screw conveyors so as to ensure no oxygen can leak into the system. Hot air enters the reactor (107) via an entrance (410) of the later stage reaction chamber (405) and exits the reactor (107) via outlets (413) of the earlier stage reaction chambers (401). Each of the chambers (401, 405) has two outlets: one opened on the top for the egress of gaseous products from the chambers (401, 405), and one opened at the bottom of the reaction chambers (401, 405) for the egress of solid products of the reaction chambers (401, 405). Each of the earlier stage chambers (401) has one inlet for the ingress of the fragmented tyres and the like as the feed to the reactor (107) and one inlet for the possible injection of later stage gaseous pyrolysis product. The later stage reaction chamber (405) includes a number of inlets, the number of which being equal to the number of earlier stage reaction chambers (401), as the outlets of the earlier stage reaction chambers (401) are connected to the inlet of the later stage chamber (405).
Operation of the reactor (107) and method discussed above are further illustrated in the following working examples.
Example I Case 1
Using the plant (100) shown in Fig. 2, shredded tyres of a maximum dimension of about 50mm x 50mm x 50mm with the composition of Table 1 below were fed at a rate of about
500kg/hr to each of two identical earlier stage reaction chambers (401) of the reactor (107),
Each earlier stage reaction chamber (401) is a cylinder with an inner diameter of 1.5 meters and a height of 1.8 meters.
Table 1 Composition of the Tyres Shreds
Wt. %
Organics C 47.3
H 6.7 O 1.2
N 0.3
S 0.7
Inorganic Carbon Black 32.4
Steel 11.4
Total 100.0
The screw conveyors (403, 404) were started to transport the residue at the lower part of the earlier stage reaction chambers (401) to the later stage reaction chamber (405), which is of an inner diameter of 2.4 meters and a height of 2.4 meters.
The hot air from the gas burner (117) and the liquid fuel burners (106) first entered the later stage reaction chamber (405) of the reactor (107) at a temperature of 1043K and exited the chamber (405) at a reduced temperature of 873K. The flue gas then entered the earlier stage reaction chambers (401) at a further reduced temperature of 868K and finally exited the pyro lysis reactor (107) at a still further reduced temperature of 614K.
The pyrolysis gases from different stages were condensed in different containers, i.e., taking Pathway 1 shown in Fig. 3. Samples were taken from each of the condensate (314, 313) after the system processed for two hours. The properties of the condensates, i.e., pyrolysis oils, are as follows:
Table 2 Properties of Condensate, i.e.. Pyrolysis Oil, from the Earlier Stage (from 314) and the Later Stage (313)
Stream 314 Stream 313
Wt. % Wt. %
Elemental Composition Carbon (C) 85. 1 86.5
Hydrogen (H) 11. 2 10.0 Oxygen (O) 3. 1 2.6
Nitrogen (N) 0. 0.3 Sulfur (S) 0. 0.6
Chemical Composition Total Aromatics 51.2 78.8
Physical Properties Specific Gravity (SG) 086 0.91 Gross Calorific Value (GCV) 43.5MJ/kg 42.7MJ/kg
50% Recovery by ASTM
478K 597K
D86 Method
Viscosity 1.2 cSt 1.9 cSt
"Specific gravity" is a dimensionless ratio of the densities of a material with reference to water. Mathematically, specific gravity is expressed as:
βobject
G = jDwater
where "G" is the specific gravity,
"Abject" is the density of the material, and
"Avater" is the density of water, which is approximately 1000kg/m3.
The "calorific value" of a substance is the amount of heat released during the combusion of a specified amount of it. This value is measured in units of energy per unit of the substance, usually mass. As to "gross calorific value" (also called "gross energy" or "higher heating value"), such is determined by bringing all the products of combustion back to the original pre-combustion temperature, and in particular condensing any vapour (e.g. water vapour) produced.
"ASTM D86 method" is a method (as set down by ASTM International) for testing the temperature required to evaporate a specific amount of tested petroleum products.
The mixing of all the pyrolysis oils obtained in the above process yields pyrolysis oil with the properties shown in Table 3 below.
Table 3 Properties of Mixed Oils
Wt. %
Elemental Composition C 85.6
H 10.8 O 3.2
N 0.3
S 0.5
Chemical Composition Total Aromatics 61.7
Physical Properties S G 0.88
GCV 42.9MJ/kg
50% Recovery by ASTM
D86 Method
Viscosity 1.6 cSt
Case 2
The valve (407) was manipulated to turn to Pathway 2, through which the pyrolysis gases from the later stage were transported to the gas burner (117). The pyrolysis gases from the later stage entered the gas burner (117) at a temperature of 465K and was completely combusted by the gas burners (117). The oil supply tank (108) was monitored for the comparison of the oil consumption at the steady states of the system between using different pathways. The results are shown in Table 5 below.
Case 3
The valve (407) was again manipulated, so that the pyrolysis gas of the later stage of the pyrolysis reactor followed Pathway 3. The temperature of the later stage pyrolysis gases entering the earlier stage reaction chambers (401) is 477K. The temperature of the flue gas exiting the outlet was measured and was found to be the same as the pervious two cases, namely, case 1 and case 2. The pyrolysis gases were condensed, the properties of that oil was analyzed. The analysis results were tabulated in Table 4.
Table 4 Properties of the Condensate, i.e.. Pyrolysis Oil from the Later Stage
Wt. %
Elemental Composition C 85.5
H 10.7
O 3
N 0.3 S 0.5
Chemical Composition Total Aromatics 55.7
Physical Properties S G 0.88
GCV 43.0MJ/kg
50% Recovery by ASTM
514K D86 Method
Viscosity 1.4 cSt
It can be seen that the properties shown in Table 4 are different from the oil properties shown in Table 3. This shows that there had been further pyrolysis of the pyrolysis gases from the later stage.
The consumption of oil by the oil burner and the total product recoveries for each of the systems using different pathways are tabulated as bellows:
Table 5 Oil Consumption of Liquid Fuel Burner and Recovery of Product Using Different Pathways
Burner Oil Product Recovery (Wt. %)
Pathway Consumption
Oil Solid Gas (kg/min)
1 0.6 41.2 45.7 13.1
2 0.1 30.9 45.6 3 0.6 38.7 46.3 15.0
Note that the sum of all the weight percentages of products in Pathway 2 is not equal to 100%, as all pyrolysis gases formed in later stage of this pathway were burned directly.
The solid residues from later stage of different schemes were analyzed. Steel wires were separated by a magnetic separator. The remaining residue was analyzed by an element analyzer. It was found that the elemental compositions of different schemes are very similar. The averaged values of the solid residues of the three different schemes are listed as below:
Table 6 Solid Residue from the Apparatus Wt. %
Steel 26
C 72.2
H 1.1
N 0
S 0.7
O 0
Total 100
Example II
Using the plant (100) shown in Fig. 2, a mixture of plastic and rubber having the mixing ratio and elemental composition shown in Table 7 below was loaded into the plant (100), and thus the reactor (107), which is the same as the one used in Example I, except that there are four identical earlier stage reaction chambers (401), which are identical to those used in example I, discussed above.
Table 7 Mixing Ratio of the Feed and its Elemental Composition
Wt. %
PE 30
PP 20
PS 35
Nature Rubber 15
C 41
H 59
O 0
N 0
S 0
Pathway 1 was chosen in this example. In Trial 1, the aforesaid mixture was fed to two of the earlier stage reacting chambers (401) at a rate of 500kg/hr. In Trial 2, the above mixture was fed to the four earlier stage reaction chambers (401) at a rate of 250kg/hr.
Keeping all other operation variables constant, the flue gas temperatures of the two different trials were summarized in Table 8 and the properties of the pyrolysis oil products were compared and summarized in Table 9.
Table 8 Flue Gas Temperatures of the Trials
Temperature (K)
Trial 1 Trial 2
Enter the 2nd stage 1043 1043
Exit the 2nd stage 873 881
Enter the 1 st stage 868 875
Exit the 1 st stage 614 581
Table 9 Properties of the Pvrolvsis Oil of Trial 1 and Trial 2
Trial 1 Trial 2
C 39.9 40.0
H 60.1 60.0
Elemental Composition O 0.0 0.0
N 0.0 0.0
S 0.0 0.0
Chemical Composition Total Aromatics 19.0 18.7
S G 0.82 0.82
GCV 43.2MJ/kg 44.1MJ/kg
Physical Properties
50% Recovery by ASTM 432K 426K D86 Method
Viscosity 1.9 cSt 2. I cSt
It should be understood that the above only illustrates an example whereby the present invention may be carried out, and that various modifications and/or alterations may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention.
For example, an apparatus and a method according to the present invention may be used for treating wastes containing mercury and waste tyres, in which case the pyrolysis temperature are provided as follows: natural rubber, at 623K; and cyclized organic materials, polybutadiene rubber (PBR) and styrene butadiene (SBR) of waste tyres, at 723K; and - all other organic matters, at 873K.
Although mercury is not pyrolyzable, it will evaporate (or gasify) at 633K.
In this case, a three-stage reactor may be provided, including: - a stage one pyrolysis chamber for pyrolyzing natural rubber at a temperature of 623K; a stage two chamber for heating and evaporating mercury at 673K; and a stage three pyrolysis chamber for pyrolyzing cyclized organic materials, polybutadiene rubber (PBR) and styrene butadiene (SBR) of waste tyres and all other organic matters at 873K.
By way of such an arrangement, oil from the stage three pyrolysis chamber can be free of mercury and organo-metallic complex, which are highly toxic.
Thus, the present invention envisages that one or more chamber for treating non-pyrolyzable materials is provided (a) upstream of the earlier stage reaction chamber
(401), (b) between the earlier stage reaction chamber (401) and the later stage reaction chamber (405), and/or (c) downstream of later stage reaction chamber (405), as may be necessary.
It should also be understood that the amount (in terms of both mass and volume) of pyrolyzable, gasifiable or vaporizable (PGV) materials decrease during the course of treatment by the present system. Take the pyrolysis of waste tyres as an example, after having gone through the one of the earlier stage reaction chambers (401) which heats the material up to 35O0C to 4000C, the mass and volume of the waste tyre material would significantly reduce, usually by up to 50%. Thus, if the volume of the later stage reaction chamber (405) is equal to that of the earlier stage chamber (401), the later stage reaction chamber (405) can process residues from two earlier stage chambers (401).
In addition, although the embodiment discussed above shows that the reactor (107) includes a plurality of earlier stage reaction chambers (401) and one later stage reaction chamber, it is envisaged that the reactor (107) may comprise more than two stages, and that each stage may comprise a plurality of reaction chambers, in which each reaction chamber is independently operable.
It should also be understood that certain features of the invention, which are, for clarity, described in the context of separate embodiments, may be provided in combination in a single embodiment. Conversely, various features of the invention which are, for brevity, described in the context of a single embodiment, may also be provided separately or in any appropriate sub-combinations.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. An apparatus for pyrolysis of carbonizable plastic and rubber materials, including at least a first reaction chamber and a second reaction chamber, wherein said first reaction chamber is adapted to receive said materials for pyrolysis, and wherein said second reaction chamber is adapted to receive treated materials from said first reaction chamber for subsequent pyrolysis, characterized in including means adapted to direct gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to at least two different destinations.
2. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in including means adapted to direct at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to a burner for providing heat to at least one of said reaction chambers.
3. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in including means adapted to direct at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to said first reaction chamber.
4. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in including means adapted to direct at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to means for condensing said products to pyrolysis oil.
5. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in including a plurality of first reaction chambers arranged in parallel with one another and each in series with said second reaction chamber.
6. An apparatus according to Claim 1 or 5 further characterized in that said first reaction chamber(s) is positioned higher than said second reaction chamber.
7. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in that said apparatus is adapted to carry out said pyrolysis at near-atmospheric pressure.
8. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in that said second chamber is adapted to burn at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products produced in said second reaction chamber in said second reaction chamber in an oxygen-deficient environment.
9. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in that said first and second reaction chambers are heated by a same heating medium.
10. An apparatus according to Claim 9 further characterized in being adapted to feed said heating medium through said second reaction chamber and then through said first reaction chamber.
11. An apparatus according to Claim 1 further characterized in that at least one of said first and second reaction chambers includes means for stirring the content therein.
12. A method for pyrolysis of carbonizable plastic and rubber materials, including steps of:
(a) feeding said materials to a first reaction chamber;
(b) carrying out pyrolysis of said material in said first reaction chamber;
(c) conveying the treated material from said first reaction chamber to a second reaction chamber;
(d) carrying out pyrolysis of said material in said second reaction chamber; characterized in including a step (e) of directing gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to at least two different destinations.
13. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (f) of directing at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to a burner for providing heat to at least one of said reaction chambers.
14. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (g) of directing at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to said first reaction chamber.
15. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (h) of directing at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products in said second reaction chamber to means for condensing said products to pyrolysis oil.
16. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (i) of arranging a plurality of first reaction chambers in parallel with one another and each in series with said second reaction chamber.
17. A method according to Claim 12 or 16 further characterized in including a step (j) of positioning said first reaction chamber(s) higher than said second reaction chamber.
18. A method according to Claim 12 or 16 further characterized in that said first reaction chamber(s) is smaller in size than said second reaction chamber.
19. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in that said steps (b) and (d) are carried out at near-atmospheric pressure.
20. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (k) of burning at least part of gaseous pyrolysis products produced in said second reaction chamber in said second reaction chamber in an oxygen-deficient environment.
21. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (1) of heating said first and second reaction chambers by a same heating medium.
22. A method according to Claim 21 further characterized in including a step (m) of feeding said heating medium through said second reaction chamber and then through said first reaction chamber.
23. A method according to Claim 12 further characterized in including a step (n) of stirring the content of at least one of said first and second reaction chambers.
PCT/CN2007/071106 2007-11-21 2007-11-21 Apparatus and process for pyrolysis of scrap tyres and the like WO2009065271A1 (en)

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WO2021087052A1 (en) * 2019-10-31 2021-05-06 Eastman Chemical Company Pyrolysis method and system for variable recycle waste feedstocks and post-industrial liquid wastes

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CN105441097B (en) * 2015-11-20 2018-09-14 北京科技大学 A kind of damaged tire oil recovery system and receive oily method

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WO2021087052A1 (en) * 2019-10-31 2021-05-06 Eastman Chemical Company Pyrolysis method and system for variable recycle waste feedstocks and post-industrial liquid wastes

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