WO2008055286A1 - Automated dice game - Google Patents

Automated dice game

Info

Publication number
WO2008055286A1
WO2008055286A1 PCT/AU2007/001571 AU2007001571W WO2008055286A1 WO 2008055286 A1 WO2008055286 A1 WO 2008055286A1 AU 2007001571 W AU2007001571 W AU 2007001571W WO 2008055286 A1 WO2008055286 A1 WO 2008055286A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
dice
player
game
dealer
bets
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/AU2007/001571
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Terry O'halloran
Murray Nicol
Nathan Wadds
Original Assignee
Stargames Corporation Pty Limited
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00157Casino or betting games
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3202Hardware aspects of a gaming system, e.g. components, construction, architecture thereof
    • G07F17/3204Player-machine interfaces
    • G07F17/3211Display means
    • G07F17/3213Details of moving display elements, e.g. spinning reels, tumbling members
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/04Dice; Dice-boxes; Mechanical dice-throwing devices

Abstract

A craps gaming system includes at least a dice rolling area, adapted for physical dice to be rolled; a plurality of player data input terminals, at least some of said terminals being disposed so that the dice rolling area is visible from the terminals, said terminals each including an electronic data interface to permit a player to select bets and amounts to be wagered on said bets and to transmit electronic signals regarding the bets and amounts wagered; and a dealer data input terminal adapted to control the craps game, so that after the dice are rolled, the result is entered by data input to the dealer terminal. A game processor receives data input to the player terminal and the dealer terminal, the game processor receiving electronic signals regarding roll results. The game processor then determines and informs player terminals of: a) any successful bets by players are credited automatically based on the recorded result, b) any bets which are lost are removed, and c) any bets whose outcome is not determined are carried over to the next dice roll.

Description

AUTOMATED DICE GAME

1. FIELD QF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to casino table games using dice, particularly craps, and to games with automated wagering capabilities in combination with casino table games using dice.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE ART

The game of craps is one of the most popular table games in casinos, particularly in North America. It tends to create noise and excitement, due to the wide range of bets available to players, the interaction of the player with the dice and other players, and the exciting play, particularly when a player is on a roll.

However, it is a very expensive game for a casino to operate because it is labor intensive and more than ordinary casino skills are needed for personnel at the craps table. The relatively complex rules and the complexity of the many different odds available on payouts on different wagers require highly skilled casino staff to administer the game. Typically, four or five casino personnel are required to oversee a table. The high operating costs in turn tend to cause the casinos to raise the minimum bets which players can make, so that the overhead of table operation can be met by the return to the house on larger wagers. As a consequence, some players that would have played craps turn to other games instead as they cannot afford the stakes.

One solution is to provide an all electronic game, for example as offered by internet casino sites. The dice are simulated, and all bets are managed automatically. However, there is no atmosphere of being part of a common game for the players, which is one of the most attractive features of craps to players.

US Patent No. 5,770,533 to Franchi discloses an operating system for a casino, in which all table betting occurs using an electronic betting card, or similar electronic arrangement. A craps table is disclosed with electronic betting by players at the table.

Thus, what is needed is a craps game for operation in a casino wherein the labour costs for the casino are reduced as compared with conventional craps games, whilst retaining the excitement of the conventional craps game. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present technology provides a craps game in which the dice are physically rolled, but where the placing of wagers and paying of bets are handled electronically, among other things.

According to one aspect, the present technology provides a craps gaming system, including at least a dice rolling area, adapted for physical dice to be rolled; a plurality of player data input terminals, at least some of said terminals being disposed so that the dice rolling area is visible from the terminals, said terminals each including an electronic data interface to permit a player to select bets and amounts to be wagered on said bets and to transmit electronic signals regarding the bets and amounts wagered; and a dealer data input terminal adapted to control the craps game, so that after the dice are rolled, the result is entered by data input to the dealer terminal; a game processor that receives data input to the player terminal and the dealer terminal, the game processor receiving electronic signals regarding roll results; the game processor then determining and informing players of: a) any successful bets by players are credited automatically based on the recorded result, b) any bets which are lost are removed, and c) any bets whose outcome is not determined are carried over to the next dice roll.

According to another aspect, the present invention provides method of operating a craps table, the table including at least a dice rolling area, adapted for physical dice to be rolled, and wherein a plurality of player terminals in communication with a game controller are provided, at least some of said terminals being disposed so that the dice rolling area is visible from said terminals, said terminals each including an interface to permit a player to select and enter bets and amounts to be wagered on said bets and communicate the bets and amount to the game controller; and a dealer terminal adapted to control the game, the method including at least the steps of: the game controller receiving player selections of bets and amounts; permitting a player to physically roll the dice; recording the outcome of the dice roll with the game controller; and the game controller determining the results of the players bets, including paying winnings, collecting losses, and carrying over bets which are not determined to the next dice roll.

An advantage of the present technology is that is allows for the physical interaction of the players with the dice and with each other to be retained, which is central to the game, while allowing electronic management of the complex auditing, crediting and debiting functions associated with the game of craps such as betting, crediting of player winnings, and the like. This allows the dealer to concentrate upon the major remaining security issues at the craps table, such as for example, ensuring that the shooter is behaving correctly, that the dice have not be substituted , and that in general no irregularities in relation to dice handling and rolling occur. It is envisioned, that some assistance with explaining bets and play to the player may be required, and the dealer/croupier may assist players in entering credit into terminals and the like, but the nature and extent of casino personnel activities (except for the passing and declaring of the dice rolls) are fundamentally changed by the features of the present invention. For example, much of the betting and payment related functionality can be provided by the player data entry interface and terminal of the present invention, whereas in conventional craps games this aspect is handled exclusively by live casino personnel.

Further, in the present invention, there is virtually no chance of error in payment to the players, as the wagers are made electronically, and then automatically compared with the result and the payment made.

The game on a device constructed in accordance with the present invention can also be played at a faster rate than conventional craps games, further decreasing the cost per dice roll to the house. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Embodiments of the present invention will now be further described with reference to the drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of one possible implementation of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the implementation of Figure 1 ;

Figure 3 is a schematic illustration of an exemplary embodiment of the electronic components and network which may be operatively associated with the present invention;

Figure 4 is a flowchart illustrating the flow of play in one implementation of the present invention; and

Figure 5 illustrates a screen shot of an illustrative player interface in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention will now be described with reference to specific embodiments. It will, however, be appreciated that the present invention may be applied in many difference ways, and may be physically implemented in a variety of structures. The present invention is not limited to any specific one of these. Further, the nature of the present invention is such that those skilled in the art will appreciate that many other features may be added to the implementation, within the general scope of the invention.

The present invention is best understood in the context of the rules of craps. Although the present invention may be played with any suitable rules, an example is disclosed in "SCARNE ON DICE", 8th Revised Edition, 1980, John Scarne, Melvin Powers Wilshire Book Company, Hollywood, CA 91605, pp.23- 136, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. The following description assumes an understanding of the rules and operation of the regular game of craps, such as that disclosed in the aforementioned reference.

A craps gaming system of the present invention includes at least a dice rolling area, adapted for physical dice to be rolled. There are plurality of player data input terminals, at ieast some of the terminals being disposed so that the dice rolling area is visible from the terminals. The player data input terminals each preferably include an electronic data interface to permit a player to select bets and amounts to be wagered on the bets, and to transmit electronic signals regarding the bets and amounts wagered. A dealer data input terminal is adapted to control the craps game, among other things.

After the dice are rolled, the result is entered by data input to the game controller, either through the dealer terminal or by automated entry. The game processor receives data input to the player terminal and the dealer terminal and at least temporarily stores the same in memory. The game processor also receives communication from the dealer terminal or via electronic signals from the automated entry device regarding the dice roil results. The game processor then determines and informs players, preferably via the player terminal, of: a) any successful bets by players, which are credited automatically based on the recorded result, b) any bets which are lost, which results in the player's credits being removed accordingly, and c) any bets whose outcome is not determined, which are carried over to the next dice roll unless otherwise indicated by the player. The craps gaming system may have the result of each dice roll manually entered by the dealer into the dealer terminal.

As mentioned above, the craps gaming system of the present invention may have the dice roll result automatically determined and the determined results forwarded to the game controller. There may be a central electronic display near the dice rolling area for display of results and other craps gaming information, as well as entertainment images. Al! wagers should occur at the player terminals or through other electronic wager and betting systems, with no physical chips on the table. The dealer terminal may be adapted to permit the dealer to credit player terminals using cash, chips, casino value tickets (e.g., ticket-in and ticket-out technology), credits cards, account cards or other direct player payment. The dealer console may be adapted to close betting prior to the dice being rolled. At least some of the player terminals are arranged around the periphery of the dice rolling area, and at least one gap in the periphery of the table is provided to provide access for the dealer to the dice rolling area.

Figures 1 and 2 illustrate one embodiment of the present technology and its use within the generic scope of the claimed invention. A table 10 includes a dice rolling surface 15 and a series of player data input terminals 11 arranged around the periphery of the table 10. It is noted that in contrast to a conventional table, player terminals (for example 11a, 11 b) may be positioned on both sides of the dice rolling surface, so as to make more efficient use of the area and allow for more players to play a single table.

Gaps 13, 14, that is, in this embodiment, indented locations along the periphery of table 10 without player data input terminals 11 disposed thereon, provide a space for the dealers to facilitate play. Specifically, gap 13 provides a space for the stickman, and gap 14 provides a space for the dealer to assist with wagers, credit and the like, and includes dealer data input terminal 12. It will be appreciated that other arrangements are possible. A single dealer could control both functions, but it would be difficult to maintain adequate supervision of the dice, unless strict wagering produces were established, such as the dealer instituting an open wagering period and wager lock-out period while dice were being handled by the dealer.

The stickman operates in a manner which is more or less the same as in a conventional craps table. He uses his stick to collect the dice after each throw, and pass them to the player whose turn it is to be the shooter after the wagering period is closed. As the stickman is already in charge of controlling the time of passing on the dice, it is also possible for the stickman to control the wager lockup function, if any, in the dealer input terminal. He is also responsible for ensuring that the dice are not substituted or tampered with by the players. He can also talk up play and generally assist in creating an exciting atmosphere for the game.

The dealer data input terminal 12 according to this implementation may have a variety of various functions. It may allow the dealer to accept cash, chips, or other forms of value from the players, and allow the dealer to effect credit into a respective player data entry terminal 11. It further may allow the dealer to commence a countdown to the next roll, or more particularly, to the time when no more bets will be accepted, or changed. This is an important function to ensure the smooth running of the game. The dealer data entry terminal 12, in this implementation, allows the dealer in input the value of the dice after each roll, using a keypad or the like. This roll value input will be transmitted to the game controller where player wager entires have been provided, so that the game processor or other combination of processors can evaluate the outcome of each individual wager made to players and the collective effect of the totality of wagers made by each and every player at the table.

The present technology of the claimed invention may be implemented using various dice arrangements. In the simplest form, conventional dice (a six- sided cube having face values of 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 on respective faces, with the sum of values on opposed faces totalling a value of seven) are used, and the dealer simply inputs the value of the dice (e.g., 3, 6, etc.) into the keypad. Alternatively, the present invention may be implemented with automated means to sense the state of the rolled dice, and transmit this via wired or wireless means to the dealer terminal (e.g., for visual verification and further dealer confirming input of lack or override command) or game controller. One possible arrangement is to provide sensors and transmitters within the dice. Such arrangements are disclosed, for example, in US Patent No. 6,331 ,145 to Sity et al., the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. Another possible arrangement for the wagering system is to utilise sensors within the rolling surface which interact in some way with the dice, for example magnetic sensors or Hall effect devices. Such an arrangement is disclosed, for example, in US Patent No. 5,885,157 to Harada et al., which is incorporated herein by reference. Another arrangement could use a digital image sensor, positioned above the table for example, to image the dice and determine the value displayed on the dice. Any such automated reading arrangement could be used with in accordance with the present invention.

It is also contemplated that automated means could be used to throw the dice. These, for example, could be of related construction to mechanisms used to draw lotto or keno type games, or similar to those use for Sic Bo. In this implementation, the dice results may be captured manually by the dealer, or in an automated way as discussed.

It is also preferred that at large, shared screen 20 be placed over the table, visible to all players (see Figure 3). This provides a suitable display of game outcomes, and may also be used to indicate the current state of play, roils, the point, and so forth.

Play, in terms of dice rolling, may proceed much as in a conventional craps game. The process may be explained with reference to Figure 4. A player decides to commence play, shown as start 30. The player needs to establish credit 31 at the table. The present invention is compatible with this step being achieved by any suitable means, such as for example, by being cashed in by the dealer at the dealer terminal, as previously described. In alternative implementations, electronic betting cards, bill acceptors, or the like may be provided. In the preferred implementation, credit is established at a terminal for the specific player at that terminal via a card reading device for cards having a magnetic strip disposed thereon.

The players then select the bets 32 wish to make, and the amounts of those bets, on their respective terminal using the electronic interface. An illustrative interface will be described further below. At a suitable time, the dealer activates a count down function 33 on the dealer terminal 12. This provides a fixed time, for example 30 seconds, within which all bets must be laid or changed. Preferably, a display appears on each player terminal 11 , and on the shared terminal 20, which visually shows the countdown taking place.

At the conclusion of the countdown, the dice are rolled 34 by the appropriate player in the conventional way according to standard craps rules. It is noted that as there are no chips and the like on the rolling surface, the dice are not impended by such objects on the roiling surface. The rolling surface is bounded by padded walls 16 as in a conventional table.

When the dice settle, the result is recorded 35 by the dealer on the dealer terminal 12, and the player terminals 11 register the accounting results of the wager and the players accounts, as indicated at the terminals, are consequently paid out 36, and indicate bets lost or won, or carried over as appropriate to the results of the roll. After any roll, the display screen can show what wagers remain active, what previous wagers were eliminated, and other changes in wagering status. If the shooter has established a point, this can be indicated on the shared display (especially with the specific point identified and even maintained prominently on the screen, to replace the use of a point button on the table surface) and on the individual player screens. It will be appreciated that in many respects these aspects greatly speed up play. The wins are paid out more or less instantly, and the players have only to decide upon and place new bets 32 prior to the next roll of the dice, or alternatively to decide to cases play and collect any remaining credit 37.

The input from the player's data input terminal may also go to a finance controlier to monitor play. Player rating typically comprises a player's account, average bet, buy-in amounts, time-in, time-out and win/loss information. The method in use for rating players at table games requires handwritten forms to be manually entered into a database. This method of data acquisition is inefficient and inherently prone to error, and it is typical for this purpose to be accomplished through multiple personnel. Casinos are also required by law to monitor and report transactions above certain thresholds. This legal requirement often requires a casino to rate unknown players. As an unknown player moves between table games, rating and/or establishing when the player has reached a particular threshold becomes increasingly difficult. A system constructed in accordance with the present invention can also be used to assist in data reporting, especially where players are identified at each terminal. Apparatus components and subsystems that may be used in support of the technology of the present claimed invention can be found generally in the art, and for example in U.S. Patents Nos. 6,676,517; 6,877,745; 6,749,512; 6,609,710; and 6,213,876, the disclosures of which are all incorporated herein by reference, may be incorporated into a game constructed in accordance with the present system. These references, and every reference cited in this specification are incorporated herein by reference.

The craps table 10 may be of any suitable construction. As in the preferred implementation a variety of terminals are mounted upon the table, it may be appropriate to utilise a more solid construction than for a regular craps table. For example, the table may be formed with a steel frame and timber, overlayed with felt or similar material. The rolling surface 15 and padded walls 16 may be constructed with conventional felt, foam and similar materials, and even the conventional or unique craps indicia and patterns to make the ambiance of the electronic game similar to that of a completely live craps game with on-the-table chip wagering.

The terminals may include any suitable visual display, preferably of touch screen type. An alternative to touch screen could be a system of keys, buttons on a panel, or a mouse or joystick arrangement to manipulate suitable icons on screen. The function required is that the players can select which bets to make, and the amounts of those bets. Whilst a layout similar to a conventional craps table layout is preferred, any suitable visual arrangement could be used. Additional facilities may be provided, for example bill acceptors, loyalty card readers, and any other such facilities as may be provided with an electronic or table game.

Figure 3 illustrates schematically the arrangement connecting the various players' terminals 11a, 11 b, 11 n to the rest of the system. Network 18 connects all the relevant components. Apart from the terminals as illustrated, this could include further displays, peripherals such a bill acceptors, and so forth. Network 18 may be any suitable LAN, for example an Ethernet network, preferably using an encrypted and secure protocol for communications to prevent illicit tampering by players. Such arrangements are well known in the art. Dealer terminal 12 is also connected to network 18, as is processor 13, which operates the overall game and drives the main display 20. Processor 13 is preferably connected via a separate connection 21 to the main casino operating system, to facilitate reporting, supervision and so forth.

An example of a suitable touch screen based screen display will now be described with reference to Figure 5. The screen 50 generally shows a craps betting layout, with a row of windows 41 showing credit available, amount bet and won across the top. A row of buttons across the bottom 45 offers a variety of play related options, for example cash out, clear and undo. In the situation illustrated, the point has already been thrown, a 5, and this is marked with icon 42. The player has available a stack of virtual chips 44 having various denominations, illustratively 1 to 100. The player has placed a 25 unit chip 43 on the passline. Areas for various bets are provided as in a conventional craps game, with the bet and amount being selected by the player by dragging the virtual chip of the selected value to the desired area. Multiple chips can be dragged to achieve different values as desired by the player, up to of course the limit of credit established on the machine. The time limit is also displayed 46. The chips may be replaced by a click and rag function up to the time of a wagering closeout signal from the dealer. A feature may also be provided whereby the player is given the option to view all other bets placed on the game, either with or preferably without identification of the terminal or player from where the other bets have originated. This may be a special screen that may be pulled up, an insert screen within the player's main screen, or even a separate small screen adjacent the player's data input terminal main screen. This allows the player to understand the current run of betting, as in a conventional craps game. Similarly, the total of wins or losses on (say) previous rolls or the current run of play (a history of the roll events on the dice) may be displayed for the table as a whole or to a player that calls up the history on his/her dedicated data entry terminal screen.

It is also an option that they player screen, provide a history, for the current shooter at least, of rolls so that the current state of paly can be better understood. An event history screen is also important to new players arriving at the table and may convince them to enter the game earlier if they perceive a history of advantageous roll events.

The shared display may also display, either in windows or in rotation, some or all of the information discussed for display on the player screens. It may also provide a live video feed on what is occurring at the table, so as to project the excitement at the table to the surrounding area. Supplemental animation, such as virtual character images, animation characters or the like may also be provided preferably on a short-term display basis (e.g., less than 15 seconds, less than 10 seconds, etc.) that would not interfere with the flow of the game, yet maintain the crowd ambiance of a craps table.

A game constructed in accordance with the present invention may also be configured to provide for remote or satellite terminals to be used, in addition to or as an alternative to terminals at the table. In such an arrangement, a display of the dice being roiled would ideally be provided. This may be as a window within the screen, or perhaps on a large display visible from the remote terminal. Such terminals could also be provided theatre style in the vicinity of the main table. It is preferred that for such terminals, credit is established using a mechanism other than the table dealer, for example a bill acceptor or other suitable arrangement.

It should be understood that incorporating the present invention in an integrated system, such as those described herein, is exemplary of the type of application for which a system and method in accordance with the present disclosure is well-suited. Those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that a system and method configured in accordance with the present invention may be used in conjunction in other applications as well.

Thos skilled in the art will also readily appreciate that a system in accordance with the present disclosure may include the various computer and network related software and hardware that may be used for providing communication in a closed or distributed computing network, that is, programs, operating systems, memory storage devices, input/output devices, data processors, servers with links to data communication systems, wireless or otherwise, such as those which take the form of a local or wide area network, and a plurality of data transceiving terminals within the network, such as user interfaces. Those skilled in the art will further appreciate that, so long as its users (i.e., players and dealers) are provided with access to a system and method constructed in accordance with the present invention, the type of network, software or hardware used may be discretionary and not vital to the full implementation of the present ivention.

It will be appreciated that various additions and variations are possible to the implementations described within the scope of the invention, and the implementations described are not intended to the limitative.

Claims

1. A craps gaming system, including at least a dice rolling area, adapted for physical dice to be rolled;
a plurality of player data input terminals, at least some of said terminals being disposed so that the dice rolling area is visible from the terminals, said terminals each including an electronic data interface to permit a player to select bets and amounts to be wagered on said bets and to transmit electronic signals regarding the bets and amounts wagered; and
a dealer data input terminal adapted to control the craps game, so that after the dice are rolled, the result is entered by data input to the dealer terminal;
a game processor that receives data input to the player terminal and the dealer terminal, the game processor receiving electronic signals regarding roll results; the game processor then determining and informing players of:
a) any successful bets by players are credited automatically based on the recorded result,
b) any bets which are lost are removed, and
c) any bets whose outcome is not determined are carried over to the next dice roll.
2. A craps gaming system according to claim 1 , wherein the result of each dice roll is manually entered by the dealer into the dealer terminal.
3. A craps gaming system according to claim 1 , wherein the dice roll result is automatically determined and the determined results forwarded to the game controller.
4. A craps gaming system according to claim 1 , further including a central electronic display near the dice rolling area for display of results and other craps gaming information.
5. A craps gaming system according to claim 1 wherein all wagers occur at the player terminals.
6. A craps gaming system according to claim 1 , wherein the dealer terminal is adapted to permit the dealer to credit player terminals using cash, chips, casino value tickets, credits cards, accounts cards or other direct player payment.
7. A craps gaming system according to claim 1 , wherein the dealer console is adapted to close betting prior to the dice being rolled.
8. A craps game according to claim 1 , wherein at least some of the player terminals are arranged around the periphery of the dice rolling area, and at least one gap in the periphery of the table is provided to provide access for the dealer to the dice rolling area.
9. A method of operating a craps table, the table including at least a dice rolling area, adapted for physical dice to be rolled, and wherein a plurality of player terminals in communication with a game controller are provided, at least some of said terminals being disposed so that the dice rolling area is visible from said terminals, said terminals each including an interface to permit a player to select and enter bets and amounts to be wagered on said bets and communicate the bets and amount to the game controller; and a dealer terminal adapted to control the game,
the method including at least the steps of: a) The game controller receiving player selections of bets and amounts; b) permitting a player to physically roll the dice; c) recording the outcome of the dice roll with the game controller; and d) the game controller determining the results of the players bets, including paying winnings, collecting losses, and carrying over bets which are not determined to the next dice roll.
PCT/AU2007/001571 2006-11-10 2007-10-18 Automated dice game WO2008055286A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2006235950 2006-11-10
AU2006235950 2006-11-10

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2008055286A1 true true WO2008055286A1 (en) 2008-05-15

Family

ID=39364086

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/AU2007/001571 WO2008055286A1 (en) 2006-11-10 2007-10-18 Automated dice game

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2008055286A1 (en)

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5770533A (en) * 1994-05-02 1998-06-23 Franchi; John Franco Open architecture casino operating system
US6659866B2 (en) * 2000-03-08 2003-12-09 Stargames Corporation Pty Ltd. Automatic table game
US20050215326A1 (en) * 2004-03-29 2005-09-29 Alex Iosilevsky Electronic game table
US20060003828A1 (en) * 2004-07-01 2006-01-05 Mike Abecassis System for electronic gaming transactions
WO2006045137A1 (en) * 2004-10-25 2006-05-04 Stargames Corporation Pty Limited Enhanced gaming system

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5770533A (en) * 1994-05-02 1998-06-23 Franchi; John Franco Open architecture casino operating system
US6659866B2 (en) * 2000-03-08 2003-12-09 Stargames Corporation Pty Ltd. Automatic table game
US20050215326A1 (en) * 2004-03-29 2005-09-29 Alex Iosilevsky Electronic game table
US20060003828A1 (en) * 2004-07-01 2006-01-05 Mike Abecassis System for electronic gaming transactions
WO2006045137A1 (en) * 2004-10-25 2006-05-04 Stargames Corporation Pty Limited Enhanced gaming system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8177628B2 (en) Lot-to-lot roulette combination
US7175521B2 (en) Gaming method, device, and system including trivia-based bonus game
US6991544B2 (en) Method, apparatus and article for hierarchical wagering
US6644664B2 (en) Gaming machine with discrete gaming symbols
US7513828B2 (en) Gaming device having secondary game played in parallel with primary game
US6450883B1 (en) Operation of gaming machines
US7309065B2 (en) Interactive simulated baccarat side bet apparatus and method
US7070503B2 (en) Slot machine method with symbol replacement
US20060154721A1 (en) Electronic gaming device that provides an undisplayed outcome
US6659866B2 (en) Automatic table game
US5542669A (en) Method and apparatus for randomly increasing the payback in a video gaming apparatus
US20090111573A1 (en) Server based gaming system providing multiple side bet awards
US8337296B2 (en) Method and apparatus for using upstream communication in a card shuffler
US20060178191A1 (en) Gaming apparatus and systems
US20050164759A1 (en) Electronic gaming machine with architecture supporting a virtual dealer and virtual cards
US20070135207A1 (en) Game with changing odds and payouts
US20060068498A1 (en) Electronic card table and method
US20080113764A1 (en) System, method and apparatus to produce decks for and operate games played with playing cards
US20060189378A1 (en) Gaming machine having cooperative bonus symbols
US20060058088A1 (en) System and method for providing an electronic poker game
US6755737B2 (en) Gaming machine having bonus game
US20060068871A1 (en) System and method for detecting collusion between poker players
US7708630B2 (en) Rotor-based gaming device having a system for changing the quantity of potential game outcomes for subsequent plays
US20070015585A1 (en) Method and system for providing a bonus award to multiple players playing gaming machines on a network based on a winning outcome at a single linked machine
US20060058083A1 (en) Electronic card table and method for providing a timed electronic card game

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 07815376

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

122 Ep: pct app. not ent. europ. phase

Ref document number: 07815376

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1