WO2007033010A1 - Modular external infusion device - Google Patents

Modular external infusion device

Info

Publication number
WO2007033010A1
WO2007033010A1 PCT/US2006/035035 US2006035035W WO2007033010A1 WO 2007033010 A1 WO2007033010 A1 WO 2007033010A1 US 2006035035 W US2006035035 W US 2006035035W WO 2007033010 A1 WO2007033010 A1 WO 2007033010A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
module
user
device
display
infusion
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2006/035035
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Emilian Istoc
Himanshu Patel
Original Assignee
Medtronic Minimed, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/172Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic
    • A61M5/1723Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic using feedback of body parameters, e.g. blood-sugar, pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/142Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/16804Flow controllers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/172Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/35Communication
    • A61M2205/3546Range
    • A61M2205/3553Range remote, e.g. between patient's home and doctor's office
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/35Communication
    • A61M2205/3546Range
    • A61M2205/3569Range sublocal, e.g. between console and disposable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/35Communication
    • A61M2205/3576Communication with non implanted data transmission devices, e.g. using external transmitter or receiver
    • A61M2205/3584Communication with non implanted data transmission devices, e.g. using external transmitter or receiver using modem, internet or bluetooth
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/35Communication
    • A61M2205/3576Communication with non implanted data transmission devices, e.g. using external transmitter or receiver
    • A61M2205/3592Communication with non implanted data transmission devices, e.g. using external transmitter or receiver using telemetric means, e.g. radio or optical transmission
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/50General characteristics of the apparatus with microprocessors or computers
    • A61M2205/52General characteristics of the apparatus with microprocessors or computers with memories providing a history of measured variating parameters of apparatus or patient
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2230/00Measuring parameters of the user
    • A61M2230/20Blood composition characteristics
    • A61M2230/201Glucose concentration
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/1413Modular systems comprising interconnecting elements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/142Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps
    • A61M5/14244Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps adapted to be carried by the patient, e.g. portable on the body

Abstract

A modular external infusion device that controls the rate a fluid is infused into an individual's body, which includes a first module and a second module. More particularly, the first module may be a pumping module that delivers a fluid, such as a medication, to a patient while the second module may be a programming module that allows a user to select pump flow commands. The second module is removably attachable to the first module.

Description

MODULAR EXTERNAL INFUSION DEVICE

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the Invention

[0001] Embodiments of this invention is related generally to an external infusion device, and more particularly, to a modular external infusion device that controls the rate a fluid is infused into an individual's body.

Description of Related Art

[0002] Infusion devices and systems are relatively well known in the medical arts, for use in delivering or dispensing a prescribed medication such as insulin to a patient. In one form, such devices comprise a relatively compact pump housing adapted to receive a syringe or reservoir carrying a prescribed medication for administration to the patient through infusion tubing and an associated catheter or infusion set.

[0003] Infusion devices and systems generally include a display and an input device. In infusion devices known in the art, the display and input device are part of the pump housing.

Thus, the entire infusion device, including any input and output devices, is composed in a unitary housing. A drawback to these infusion devices is that they may be too bulky and/or heavy to conveniently wear.

[0004] There are a number of infusion devices developed to alleviate the problems associated with weight and bulkiness. Such infusion devices may include a small drive motor connected via a lead screw assembly for motor driven advancement of a reservoir piston to administer the medication to the user. Programmable controls can operate the drive motor continuously or at periodic intervals to obtain a closely controlled and accurate delivery of the medication over an extended period of time. These infusion devices are used to administer insulin and other medications, with exemplary pump constructions being shown and described in

U.S. Patent Nos. 4,562,751; 4,678,408; 4,685,903; 5,080,653; 5,097,122, and 6,551,276, which are incorporated by reference herein.

[0005] Infusion devices of the general type described above have provided significant advantages and benefits with respect to accurate delivery of medication or other fluids over an extended period of time. The infusion device can be designed to be extremely compact as well as water resistant, and may thus be adapted to be carried by the user, for example, by means of a belt, clip, or the like. As a result, important medication can be delivered to the user with precision and in an automated manner, without significant restriction on the user's mobility or life style, including in some cases, the ability to participate in water sports. However, there remains a need in the art for an infusion device, with the capabilities of the above-described infusion devices but, that is also capable of being even more compact.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] In accordance with embodiments of the invention, a modular external infusion device is provided that controls the rate a fluid is infused into an individual's body. An embodiment of the present invention includes a first module and a second module. The first module may be a pumping module that delivers a fluid, such as a medication, to a patient. [0007] The second module is removably attachable to the first module. In one embodiment, the second module may be attached by sliding onto the first module. Alternatively, the second module may be attached to the first module by parts, such as sliding parts that mate. In another embodiment, the second module may be attached to the first module by snapping parts that mate. Other alternatives, such as screwing components, hook and loop fasteners (e.g., Velcro™), adhesives, and the like, may also be used.

[0008] In further embodiments, the second module is a programming module that allows a user to select pump flow commands. In these embodiments, the second module contains a user interface and controls the first module. Where the first module is a pumping module, the second module preferably controls the pumping of the first module. The control by the second module of the first module does not necessarily need to be constant or continuous. For example, in a preferred embodiment, the second module inputs a pumping schedule to the first module. The first module will then pump based on the inputted schedule without any further inputs from the second module. In this way, the first module may continue its pumping schedule even when disconnected from the second module.

[0009] The pumping of the first module may be driven by any desired drive mechanism.

Example drive mechanisms include, but are not limited to, gas, drive syringe, and electrolytic. [0010] In particular embodiments, the second module has a display with one or more input devices, such as for example, buttons or keys. The display may be a touch screen display that can be used in conjunction with the input devices. The touch screen may be used in conjunction with, or as an alternative to, the buttons or keys. The display may be adapted to display various icons on the touch screen display, including multi-national icons that can be interpreted by users regardless of language. Display settings may be customizable, including, but not limited to, the background, sounds, fonts, and wallpaper. Different display features may be provided by the module and/or may be downloaded from a computer. [0011] The second module may communicate with the first module by any suitable method. For example, the communication may be a direct connection, as by electrical contacts or wire. Alternatively, it may be a wireless method, such as radio frequency (RF) or magnetic induction.

[0012] In a preferred embodiment where the second module controls the pumping of the first module, the first module contains a pumping mechanism. The pumping mechanism can be any mechanism known in the art and suitable for pumping fluid. The first module can be used with or without the second module. It preferably can operate semi-independently from the second module while keeping in contact with it. It is preferably compact so that it can be worn under clothing if desired.

[0013] The second module may be used in conjunction with the first module, for example, to control the pumping features. It may also be used for stand-alone applications, such as sensing an analyte level of the patient. The second module may have a sensor interface, an analyte meter, or both. The analyte may be, for example, blood glucose. The sensor may be, for example, a glucose sensor. The blood glucose meter may be housed in the second module. The second module may have a receiver, in addition to or instead of the blood glucose meter, to receive information transmitted from a separate blood glucose meter. The second module may be configured to communicate with a blood glucose meter and/or a glucose sensor. The communication between the second module and the blood glucose meter and/or glucose sensor may be wireless or wired.

[0014] In particular embodiments of the invention, the first module and/or the second module may have one or more alarms. Alarms may be audible, tactile, and/or visual. Alarms may indicate low or high blood glucose levels or infusion device problems, such as for example, blockages or overdelivery of fluids in the pump. In certain embodiments, the alarm may sound whenever blood glucose levels go beyond a programmed or allowed range. The second module may also include alarm(s) where the first module does not include any. The second module and/or the first module may include a speaker, which may be configured to output alarms and other sounds. The sounds may sound like a buzzer or another noise. The sounds may be words. For example, if the user's blood glucose is high, an alarm may be a sound that states, "Your blood glucose is high." [0015] One or both of the second module and the first module may communicate to a personal commuter. The communication may be wired or wireless. For example, the modules may communicate with the computer when inserted into a docking station or when connected by a wire to the computer. The communication may be wireless, such as RF, Bluetooth, or any other wireless method.

[0016] In further embodiments, a computer software program may be used that is essentially a virtual second module. The same commands and controls that exist in the second module may exist in the computer program. The second module may be synched with the computer program on the computer, so that changes made on the computer are indicated in the second module, and vice versa.

[0017] The first module may have a button or switch or other input device to stop the pump in an emergency. To avoid accidental activation of the emergency stop, there may be a safety feature implemented. For example, if the emergency stop is a button, the stop might not be activated until the button is pressed for a continuous period of time, for example two seconds. In an alternative, there may be two buttons that both need to be pressed at the same time. [0018] Other features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, various features of embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0019] A detailed description of embodiments of the invention will be made with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein like numerals designate corresponding parts in the several figures.

[0020] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a modular external infusion device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

[0021] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a modular external infusion device with arrows indicating the manner in which a first module and a second module fit together in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

[0022] FIG. 3 is a top view of a second module displaying a Notes Menu in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

[0023] FIG. 4 is a top view of a second module displaying a Screen Menu in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. 6 in any other way that allows the two modules to be placed together. The first module 200 contains the pumping mechanism. The pumping mechanism can be any one of the suitable pumping mechanisms in the art. For example, the pumping mechanism may include a piston- type drive system as described in U.S. Patent No. 6,248,093, which is herein incorporated by reference. Further exemplary infusion device constructions are shown and described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,562,751; 4,678,408; 4,685,903; 5,080,653; and 5,097,122. In certain embodiments, the second module controls the pumping of the first module. The second module may also include a blood glucose meter and/or could interface with any desired, available blood glucose meter. It may also be configured to mate with or slide over a blood glucose meter. [0032] As shown in FIG. 2, in certain embodiments, the second module 100 is removably attachable to the first module 200. For example, the second module 100 may be attached to the first module 200 by sliding parts 102, 202 that mate. In another embodiment, the second module may be attached to the first module by snapping parts that mate. Other alternatives, such as screwing components, hook and loop fasteners (Velcro ), adhesives, and the like, may also be used. In this manner, the second module may be easily removed and attached from the first module without interrupting or discontinuing the pumping schedules. Consequently, the user is given an option to wear the first module without the second module, making the infusion device even lighter and less bulky.

[0033] Although the second module and the first module are shown as being block- shaped, they could be shaped in a number of different ways. For example, the second module could be shaped in any way that is suitable to interface with the first module and to allow the user to view the display and input commands. The first module could be shaped in a way that is able to hold a desired amount of medication. Example shapes include, but are not limited to, a pen shape, a flat shape, and a round shape. A hospital pump may also be used as the first . module.

[0034] As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the second module 100 has a display 101. The display acts as part of a user interface. The display may be, for example, an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, a light emitting diode (LED) display, and a liquid crystal display (LCD). In an embodiment with the OLED display, the display is self luminous and consequently does not require an additional backlight to illuminate the display. The display may be a touch screen display that allows the user to touch the screen to input data and/or commands into the second module. 7

[0035] In addition to, or instead of (in the case of a touch screen display) the display, the second module may have one or more input devices, such as buttons or keys for example. In further embodiments, alternative input devices such as joysticks, touch pads, track balls, a keyboard, and/or a microphone for voice commands may also be used. The second module may contain a camera to store pictures that may be displayed on the second module display. The display may be adapted to display one or more icons. The user may use the input device(s) to select icons and/or, in the case of a touch screen display, the user may select the icons by touching the display at the locations of the icons he wishes to select. There can be any number of kinds of icons, for example, icons could include basal icons, bolus icons, sensor trend icons, food index and/or nutritional index icons, data transfer icons, power icons, settings icons, log book icons, alarm icons, exercise icons, sleep icons, eat icons, favorites, icons, most recent use icons, and so forth. The icons presented on the user interface may be customizable to represent a particular thing that the user, a patient, doctor, parent, or other user, may want to do. For example, a doctor may wish to include an icon for a temporary basal rate that a patient commonly uses. In that case, the patient could activate the temporary basal rate icon to start that particular temporary basal rate or to go directly to a temporary basal rate screen. [0036] It is noted that some users can be expected to have somewhat diminished visual and tactile abilities due to the complications from diabetes or other conditions. Thus, the display and buttons or other input devices may be configured and adapted to the needs of a user with diminished visual and tactile abilities. In alternative embodiments, the second module (and/or the first module) may communicate to the user by audio signals, such as beeps, speech or the like.

[0037] Other display settings may be customizable, including, but not limited to, the background, sounds, fonts, and wallpaper. There may be a children's mode, with limited features available so that a child cannot dispense too much medication at once. Different display features may be included in the module and/or may be downloaded from a computer. The second module may have a memory with which to store customized settings or pump control. The memory may be of any type that is known in the art, such as a volatile or nonvolatile memory. Both a volatile and non- volatile memory may be used, which can speed up operation of the pump. As an example, non-volatile memories that could be used in the invention include flash memories, thumb drives and/or memory sticks such as USB thumb drives, removable hard drives, and optical drives. δ

[0038] The second module preferably has a real time operating system (RTOS). The user interface may be a multi-national icon driven one, with or without text. A multi-national icon driven interface may reduce development, testing, and validation time while also decreasing the learning curve on the part of the user. Alternatively, the user interface may be text based and may or may not incorporate scrolling to allow the user to scroll through text. [0039] Shown in FIGS. 3-5 are a number of possible screens that may be used on the display for a user interface in embodiments of the invention. Each of these screens may display a specific user menu with icons that the user may use to select different options for programming insulin delivery and/or selecting different infusion device features. The menus may all be interrelated so that a user may navigate and access each menu from the other menus. Each menu icon may be categorized as a "root menu" or an "active menu." A root menu represents the previous menu that the current menu derives from, or the last menu visited by the user. This may be shown as the icon located at the upper left corner. A white pipe line may be used to link the root menu to the current menu, shown as an icon located at the bottom left corner. An active menu represents the present menu selected, from which the user may choose to continue accessing other submenus by selecting the icons displayed on the active menu screen. [0040] In FIG. 3, one embodiment of such a user menu is shown. The Screen Menu 104 allows a user to adjust the settings of the display of the second module. The root menu is depicted as a settings wheel 106 and the active menu is depicted as a computer monitor 108. Other icons shown include the standard contrast icon 110 and brightness icon 112. In the upper right hand corner, the information icon 114 is shown. The user may select the information icon 114 to query for more information about the current menu items displayed. In one embodiment, the information icon is displayed on all of the menus.

[0041] An embodiment of another menu is shown in FIG. 4, illustrating a Notes Menu

116. The Notes Menu 116 may include several icons regarding exercise 118 and meal events 120, which the user may use to enter these events and factor them into the pumping schedules. In the embodiment, the root menu is depicted as a folder 122 and the active menu is depicted as a desktop with a pen 124. The menu may also allow the user to take notes and store the notes into either the second module or the first module for future reference. [0042] FIG. 5 further illustrates menus that may be included in embodiments of the invention. The menus may be interrelated so that each menu is accessible from other menus. For example, in FIG. 5, a base menu is depicted by a house icon 126, and from that menu, three other menus may be accessed through the View menu (the active menu) 128 represented by the 9 eye icon 130. The three submenus may include a Pump Graph Menu 132, a Blood Glucose Reading Menu 134, and a Sensor Graph Menu 136. The Pump Graph Menu 132 shows the user a graph of the insulin delivery over a selected time. The active menu is indicated by the pump icon 138. The Blood Glucose Reading Menu 134 shows the current blood glucose reading that is either determined by a blood glucose meter included in the second module, or received or transmitted from a separate blood glucose meter. The active menu is indicated by the blood drop icon 140. The Sensor Graph Menu 136 shows the user a graph of the sensor readings over time. The menu may also show the calibration points 142, 144 for the sensor on the graph. The sensor readings may be received via RF. The active menu is indicated by the RF receiver icon 146.

[0043] The various menus allow the user to input information that is communicated from the second module to the first module. In a preferred embodiment, the pumping mechanism of the first module is controlled by the second module according to the information supplied by the user. The second module may communicate to the first module through RF or magnetic induction. The second module may communicate with the first module through wired or wireless connections, and other methods. For example, the communication may be a direct connection, as by electrical contacts or wire. Other types of communication might include, for example, an RS232 connection, a USB connection, or a wired Ethernet connection, Bluetooth, ZigBee, 802.11 protocol, wireless local area network (LAN) or a wireless Ethernet connection. [0044] In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 6, the First module 200 is a pumping module that includes a pump 210, a motor 208, and an alarm 222, which are all comprised in or on a first module case 224. A display 201 may be located on the module case 224. The first module 200 may include a power supply 206, discussed in more detail below. The first module may further include control electronics 212 having a memory 216 to store pumping programs and/or commands and a processor 214 to process the commands to control the pumping of the module. The first module 200 may include an operation indicator 218, which may be a simple light or other type of visual signal to indicate that the pump is operating. Alternatively, the operation indicator may be on the display 201, such as an LED display. The alarm 222 may be a tactile alarm, such as a vibrating alarm, an audible alarm and/or a visual alarm. It is preferred that the first module have at least minimum safety features, such as the alarm, that can indicate malfunctions.

[0045] The first module may receive instructions sent by the second module transmitter through its receiver 204. In some embodiments, both a transmitter and receiver may be included 10 in the first module. The combined transmitter/transceiver configuration is also known as a transceiver. In this way, the first module may receive instructions from the second module as well as send back signals to the second module to better maintain fluid delivery. Likewise, the second module may include a transceiver so that both the first and second modules may send and receive signals from one another.

[0046] The first module may have a button or switch or other input device to stop the pump in an emergency 220. To avoid the emergency stop 220 being activated accidentally, there may be a safety feature implemented. For example, if the emergency stop is a button, the stop might not be activated until the button is pressed for a continuous period of time, for example two seconds. There may be two buttons that both need to be pressed at the same time. In further embodiments, the first module may also have general input devices, like buttons or keys, to input instructions or program fluid delivery.

[0047] Although the first module described in this embodiment is a pumping module, it is envisioned that a number of different kinds of first modules could be used with the second module. For example, the second module could work with a first module that is a continuous glucose sensor and/or a blood glucose meter.

[0048] In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 7, the second module 100 includes a processor 314 in communication with a display 301. The display 301 may be located on the module case 324. The processor 314 is also in communication with any input device 328, such as keys or buttons. The second module 100 includes a memory 316, in communication with the processor 314, for storing information input from the input device(s) 328 and for output on the display 301, where the processor 314 and memory 316 are part of the control electronics 312. In addition, the memory 316 is adapted to store any programs loaded as part of the pump software 326. The first module preferably has software similar to that in the second module, but without the same user interface.

[0049] The second module may send instructions to the first module through its transmitter 304. In some embodiments, both a transmitter and receiver may be included in the second module. The combined transmitter/transceiver configuration is also known as a transceiver. In this way, the second module may both send instructions to and receive instructions from the first module to better maintain fluid delivery. Likewise, the first module may include a transceiver so that both the second and first modules may send and receive signals from one another. 11

[0050] The first module, with its pumping module, preferably has a very limited user interface for operational and/or basal indication and emergency bolus. The second module 100 may further include a power supply 306, discussed in more detail below. The second module 100 may also include an operation indicator 318, which may be a simple light or other type of visual signal to indicate that the second module 100 is operating. It may additionally include a first module operation indicator that indicates whether the first module 200 is operating. The second module 100 may include emergency stops 320 similar to those that may be included in the first module 200.

[0051] The second module and the first module preferably each have their own power supply, although it is possible for there to be a power supply in the first module alone, so that the second module is only connected to a power supply when it is electrically connected to the first module. Each power supply may be rechargeable or disposable. Where the power supply is rechargeable, it may be a rechargeable battery. If the second module has a rechargeable battery, the second power supply may recharge when the second module connects to the first module and/or when the second module is connected to another power supply. For example, the power supply could recharge when the second module is docked in a docking station. The second module may be electrically connected to a power outlet for charging the power supply. The second module could also be connected to a portable battery charger for charging the power supply. Additionally, the power supply could be a kinetically rechargeable battery. [0052] The first module, like the second module, may also have a rechargeable power supply. If the first module has a rechargeable battery, the first power supply may recharge when the first module connects to the second module and/or when the second module is connected to another power supply. A battery recharger may be adapted to recharge one module at a time or both of the second module and the first module at the same time. A battery recharger could also be adapted to charge more than modules, for example for systems that include two first modules. The power supply for either module may be a removable battery that can be recharged separately from the modules. Additionally, it is possible that the first module may be manufactured and sold cheaply enough that the entire module could be disposable at the end of a non-rechargeable battery life. In this case, the battery may be sealed inside the module for better water resistance. Furthermore, the second module and/or the first module themselves may be water resistant. They also may be waterproof. Alternatively, the second and first modules may be manufactured so that the compatibility to operate as an entire module is not limited to a specific counterpart. In this manner, if and when the second module or the first 12 module breaks or is too worn to continue use, a new second or first module may be purchased and be compatible with the remaining counterpart.

[0053] A power indicator may be included on the display of the second module and/or the first module so that the user can conveniently check the level of power. The indicator may provide a warning to the user as to when the power supply needs to be recharged or replaced. For example, the intensity of the indicator may correlate with the power level. In addition, a warning indicator may notify the user that the power supply is very low or about to run out by blinking.

[0054] In embodiments where the first module is a pump module and is disposable after a period of time, the first module may be pre-filled with the fluid for infusing and intended for a single infusion of fluid. Once all of the fluid has been infused, the first module may be disposed. For example, if the first module holds three days worth of fluid, it would be disposable after three days of use. The amount of fluid included could be equal to the average amount that would be used during the average lifetime of the included battery. Alternatively, more fluid or less fluid could be included so that the battery would likely run out first or so that the fluid would likely run out first. In still other embodiments, the first module may be refillable as to the fluid, but include a non-rechargeable battery that is sealed within the housing. In that case, the first module could be disposable at the end of the battery life. The life of the first module would generally depend on the type of battery used.

[0055] The modules may include a number of ways to increase battery life. For example, one or more module could include solar cells to increase the light of the displays and to increase power. In further embodiments, the display may be configured to turn off after a certain amount of time, which may be preset or set by the user. Alternatively, the display may remain on at all times. It may be an option selectable by the user for the display to either remain on at all times or to turn off after a certain amount of time. The entire second module could also be configured to turn off after a certain amount of time to save power. Where the second modules inputs a schedule into the first module and is not needed until the next input from the user, it is not necessary for the second module to remain on at all times.

[0056] The second module may be used in conjunction with the first module, for example to control the pumping features, or it may also be used for stand-alone applications, such as sensing an analyte level of the patient. The second module may have a sensor interface, an analyte meter, or both. The analyte may be, for example, blood glucose. And the sensor may be, for example, a continuous glucose sensor. Example glucose sensors are described in U.S. 13

Patent Nos. 5,390,671; 5,391,250; 5,482,473; and 5,586,553, and U.S. Application Serial No. 10/273,767 (published as U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0074785 Al, on April 22, 2004), which are herein incorporated by reference. While the blood glucose meter may be housed in the second module, it is also possible that the second module has a receiver, in addition or instead of the blood glucose meter, to receive information transmitted from a separate blood glucose meter. In further embodiments, the first module may be a sensing device or a blood glucose meter. In still further embodiments, the second module may be adapted to interface with two or more first modules. For example, in one embodiment, a blood glucose meter, by itself or including a continuous glucose sensor, is adapted to be a second first module. The modules may stack upon each other, like a sandwich, so that the one of the first modules is sandwiched between the other first module and the second module. Alternatively, the modules may be worn separately or side-to-side from each other.

[0057] In particular embodiments of the invention the first module has one or more alarms. The second module may also have one or more alarms. Alarms may be audible, tactile, and/or visual. Alarms may indicate low or high blood glucose levels, pumping problems like blockages or overdelivery of fluids, lack of communication between devices, or power failure, for example. In embodiments, the alarm may sound whenever blood glucose levels go beyond a programmed or allowed range. The range may be selected and inputted manually by a user or the range may be calculated based off of a set of governing parameters. The second module may include a speaker, which may be configured to output alarms or other sounds. The sounds may sound like a buzzer or another noise. They may be words. For example, if the user's blood glucose is high, an alarm may sound that says, "your blood glucose is high." [0058] The first module can be used with or without the second module. It is preferably compact so that it can be worn under clothing if desired. It preferably can operate semi- independently from the second module while keeping in contact with it. The first module preferably has a minimal user interface. In one embodiment, it may only have a power switch or on/off button. Where the first module is a pumping module, the first module may instead include an emergency stop button or switch in case the pump alarms. In further embodiments, the first module may include a simple display, such as an LED display, and/or one or more buttons. For example, where the first module is a pumping module, the display may display the pumping rate of the module and the user may use one or more buttons or keys to change the pump rate. In further embodiments, the pumping module may be adapted to display several characteristics of the pumping program, which the user could scroll or select through using one 14 or more buttons or keys. In still further embodiments, the display may be more sophisticated, like an LED or OLED, for example, and/or the first module may include additional or different input devices, such as joysticks, touch pads, track balls, a keyboard, and/or a microphone. [0059] The second module and the first module may use any number of communications protocol. One or both of the second module and the first module may communicate to a personal commuter. The communication may be wired or wireless. For example, the modules may communicate with the computer when inserted into a docking station or when connected by a wire to the computer. The communication may be wireless, such as RF, Bluetooth, or any x other wireless method. Other types of communication might include, for example, an RS232 connection, a USB connection, or a wired Ethernet connection, Bluetooth, ZigBee, 802.11 protocol, wireless local area network (LAN) or a wireless Ethernet connection. The second module and/or the first module may be configured to interact with an analyte sensor. For example, the second module may to communicate with a blood glucose sensor and/or a glucose meter as well. The sensor may be a continuous glucose sensor. The communication between the second module and the blood glucose sensor and/or glucose meter may also be wired or wireless.

[0060] The second module and/or the first module may be configured to notify the user if there are communication problems between any of the devices. When strict medication delivery and monitoring is required, for example a closed-loop system, the first module can be programmed to stop dispensing medication when it fails to receive periodic scheduled communication from the second module or a personal computer (PC) or the like. In alternative, an alarm may sound when the scheduled communication is not received, rather than stopping the medication dispense. This timeout option and duration is programmable and may also be included in the delivery schedule. The notification may be of one or more types, such as an alarm, an icon on the display, or some other type of notification.

[0061] The first module may also be configured to communicate with a blood glucose meter or a blood glucose sensor in the case of a virtual second module. The first and/or second module may further be configured to communicate with implantable devices such as an implantable insulin pump or an implantable blood glucose sensor. The first and/or second module may also communicate and transfer user settings, history data, new software or firmware, and configuration information with other first and/or second modules or PCs. This would allow for system replacements and software upgrades. The first and/or second module may also communicate to more than one pump or sensor modules. 15

[0062] The second module may have an on-pump training mode, so that a user may learn how to use the pump interactively, without having to actually dispense medication. In the on- pump training mode, the second module teaches the user to go through the steps that the user would take to perform an action using the second module. The on-pump training mode may be a mode that is only able to be activated when the second module is separated from any first module. Alternatively, the on-pump training mode may be set up so that a user can enter the training mode at any time. For example, if a user is learning to use a temporary basal rate option, the user might want to enter the training mode to get instruction directly from the second module, instead of from a manual. In further embodiments, the on-pump training mode may allow the user to direct the second module to perform the actions taken during the training mode. For example, during a training session in which the user learns to use a temporary basal rate option, the user may select a temporary basal rate and a time period for delivery of the temporary basal rate option. At the end of the training session, the pump may query the user to determine whether the user wants to run a program so that the pump can proceed at a selected temporary basal rate for a selected time period. If the user selects to run the program, the second module sends an instruction to a first pumping module to pump the selected temporary basal rate for the selected time period. If the user selects to not run the program, the second module does not send an instruction to a first pumping module.

[0063] In an embodiment where the second module communicates with a glucose sensor and the first module, it is anticipated that a closed-loop system may be employed. In a closed- loop system, the pump interacts with a continuous glucose sensor to mimic the functions of a healthy pancreas. Preferably, the system works with minimal interaction from the patient. An example of a closed loop system is described in U.S. Patent No. 6,558,351, which is herein incorporated by reference.

[0064] Additionally, one or both of the second module and the first module may communicate with other devices, such as a phone or pager system. In further embodiments, the second module and/or the first module may include a Global Positioning System (GPS) device. Alternatively, the second module and/or the first module may interface with a GPS device. The GPS device can be configured to help the user determine his or her location or get directions to another location, like a standard GPS device used in an automobile. The GPS device can also be used to locate a user from a remote location. For example, if a user has a blood glucose emergency, emergency personnel could use the GPS device to find the user. The GPS may be 16 always on, or intermittently, for example able to be turned on by the user, or turned on automatically if a problem exists.

[0065] In further embodiments, there is a computer software program that is essentially a virtual second module. The same commands and controls that exist in the second module may exist in the computer program. The second module may be synched with the computer program on the computer, so that changes made on the computer are indicated in the second module, and vice versa. In still further embodiments, the second module may be adapted to interact with a virtual patient software program that allows a patient and/or a doctor to change different parameters and see how it would affect the patient. The virtual patient software program may receive data from the second module to populate the program parameters. An example of a virtual patient software program is described in pending U.S. Patent Application No. 40088- 316103, entitled "Virtual Patient Software System for Educating and Treating Individuals with Diabetes," filed June 3, 2005, attorney docket no. 11/145,485, which is herein incorporated by reference.

[0066] Additional software may be used on the computer for keeping records and analysis of patient data, such as tracking medication delivery, etc. The software may include graphing capabilities and spreadsheets and other data displays. In certain embodiments, the second module is configured to display information from the software on the computer. For example, the second module may be configured to display a graph of medication delivery over a certain time, such as the basal delivery for the past twenty-four hours. In another embodiment, the first module may be controlled from a remote location, the remote location being a PC. [0067] While the description above refers to particular embodiments of the present invention, it will be understood that many modifications may be made without departing from the spirit thereof. The accompanying claims are intended to cover such modifications as would fall within the true scope and spirit of the present invention.

[0068] The presently disclosed embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims, rather than the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

Claims

17WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. An external infusion device for infusing a fluid into a body comprising: a first module including a first housing, an alarm in the first housing, a reservoir in the first housing to hold a fluid, and a pump in the first housing, adapted to pump the fluid from the reservoir; and a second module adapted to removably attach to the first module, the second module including a second housing, and a display in the second housing, whereinjhe second module communicates with the first module to provide a fluid delivery program for the flow of the fluid from the first housing.
2. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the first module further includes one or more input keys on the first housing.
3. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the first module further includes a memory to store the fluid delivery program.
4. The external infusion device of claim 3, wherein the memory is a flash memory.
5. The external infusion device of claim 3, wherein the first module further includes a processor to retrieve the fluid delivery program from the memory and to control the pumping of the fluid from the first reservoir.
6. The external infusion device of claim I, wherein the first module further includes at least one power supply that provides power to actuate the pump.
7. The external infusion device of claim 6, wherein the at least one power supply is a rechargeable battery.
8. The external infusion device of claim 1 further including an emergency stop button that stops the pump when the emergency stop button is activated. 18
9. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by sliding onto the first module.
10. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by snapping onto the first module.
11. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by hook and loop fasteners.
12. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the alarm is selected from at least one of the group consisting of a tactile alarm, an auditory alarm, and a visual alarm.
13. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the alarm is triggered when a user's glucose level value goes beyond an allowed value range.
14. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the alarm is triggered when there is a pump blockage.
15. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the alarm is triggered when a malfunction is detected.
16. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the alarm is triggered when communication between the second and the first modules is disrupted.
17. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the display is selected from the group consisting of an LCD display, an LED display, and an OLED display.
18. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module further includes one or more input devices selected from the group consisting of buttons, keys, joysticks, touch pads, track balls, and microphones.
19. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the display is touch sensitive.
20. The external infusion device of claim 19, wherein the touch sensitive display is adapted to display various icons with which a user programs the infusion of fluid into the user's body.
21. The external infusion device of claim 20, wherein the various icons are organized into program menus.
22. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the display further includes customizable settings. 19
23. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the first module is adapted to continue delivering fluid according to the fluid delivery program when the first module is not attached to the second module.
24. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module further includes a sensor interface, the sensor being a continuous glucose sensor.
25. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module further includes a blood glucose meter.
26. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second module includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) device.
27. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the communication between the second and first modules is wired.
28. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the communication between the second and first modules is wireless.
29. The external infusion device of claim 28, wherein the wireless communication is selected from the group consisting of radio frequency (RF), Bluetooth, wireless local area network (LAN) and wireless Ethernet connection.
30. The external infusion device of claim 1, wherein the second further includes a transmitter to transmit data to the first module.
31. The external infusion device of claim 30, wherein the first module includes a receiver to receive the data.
32. The external infusion device of claim 30, wherein the second module transmitter is a transceiver.
33. The external infusion device of claim 31, wherein the first module receiver is a transceiver.
34. A method for infusing a fluid into a body from an external infusion device, comprising: activating one or more icons displayed on a second module of an external infusion device to select one or more program menus formed by the one or more icons, the external infusion device having a first module, the first module including a first housing, an alarm in the first housing, a reservoir in the first housing to hold fluid, and a pump in the first housing, 20 adapted to pump the fluid from the reservoir, and a second module, the second module being adapted to removably attach to the first module, the second module including a second housing, and a display in the second housing, wherein the second module communicates with the first module to provide a fluid delivery program for the flow of the fluid from the first housing; and programming pump flow commands to be communicated to the first module, wherein the first module dispenses the fluid through a pump in the first module in accordance with the pump flow commands of the second module.
35. The method of claim 34 further including removing the second module from the first module, wherein the first module continues fluid delivery when not attached to the second module.
36. The method of claim 34 further including storing the fluid delivery program in a memory.
37. The method of claim 34, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by sliding onto the onto the first module.
38. The method of claim 34, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by snapping onto the first module.
39. The method of claim 34, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by hook and loop fasteners.
40. The method of claim 34, wherein the display is touch sensitive.
41. The method of claim 34, wherein the display further includes customizable settings.
42. The method of claim 34 further including using a Global Positioning System (GPS) device.
43. The method of claim 34, wherein the second module is compatible with a replacement of the first module.
44. The method of claim 34, wherein the first module is compatible with a replacement of the second module.
45. A method for infusing a fluid into a body from an external infusion device, comprising: 21 displaying one or more icons on a display of a second module of an external infusion device, the external infusion device having a first module, the first module including a first housing, an alarm in the first housing, a reservoir in the first housing to hold fluid, and a pump in the first housing, adapted to pump the fluid from the reservoir, and a second module, the second module being adapted to removably attach to the first module, the second module including a second housing, and a display in the second housing, wherein the second module communicates with the first module to provide a fluid delivery program for the flow of the fluid from the first housing; receiving pump flow commands on fluid delivery in the first module; and delivering the fluid according to the pump flow commands.
46. The method of claim 45 further including storing the fluid delivery program in a memory.
47. The method of claim 46 further including retrieving the stored fluid delivery program from the memory to control fluid delivery.
48. The method of claim 45 further including initiating an alarm to alert when a user's blood glucose level value goes beyond an allowed value range.
49. The method of claim 45 further including initiating an alarm to alert when there is a pump blockage.
50. The method of claim 45 further including initiating an alarm to alert when a malfunction is detected.
51. The method of claim 45 further including initiating an alarm to alert when communication between the second and the first module is disrupted.
52. The method of claim 45, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by sliding onto the onto the first module.
53. The method of claim 45, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by snapping onto the first module.
54. The method of claim 45, wherein the second module is adapted to removably attach to the first module by hook and loop fasteners.
55. The method of claim 45, wherein the display is touch sensitive. 22
56. The method of claim 45, wherein the display further includes customizable settings.
57. The method of claim 45 further including using a Global Positioning System (GPS) device.
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US20120203196A1 (en) 2012-08-09 application
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US9220840B2 (en) 2015-12-29 grant
US8182462B2 (en) 2012-05-22 grant
US7713240B2 (en) 2010-05-11 grant
US20070060871A1 (en) 2007-03-15 application
US20130310737A1 (en) 2013-11-21 application
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US20120101474A1 (en) 2012-04-26 application
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US8152764B2 (en) 2012-04-10 grant
US8517987B2 (en) 2013-08-27 grant
US20160067404A1 (en) 2016-03-10 application
US7815622B2 (en) 2010-10-19 grant
US20120150007A1 (en) 2012-06-14 application

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