WO2007024230A1 - Chest tube drainage system - Google Patents

Chest tube drainage system Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2007024230A1
WO2007024230A1 PCT/US2005/030423 US2005030423W WO2007024230A1 WO 2007024230 A1 WO2007024230 A1 WO 2007024230A1 US 2005030423 W US2005030423 W US 2005030423W WO 2007024230 A1 WO2007024230 A1 WO 2007024230A1
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WO
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
device
chest
chest tube
tube
flow lumen
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2005/030423
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Richard L. Watson, Jr.
Original Assignee
Spheric Products, Ltd.
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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/008Drainage tubes; Aspiration tips
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/0001Containers for suction drainage, e.g. rigid containers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/0094Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems having means for processing the drained fluid, e.g. an absorber
    • A61M1/0096Draining devices provided with means for releasing antimicrobial or gelation agents in the drained fluid
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/82Internal energy supply devices
    • A61M2205/8206Internal energy supply devices battery-operated

Abstract

A system for draining the chest cavity of a patient subjected to a traumatic chest injury and/or to surgery within the chest. The system includes a small, portable suction device and a chest tube with an improved terminal structure. A number of embodiments of the suction device are disclosed; the first (with two variations) a small, completely disposable, bottle-shaped assembly comprising a motor/pump section, a power section, and a dessicant filled chamber, the second (also with two variations) a small box shaped assembly with a disposable dessicant pouch and a power supply that mounts to a battery charger positioned on a IV pole. A number of chest tube terminus structures are disclosed, including multi-lumen structures having high-airflow an low-airflow lumens as well as “dead” and “live” lumens. Fenestrations are variously positioned between and through the luments in order to collect coagulated components of the extracted fluids and prevent them from clogging the primary flow tube and restricting or preventing continuous airflow.

Description

TITLE: CHEST TUBE DRAINAGE SYSTEM

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the Invention

[01] The present invention relates generally to medical and surgical devices and systems that serve to remove air and fluids from the body of a patient after injury or during and after surgery.

The present invention relates more specifically to a system for use in association with the removal of air and fluids from the chest cavity of a patient during surgery or as a manner of treatment for a chest injury.

Background Information [02] The human chest cavity is lined with membranes referred to as the parietal pleura and the visceral pleura. The parietal pleura line the chest cavity itself, while the viscera pleura are the membranes that line the lungs. The space between the two membranes is called the intrapleural space (or sometimes simply "the pleural space") that normally has a small amount of fluid within it in a healthy individual. This fluid is drained and regulated by the lymphatic system and provides lubrication and cohesion between the pleura for normal lung function.

[03] An individual may accumulate air, fluid, or purulent drainage in the intrapleural space due to a number of pathologic conditions. When blood accumulates in this space, the condition is referred to as a hemothorax; air accumulation in the space is referred to as a pneumothorax; and purulent drainage accumulating in that space is referred to as empyema. Under such conditions as these, chest tubes may be required to provide drainage of air and excess fluid of any type. Excess fluid in the intrapleural space may be caused by liver or kidney failure, congestive heart failure, infection, malignancy blocking the lymphatic system, trauma, or other injury to the lungs or chest cavity. If the amount of fluid is very small, chest tubes would not typically be necessary. However, if a considerable amount of fluid or blood that cannot be absorbed by the body itself is present, chest tubes and a drainage system will typically be required. Similar conditions may exist within the intrapleural space during and after surgical intervention into the chest cavity.

[04] When there is an excess amount of fluid or air in the pleural space, simply having an open airway will not typically result in sufficient air exchange for the patient due to the likely presence of a partial or complete lung collapse. A lung collapse occurs when the pressure in the intrapleural space is altered by the excess air or fluid accumulation presses inward on the lung causing it to collapse. Normally, the intrapleural pressure is below atmospheric pressure, thus allowing the lung to easily expand. When a lung does collapse, chest tubes may be used to allow drainage of the air or fluid and restore normal pressure to the intrapleural space so the lungs can expand and adequate gas exchange will occur. Such chest tubes inserted into the pleural space are typically attached to a drainage system that is closed to the atmosphere and is often maintained at sub-atmospheric pressure so as to create suction. [05] Depending on the condition of the patient, a chest tube may be inserted and maintained at the patient's bedside, in an ambulance, or in an operating room. The positioning of a chest tubes and the point of insertion will depend in part upon the type of fluid which has accumulated in the intrapleural space.

[06] Previous efforts to provide chest tube drainage systems have typically utilized gravity and suction to evacuate the excess fluids and air. The typical closed chest drainage system is maintained at a level lower than that of the patient in order for gravity to facilitate fluid drainage from the intrapleural space. Suction may also be used to promote the transfer of air or fluid out of the intrapleural cavity. [07] The traditional drainage system of the prior art involved the use of one, two, or three bottle pleural drainage systems. Each of these systems operated under the basic principles of gravity, positive pressure, and suction, with the one bottle system being the simplest, yet most difficult to monitor. The two bottle system required less vigilance with respect to fluid level monitoring, whereas the three bottle pleural drainage system enabled suction control. Most modern facilities now use a disposable (or partially disposable) pleural drainage system that combines suction control, fluid collection, and a water seal into one multi-chambered unit. These are simply three chambered systems that use the same principles as the classic three bottle system. Examples of such systems are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,784,642, 4,769,019 and 4,354,493.

[08] Several difficulties arise with systems heretofore described in the art, including the kinking of the tubing, the formation of clots and blockages, problems with the suction, and problems with dependent loops (air and fluid) in the tubing. Additionally, the classic bottle systems, even those that involve an integrated three chamber structure, are typically quite bulky and do not allow easy transportation or ambulation of the patient. Although some integrated systems have been developed that are directed to being lightweight, portable, non-breakable, and disposable, many problems with the collection tubing still exist. Additionally, these types of devices typically must be connected to large pump systems or stationary vacuum sources which decrease or altogether eliminate their portability. [09] A problem almost universally encountered within the prior art is the inadequate drainage of the intrapleural space due to clots or gelatinous inflammatory material and the resultant plugging or kinking of the tube. Another frequent problem in the prior art is the disposal of the biohazardous fluids from the drainage collection chambers. While the chambers may be sealed during use it is often necessary to expose the health care provider to the collected fluids during the removal and disposal process.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[10] The present invention provides a system for draining the chest cavity of a patient subjected to a traumatic chest injury and/or subjected to surgical procedures within the chest cavity. The system includes a small, portable suction device and a chest tube with an improved terminal structure. Two embodiments of the suction device are disclosed. The first embodiment of the suction device is a small, completely disposable, bottle shaped assembly comprising a motor/pump section, a power section, and a desiccant chamber. The second suction device embodiment is a small box shaped assembly with a disposable desiccant pouch. This second configuration of the suction device can be mounted to a battery charger that may in turn be positioned on an IV pole.

[11] A number of chest tube terminal structures for insertion into the pleural space of a patient are disclosed in the system of the present invention, including multi-lumen structures having both high-airflow and low-airflow lumens. Fenestrations in the form of small slits or the like in the tubular walls are variously positioned between the lumens and between the interior and exterior spaces defined by the lumens, in order to collect coagulated components of the extracted fluids and facilitate the maintenance of a continuous flow of air. [12] Further, system of the present invention lends itself to the incorporation of a variety of sensors in the chest tube, the chest tube terminus, and/or the suction device. These sensors may include any of a number of pressure monitoring devices, differential pressure devices, flow rate meters, fluid/gas mixture transducers, and blood saturation monitors.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS [13] Figure 1 is a perspective view of a first structural embodiment of the suction device component of the system of the present invention.

[14] Figure 2 is a schematic functional diagram of the first structural embodiment of the suction device component of the system of the present invention. [15] Figure 3 is a front view of a second structural embodiment of the suction device component of the system of the present invention.

[16] Figure 4 is a side view of the second structural embodiment of the suction device component of the system of the present invention, shown attached to an IV pole.

[17] Figure 5 is a top view of a first chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention.

[18] Figure 6A is a transverse cross-sectional view (along A-A in Figure 5) of the first chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 5.

[19] Figure 6B is a transverse cross-sectional view of an alternate configuration to the chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 5. [20] Figure 6C is a top cross-sectional view of the first chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 6A at its attachment to the chest tube.

[21] Figure 6D is a side cross-sectional view of the chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 6B at its attachment to the chest tube.

[22] Figures 7A, 7C, and 7E are transverse cross-sectional views of further alternate embodiments of the chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention.

[23] Figures 7B, 7D, and 7F are top and side cross-sectional views of the further alternate embodiments of the chest tube terminus structure of the system of the present invention as shown in Figures 7A, 7C, and 7E respectively. [24] Figure 8 is a top view of a further alternate chest tube terminus structural embodiment of the system of the present invention.

[25] Figure 9 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the chest tube terminus embodiment of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 8. [26] Figure 10 is a schematic cross-sectional view of the human chest showing the typical placement of a chest tube using a trocar.

[27] Figure 11 is a schematic diagram showing the placement and use of the primary components of the chest tube drainage system of the present invention.

[28] Figure 12 is a perspective view of a further alternate embodiment of the system of the present invention.

[29] Figure 13 is a perspective view of the embodiment of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 12 with the addition of a power charger unit.

[30] Figure 14 is a perspective view of the embodiment of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 12 with the power charger unit attached. [31] Figure 13 is a perspective view of the embodiment of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 12 with the desiccant chamber detached.

[32] Figure 16 is a perspective view of a further alternate embodiment of suction device of the system of the present invention.

[33] Figure 17 is a perspective view of the embodiment of the system of the present invention shown in Figure 16 with the desiccant chamber and the pump/motor unit detached from each other.

[34] Figure 18 is a partial cross-sectional perspective view of the embodiment of the system of the present invention shown in Figurelό. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT 1. The Suction Pump and Desiccant Container

[35] As summarized above, the present invention is directed to a system for sucking air and excess fluid out of the chest cavity of a patient during and after surgical operations, as well as in response to a chest injury such as, for example, a collapsed lung. Figure 1 discloses one critical element of a first preferred system embodiment of the present invention, comprising a suction device 10 having a motor/pump section 14, a power section 16, and a desiccant chamber section 12 in operative communication with each other. Desiccant chamber 12 preferably incorporates chest tube connection 18, which in the preferred embodiment may be a screw-on, or quick connect fitting, for connection to a chest tube (not shown), the other end of which is adaptable for placement in the chest cavity as described in more detail below. Desiccant chamber 12 is preferably constructed of a clear, high impact plastic and is removable from power section 16 and motor/pump section 14 at disconnection point 20 and is replaceable in a like manner. Desiccant chamber 12 contains a desiccant material (not shown in this view) for absorbing liquids, such as blood, that are sucked out of the chest cavity along with the air. Desiccant chamber 12 preferably contains anti-microbial and/or anti-bacterial chemicals, which are preferably chlorine-based, to render the suctioned materials non-bio-hazardous. Although Figure 1 shows for illustration the power section 16 located at the base of the motor/pump section 14, the power section 16 may be placed in any other desired location including without limitation between the desiccant chamber 12 and the motor/pump section 14, and on the inside or outside (or a combination of both) of the suction device 10.

[36] Figure 2 discloses in schematic form the basic functional components of the suction device of the system of the present invention, as characterized in each of the preferred embodiments described. Suction device 10 comprises motor/pump section 14 and power section 16 connected to desiccant chamber 12 at, disconnection point 20. Airflow is directed through the device from chest tube connection 18 (wherein the air flow may include fluid flow) into desiccant chamber 12 wherein fluids in the airflow are absorbed into desiccant material 22. An electrically driven motor (powered by power section 16) turns an air pump within motor/pump section 14 to direct the air flow from desiccant chamber 12 and out from the device.

[37] An alternative preferred embodiment of the suction device of the system of the present invention is shown in Figures 3 & 4. This embodiment of suction device 40 may be mounted on an IV pole 50 as illustrated in Figure 4. This embodiment of suction device 40 incorporates chest tube connection 42 and preferably has a disposable desiccant pouch 44 (hidden in these views within the device enclosure) as disclosed and described in U.S. Patent No. 6,648,862, the disclosure of which is incorporated in its entirety herein by reference. As illustrated in Figure 4, a power charging unit 46 is preferably clipped to IV pole 50 by way of bracket 52. Suction device 40 incorporates chargeable power supply 44 which in turn attaches, clips, plugs into or otherwise connects into power charging unit 46 as shown. [38] The first embodiment of the suction device of the present invention described above with respect to Figures 1 & 2 may be constructed small enough and of readily available materials and components as to allow the unit to be completely disposable (i.e. a single patient, single use device). The desiccant chamber section (12 in Figure 1) may be replaced as needed for a particular patient while the entire device might be disposed of after use is completed for the particular patient.

[39] The first embodiment of the suction device of the present invention described above may also find application in other medical situations not involving chest tube placement and drainage. The low vacuum device could, for example, be utilized as a very small wound pump to provide a sub-atmospheric pressure on a healing wound as has become beneficially evident in the wound treatment field. The airflow volume required for a chest tube pump would generally be higher, and the volume required for a wound pump generally lower. Variations in the airflow generated by this variation of the suction device component of the system of the present invention could be achieved through known methods of modifying the pump rate by way of modifying the motor speed. These variations could be implemented as "hard wired" flow rates through preset electronic/electrical parameters, or as variable flow rates through the use of variable electronic/electrical components in the motor controller circuitry. [40] The second embodiment of the suction device of the present invention described above with respect to Figures 3 & 4 would be constructed in a manner similar to the device described in the referenced U.S. Patent No. 6,648,862. In so far as the device described in this referenced U.S. Patent is primarily directed to the wound healing arts, the structure of a similar device appropriate for use with chest drainage would require modifications that would increase the airflow volume through the device and the capacity of the desiccant chamber. The desiccant material (contained within the desiccant pouch) and the chamber within which it is positioned, would be separately disposable apart from the motor/pump section and the power section of the device.

[41] The device of this second embodiment would also lend itself to the use of more complex automated decision algorithms that may serve to control the airflow rates and respond to changes in pressure within the system. This increased electronic control complexity also allows the second embodiment described to lend itself to the greater use of sensors within the system that would monitor the various pressures, fluid content, and blood composition (oxygen saturation, for example). A number of such sensor applications are described in U.S. Patent No. 6,648,862, incorporated by reference above. 2. The Chest Tube & Chest Tube Terminus

[42] As indicated above, many problems with chest tubes have centered around blood coagulating in the tube and blocking the flow of air and fluid through the tube. The present invention provides a solution to this problem in the form of a combination high-flow/low-flow tube design that incorporates low-flow or "dead tubes" that allow the blood to collect within them without blocking the high-flow portion of the tube. An example of one such tube and terminus structure is illustrated in Figure 5 (top view), Figures 6A & 6B (transverse cross- section views) and Figures 6C & 6D (lateral cross-sectional views). As shown in Figure 5, this chest tube terminus has a central, relatively large, high-flow lumen 62 and two smaller low-flow lumens 64 & 66 on either side. In a first variation of the structure shown, all of the lumens may be connected to the suction device with the individual lumen air flow rate determined by the differences in cross-sectional geometry of the lumens (and the opening of the lumen into the tube) as well as the number and size of the fenestrations positioned through the lumen walls.

This structure shown in transverse cross-section in Figure 6A is functionally disclosed in clear detail in the lateral cross-section of Figure 6C. As shown, flow can occur directly from the low flow lumens into the suction tube in addition to flowing first into the high flow lumen (through the intermediate fenestrations 75) and then into the suction tube 73. [43] Each of the lumens is preferably perforated with a plurality of external fenestrations as shown; high flow lumen 62 with fenestrations 68, low flow lumen 64 with fenestrations 72, and low flow lumen 66 with fenestrations 70. Additional intermediate fenestrations 75 may be incorporated that would allow the low-flow lumens to communicate with the high-flow lumen as described above. In any of these variations, the structures as shown and described serve to maintain the free flow of air through the system. As collected blood and other fluids coagulate, the coagulated components tend to migrate into the low-flow lumens and thereby leave the high- flow lumen unobstructed for continuous airflow. In addition, the fenestrations provide multiple pathways for air to move around a blood clot in the tube and thereby facilitate continuous airflow.

[44] Alternatively, as illustrated in Figure 6B, a chest tube in accordance with the present invention may have one or more "live" lumens 74, 78 & 82, connected to the suction source and one or more "dead" lumens 76, 80 & 84 that are not directly connected to the suction source. The "live" lumens 74, 78 & 82 are connected by intermediate fenestrations (as shown) to the "dead" lumens 76, 80 & 84, which serve as reservoirs for the suctioned liquid, leaving the "live" lumens 74, 78 & 82 clear for continuous airflow. Figure 6D discloses in a lateral cross-sectional view the manner in which the "dead" lumens terminate prior to the suction tube connection point leaving only the "live" lumens to directly connect with the suction tube. [45] Referring now to Figure 7A, a further alternative preferred chest tube design in accordance with the present invention is shown in cross-section to comprise a centralized, relatively stiff, high-flow lumen 90 and one or more peripheral low-flow lumens 92 & 94 formed of relatively flexible outer walls that collapse as blood coagulates in them. The collapse of the outer, flexible lumens 92 & 94 helps to push the liquid through the chest tube and into the desiccant chamber of the suction device. Fig 7B discloses the manner of connection to the suction tube wherein low flow lumens 92 & 94 terminate prior to the suction tube connection leaving only high flow lumen 90 directly connected to the suction tube. In this manner, flow through the low flow lumens is restricted through the intermediate fenestrations into the high flow lumen, thus resulting in the lower flow and the desired accumulation of fluids and coagulates in the side lumens.

[46] Referring now to Figure 7C, still another alternative preferred embodiment of a chest tube design in accordance with the present invention comprises a central suction lumen 100 and one or more diffused suction lumens 102 & 104, each of which may be connected to a different level of suction (via different ports on the suction device connected to the respective lumens/lines (not shown)) or the same level of suction as shown in Figure 7D. In this structure, with the different levels of suction, blood clots will again tend to congregate in the lower-suction lumens 102 & 104, leaving the higher-suction lumen 100 free for continued airflow. [47] Still another alternate preferred embodiment of the cross-sectional structure of the chest tube component of the present invention is shown in Figures 7E & 7F. In this embodiment, a central fenestrated suction tube 110 is surrounded by an outer tube 114, with dead space 112 in between the two tubes. In this embodiment, suction that is placed on inner tube 110 allows fluids to be drawn up into the tube and then deposited through the fenestrations (as shown) into the dead space 112 in between inner tube 110 and outer tube 114. Figure 7F shows the manner in which this embodiment is connected to the suction tube with only the central tube 110 directly connected.

[48] The multi-lumen structures described above also lend themselves to utilization of certain two-way airflow configurations and methods that could be used to help keep the tubes clear of fluids. The basic principles of a two-way airflow are known in the art and have been utilized with mixed success in conjunction with known suction devices and known drainage catheters. An example of the application of the basic principle is described in U.S. Patent No. 5,738,656. As long as the overall functional effect of the chest tube structure and the suction system is to create a sub-atmospheric pressure (suction) within the intrapleural space, such two-way air-flow could direct and allow a constant flow of air through the tubes to keep them clear. Unique applications of the two-way air flow approach could, for example, be implemented in the present invention by alternately reversing the "live" and "dead" lumens in the multi-lumen configurations described above: In a first state, deposits would tend to form in the "dead" chambers and in particular in the fenestrations connecting to the "live" chambers. In a reverse state these same deposits could be "cleared" from the fenestrations when the airflow across the fenestrations is reversed. Such flow reversal could be accomplished by using a valve located at the chest tube terminus or by bringing separate suction tubes or tube lumens back to the suction device where the switching could occur. Other approaches that implement a reversal of pressure differentials across the fenestrations may also serve to clear the tube of blockages. [49] Referring now to Figures 8 & 9, still another embodiment is shown having a central high flow lumen 122 with fenestrations (hidden in this view, interior to the structure) and diffusion areas or low flow lumens 124 & 126 on either side, each with their own fenestrations 128 & 130 to the outside. In this embodiment, internally fenestrated central tube 122 would be of the same stiffness as currently available chest tubes. Central tube 122 is bordered by lumens 124 & 126 formed by a softer rubber material, which serves to define diffusion areas within. The chest tube terminus 120 thus defined, including side lumens 124 & 126 constructed of the softer material, may be readily inserted into the intrapleural space with a trocar removably positioned down the central tube 122.

[50] Figure 10 describes in broad terms the manner of insertion of a drainage chest tube through the use of a trocar as is known in the art. Figure 11 shows in broad terms the arrangement of the basic components of the chest tube drainage system of the present invention and its placement within the chest of a patient. 3. Further Alternate Configurations of the Suction Device

[51] Reference is now made to Figures 12 - 15 for a brief description of an alternate structural embodiment of the system of the present invention. In Figure 12, suction device 154 is shown incorporating desiccant chamber 158, which itself is connected by way of chest tube 152 to chest tube terminus 150. Suction device 154 is seen to comprise pump/motor section 156, as well as power supply 164. Pump/motor section 156 incorporates flow controls 160 and data display 162. The embodiment shown in Figure 12 lends itself to greater mobility and ease of use by the health care providers attending to the patient utilizing the chest tube drainage system.

[52] Figure 13 shows the system described above in Figure 12 with the addition of battery charger and mounting bracket 166. The structure of charger and bracket 166 is such as to receive suction device 154 therein and provide a charge to incorporated power supply 164. This attachment is shown in clearer detail in Figure 14 where suction device 154 is slid into and electrically connected with battery charger and mounting bracket 166. Bracket 166 may incorporate features on a reverse side that would permit it to be mounted to an IV pole as in the previously described embodiments.

[53] Reference is finally made to Figure 15 wherein desiccant chamber 158 is shown removed from suction device 154. In this view, vacuum ports 168 and 170 are shown on suction device 154 and desiccant chamber 158 respectively. When attached together, these ports 168 and 170 mate to form the connection between suction device 154 and desiccant chamber 158. In this manner, the assembly comprising desiccant chamber 158, chest tube 152, and chest tube terminus 150, may all be disposed of separately. In some instances it may be appropriate to dispose of desiccant chamber 158 alone once it becomes full, while not immediately removing or disposing of chest tube 152 and chest tube terminus 150.

[54] Reference is now made to Figures 16 - 18 for a brief description of a further alternative embodiment of the suction device described for the system of the present invention. Suction device 180, shown in Figure 16, is similar in many respects to the embodiment disclosed above in conjunction with Figure 1. Suction device 180 is connected to chest tube 182 by way of chest tube connector 184, which is positioned at a top point on desiccant chamber 188. Desiccant material 190 is shown contained within desiccant chamber 188 in Figure 16. Motor/Pump section 186 is shown attached to desiccant chamber 188 at disconnection point 192. [55] Figure 17 shows in greater detail the interior components and structure of suction device

180 described above with respect to Figure 16. In this view, desiccant chamber 188 has been removed from motor/pump section 186 at disconnection point 192. Various features along this connection point 192 are designed to match and mate when the assembly is connected. Vacuum ports 194a in desiccant chamber 188 align with and match vacuum ports 194b in motor/pump section 186. Desiccant chamber 188 incorporates a pressure sensor (described in more detail below with regard to Figure 18) which electrically connects into motor/pump section 186 by way of contacts 196a/196b and 198a/198b. Desiccant chamber 188 incorporates a reduced perimeter 200a that fits into and locks onto track 200b positioned on the upper perimeter of suction device 186. When connected in this way, each of the respective vacuum ports and electrical contacts align for connection between the components of the device.

[56] Reference is finally made to Figure 18 for a detailed description of the interior construction of desiccant chamber 188 and its respective connections to motor/pump section 186. In this partial cross sectional view of Figure 18, desiccant material 202 is shown positioned within the volume of space 204 defined by the walls of desiccant chamber 188. Tube connector 184 is shown to incorporate a check valve 206 to prevent the backflow of material from chamber 188 into chest tube 182. Aligned ports 194a and 194b are shown in this view, as are aligned contacts 196a/196b and 198a/198b. [57] Shown positioned below desiccant material 202 in Figure 18 is differential pressure transducer 208. This transducer provides the necessary determination of the content of desiccant chamber 188 and serves to alert a health care provider when the chamber has been filled and needs to be replaced.

4. Additional Features and Additional Embodiments [58] A variety of sensors may also be utilized in association with the chest tube embodiments constructed in accordance with the present invention. For example, flow rate, SAO2, ECG, and respiratory rate sensors could be incorporated into the chest tube at a variety of appropriate locations. Pressure sensors, both absolute and differential, could be placed at various locations within the airflow path of the full system to permit accurate monitoring and control over the function of the drainage system. These sensors serve to reduce the level of human monitoring that might otherwise be required and supplement such human monitoring to provide better patient care.

[59] Additionally, embedded web-enabled sensor and monitoring technologies could be placed in the various devices of the present invention to transmit the data collected to a remote location via the Internet. Such systems, typically housed within the suction device of the present system, could serve to alert the health care providers of both critical and non-critical conditions within the patient.

[60] It is anticipated that further variations in both the structure of the suction device of the present invention and the chest tube terminus of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art after a reading of the present disclosure and a discernment of the attached drawing figures. Such variations, while not explicitly described and defined herein, may be seen to fall within the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Claims

I claim:
1. A device for suctioning air and body fluids from a patient comprising: a chest tube having a first end and a second end, said chest tube further comprising a high-flow lumen, a low-flow lumen, and a plurality of fenestrations positioned through said high-flow lumen and said low-flow lumen walls wherein said fenestrations allow said air and body fluids to flow between said high-flow lumen and said low-flow lumen; a desiccant chamber section for receiving said air and body fluids from said chest tube, wherein said desiccant chamber section is attachable to said chest tube first end via a chest tube connection; a motor/pump section in operative communication with said chest tube, said motor/pump section capable of creating sub-atmospheric pressure within said chest tube; and wherein said low-flow lumen allows said body fluids to collect within it without blocking flow through said high-flow lumen.
2. The device of Claim 1, wherein said desiccant chamber contains in its interior a desiccant for absorbing liquids.
3. The device of Claim 1, wherein said desiccant chamber contains anti-microbial and/or antibacterial chemicals able to render said suctioned air and liquids non-bio-hazardous
4. The device of Claim 1, wherein said desiccant chamber is constructed of clear, high impact plastic.
5. The device of Claim 1, wherein said desiccant chamber is removably attachable to said power section and said motor/pump section.
6. The device of Claim 1, wherein said chest tube connection allows said chest tube to be removably connectable to said desiccant chamber.
7. The device of Claim 6, wherein said chest tube connection is a screw-on or quick connect fitting.
8. The device of Claim 1, wherein a second end of said chest tube is adaptable for placement within said patient's chest cavity.
9. The device of Claim 1, wherein said second end of said chest tube is attachable to a trocar for placement with said patient's chest cavity.
10. The device of Claim 1, wherein said lumens are in direct communication with said motor/pump section.
11. The device of Claim 10, wherein said motor/pump section is capable of creating a unique sub- atmospheric pressure within each of said lumens.
12. The device of Claim 1, wherein said high-flow lumen is in direct communication with said motor/pump section, and said low-flow lumen is in indirect communication with said motor/pump section.
13. The device of Claim 1, wherein said high-flow lumen further comprises relatively inflexible walls, and said low-flow lumen further comprises relatively flexible walls.
14. The device of Claim 1, wherein said suction in said high-flow lumen is greater than said suction in said low-flow lumen.
15. The device of Claim 1, wherein said chest tube further comprises a central suction tube and a dead space in an interior of said chest tube, wherein said central suction tube has fenestrations between it and said dead space that allow communication between said central suction tube and said dead space.
16. The device of Claim 1, wherein said chest tube further comprises one or more sensors.
17. The device of Claim 16, wherein said sensors are chosen from flow rate, pressure, SAO2, ECG, and respiratory rate sensors.
18. The device of Claim 16, wherein said sensors are remotely monitorable.
PCT/US2005/030423 2005-08-26 2005-08-26 Chest tube drainage system WO2007024230A1 (en)

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US9067003B2 (en) 2011-05-26 2015-06-30 Kalypto Medical, Inc. Method for providing negative pressure to a negative pressure wound therapy bandage
US10099027B2 (en) 2014-01-24 2018-10-16 Cole Research & Design Oral suction device
USD802744S1 (en) 2014-03-13 2017-11-14 Smith & Nephew Inc. Canister for collecting wound exudate
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USD764653S1 (en) 2014-05-28 2016-08-23 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Canister for collecting wound exudate
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USD815727S1 (en) 2014-05-28 2018-04-17 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Device for applying negative pressure to a wound
USD764048S1 (en) 2014-05-28 2016-08-16 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Device for applying negative pressure to a wound
USD764047S1 (en) 2014-05-28 2016-08-16 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Therapy unit assembly
USD770173S1 (en) 2014-06-02 2016-11-01 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Bag
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USD765830S1 (en) 2014-06-02 2016-09-06 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Therapy unit assembly
US10111991B2 (en) 2016-09-28 2018-10-30 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Negative pressure wound therapy device

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