WO2006101737A1 - Apparatus and methods for spinal implant with dynamic stabilization system - Google Patents

Apparatus and methods for spinal implant with dynamic stabilization system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2006101737A1
WO2006101737A1 PCT/US2006/008232 US2006008232W WO2006101737A1 WO 2006101737 A1 WO2006101737 A1 WO 2006101737A1 US 2006008232 W US2006008232 W US 2006008232W WO 2006101737 A1 WO2006101737 A1 WO 2006101737A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
implant
rod
spine
rigid
portion
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2006/008232
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Thomas A. Foster
David M. Hooper
Margaret E. Mitchell
David J. Krueger
Original Assignee
Abbott Laboratories
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/082,297 priority Critical
Priority to US11/082,297 priority patent/US20060229608A1/en
Application filed by Abbott Laboratories filed Critical Abbott Laboratories
Publication of WO2006101737A1 publication Critical patent/WO2006101737A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/56Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor
    • A61B17/58Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor for osteosynthesis, e.g. bone plates, screws, setting implements or the like
    • A61B17/68Internal fixation devices, including fasteners and spinal fixators, even if a part thereof projects from the skin
    • A61B17/70Spinal positioners or stabilisers ; Bone stabilisers comprising fluid filler in an implant
    • A61B17/7001Screws or hooks combined with longitudinal elements which do not contact vertebrae
    • A61B17/7002Longitudinal elements, e.g. rods
    • A61B17/7019Longitudinal elements having flexible parts, or parts connected together, such that after implantation the elements can move relative to each other
    • A61B17/7026Longitudinal elements having flexible parts, or parts connected together, such that after implantation the elements can move relative to each other with a part that is flexible due to its form
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/56Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor
    • A61B17/58Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor for osteosynthesis, e.g. bone plates, screws, setting implements or the like
    • A61B17/68Internal fixation devices, including fasteners and spinal fixators, even if a part thereof projects from the skin
    • A61B17/70Spinal positioners or stabilisers ; Bone stabilisers comprising fluid filler in an implant
    • A61B17/7001Screws or hooks combined with longitudinal elements which do not contact vertebrae
    • A61B17/7002Longitudinal elements, e.g. rods
    • A61B17/7011Longitudinal element being non-straight, e.g. curved, angled or branched
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/56Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor
    • A61B17/58Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor for osteosynthesis, e.g. bone plates, screws, setting implements or the like
    • A61B17/68Internal fixation devices, including fasteners and spinal fixators, even if a part thereof projects from the skin
    • A61B17/70Spinal positioners or stabilisers ; Bone stabilisers comprising fluid filler in an implant
    • A61B17/7001Screws or hooks combined with longitudinal elements which do not contact vertebrae
    • A61B17/7002Longitudinal elements, e.g. rods
    • A61B17/7004Longitudinal elements, e.g. rods with a cross-section which varies along its length
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/56Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor
    • A61B17/58Surgical instruments or methods for treatment of bones or joints; Devices specially adapted therefor for osteosynthesis, e.g. bone plates, screws, setting implements or the like
    • A61B17/68Internal fixation devices, including fasteners and spinal fixators, even if a part thereof projects from the skin
    • A61B17/70Spinal positioners or stabilisers ; Bone stabilisers comprising fluid filler in an implant
    • A61B17/7049Connectors, not bearing on the vertebrae, for linking longitudinal elements together
    • A61B17/705Connectors, not bearing on the vertebrae, for linking longitudinal elements together for linking adjacent ends of longitudinal elements

Abstract

A spinal implant provides support for desired parts of the spine. The implant can provide support in both fusion and non-fusion situations. The spinal implant includes an implant rod and fasteners for coupling or fastening the implant rod to the affected regions of the spine via the pedicles of the affected vertebrae). The implant rod includes a flexible portion and rigid end portions. The fasteners couple the end portions of the rod to the pedicles in the affected level. The flexible portion can take a variety of shapes, such as non-helical, multi-curve springs. One may combine several implant rods to provide an overall implant for more than one level of the spine. The implant can allow desired motion while tending to limit undesirable motion, thus protecting areas of the diseased or injured spine, such as the nucleus pulposus or anulus fibrosis. Furthermore, the implant can provide a combination of rigid and flexible support, as desired. One may manufacture the implant using a variety of materials, such as stainless steel, titanium, or titanium Beta C.

Description

APPARATUS AND METHODS FOR SPINAL IMPLANT WITH DYNAMIC

STABILIZATION SYSTEM

Technical Field

[001] The inventive concepts relate generally to spinal implants. More particularly, the invention concerns apparatus and associated methods for spinal implants with dynamic stabilization systems that can provide flexible or rigid support, as desired.

Background

[002] Modern spine surgery often involves the use of spinal implants to correct or treat various spine disorders or to support the spine. Spinal implants may help, for example, to stabilize the spine, correct deformities of the spine, facilitate fusion, or treat spinal fractures. Typical spinal implants either provide flexible or rigid (i.e., in a fusion procedure) support for the affected regions of the spine. Furthermore, they either limit movement in the affected regions in virtually all directions (for example, in a fused region), or they fail to limit undesired movement of the spine while allowing the desired movement. A need exists for a spinal implant that provides flexible or rigid support, as desired, while allowing desired movement of

the affected levels of the spine and limiting the undesired movement of those levels, Summary

[003] The inventive concepts relate to apparatus and methods for spinal implants with dynamic stabilization systems. In one exemplary embodiment, an implant includes a rod with a multi-curve flexible portion. Each end of the flexible portion couples or connects to a respective rigid portion of the rod. A pair of fasteners fasten the rod to vertebrae (e.g., at a desired level of the spine).

[004] In another exemplary embodiment, a system for supporting vertebral bodies in a spine includes an implant rod, and a pair of fasteners. The implant rod includes a serpentine spring portion with two ends. Each of the ends of the spring portion couples or connects to a respective pair of rigid portions of the rod. Fasteners couple the implant rod to a pair of spinal vertebrae.

[005] In yet another exemplary embodiment, a method of producing a spinal implant includes forming an implant rod from a block of material (such as titanium Beta C). The block of material is formed so as to generate a multi-curve flexible portion with two ends. The ends of the flexible portion of rod are formed so as to couple, respectively, to a pair of rigid portions of the rod.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[006] The appended drawings illustrate only exemplary embodiments of the invention and therefore should not be considered or construed as limiting its scope. Persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention appreciate that the disclosed inventive concepts lend themselves to other equally effective embodiments. In the drawings, the same numeral designators used in more than one drawing denote the same, similar, or equivalent functionality, components, or blocks.

[007] FIG. 1 shows an implant rod according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention.

[008] FIG. 2 illustrates an implant rod according to another illustrative embodiment of the invention.

[009] FIG. 3 depicts an isometric view of an implant according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention implanted to support a portion of a spine.

[0010] FIG. 4 shows a side view of the implant shown in FIG. 3.

[0011] FIGs. 5A-5C illustrate examples of implant configurations in illustrative embodiments according to the invention.

[0012] FIGs. 6A-6B depict multi-level implant rods according to exemplary embodiments of the invention.

[0013] FIG. 7 shows an implant rod according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention. [0014] FIGs. 8A-8B illustrate an implant rod 700 according to another exemplary embodiment of the invention.

[0015] FIGs. 9A-9B depict an implant rod according to an additional exemplary embodiment of the invention.

[0016] FIGs. 10A-10B show an implant rod 900 according to another embodiment of the invention.

[0017] FIGs. 11A-11B illustrate an implant according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention implanted to support a portion of a spine.

[0018] FIGs. 12A-12C depict implant rods with orientation mechanisms according to illustrative embodiments of the invention.

Detailed Description

[0019] The disclosed novel concepts relate to spinal implants with dynamic stabilization systems. In a dynamic stabilization procedure, the surgeon typically attaches an implant construct to either side of the affected vertebral level. The implant serves the function of stabilizing the spine. The inventive implants allow a controlled range of motion in some directions (or allow some types of motion), while inhibiting or limiting motion in other directions (or inhibit or limit other types of motion). The implants allow the patient to maintain flexibility and a functioning spine. The implant can also protect the loading at a level in the early stages of degeneration and allow healing of the soft tissues and bony structures at that level.

[0020] The implants can also allow flexibility in one or more levels, while supporting fusion in one or more other levels. Fusion surgery (for example, in the case of degenerative vertebral disease), allows fusion of adjacent vertebrae. Although the fusion reduces the pain, it also limits or reduces functionality of the spine, and may affect the stresses at levels superior and/or inferior to the fused level(s). By using the appropriate combination of rigid and flexible implant rods, the surgeon can provide flexibility in one or more levels and provide fusion in one or more other levels, as desired. The implant allows selective control of the loads and ranges of motion at the levels adjacent to a fusion and may help to prevent adjacent disc disease.

[0021] The novel spinal implants provide many advantages over conventional implants, as described below in detail. The spinal implants tend to allow desired movements of the affected parts of the spine, while tending to limit undesired movement of those regions. For example, the implants allow controlled flexion or extension, which may benefit the spine and promote nutritional exchange in the disc. At the same time, the implants limit or tend to disallow torsion or shear, movements considered harmful to the affected parts of the spine, which may include the nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis. [0022] The disclosed implants allow rigid or flexible support for the spine, as desired (rather than providing either rigid or flexible support exclusively). The disclosed implants also offer relative ease of manufacturing. One may manufacture implants with low-profile springs or flexible regions, with no articulating pieces (no joints) that would generate wear debris.

[0023] The implants provide a flexible mechanism for providing support for one or more levels of the spine, as desired. The surgeon may vary the type of support from one level to another. For example, for one level, the surgeon may use the implant to provide flexible support, while for another level, the implant may provide rigid support. As another example, the surgeon may use alternating flexible and rigid segments of the implant to provide the desired support for the spine.

[0024] The implants can also combine rigid and flexible rods in a modular fashion to support both fusion and non-fusion applications. The ability to custom- fit the implants to the patient's needs provides the surgeon and the patient with an improved option over conventional implants. The disclosed implants also allow preloading of the implant to create distraction or lordosis of the instrumented level(s) of the spine (i.e., help to produce a desired profile of the affected regions of the spine).

[0025] FIG. 1 shows an implant rod 100 according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention. Implant rod 100 includes a flexible or spring region (or serpentine portion or member) 103, transition portions or areas 106 (optional), and end or rigid portions 109. Spring region 103 has a multi-curve or complex shape, i.e., it includes more than one curve (for example, an "S" shape, rather than a simple "C" shape).

[0026] Spring portion 103 couples to rigid portions 109 via optional transition portions 106. Transition portions 106 serve to reduce the stress concentrations between the spring portion 103 and the rigid end portions 109. Note, however, that one may omit transition portions 106, depending on a variety of factors, such as the type of materials used, the desired strength and profile of the implant, etc., as desired. In the embodiment shown, spring portion 103 has a curvilinear, non- helical shape.

[0027] Note that spring portion 103 has two curved portions (one portion with the shape of a "U" coupled to a portion shaped like an upside-down WU"). As described below in detail, however, one may use a variety of other shapes and configurations, as desired.

[0028] FIG. 2 illustrates an implant rod 200 according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention. Similar to implant rod 100 of FIG. 1, implant rod 200 includes spring portion 103, optional transition portions 106, and end or rigid portions 109. Spring portions 103 has a shape similar to spring portion 103 in FIG. 1. L0029] Spring portion 103 of rod 200 includes five curved portions. As persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention

understand, one may use a wide variety and configurations of spring portion 103, such as the number and shape of the curved regions, as desired. The number of curves and configuration of spring portion 103 depends on a number of factors, such as the patient's physical size, the materials used, the degree of flexibility desired, etc., as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand.

[0030] FIG. 3 shows an isometric view of an implant according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention implanted to support a portion of a spine. The figure shows vertebral body 305 and vertebral body 310. The implant uses rods 300A and 300B, one on each side of vertebral bodies 305 and 310. Implant rods, although similar to rods 100 and 200 (see FIGs. 1 and 2, respectively), differ in the number of curves of their flexible or spring portions. Note, however, that one may readily use rods with other numbers of curves or shapes, and cross-sections, as desired, and as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand.

[0031] Implant rod 300A couples to vertebral bodies 305 and 310 through a desired type of fastener, such as pedicle screws 320A and 320B. More specifically, end portions 109 of implant rod 300A couple to pedicle screws 320A and 320B, respectively. Pedicle screws 320A and 320B hold end portions 109 in place so that the overall height of the implant matches the desired spacing for a particular patient. Pedicle screws 320A and 320B also fasten implant rod 300A to pedicles 325 (see FIG. 4 for location of pedicles 325) of vertebral bodies 305 and 310. Pedicle screws 320C and 320D serve similar functions with respect to implant rod 300B.

[0032] FIG. 4 illustrates a side view of the implant shown in FIG. 3. More specifically, FIG. 4 depicts implant rod 300A and pedicle screws 320A and 320B. As noted above, one may adjust the spacing between pedicle screws 320A and 320B (i.e., preload the implant) so as to achieve a desired posture for the affected portion of the spine. During the procedure, the surgeon may push towards each other (compression) pedicle screws 320A and 320B, or pull them away from each other (distraction). End portions 109 of implant rod 300A slide within the respective pedicle screws 320A and 320B. Once the surgeon has achieved the desired spacing or preloading, he or she tightens cap screws 340A and 340B. Cap screws 340A and 340B securely hold end portions of rod 300A in place and thus

maintain the desired spacing between vertebral bodies 305 and 310.

[0033] As noted above, the disclosed implants can support both fusion and non- fusion situations, in a wide variety of configurations. FIGs. 5A-5C depict examples

of implant configurations in illustrative embodiments according to the invention. In FIG. 5A, implant 400A includes rod 300. Rod 300 constitutes a flexible rod, as described above. It can provide support for a non-fusion situation. [0034] In FIG. 5B, implant 400B includes rod 300A and rod 300B. Both rod 300A and rod 300B constitute flexible rods, and can provide flexible support for two vertebral levels (flexion-flexion). Note that one may use more than two rods, as desired, and as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand.

[0035] Referring to FIG. 5B, note that one may substitute a rigid rod for flexible rod 300A or 300B, as desired, thus providing support in a fusion situation. FIG. 5C illustrates such a configuration (flexion-rigid). More specifically, one substitutes rigid rod 405 for flexible rod 300B in order to produce implant 400C in FIG. 5C. Implant 400C provides support for a non-fusion level as well as support for a fusion level. Note, however, that by using an appropriate number and configuration of rods, one may support one or more non-fusion levels, one or more fusion levels, or both, as desired, and as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand.

[0036] Ordinary, one may construct multi-level implant rods from one piece of material. In other words, one may process a single piece of material to produce a multi-level implant rod. Alternatively, one may construct multi-level implants by joining implant rods with a mating or coupling mechanism, as desired. FIGs. 6A-6B illustrate multi-level implant rods according to exemplary embodiments of the invention. FIG. 6A shows multi-level implant rod 500. Implant rod 500 includes rod 300A and rod 300B. Mating or coupling member 505 couples one end portion

- 10 -

\ of implant rod 300A to an end portion 109 of implant rod 300B. In FIG. 6A, coupling member 505 constitutes a sleeve, although one may use other mechanisms, as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand.

[0037] FIG. 6B shows a cut-away view of implant 500 of FIG. 6A. Coupling member 505 may have an appropriate size or length so as to allow desired spacing between rod 300A and rod 300B. By adjusting the spacing between rod 300A and rod 300B, one may fit the implant to the patient's spine or provide angulation between members 300A and 300B, as desired.

[0038] One may use a variety of configurations, shapes, and materials for the implants, including the implant rods. FIG. 7 shows an implant rod 600 according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention. Similar to the implant rods described

above, implant rod 600 includes flexible portion 605, optional transition portions 106, and end or rigid portions 109. Rather than a curvilinear spring or flexible portion, spring portion 605 has an angular or substantially angular configuration. More specifically, in embodiment 600, spring portion 605 has the shape of an "M." As in the above curvilinear designs, this angular configuration may include two or more angled sections, rather than the three angles shown.

[0039] FIGs. 8A-8B illustrate an implant rod 700 according to another exemplary

embodiment of the invention. FIG. 8A shows an isometric view of implant rod 700. Similar to the implant rods described above, implant rod 700 includes flexible portion 705, optional transition portions 106, and end or rigid portions 109. Flexible portion 705 has an annular, circular, or elliptical shape (e.g., a loop) of desired proportions. FIG. 8B depicts a side view of implant 700.

[0040] FIGs. 9A-9B illustrate an implant rod 800 according to another exemplary embodiment of the invention. FIG. 9A shows an isometric view of implant rod 800. Like the implant rods described above, implant rod 800 includes flexible portion 805, and end or rigid portions 109. Optionally, implant rod 800 may include transition portions 106, as desired. Flexible portion 805 includes one or more λvS"- shaped curves of desired shapes and orientations. For example, the embodiment shown includes three "S"-shaped curves, with the two outermost curves in one orientation, and the middle curve in an opposing orientation. Alternatively, the "S" shaped curve may include three or more curved regions, rather than the two ("U"

and inverted "U"). Also, the design may have two, four, or more curved sections (rather than the three curved sections shown). FIG. 9B depicts a side view of

implant 800.

[0041] FIGs. 10A-10B illustrate an implant rod 900 according to another embodiment of the invention. FIG. 1OA shows an isometric view of rod 900, whereas FIG. 1OB depicts a side view. [0042] Rod 900 includes spring or flexible portion 103, optional transition portions 905, and end or rigid portions 910. Spring portion 103 couples to rigid portions 910 via transition portions 905. Transition portions 905 provide a relatively rigid mechanism for coupling spring portion 103 to the rigid end portions 910, as desired.

[0043] In the embodiment shown, spring portion 103 has a curvilinear, non- helical shape. Note, however, that spring portion 103 may have other shapes and configurations, as desired, and as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand. For example, spring portion 103 may have any of the shapes shown in FIGs. 7-9.

[0044] Rigid portions 910, rather than extending radially outward (see, for example, FIGs. 1-2) from transition portions 905, bend or deflect towards spring portion 103. As FIG. 1OB shows, rigid portions 910 may deflect in a downward or upward direction (or a combination of the two, one for each rigid portion) from the horizontal axis of rod 900, as desired. This configuration allows the rod to be applied when the pedicle screws are closely positioned or when an offset configuration is desired. Furthermore, rigid portions 910 provide a mechanism for preloading or physically configuring the geometrical properties of implant 900.

[0045] FIG. HA shows a side view of an implant according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention implanted to support a portion of a spine. The figure shows vertebral body 305 and vertebral body 310, having pedicles 325. The implant uses rod 900, coupled to vertebral bodies 305 and 310. The implant includes another rod on the opposite side of vertebral bodies 305 and 310 (not shown in FIG. HA).

[0046] Implant rod 900 couples to vertebral bodies 305 and 310 through pedicle screws 320A and 320B. More specifically, end portions 910 of implant rod 900 couple to pedicle screws 320A and 320B, respectively. Pedicle screws 320A and 320B hold end portions 910 in place so that the overall height of the implant matches the desired spacing and loading for a particular patient. Pedicle screws 320A and 320B also fasten implant rod 900 to pedicles 325 of vertebral bodies 305 and 310.

[0047] The surgeon can adjust the distance between the vertebral bodies 305 and 310 by preloading implant rod 900, as described above. Once the adjustment has been made, the surgeon can use pedicle screws 320A and 320B to secure rod 900, as described above. FIG. HB shows another view of the implant in FIG. HA. FIG. HB shows details of the arrangement of the pedicle screws with respect to rod 900 and end portions 910.

[0048] To assist in orientation and securing rods according to various

embodiments of the invention, one may use a variety of orientation

aids/mechanisms or location features. FIGs. 12A-12C show implant rods with orientation mechanisms according to illustrative embodiments of the invention. Persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand that one may use any of the varieties of the spring portion, described above, with the orientation and location features, as desired.

[0049] FIG. 12A shows a rod 100OA. Rod IOOOA includes spring portion 103, optional transition portions 106, and end portions 109. Each end portion 109 has a flat (or substantially flat) region 1005 that allows orientation of rod IOOOA (and hence spring portion 103) with respect to the affected portion of the spine.

[0050] Note that one may use a wide variety and configuration of orientation mechanisms, as desired. For example, FIG. 12B shows a rod 100OB, with spring portion 103, optional transition portions 106, and end portions 109. Each of end portions 109 includes a pair of flat (or substantially flat) regions 1010, disposed on opposing side of end portion 109.

[0051] As another example, FIG. 12C shows a rod lOOOC. Rod IOOOC includes spring portion 103, optional transition portions 106, and end portions 109. Each end portion 109 has a plurality of flat (or substantially flat) regions 1015 that allows orientation of rod IOOOC (and hence spring portion 103) with respect to the affected portion of the spine. In rod IOOOC, each of end regions 109 has six flat regions 1015, although one may use other numbers, as desired. [0052] Note that, rather than using flat regions as described above, one may use other mechanisms, as desired, and as persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention understand. For example, one may use dimples, grooves, or other indicators of orientation. Furthermore, one may use various numbers of such indicators, as desired.

[0053] As noted, one may manufacture the disclosed implants (including the implant rods) from a variety of materials. For example, one may use stainless steel, titanium, other metals, or polymers, as desired. In one embodiment, one may use titanium Beta C, a titanium alloy having the composition Ti-3AI-8V-6Cr- 4Mo-4Zr (or similar compositions, as desired). Titanium Beta C may be solution treated at 815 0C, and aged at 565 0C, or may be treated to other conditions to achieve the desired material characteristics.

[0054] Titanium Beta C provides relatively high resistance to fatigue. One may manufacture the implant rods and the pedicle screws from titanium Beta C to take advantage of that property. Using titanium Beta C helps to provide relatively robust, fatigue-resistant implants with improved longevity and performance characteristics, given the ability to vary the mechanical properties of this titanium alloy by varying the heat treat parameters

[0055] As noted above, the disclosed implants offer relative ease of manufacturing as an advantage. To manufacture the implants, one may use a lathe and wire EDM to fabricate the implant by shaping and forming a piece or block of material. Advantageously, one may manufacture each implant from a monolithic piece of material, thus reducing joints and associated manufacturing expenses. As an alternative, one may fabricate the implants by using mill processes, as desired.

[0056] Various modifications and alternative embodiments of the invention in addition to those described here will be apparent to persons of ordinary skill in the art who have the benefit of the description of the invention. Accordingly, the manner of carrying out the invention as shown and described are to be construed as illustrative only. Persons skilled in the art may make various changes in the shape, size, number, and/or arrangement of parts without departing from the scope of the invention described in this document. For example, persons skilled in the art may substitute equivalent elements for the elements illustrated and described here, or use certain features of the invention independently of the use of other features, without departing from the scope of the invention.

Claims

Claims
1. An implant, comprising: a first rod, comprising a non-helical, multi-curve flexible portion coupled to a respective rigid portion at each end; and a plurality of fasteners coupled to the first rod, the plurality of fasteners configured to fasten the first rod to vertebrae.
2. The implant according to claim 1, wherein the plurality of fasteners comprises a plurality of pedicle screws configured to couple the first rod to vertebrae.
3. The implant according to claim 1, wherein the first rod is preloaded before being fastened to the vertebrae.
4. The implant according to claim 1, further comprising a second rod adjacent to the first rod, wherein the second rod comprises a flexible portion.
5. The implant according to claim 1, further comprising a second rod adjacent to the first rod, wherein the second rod comprises a rigid rod.
6. The implant according to claim 1, further comprising a second rod coupled to the first rod, wherein the second rod comprises a rigid rod or a flexible rod.
7. The implant according to claim 6, further comprising a sleeve, wherein the sleeve couples the first rod to the second rod.
8. The implant according to claim 1, wherein the implant tends to limit shear and torsion movements in the spine, and wherein limiting the shear and torsion movements tends to protect the nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosis.
9. The implant according to claim 2, wherein the rigid portions extend outwardly from the flexible portion.
10. The implant according to claim 2, wherein the rigid portions extend inwardly from the flexible portion.
11. A system for supporting vertebral bodies in a spine, comprising: an implant rod, comprising: a non-helical serpentine spring portion, having first and second ends;
and first and second rigid portions coupled, respectively, to the first and second ends of the spring portion.
12. The system according to claim 11, wherein the implant tends to support flexion-extension of the spine, and wherein the implant tends to limit shear and torsion movements in the spine.
13. The system according to claim 11, wherein limiting the shear and torsion movements in the spine tends to protect the nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosis, and allows healing of the spine.
14. The system according to claim 11, further comprising first and second fasteners configured to couple the implant rod to a pair of vertebrae; wherein the first rigid portion couples to the first fastener, and wherein the second rigid portion couples to the second fastener.
15. The system according to claim 14, wherein the first fastener comprises a first screw configured to couple to a first pedicle in the spine, and wherein the second fastener comprises a second screw configured to couple to a second pedicle in the spine.
16. The system according to claim 11, wherein the first rigid portion comprises at least one orientation mechanism, and wherein each orientation mechanism is configured to facilitate orienting the spring in a desired direction.
17. The system according to claim 16, wherein each orientation mechanism comprises a flat portion.
18. The system according to claim 16, wherein the implant rod further comprises: a first transition portion coupled to the first end of the spring portion and to the first rigid portion; and a second transition portion coupled to the second end of the spring portion and to the second rigid portion.
19. A method of producing a spinal implant, the method comprising forming an implant rod from a block of material, wherein the rod comprises a non-helical, multi-curve flexible portion coupled to first and second rigid portions. 20. The method according to claim 18, wherein the block of material comprises
titanium Beta C.
20. The method according to claim 18, wherein the spinal implant comprises a multi-level implant.
PCT/US2006/008232 2005-03-17 2006-03-08 Apparatus and methods for spinal implant with dynamic stabilization system WO2006101737A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/082,297 2005-03-17
US11/082,297 US20060229608A1 (en) 2005-03-17 2005-03-17 Apparatus and methods for spinal implant with dynamic stabilization system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2006101737A1 true WO2006101737A1 (en) 2006-09-28

Family

ID=36589285

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2006/008232 WO2006101737A1 (en) 2005-03-17 2006-03-08 Apparatus and methods for spinal implant with dynamic stabilization system

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20060229608A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2006101737A1 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2008005740A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc Minimal spacing spinal stabilization device and method
WO2011095641A1 (en) * 2010-02-08 2011-08-11 Aesculap Ag Connecting element for a vertebral column-stabilizing system, and vertebral column-stabilizing system
DE102010041264A1 (en) 2010-09-23 2012-03-29 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilization device for the spine
DE102012202749A1 (en) 2012-02-22 2013-08-22 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilization device for bone e.g. spinal column, has deformable regions that are arranged in form of loop, so that sides of loop surround bone in bone quiescent state
DE102012202750A1 (en) 2012-02-22 2013-08-22 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilization device for treating degenerative diseases of spinal column, has support- and mating surfaces formed for clamping by load of spring element, and retaining elements movably mounted against each other in direction
CN103356275A (en) * 2012-03-29 2013-10-23 董健文 Micro-movement lumber pedicle screw elastic-fixation system
US8657856B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2014-02-25 Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc. Size transition spinal rod
US20160331411A1 (en) * 2002-05-08 2016-11-17 Stephen Ritland Dynamic Fixation Device and Method of Use

Families Citing this family (96)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2812185B1 (en) 2000-07-25 2003-02-28 Spine Next Sa Semi-rigid connection piece for rachis stabilization
US10383660B2 (en) 2007-05-01 2019-08-20 Roger P. Jackson Soft stabilization assemblies with pretensioned cords
US8876868B2 (en) 2002-09-06 2014-11-04 Roger P. Jackson Helical guide and advancement flange with radially loaded lip
AU2005304849B8 (en) 2002-09-06 2009-09-03 Roger P. Jackson Helical guide and advancement flange with break-off extensions
US8926672B2 (en) 2004-11-10 2015-01-06 Roger P. Jackson Splay control closure for open bone anchor
US20050171543A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2005-08-04 Timm Jens P. Spine stabilization systems and associated devices, assemblies and methods
US7377923B2 (en) 2003-05-22 2008-05-27 Alphatec Spine, Inc. Variable angle spinal screw assembly
US8926670B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2015-01-06 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone screw assembly
US7967850B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2011-06-28 Jackson Roger P Polyaxial bone anchor with helical capture connection, insert and dual locking assembly
US7179261B2 (en) 2003-12-16 2007-02-20 Depuy Spine, Inc. Percutaneous access devices and bone anchor assemblies
US7527638B2 (en) 2003-12-16 2009-05-05 Depuy Spine, Inc. Methods and devices for minimally invasive spinal fixation element placement
US8292926B2 (en) 2005-09-30 2012-10-23 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization connecting member with elastic core and outer sleeve
US7766915B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2010-08-03 Jackson Roger P Dynamic fixation assemblies with inner core and outer coil-like member
US8105368B2 (en) 2005-09-30 2012-01-31 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization connecting member with slitted core and outer sleeve
CA2555868C (en) 2004-02-27 2011-09-06 Roger P. Jackson Orthopedic implant rod reduction tool set and method
US8353932B2 (en) 2005-09-30 2013-01-15 Jackson Roger P Polyaxial bone anchor assembly with one-piece closure, pressure insert and plastic elongate member
US7862587B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2011-01-04 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization assemblies, tool set and method
US7160300B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2007-01-09 Jackson Roger P Orthopedic implant rod reduction tool set and method
US7651502B2 (en) 2004-09-24 2010-01-26 Jackson Roger P Spinal fixation tool set and method for rod reduction and fastener insertion
US7833250B2 (en) 2004-11-10 2010-11-16 Jackson Roger P Polyaxial bone screw with helically wound capture connection
DE102004055454A1 (en) * 2004-11-17 2006-05-24 Biedermann Motech Gmbh Flexible element for setting of bones e.g. spinal cord has loop-shaped staff which runs along the connecting axle from one end to another end on two opposite sides of axle
US8152810B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2012-04-10 Jackson Roger P Spinal fixation tool set and method
US7621918B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2009-11-24 Jackson Roger P Spinal fixation tool set and method
WO2006057837A1 (en) 2004-11-23 2006-06-01 Jackson Roger P Spinal fixation tool attachment structure
US7361196B2 (en) 2005-02-22 2008-04-22 Stryker Spine Apparatus and method for dynamic vertebral stabilization
US10076361B2 (en) 2005-02-22 2018-09-18 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone screw with spherical capture, compression and alignment and retention structures
US7776067B2 (en) 2005-05-27 2010-08-17 Jackson Roger P Polyaxial bone screw with shank articulation pressure insert and method
US8012177B2 (en) 2007-02-12 2011-09-06 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization assembly with frusto-conical connection
US20070093813A1 (en) * 2005-10-11 2007-04-26 Callahan Ronald Ii Dynamic spinal stabilizer
US20070093814A1 (en) * 2005-10-11 2007-04-26 Callahan Ronald Ii Dynamic spinal stabilization systems
US20070093815A1 (en) * 2005-10-11 2007-04-26 Callahan Ronald Ii Dynamic spinal stabilizer
US8109973B2 (en) 2005-10-31 2012-02-07 Stryker Spine Method for dynamic vertebral stabilization
US7704271B2 (en) 2005-12-19 2010-04-27 Abdou M Samy Devices and methods for inter-vertebral orthopedic device placement
US8444681B2 (en) 2009-06-15 2013-05-21 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone anchor with pop-on shank, friction fit retainer and winged insert
US9216041B2 (en) 2009-06-15 2015-12-22 Roger P. Jackson Spinal connecting members with tensioned cords and rigid sleeves for engaging compression inserts
US9168069B2 (en) 2009-06-15 2015-10-27 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone anchor with pop-on shank and winged insert with lower skirt for engaging a friction fit retainer
US9393047B2 (en) 2009-06-15 2016-07-19 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone anchor with pop-on shank and friction fit retainer with low profile edge lock
US9980753B2 (en) 2009-06-15 2018-05-29 Roger P Jackson pivotal anchor with snap-in-place insert having rotation blocking extensions
US7815663B2 (en) * 2006-01-27 2010-10-19 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Vertebral rods and methods of use
US20070233091A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2007-10-04 Naifeh Bill R Multi-level spherical linkage implant system
US8025681B2 (en) 2006-03-29 2011-09-27 Theken Spine, Llc Dynamic motion spinal stabilization system
US8012179B2 (en) * 2006-05-08 2011-09-06 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Dynamic spinal stabilization members and methods
US20080039847A1 (en) * 2006-08-09 2008-02-14 Mark Piper Implant and system for stabilization of the spine
US8308770B2 (en) * 2006-09-22 2012-11-13 Depuy Spine, Inc. Dynamic stabilization system
KR100797755B1 (en) * 2006-11-28 2008-01-23 (주)메디쎄이 Rod connecting peidcle screws
KR100829338B1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-05-13 김수경 Spinal stabilization apparatus
US20080140202A1 (en) * 2006-12-08 2008-06-12 Randall Noel Allard Energy-Storing Spinal Implants and Methods of Use
WO2008073323A2 (en) 2006-12-08 2008-06-19 Jackson Roger P Tool system for dynamic spinal implants
US7666211B2 (en) * 2006-12-28 2010-02-23 Mi4Spine, Llc Vertebral disc annular fibrosis tensioning and lengthening device
US8475498B2 (en) 2007-01-18 2013-07-02 Roger P. Jackson Dynamic stabilization connecting member with cord connection
US8092500B2 (en) 2007-05-01 2012-01-10 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization connecting member with floating core, compression spacer and over-mold
US10258382B2 (en) 2007-01-18 2019-04-16 Roger P. Jackson Rod-cord dynamic connection assemblies with slidable bone anchor attachment members along the cord
US8366745B2 (en) 2007-05-01 2013-02-05 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization assembly having pre-compressed spacers with differential displacements
US7901437B2 (en) 2007-01-26 2011-03-08 Jackson Roger P Dynamic stabilization member with molded connection
US8097022B2 (en) * 2007-02-20 2012-01-17 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Flexible coupling members for spinal stabilization members
US8740944B2 (en) * 2007-02-28 2014-06-03 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Vertebral stabilizer
AU2008263148C1 (en) 2007-05-31 2012-05-24 Roger P. Jackson Dynamic stabilization connecting member with pre-tensioned solid core
US8080038B2 (en) 2007-08-17 2011-12-20 Jmea Corporation Dynamic stabilization device for spine
BRPI0706247A2 (en) * 2007-09-21 2009-12-01 Cavali Paulo Tadeu Maia flexible, sliding and dynamic implant system for selective stabilization and correction of spinal deformities and instabilities
US8911477B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2014-12-16 Roger P. Jackson Dynamic stabilization member with end plate support and cable core extension
US9232968B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2016-01-12 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Polymeric pedicle rods and methods of manufacturing
US8202299B2 (en) * 2008-03-19 2012-06-19 Collabcom II, LLC Interspinous implant, tools and methods of implanting
US20090248083A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-10-01 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Elongated connecting element with varying modulus of elasticity
US20090248077A1 (en) * 2008-03-31 2009-10-01 Derrick William Johns Hybrid dynamic stabilization
WO2010009169A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2010-01-21 Synthes Usa, Llc Flexible dampening intervertebral modular spacer device
KR20110055543A (en) * 2008-08-14 2011-05-25 신세스 게엠바하 Posterior dynamic stabilization system
US20100042157A1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2010-02-18 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Vertebral rod system and methods of use
US9636121B2 (en) * 2008-11-11 2017-05-02 Harbinger Medical Group, Llc Facet distraction device, facet joint implant, and associated methods
US8641734B2 (en) 2009-02-13 2014-02-04 DePuy Synthes Products, LLC Dual spring posterior dynamic stabilization device with elongation limiting elastomers
US8118840B2 (en) 2009-02-27 2012-02-21 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Vertebral rod and related method of manufacture
WO2013043218A1 (en) 2009-06-15 2013-03-28 Jackson Roger P Polyaxial bone anchor with pop-on shank and winged insert with friction fit compressive collet
US9320543B2 (en) 2009-06-25 2016-04-26 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Posterior dynamic stabilization device having a mobile anchor
TW201102043A (en) * 2009-07-03 2011-01-16 Accumis Inc Flexible spinal fixation device and rod thereof
US20110066187A1 (en) * 2009-09-11 2011-03-17 Zimmer Spine, Inc. Spinal stabilization system
US9011494B2 (en) * 2009-09-24 2015-04-21 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Composite vertebral rod system and methods of use
EP2485654A4 (en) 2009-10-05 2014-07-30 Jackson P Roger Polyaxial bone anchor with non-pivotable retainer and pop-on shank, some with friction fit
US9157497B1 (en) 2009-10-30 2015-10-13 Brigham Young University Lamina emergent torsional joint and related methods
US9138264B2 (en) * 2009-11-02 2015-09-22 Life Spine, Inc. Laminoplasty rod system
US9445844B2 (en) * 2010-03-24 2016-09-20 DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Composite material posterior dynamic stabilization spring rod
EP2613719A1 (en) 2010-09-08 2013-07-17 Roger P. Jackson Dynamic stabilization members with elastic and inelastic sections
DE102010060101A1 (en) * 2010-09-20 2012-03-22 Aesculap Ag Spinal stabilization system and surgical device for temporarily stiffening a flexible intermediate portion of a spinal stabilization system connector
DE102010060112A1 (en) * 2010-09-20 2012-03-22 Aesculap Ag Spinal stabilization system, spinal stabilization system connector, and method of making such a connector
GB2502449A (en) 2010-11-02 2013-11-27 Roger P Jackson Polyaxial bone anchor with pop-on shank and pivotable retainer
JP2014500068A (en) 2010-11-10 2014-01-09 ロジャー・ピー・ジャクソン A polyaxial bone anchor having a pop-on shank, a friction-fitted and fully constrained retainer, an insert, and an instrument receiving component
WO2012128825A1 (en) 2011-03-24 2012-09-27 Jackson Roger P Polyaxial bone anchor with compound articulation and pop-on shank
EP2717807A2 (en) * 2011-06-07 2014-04-16 Brigham Young University Serpentine spinal stability device and associated methods
CA2844278C (en) 2011-08-08 2018-11-13 Revivo Medical, Llc Dynamic spinal fixation system, method of use, and spinal fixation system attachment portions
US20130103090A1 (en) * 2011-10-25 2013-04-25 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Vertebral rod system and methods of use
US8911478B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2014-12-16 Roger P. Jackson Splay control closure for open bone anchor
US10058354B2 (en) 2013-01-28 2018-08-28 Roger P. Jackson Pivotal bone anchor assembly with frictional shank head seating surfaces
US8852239B2 (en) 2013-02-15 2014-10-07 Roger P Jackson Sagittal angle screw with integral shank and receiver
US9566092B2 (en) 2013-10-29 2017-02-14 Roger P. Jackson Cervical bone anchor with collet retainer and outer locking sleeve
US9451993B2 (en) 2014-01-09 2016-09-27 Roger P. Jackson Bi-radial pop-on cervical bone anchor
US9597119B2 (en) 2014-06-04 2017-03-21 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone anchor with polymer sleeve
US10064658B2 (en) 2014-06-04 2018-09-04 Roger P. Jackson Polyaxial bone anchor with insert guides
US9642651B2 (en) 2014-06-12 2017-05-09 Brigham Young University Inverted serpentine spinal stability device and associated methods

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2728158A1 (en) * 1994-12-14 1996-06-21 Elberg Jean Francois Spinal column prosthesis
EP1281361A1 (en) * 2001-08-02 2003-02-05 Lafitt, S.A. Device to prevent intervertebral disk degeneration
US20030171749A1 (en) * 2000-07-25 2003-09-11 Regis Le Couedic Semirigid linking piece for stabilizing the spine
US20030191470A1 (en) * 2002-04-05 2003-10-09 Stephen Ritland Dynamic fixation device and method of use
US6648885B1 (en) * 1998-11-12 2003-11-18 Sdgi Holdings, Inc. Device for the osteosynthesis of a spinal segment
WO2005030066A1 (en) * 2003-09-29 2005-04-07 Synthes Gmbh Device for elastically stabilising vertebral bodies
US20050203511A1 (en) * 2004-03-02 2005-09-15 Wilson-Macdonald James Orthopaedics device and system
EP1658815A1 (en) * 2004-11-17 2006-05-24 BIEDERMANN MOTECH GmbH Elastic element for use in a stabilising device for bones or vertebrae
WO2006066053A1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-22 Stryker Spine Spinal rods having segments of different elastic properties and methods of using them

Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4648388B1 (en) * 1985-11-01 1995-10-31 Acromed Corp Apparatus and method for maintaining vertebrae in a desired relationship
GB2254394B (en) * 1988-12-21 1993-03-17 Squibb Bristol Myers Co Coupler assembly
US5334203A (en) * 1992-09-30 1994-08-02 Amei Technologies Inc. Spinal fixation system and methods
JPH09215753A (en) * 1996-02-08 1997-08-19 Schneider Usa Inc Self-expanding stent made of titanium alloy
US6802844B2 (en) * 2001-03-26 2004-10-12 Nuvasive, Inc Spinal alignment apparatus and methods

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2728158A1 (en) * 1994-12-14 1996-06-21 Elberg Jean Francois Spinal column prosthesis
US6648885B1 (en) * 1998-11-12 2003-11-18 Sdgi Holdings, Inc. Device for the osteosynthesis of a spinal segment
US20030171749A1 (en) * 2000-07-25 2003-09-11 Regis Le Couedic Semirigid linking piece for stabilizing the spine
EP1281361A1 (en) * 2001-08-02 2003-02-05 Lafitt, S.A. Device to prevent intervertebral disk degeneration
US20030191470A1 (en) * 2002-04-05 2003-10-09 Stephen Ritland Dynamic fixation device and method of use
WO2005030066A1 (en) * 2003-09-29 2005-04-07 Synthes Gmbh Device for elastically stabilising vertebral bodies
US20050203511A1 (en) * 2004-03-02 2005-09-15 Wilson-Macdonald James Orthopaedics device and system
EP1658815A1 (en) * 2004-11-17 2006-05-24 BIEDERMANN MOTECH GmbH Elastic element for use in a stabilising device for bones or vertebrae
WO2006066053A1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-22 Stryker Spine Spinal rods having segments of different elastic properties and methods of using them

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160331411A1 (en) * 2002-05-08 2016-11-17 Stephen Ritland Dynamic Fixation Device and Method of Use
WO2008005740A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc Minimal spacing spinal stabilization device and method
US7799055B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2010-09-21 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Minimal spacing spinal stabilization device and method
US8657856B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2014-02-25 Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc. Size transition spinal rod
US9078704B2 (en) 2010-02-08 2015-07-14 Aesculap Ag Connecting element for a stabilization system for the vertebral column, and stabilization system for the vertebral column
WO2011095641A1 (en) * 2010-02-08 2011-08-11 Aesculap Ag Connecting element for a vertebral column-stabilizing system, and vertebral column-stabilizing system
DE102010041264A1 (en) 2010-09-23 2012-03-29 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilization device for the spine
WO2012048690A1 (en) 2010-09-23 2012-04-19 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilizing system for the spinal column
DE102012202749A1 (en) 2012-02-22 2013-08-22 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilization device for bone e.g. spinal column, has deformable regions that are arranged in form of loop, so that sides of loop surround bone in bone quiescent state
DE102012202750A1 (en) 2012-02-22 2013-08-22 Aces Gmbh Dynamic stabilization device for treating degenerative diseases of spinal column, has support- and mating surfaces formed for clamping by load of spring element, and retaining elements movably mounted against each other in direction
CN103356275A (en) * 2012-03-29 2013-10-23 董健文 Micro-movement lumber pedicle screw elastic-fixation system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20060229608A1 (en) 2006-10-12

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP2142121B1 (en) Flexible spine stabilization system
JP3787363B2 (en) Variable length and variable angle cross-link devices
EP1830753B1 (en) Facet joint replacement
AU2004216131B2 (en) Adjustable rod and connector device and method of use
CN101321501B (en) Multi-axial screw
CA2368250C (en) Connecting apparatus using shape-memory technology
US9861400B2 (en) Spinous process implants and associated methods
US8062336B2 (en) Polyaxial orthopedic fastening apparatus with independent locking modes
EP1850805B1 (en) Apparatus for dynamic vertebral stabilization
US8740944B2 (en) Vertebral stabilizer
EP1673024B1 (en) Multi-axial orthopedic device and system, e.g. for spinal surgery
ES2275663T3 (en) Stabilization system of the superelastic vertebral column.
ES2556111T3 (en) Interspinous vertebral and lumbosacral stabilization devices
US7927358B2 (en) Spinal stabilization device
AU2003228960B2 (en) Dynamic fixation device and method of use
AU2009281979B2 (en) Apparatus for stabilizing vertebral bodies
ES2307010T3 (en) Device for spondylodesis.
US8439954B2 (en) Spring-loaded, load sharing polyaxial pedicle screw assembly and method
US7491240B1 (en) Artificial spinal disc replacement system and method
US6964686B2 (en) Intervertebral disc replacement prosthesis
JP5435943B2 (en) Dynamic fixing device
US8182534B2 (en) Orthopedic device assembly with elements coupled by a retaining structure
JP4945195B2 (en) Rod implant element and stabilization device
US7717941B2 (en) Linking element for dynamically stabilizing a spinal fixing system and spinal fixing system comprising same
US9801663B2 (en) Flexible spine components

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: RU

122 Ep: pct app. not ent. europ. phase

Ref document number: 06737408

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1