WO2006084303A1 - Glycemic and health-related data management - Google Patents

Glycemic and health-related data management Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2006084303A1
WO2006084303A1 PCT/AU2006/000086 AU2006000086W WO2006084303A1 WO 2006084303 A1 WO2006084303 A1 WO 2006084303A1 AU 2006000086 W AU2006000086 W AU 2006000086W WO 2006084303 A1 WO2006084303 A1 WO 2006084303A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
data
glycemic
health
healthcare
client
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/AU2006/000086
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Gary John Layton
Original Assignee
International Diabetes Institute
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to AU2005900566A priority Critical patent/AU2005900566A0/en
Priority to AU2005900566 priority
Application filed by International Diabetes Institute filed Critical International Diabetes Institute
Publication of WO2006084303A1 publication Critical patent/WO2006084303A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models

Abstract

A method for managing glycemic and health-related data including the steps of sharing and synchronising glycemic and health-related data among a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.

Description

GLYCEMIC AND HEALTH-RELATED DATA MANAGEMENT

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to glycemic and health-related data management.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

There is an increasing awareness among healthcare consumers, healthcare providers and food manufacturers of the importance of the glycemic properties of carbohydrates. This is the next logical step from the consideration of carbohydrate in diet and addresses the shortcomings of the low carbohydrate dietary approach. Namely, that low carbohydrate diets are unnatural and unhealthy. Low carbohydrate diets fail because they exclude important nutrients, but more importantly they fail to recognise that all carbohydrates are not the same. Slowly digested carbohydrate diets (low glycemic index/glycemic load diets) may offer significant health benefits including the prevention and management of conditions and chronic metabolic diseases, such as impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, heart disease and some forms of cancer.

It is desirable to make up-to-date and reliable glycemic and health-related data available to healthcare consumers and healthcare providers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the presentinvention, there is provided a method for managing glycemic and health-related data including the steps of sharing and synchronising glycemic and health- related data among a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.

The present invention also provides a system for managing glycemic and health-related data including a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client each configured for sharing and synchronising glycemic and health-related data among each other to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.

The present invention further provides a computer-readable medium carrying one or more sequences of instructions for managing glycemic and health-related data, wherein execution of the one or more sequences of instructions by one or more processors causes the one or more processors to share and synchronise glycemic and health-related data among a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.

The server can be a web server having a database storing a knowledge base of glycemic and health-related data.

The at least one healthcare consumer client can be at least one of a personal computer, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a mobile phone, an in-store kiosk terminal, an Internet- enabled domestic, industrial or retail appliance terminal including a refrigerator or microwave oven.

The at least one healthcare provider client can be at least one of a personal computer, a PDA and a mobile phone. The glycemic and health-related data can include at least one of food data, meal data, glycemic index data, glycemic load data, calendar data, universal product code (UPC) data, barcode "data, dietary data, nutritional data, biometric data, patient data, disease data, treatment data, medical data, drug data, clinical data and physical activity data.

The authorised users can include individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers, and healthcare providers thereto.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

An embodiment of the present invention will now be described solely by way of non- limiting example and with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a schematic diagram of an embodiment of a system for managing glycemic and health-related data of the present invention; Figures 2-10 are sample administrator screens of a central server; and

Figures 11-17 are sample healthcare consumer screens of a healthcare consumer client.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

Figure 1 illustrates a glycemic information management (GIM) system 100 which includes three interactive hardware/software, namely a GIM central server (including administrator applications) 110, a healthcare consumer client 120 and a healthcare provider client 130. The components are connectable together via a wired and/or wireless network, for example, the Internet.

The functionality interactively provided by the components of the GDVI system 100 can, for example, include:

1. a library of published glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) values for a wide variety of foods;

2. presentation of published GI and GL values for a wide variety of foods; 3. a library of published nutritional information, including energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, total carbohydrates, sugars and sodium, for a wide variety of foods;

4. presentation of published nutritional information, including energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, total carbohydrates, sugars and sodium, for a wide variety of foods;

5. calculation and recording by time and date of individual food or meal GI and GL estimates;

6. calculation and recording by time and date of total daily food or meal GI and GL estimates; 7. calculation and recording by time and date of individual food or meal nutritional consumption data including energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, total carbohydrates, sugars and sodium;

8. calculation and recording by time and date of total daily food or meal nutritional consumption data including energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, total carbohydrates, sugars and sodium;

9. user daily GI and GL consumption estimates, recorded by date and time, storage and retrieval;

10. user daily nutritional consumption data, recorded by date and time, storage and retrieval; 11. suggested food substitutions according to preferable GI, GL and/or nutritional properties;

12. recommended daily intake of nutrients calculated according to user gender, age, weight and height with daily nutritional consumption displayed graphically showing amounts consumed relative to recommended daily intake; 13. recommended daily energy intake calculated according to user gender, age, weight, height and desired weight loss/gain/maintenance;

14. periodic update of complete data library;

15. storage and retrieval of user biometrical data (including weight, waist measurement, hip measurement and plasma glucose), recorded by date and time; 16. storage and retrieval of user nutritional, physical activity and lifestyle data, recorded by date and time, storage and retrieval;

17. user GI, GL, nutritional, biometric, physical activity and lifestyle data charting by date and/or time; 18. collation of GI, GL and nutritional, biometric, physical activity and lifestyle data on multiple users for group analysis;

19. general and customised user nutritional and physical activity guideline storage, editing and retrieval; and

20. transfer between devices (platforms) of all data described above.

The GIM central server 110 can, for example, be a web server having a database storing a knowledge base of glycemic and health-related data. The knowledge base can include, for example, food data, meal data, glycemic index data, glycemic load data, calendar data, UPC data, barcode data, dietary data, nutritional data, biometric data, patient data, disease data, treatment data, medical data, drug data, clinical data and physical activity data.

The healthcare consumer client 120 can, for example, be at least one of a personal computer, a PDA, a mobile phone, an in-store kiosk terminal, an Internet-enabled domestic, industrial or retail appliance terminal including a refrigerator or microwave oven.

The healthcare provider client 130 can, for example, be a personal computer, a PDA and a mobile phone.

Authorised users of the GIM system 100 can, for example, include healthcare consumers, for example, the general public, research subjects, patients, athletes, etc. Authorised users of the GEVI system 100 can, for example, include healthcare providers, for example, doctors, nurses, dietitians, nutritionists, fitness advisors, researchers, etc. Other authorised users can include administrators of the GDvI system 100.

The individual components of the GEvI system 100 are discussed below. GIM central sei~ver

The GIM central server 110 includes a database of GI data, GL data, food nutritional data, nutritional guidelines and physical activity guidelines that are available for user download.

The GIM central server 110 may be a web server or an Internet information server which has a master database of all data, including GI and food nutritional data, and all other information to allow maintenance of the database and to service external electronic requests for data updates. The data maintenance application may be through a web-based interface, and servicing of external electronic requests may be via a web-service.

The database of the GIM central server 110 can be managed by an administrator. The administrator can retrieve information on a particular food in two ways; either by using a word search, or by browsing through the available data entries. Figure 2 is a sample screen which presents the administrator with a text box to enter a search string. The administrator can enter a search string (including wildcards) and click a search button. The GIM central server 110 returns a list of food names that match the search string. The administrator selects a particular food name and the system displays the nutritional information for the food item.

Figure 3 is a sample screen of an expandable and collapsible hierarchical tree view which enables an administrator to browse the names of food items in the database. The branch and leaf nodes of the hierarchical tree can be alphabetically arranged as illustrated in the sample screen of Figure 4. The administrator can open individual nodes of the tree until a desired food is found. The GEVI central server 110 displays the GI, GL and nutritional information for the desired food item.

Figure 5 is a sample screen which allows an administrator to create, update or delete food information (including name, GI, nutritional details and possible substitutions) from the food database of the GEVI central server 110. The administrator can also use a barcode scanner to create, update or delete food information based on scanned barcode data or manually-entered UPC data corresponding to food products. An audit history of changes made to the food information is maintained, as illustrated by the sample screen of Figure 6.

Figure 7 is a sample screen which allows an administrator to enter data in the nutritional and physical activity guidelines section of the GIM central server 110. The administrator has the ability to create, update or delete nutritional and physical activity guidelines from the database. The GIM central server 110 maintains an audit history of changes made to any guidelines.

The GEVI central server 110 enables an administrator to create users, change user permissions, change user details and delete users, as illustrated by the sample screen of Figure 8.

Figure 9 is a sample screen which enables an administrator to set food categories according to a food hierarchy and assign food items to categories. The GEVI central server 110 keeps an audit history of changes made to the food information. The audit history of changes made by individual administrators of the GEVI central server 110 can be reviewed using the sample screen of Figure 10.

The GEVI central server 110 processes "Status" and "Update" requests received via Internet connections from healthcare consumer client applications 120, 130 and healthcare provider client applications 140, 150. The client requests contain a username, password and date of last successful update. For "Status" requests having valid usernames, passwords current user account subscriptions, the GEVI central server 110 identifies to the requesting client any data, including nutritional records, nutritional or physical activity guidelines on the GIM central server 110 that have been updated or created since the date supplied in the message. If no data in the GEVI Central Server database has been created or edited since the last client update, a "No" message is sent to the requesting client. For "Update" requests having valid usernames, passwords current user account subscriptions, the GEVI central server 110 retrieves from the GEVI central server 110 database any data, information or guidelines that have been updated or created since the date supplied in the message. The information is compiled into an "Update" message and sent to the requesting client.

Healthcare consumer clients

The healthcare consumer client 120 can, for example, be implemented as a personal computer, a PDA, a mobile phone, an in-store kiosk terminal, an Internet-enabled domestic, industrial or retail appliance terminal including a refrigerator or microwave oven.

The healthcare consumer client 120 enables an authorised healthcare consumer user to enter and modify their personal information (eg, first name, surname, date of birth, gender, height, weight, measuring units (metric or imperial units), healthcare provider's name, guidelines and desired weight). On a separate screen, the healthcare consumer user is presented with a variety of automatically calculated nutritional targets based on the user's age, gender, weight and height. The healthcare consumer user can select automatically calculated nutritional targets according to desired weight change or maintenance.

The healthcare consumer client 120 enables a user to either to search for a food in the food database, or browse the food database. Figure 11 is a sample screen in which the user is presented with a text box to enter a search string. The user enters a search string

(including wildcards) and clicks the search button. A list of food names that match the search string is then retrieved and displayed to the user. The user can also select a particular food name and serving size. The healthcare consumer client 120 then displays the nutritional information (including GI, GL, energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars and sodium) and possible substitutions for the food item.

The healthcare consumer client 120 can also present a user with a collapsed hierarchical tree view of the names of food items in the database. The user can then open branches until the desired food is located. In addition, the healthcare consumer client 120 can present a user with an alphabetic list of food items in the database. The user can then navigate through the list until they find the desired food. As with the search string option above, the user can select a food name and serving size from the alphabetical list. The healthcare consumer client 120 then displays the nutritional information (including GI, GL, energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars and sodium) and possible substitutions for the food item.

The healthcare consumer client 120 can also include a barcode scanner to retrieve, create, update or delete food information based on scanned barcode data or manually-entered UPC data corresponding to food products.

The healthcare consumer client 120 allows a user to select a number of food items from the database and enter the amount of each food consumed by weight or number of servings. The user may record the consumption of a meal in a diary and/or add the meal to a list of preferred foods in the healthcare consumer client 120. A user can use the search or browse option to add a food item to the meal. Each time the user enters an amount of food consumed, the healthcare consumer client 120 automatically calculates the GI and GL estimates of the meal and other nutritional information for the meal (including energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars and sodium). The user can continue to add food items to the meal until all items have been entered.

If a user chooses to record the meal, the healthcare consumer client 120 prompts the user for a date and time, defaulting to the current date and time. If a user chooses to record the meal in their list of preferred foods, the user is prompted for an entry name. If the user navigates away from the meal screen and the meal has not been saved to the list of preferred foods and/or has not been recorded in the diary, the healthcare consumer client 120 displays a warning screen, asking the user to save the information.

As illustrated by the sample screen in Figure 12, the healthcare consumer client -120 allows a user to browse nutritional or physical activity guidelines in the healthcare consumer client database. Referring to the sample screen of Figure 13, the user can also set personal nutritional or physical activity targets. In addition, the healthcare consumer client 120 can calculate targets for the user based on their age, weight, height and activity level for weight maintenance, weight loss and weight gain.

The healthcare consumer client 120 allows a user to maintain a list of preferred foods. Food items from the client database can be added to the list of preferred foods, after calculating the GI, GL and nutritional properties of the food or meal. Nutritional information may be entered for a new food item by the user. Foods added from the client database appear in both the client database and the list of preferred foods. If a client database food item is removed from the preferred foods list, it cannot be deleted from the client database. If a meal or a user-entered food is removed from the preferred foods list, it is deleted completely. A meal or a user-entered food cannot be removed from the preferred foods list if the food is recorded in the diary as being consumed.

If a user has a food or meal item selected, the healthcare consumer client 120 allows for 'drag and drop' recording of the consumption of the food. When a user selects the option to record the information, the user is prompted for the date and time, defaulting to the current date and time. When the user selects "Save", the information is stored in the diary and the prompt is removed from the screen.

The healthcare consumer client 120 can present the records entered in the diary to a user in a calendar format, as illustrated by the sample screen in Figure 14. The user can change the date range for the records displayed. The user can also select a single entry from the calendar to display and edit the details of the entry.

Referring to the sample screen of Figure 15, a user can switch to a graph view of the diary entries, which displays the daily totals of nutritional information over the date range selected. If the user has values stored in their personal nutritional guidelines, those values will appear on the graph as a reference. Nutritional targets (including GI, GL, energy, fat, protein, carbohydrate and sodium) can be displayed and automatically calculated and adjusted according to user personal information and selected weight loss targets. Days where nutritional targets are achieved or exceeded can be highlighted in a calendar graphic, as illustrated in the sample screen of Figure 16.

The healthcare consumer client 120 allows a healthcare consumer user to record, edit and delete biometric data (including weight, waist measurement, hip measurement and blood glucose) in the diary. If a user adds a biometric data entry to the database, the system provides a dialog to allow the user to select the type of data to be entered, record the data measurement, and the date and time of measurement. The system provides the same dialog to edit an existing entry. If a user deletes an entry, the healthcare consumer client 120 prompts the user for confirmation. As illustrated in the sample screen of Figure 17, biometric data records are entered in the diary in a calendar format. A user can change the date range for the records displayed, and a user can select a single entry from the calendar

- to display and edit the details of the entry. A user can also switch to a graph view of the diary entries, which displays the values of a single type of biometric data over the date range selected.

The healthcare consumer client 120 allows a user to email data to a healthcare provider from a specific date range such as food consumption, physical activity and biometric data. The user selects a "Send data to..." option and is prompted to enter a selected date range. After the user selects a date range, the types of entries that exist in that date range are displayed. The user can then select the types of entries that they wish to send and press the "Send" button. The healthcare consumer client 120 constructs a file containing the selected information in an encrypted format. The default email client is then instructed to create a new email with the constructed file inserted as an attachment. The user completes the email and sends it to the healthcare provider.

Conversely, a user of a healthcare consumer client 120 can receive a file containing nutritional or physical activity guidelines from a healthcare provider.. The user can then store the file on their local hard disk or PDA. The user selects "Import ...guidelines" and a "Select File" dialog is presented. The user can then select the file to be imported. If the file is valid, the healthcare consumer client 120 display the guidelines listed in the file in a new window and provides the user with an option to overwrite their existing guidelines. If the user selects "Overwrite", their personal guidelines are updated and the window containing the imported guideline information is closed. If the user selects "Cancel", the window containing the imported guideline information is closed. If the healthcare provider file is not in a valid format, the user is presented with an error message advising the user to request a new file from the healthcare provider.

As discussed above, the healthcare consumer client 120 can check the' GIM central server 110 for new updates to GI, GL, nutritional, and physical activity guidelines databases at the GEVI central server 110. The user selects "Check for Updates" and the GIM central server 110 automatically checks for updates to the database at regular intervals. The time between checks can be edited by the user, but a lower limit may be imposed.

• Data can be synchronised between multiple PC/PDA healthcare consumer clients 120, for example, PC to PC, PG to PDA or vice versa, and PDA to PDA. For example, a

"Synchronise" message can be sent from a PC healthcare consumer client 120 to a PDA or

PC healthcare consumer client 120. The information from the PDA client database can then be entered into the PC client database. An "Update" message is sent to the PDA containing data and information that has changed since the most recent synchronisation. A "Synchronisation Complete" message is sent to the client PDA after synchronisation has been completed, and the user of the client PC is notified that the synchronisation is complete.

Healthcare provider client

The healthcare provider client 130 can, for example, be implemented as a personal computer, a PDA and a mobile phone.

The functionality of the healthcare provider client 130 is generally similar to the healthcare consumer client 120 described above. For example, the healthcare provider client 130 enables a healthcare provider user to select, view and manipulate glycemic and health- related data of individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers, for example, patients/clients.

The healthcare provider client 130 allows a healthcare provider user to create new client, patient or consumer (client) records, change client details and delete client records. The healthcare provider client also allows a healthcare provider user to review information stored for a particular client or for user-defined groups of clients. The healthcare provider- client 130 enables a user to create new groups, add clients to groups, remove clients from groups and delete groups. A user can also create, edit or delete customised guidelines. These guidelines can be sent to individual clients or groups of clients.

For example, a healthcare provider user receives a data file from a client that may include food consumption, physical activity and biometric data. The healthcare provider user stores the file on their local hard disk. The user selects "Import Client data" and a "Select File" dialog is displayed. The user selects the file to be imported and, if the file is valid, the client name is listed and the file is displayed in a new window and the user is asked whether to import the data. If the healthcare provider user selects "Import", their client record is updated. If the healthcare provider user selects "Cancel" the window containing the client name window is closed.

The healthcare provider client 130 allows a healthcare provider user to send biometric, nutritional and physical activity guidelines to a single client. The system only sends data that has been entered by the healthcare provider user. The user selects the "Send data to Client" option and is prompted to enter a selected date range. When the user selects a date range, the system displays the types of entries contained in the date range. The user then selects the types of entries to send and selects "Send". The healthcare provider client 130 constructs a file containing the selected information in an encrypted format, and the default email client is instructed to create a new email with the constructed file inserted as an attachment. The healthcare provider user completes the email and sends it to the client. In addition, the healthcare provider client 130 allows a healthcare provider user to send nutritional and/or physical activity guidelines to a group of clients. The user selects the "Send guidelines to Group" option, and the user selects the guideline that they wish to send and presses the "Send" Button. The healthcare provider client 130 constructs a file containing the selected information in an encrypted format, and the default email client is instructed to create a new email with the constructed file inserted as an attachment. The healthcare provider user completes the email and sends it to the group.

The healthcare provider client 130 enables a user to export group data to a comma- delimited file. The user selects "Export" and the system displays a list of available recorded information types to export. The user selects the information types to be exported and is prompted to enter a date range for the data. The "from" date defaults to the earliest available piece of data, and the "to" date defaults to the current date. The user then selects the date range of data to be exported. The user is prompted for a filename and location for the exported file. The healthcare provider client 130 compiles the data into a comma- delimited format and writes out the file. The healthcare provider client 130 confirms the data has been exported to the file.

As with healthcare consumer client 120, data can be synchronised between multiple PC/PDA healthcare provider clients 130, for example, PC to PC, PC to PDA or vice versa, and PDA to PDA.

Example calculations

The following example formula can be used by the GIM system 100 for calculating glycemic load.

Glycemic load (GL) = (GI x carbohydrate per serving consumed) ÷ 100

An example calculation of the estimated GI of a meal is summarised in the following table. Food Amount of Proportion of total FFooood glycemic Meal glycemic glycemic glycemic indi index* carbohydrate carbohydrate

Bread 25 0.342 100 34.2

Cereal 25 0.342 72 24.6

Milk 6 0.082 39 3.2

Sucrose 5 0.068 87 5.9

Orange juice 12 0.164 74 12.1

TOTAL 73 80.0

*Meal component glycemic index values for each food equals the proportion of total glycemic carbohydrate multiplied by the food GI. The sum of these values is the meal GI.

The basic metabolic rate (BMR) in kJ/day in adults and children over 10 years of age can be estimated using, for example, the Schofield Equation in the following table.

Figure imgf000016_0001

The activity levels (AL) or average daily basal energy expenditure of adults and children 10 years at different levels of activity can be as expressed, for example, as multiples of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) as set in the following table.

Figure imgf000017_0001

So, the recommended daily energy intake (EI) for a person can be calculated by the product of the applicable BMR and AL from the above tables.

The recommended daily intake (RDI) of fat can be calculated based on a person's recommended EI. For example, example RDIs of fat can be expressed as follows.

Total fat intake < 30% of EI

Total fat intake 20-25% of EI for people with a BMI > 25

Saturated fat, including trans fats < 8% EI

Therefore, the RDI of fat in grams is calculated by the GBVI system 100 using the person's recommended EI, their recommended fat intake as a percentage of their EI and assuming, for example, that fat provides 37kJ/g (9kcal/g) based on empirical evidence and studies.

Similarly, the RDI for carbohydrate is calculated by .assuming, for example, that the RDI of carbohydrate is 55-60% of EI and that carbohydrate provides 16kJ/g (4kcal/g).

Similarly, the RDI for protein is calculated, for example, by assuming based on empirical evidence and studies that the RDI of protein is 0.75g / kg ideal body weight or 12-15% of energy from protein. In addition, protein provides 17kJ/g (4kcal/g). The GM system 100 can use, for example, an RDI of fibre of 30g/day. Similarly, the GIM system 100 can use, for example, the following RDIs of sodium. . Adults 19+ years: 40-lOOmmol/day

920-23 OOmg/day

The body mass index used by the GIM system 100 can be calculated using the following example formula.

BMI = weight (in kilograms) divided by height (in metres) squared

Other calculations and factors can be used based on empirical research.

The present invention is not limited to the embodiments that have been described and depicted, but variations and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Claims

1. A method for managing glycemic and health-related data including the steps of sharing and synchronising glycemic and health-related data among a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.
2. A method according to claim 1, wherein the server is a web server having a database storing a knowledge base of glycemic and health-related data.
3. A method according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the at least one healthcare consumer client is at least one of a personal computer, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a mobile phone, an in-store kiosk terminal and an Internet-enabled domestic, industrial or retail appliance terminal.
4. A method according to any preceding claim, wherein the at least one healthcare provider client is at least one of a personal computer, a PDA and a mobile phone.
5. A method according to any preceding claim, wherein the glycemic and health- related data includes at least one of food data, meal data, glycemic index data, glycemic load data, calendar data, diary data, universal product code (UPC) data, barcode data, dietary data, nutritional data, biometric data, patient data, disease data, treatment data, medical data, drug data, clinical data and physical activity data.
6. A method according to any preceding claim, wherein the authorised users include individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers, and healthcare providers thereto.
7. A system for managing glycemic and health-related data including a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client each configured for sharing and synchronising glycemic and health-related data among each other to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.
8. A method according to claim 7, wherein the server is a web server having a database storing a knowledge base of glycemic and health-related data.
9. A method according to claim 7 or 8, wherein the at least one healthcare consumer client is at least one of a personal computer, a PDA, a mobile phone, an in-store kiosk terminal and an Internet-enabled domestic, industrial or retail appliance terminal.
10. A method according to any one of claims 7 to 9, wherein the at least one healthcare provider client is at least one of a personal computer, a PDA and a mobile phone.
11. A method according to any one of claims 7 to 10, wherein the glycemic and health- related data includes at least one of food data, meal data, glycemic index data, glycemic load data, calendar data, diary data, UPC data, barcode data, dietary data, nutritional data, biometric data, patient data, disease data, treatment data, medical data, drug data, clinical data and physical activity data.
12. A method according to any one of claims 7 to 11, wherein the authorised users include individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers, and healthcare providers thereto.
13. A computer-readable medium carrying one or more sequences of instructions for managing glycemic and health-related data, wherein execution of the one or more sequences of instructions by one or more processors causes the one or more processors to share and synchronise glycemic and health-related data among a server, at least one healthcare consumer client and at least one healthcare provider client to enable glycemic and health-related data for individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers to be gathered, monitored, managed and analysed, wherein sharing and synchronising of glycemic and health-related data is provided only to authorised users.
14. A method according to claim 13, wherein the server is a web server having a database storing a knowledge base of glycemic and health-related data.
15. A method according to claim 13 or 14, wherein the at least one healthcare consumer client is at least one of a personal computer, a PDA, a mobile phone, an in-store kiosk terminal and an Internet-enabled domestic, industrial or retail appliance terminal.
16. A method according to any one of claims 13 to 15, wherein the at least one healthcare provider client is at least one of a personal computer, a PDA and a mobile phone.
17. A method according to any one of claims 13 to 16, wherein the glycemic and health-related data includes at least one of food data, meal data,, glycemic index data, glycemic load data, calendar data, diary data, UPC data, barcode data, dietary data, nutritional data, biometric data, patient data, disease data, treatment data, medical data, drug data, clinical data and physical activity data.
18. A method according to any one of claims 13 to 17, wherein the authorised users include individual healthcare consumers or groups of healthcare consumers, and healthcare providers thereto.
19. A method for managing glycemic and health-related data, substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
20. A system for managing glycemic and health-related data, substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
21. A computer-readable medium carrying one or more sequences of instructions for managing glycemic and health-related data, substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
PCT/AU2006/000086 2005-02-08 2006-01-24 Glycemic and health-related data management WO2006084303A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2005900566A AU2005900566A0 (en) 2005-02-08 Glycemic information management
AU2005900566 2005-02-08

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2006084303A1 true WO2006084303A1 (en) 2006-08-17

Family

ID=36792823

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/AU2006/000086 WO2006084303A1 (en) 2005-02-08 2006-01-24 Glycemic and health-related data management

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2006084303A1 (en)

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2312544A1 (en) * 2000-06-27 2001-12-27 Marc Fournier Portable health and nutrition-related information device
US20030091964A1 (en) * 2001-09-06 2003-05-15 Yeager John J. System and method for generating personalized meal plans

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2312544A1 (en) * 2000-06-27 2001-12-27 Marc Fournier Portable health and nutrition-related information device
US20030091964A1 (en) * 2001-09-06 2003-05-15 Yeager John J. System and method for generating personalized meal plans

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Meigs et al. A controlled trial of web-based diabetes disease management: the MGH diabetes primary care improvement project
Peyrot et al. Correlates of insulin injection omission
Brennan et al. HeartCare: an Internet‐based information and support system for patient home recovery after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery
Arabi et al. Weekend and weeknight admissions have the same outcome of weekday admissions to an intensive care unit with onsite intensivist coverage
Murray The nursing shortage: past, present, and future
Field et al. Telemedicine and remote patient monitoring
Van den Berghe et al. Analysis of healthcare resource utilization with intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients
Azar et al. Web-based management of diabetes through glucose uploads: has the time come for telemedicine?
Healy et al. Inpatient diabetes education is associated with less frequent hospital readmission among patients with poor glycemic control
US7689437B1 (en) System for monitoring health, wellness and fitness
Wan Magic medicine cabinet: A situated portal for consumer healthcare
Jara et al. An internet of things–based personal device for diabetes therapy management in ambient assisted living (AAL)
US20030225731A1 (en) System and method for optimized dietary menu planning
US20030165799A1 (en) Computer program, method, and system for monitoring nutrition content of consumables and for facilitating menu planning
US20130304493A1 (en) Disease management system
US20050060194A1 (en) Method and system for monitoring health of an individual
US6975910B1 (en) Managing an electronic cookbook
Tran et al. Smartphone-based glucose monitors and applications in the management of diabetes: an overview of 10 salient “apps” and a novel smartphone-connected blood glucose monitor
Rosenfeld et al. Intensive care unit telemedicine: alternate paradigm for providing continuous intensivist care
US20170199975A1 (en) Individualized healthcare management system
US20030212576A1 (en) Medical information system
Leddy et al. Timeliness in ambulatory care treatment: an examination of patient satisfaction and wait times in medical practices and outpatient test and treatment facilities
US7475019B2 (en) System and method for physician note creation and management
US20100169120A1 (en) Patient to device association
Gentles et al. Health information technology to facilitate communication involving health care providers, caregivers, and pediatric patients: a scoping review

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
DPE1 Request for preliminary examination filed after expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed from 20040101)
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase

Ref document number: 06704783

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

WWW Wipo information: withdrawn in national office

Ref document number: 6704783

Country of ref document: EP