WO2006065291A1 - Cleaning device - Google Patents

Cleaning device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2006065291A1
WO2006065291A1 PCT/US2005/028347 US2005028347W WO2006065291A1 WO 2006065291 A1 WO2006065291 A1 WO 2006065291A1 US 2005028347 W US2005028347 W US 2005028347W WO 2006065291 A1 WO2006065291 A1 WO 2006065291A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
cleaning
length
cleaning pad
height
width
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2005/028347
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Michael S. Brunner
Original Assignee
Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/015,657 priority Critical
Priority to US11/015,657 priority patent/US20060130252A1/en
Application filed by Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. filed Critical Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.
Publication of WO2006065291A1 publication Critical patent/WO2006065291A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/16Cloths; Pads; Sponges

Abstract

In one embodiment, a cleaning device comprises a holder and a cleaning pad removably attached to the holder. The cleaning pad comprises a non-woven web having a length along a length dimension and a width along a width dimension, and having a height along a height dimension, wherein the length and the width define a cleaning surface, wherein the height and the length defining a side surface. The width is less than the height which is less than the length. The cleaning surface is capable of cleaning other surfaces.

Description

CLEANING DEVICE
BACKGROUND
[0001] This disclosure relates to cleaning devices.
[0002] Many cleaning devices comprise a handle with a cleaning instrument attached thereto (e.g., a mop attached to a handle, and the like). These devices, over the course of multiple uses, receive a great deal of pressure and wear on their cleaning surface. This wear can cause the device to loose its cleaning efficiency. Additionally, due to the nature of the use of the cleaning devices, the cleaning devices can become fouled with dirt, grease, bacteria, and other contaminants.
[0003] The cleaning surface usually comprises a scrubbing material for cleaning other surfaces. The scrubbing materials tend to be expensive.
[0004] Accordingly, there remains a need for cleaning devices with inexpensive cleaning surfaces. There also remains a need for cleaning devices with efficiently and effectively designed handles.
BRIEF SUMMARY
[0005] Disclosed herein are cleaning pads and cleaning devices comprising cleaning pads. In one embodiment, a cleaning pad comprises: a non-woven web having a length along a length dimension and a width along a width dimension, and having a height along a height dimension, wherein the length and the width define a cleaning surface, wherein the height and the length defining a side surface. The width is less than the height which is less than the length. The cleaning surface is capable of cleaning other surfaces.
[0006] In one embodiment, a cleaning device comprises a holder and a cleaning pad removably attached to the holder. The cleaning pad comprises a non-woven web having a length along a length dimension and a width along a width dimension, and having a height along a height dimension, wherein the length and the width define a cleaning surface, wherein the height and the length defining a side surface. The width is less than the height which is less than the length. The cleaning surface is capable of cleaning other surfaces. [0007] The above described and other features are exemplified by the following detailed description.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
[0008] Refer now to figures, which are exemplary, not limiting, and wherein like elements are numbered alike in several figures and, as such may not be discussed in relation to each figure.
[0009] Figure 1 is a side view of one embodiment of a portion of a cleaning pad.
[0010] Figures 2 - 5 are top views of various embodiments of the cleaning surface of the cleaning pad of Figure 1.
[0011] Figure 6 is a perspective view of a cleaning side of a cleaning pad comprising a partially segmented nonwoven web.
[0012] Figures 7 - 10 are side views of various embodiments of a cleaning device.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
[0013] Disclosed herein are cleaning pads and cleaning devices comprising cleaning pads. The cleaning pads have one or more cleaning surfaces capable of cleaning other surfaces. All ranges disclosed herein are inclusive and combinable (e.g., ranges of "up to about 25 wt%, or, more specifically about 5 wt% to about 20 wt%" is inclusive of the endpoints and all intermediate values of the ranges of "about 5 wt% to about 25 wt%," etc.). The terms "first," "second," and the like, herein do not denote any order, quantity, or importance, but rather are used to distinguish one element from another, and the terms "a" and "an" herein do not denote a limitation of quantity, but rather denote the presence of at least one of the referenced item.
[0014] Referring now to Figure 1 , in one embodiment, a cleaning pad 10 comprises a nonwoven web 12 having a length dimension 14 (a portion of the length 14 is shown in Figure 1) along a length dimension, a width 16 along a width dimension, and a height 18 along a height dimension. For the purpose of illustration, the length dimension is represented on an axis 50-50, the width dimension represented on an axis 52-52, and height dimension represented on an axis 54-54, the three axis (50-50, 52-52, 54-54) being orthogonal to each other. The length dimension 14 and the width 16 define a cleaning surface 20. The height 18 and the length dimension 14 define a side surface 22.
[0015] The nonwoven web can be continuous along the length dimension (e.g., as illustrated in Figures 2 - 5), or can be partially segmented (e.g., as illustrated in Figure 6, wherein the length dimension 14 is cut along a portion of the height 18). Similarly, the width 16 and height 18 can, individually, be constant (e.g., uniform) or varied. For example, the cleaning device can have a shorter height toward the edge(s) and a longer height toward the center to attain a rounded effect. In another embodiment, the height can be variable across the device to attain a greater scrubbing (e.g., abrasive) effect and enhance the ability to clean uneven surfaces, e.g., having depressions, crevices, and so forth. In yet another embodiment, the cleaning device can have a longer height toward the edge(s) and a shorter height toward the center. Various combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing designs are also possible.
[0016] Desirably, the width 16 can be less than the height 18, which can be less than the length dimension 14 (e.g., as is illustrated in Figure 3 - 5), essentially using an end 20 of the nonwoven instead of the surface 22 to perform the cleaning. In certain embodiments, the nonwoven web can have an average width along the width dimension of about 0.1 millimeter (mm) to about 10 mm, or, more specifically, about 0.5 mm to about 5 mm, or, even more specifically, about 1 mm to about 3 mm. The average height along the height dimension can be about 1 mm to about 40 mm or so, or, more specifically, about 5 mm to about 30 mm, or, even more specifically, about 10 mm to about 20 mm. The average length along the length dimension can be about 10 centimeters (cm) to about 200 cm or so, or, more specifically, about 20 cm to about 100 cm, or, even more specifically, about 30 cm to about 70 cm. The specific dimensions are chosen based upon the specific intended application (e.g., scrubbing a stove-top versus an exfoliant for use on skin).
[0017] In order to attain the desired cleaning effect, the width 16 can be substantially smaller than the length dimension 14 and even than the height 18. The ratio of the average height along the height dimension to the average width along the width dimension (i.e., a height to width ratio), can be sufficiently high for the cleaning edges 20 to have bristle-like mechanical properties. The cleaning edges can move independently of one another; such, nonwoven webs provide void spaces between cleaning surfaces to hold cleaning agents and debris. For example, the nonwoven web can have a length that is greater than or equal to an order of magnitude larger than the width, and, more specifically, greater than or equal to 2 orders of magnitude larger than the width, e.g., a length of 30 cm with a width of about 4 mm, or a length of 100 cm with a width of about 5 mm, and so forth.
[0018] To further enhance the scrubbing characteristics of the cleaning device, the nonwoven web can have a density that, for example, enables trapping of debris between the layers and optionally that is capable of inducing foaming and/or a lather. For example, in some embodiments, the density can be about 0.01 grams per cubic centimeter (g/cc) to about 0.9 g/cc, or, more specifically, about 0.1 g/cc to about 0.5 g/cc, or, even more specifically, about 0.15 g/cc to about 0.25 g/cc.
[0019] As is illustrated in Figures 2 - 6, the cleaning surface 20 can have a variety of geometries. Desirably, the geometries are chosen to enhance cleaning efficiency and effectiveness. Optionally, the geometry can be chosen to also enhance brand differentiation. Geometries include various rounded (Figures 2 and 6) and multisided (Figures 3 and 4) spiral type geometries (wherein the length dimension 14 is the entire length of the spiral from point "A" to point "B" (see Figure 3)), linear geometries, folded geometries (e.g., fan folded geometry, wherein the nonwoven web is folded back and forth on itself, as illustrated in Figures 5A and 5B), and so forth, as well as combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing geometries. Figure 3 is an exemplary square spiral geometry, while Figure 4 illustrates an exemplary pentagonal spiral geometry. As shown in Figures 2 - 5, the cleaning surface 20 is substantially continuous.
[0020] In other embodiments, the cleaning surface 20 has a geometry partially segmented along the length dimension (as illustrated in Figure 6). The segments can be formed by a separation in the height dimension (e.g., perpendicular to the length dimension). The separation that forms the various segments can extend a distance of less than or equal to about 85 % of the height dimension as measured from the cleaning surface 20, or, more specifically, an extension of about 15% to about 75%, or, even more specifically, an extension of about 30% to about 70%, and, yet more specifically, an extension of about 45% to about 65% of the height. In this embodiment, the width dimension is substantially constant and the length dimension is segmented. The segments can have a length 114 that is constant or varied. This segment length 114 can be about 1 mm to about 20 mm, or, more specifically, about 4 mm to about 15 mm, and even more specifically, about 5 mm to about 10 mm; in some embodiments.
[0021] The nonwoven web 12 comprises a structure of individual fibers or threads (hereinafter fibers) that are interlaid, but not in a regular or identifiable manner as in a knitted fabric. In some embodiments, to attain enhanced abrasion and cleaning efficiency, the fiber size can be macroscopic (e.g., greater than or equal to 10 micrometers in diameter). In other embodiments, e.g., skin cleansing applications, microscopic fibers are generally desirable, yet macroscopic fibers can be employed. These fibers can have a size of less than 10 micrometers. In some embodiments, a combination of microscopic and macroscopic fibers can be employed. The fibers in the nonwoven web can have a large fiber size to form a texturized surface on the nonwoven web (such as on the cleaning surface), e.g., the nonwoven web can have projections extending from a surface of the nonwoven web. In some applications, continuous fibers can be employed. The projections can take on many forms and can be, for instance, bristles, tufts, loop structures, random portions of fibers protruding from the surface, and the like.
[0022] The nonwoven web 12 can comprise meltblown fibers, spunbond fibers, and combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing fibers. As used herein the term "spunbonded fibers" refers to small diameter fibers which are formed by extruding molten thermoplastic material as filaments from a plurality of fine, usually circular capillaries of a spinneret with the diameter of the extruded filaments then being rapidly reduced as by, for example, in U.S. Patent No. 4,340,563 to Appel et al., and U.S. Patent No. 3,692,618 to Dorschner et al., U.S. Patent No. 3,802,817 to Matsuki et al., U.S. Patent Nos. 3,338,992 and 3,341 ,394 to Kinney, U.S. Patent No. 3,502,763 to Hartman, and U.S. Patent No. 3,542,615 to Dobo et al. Spunbond fibers are generally not tacky when they are deposited onto a collecting surface. Spunbond fibers are generally continuous and have average diameters (from a sample of at least 10) larger than 7 microns, more particularly, between about 10 and 20 microns. The fibers may also have shapes such as those described in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,277,976 to Hogle et al., U.S. Patent No. 5,466,410 to Hills and 5,069,970 and 5,057,368 to Largman et al., which describe fibers with unconventional shapes.
[0023] As used herein the term "meltblown fibers" means fibers formed by extruding a molten thermoplastic material through a plurality of fine, usually circular, die capillaries as molten threads or filaments into converging high velocity, usually hot, gas (e.g., air) streams which attenuate the filaments of molten thermoplastic material to reduce their diameter, which may be to microfiber diameter. Thereafter, the meltblown fibers are carried by the high velocity gas stream and are deposited on a collecting surface to form a web of randomly dispersed meltblown fibers. Such a process is disclosed, for example, in U.S. Patent No. 3,849,241 to Butin et al. Meltblown fibers are microfibers, which may be continuous or discontinuous, are generally smaller than 10 micrometers in average diameter, and are generally tacky when deposited onto a collecting surface.
[0024] Alternatively, or in addition, the nonwoven web can comprise an air- laid and/or wet-laid staple fiber web, a carded web, and so forth, wherein the fibers are bonded to each other to form a strong web structure. The nonwoven web can have a basis weight of greater than or equal to about 10 grams per square meter (g/m2), or, more specifically, about 25 g/m2 to about 400 g/m2, or, even more specifically, about 30 g/m2 to about 200 g/m2, and, yet more specifically, about 40 g/m2 to about 160 g/m2.
[0025] Possible thermoplastic polymeric materials that may be used to form nonwoven webs include, but are not limited to, polyolefins, polyesters, polypropylene, high density polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, nylons, polytetrafluoroethylene, polycarbonate, poly(methyl) acrylates, polyoxymethylene, polystyrenes, ABS, polyetheresters, or polyamides, polycaprolactan, thermoplastic starch, polyvinyl alcohol, polylactic acid (such as polyesteramide (optionally with glycerin as a plasticizer)), poluphenylsulfide (PPS), poly ether ether ketone (PEEK), polyvinylidenes, polyurethane, polyurea, and so forth, and combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing thermoplastic polymeric materials. [0026] In one embodiment, the nonwoven web 12 can comprise meltblown fibers, e.g., fibers formed by extruding a molten thermoplastic polymeric material through a plurality of (usually circular) die capillaries as molten threads or filaments into converging high velocity, usually hot, gas (e.g., air) streams which attenuate the filaments of molten thermoplastic polymeric material to reduce their diameter. Thereafter, the meltblown fibers may be carried by the high velocity gas stream and deposited on a collecting surface to form a web of randomly dispersed meltblown fibers. Meltblown fibers may be continuous or discontinuous and are generally tacky when deposited onto a collecting surface. In some embodiments, however, low or minimal air flow is used to reduce fiber attenuation and, in some embodiments, to permit neighboring filaments of molten polymer to coalesce (e.g., to adhere along the respective sides of the strands), becoming joined at least in part along the proximate sides of the neighboring strands to form fibers that are multifilamentary aggregate fibers (i.e., an aggregate fiber formed of two or more polymer strands).
[0027] The nonwoven web 12 can have "coarse" meltblown fibers to increase the "abrasive" characteristics of the nonwoven web 12. As used herein, the term "abrasive" is intended to represent a surface texture which enables the nonwoven web to scour a surface being wiped or cleaned with the nonwoven web and remove dirt and the like. The abrasiveness can vary depending on the polymer used to prepare the abrasive fibers and the degree of texture of the nonwoven web. "Coarse" meltblown fibers have an average diameter of greater than or equal to about 15 micrometers. In one embodiment the meltblown fibers can have an average diameter of about 40 micrometers to about 800 micrometers, or, more specifically, about 50 micrometers to about 400 micrometers, or, even more specifically, about 60 micrometers to 300 micrometers.
[0028] The abrasive characteristic of the nonwoven web 12 can be sufficient to attain the desired cleaning effect (e.g., scrubbing (such as of food from a pan), exfoliating (e.g., of skin on a foot), and so forth).
[0029] Optionally, the cleaning pad(s) can comprise additional layer(s), e.g., a hydrophobic barrier layer bonded to the nonwoven web, a spacer layer, and the like. A hydrophobic barrier layer may be a permanent layer, such as a film, applied to the product, or a removable layer, such as a hydrophobic sheet. The hydrophobic barrier can inhibit or prevent wetting of part or all of the cleaning pad, so as to prevent the hand from getting wet during use.
[0030] The spacer layer can be a layer disposed between the layers of the nonwoven that form the cleaning surface. For example, the spacer layer can be disposed adjacent the nonwoven. These layers can then be rolled to form the spiral geometry, folded to form the folded geometry, and so forth. This spacer layer provides a space between the nonwoven web, providing structural integrity to the cleaning pad. The spacer layer can have a similar geometry and size as the nonwoven web, or can have a different size. For example, the spacer layer can extend a portion of the distance toward the cleaning surface (i.e., can have a height less than the height of the nonwoven web such that the spacer does not extend to the cleaning surface). In one embodiment, the spacer layer can extend from an end of the nonwoven web opposite the cleaning surface 20 toward the segments, without physically contacting the extension; thereby providing structural integrity without effecting the movement of the segments during a cleaning operation.
[0031] For example, the cleaning pad can be abrasive (e.g., for cleaning surfaces such as pots, floors, and so forth). Here the nonwoven web width can be less than 1 mm, the web is relatively stiff, has a high scrubbing co-efficient, and has a high density (e.g., greater than or equal to 0.1 g/cc). Here the spacer layer could be relatively thick (e.g., a width of greater than or equal to 1 mm), be relatively flimsy with a low scrubbing co-efficient, and a low density (e.g., less than 0.1 g/cc). In this embodiment, for example, the spacer layer can have a spacer height equal to about 80% to about 100% of the nonwoven web height.
[0032] In another embodiment, the cleaning pad can be relatively gentle (e.g., for cleaning enamel surfaces (stove tops), skin, and so forth). Here the nonwoven web width can be relatively thick (e.g., greater than or equal to 1 mm), but be relatively flimsy, with low abrasive co-efficient and high density (greater than or equal to 0.1 g/cc). Here the spacer layer can be relatively thin (less than 1 mm), be highly rigid (to provide structural integrity to the flimsy nonwoven web) and have a high density (e.g., great than or equal to 0.1 g/cc). In this embodiment, for example, the spacer layer can have a spacer height equal to about 15% to about 50% of the nonwoven web height. [0033] Optionally, the cleaning pads can also comprise cleaning, treatment, conditioning, and/or other agent(s) coated on or in the nonwoven web. Some possible agents include, but are not limited to, soaps, detergents, waxes or polishing agents (such as furniture polish, metal cleaner, leather and vinyl cleaning or restoration agent), stain removers (e.g., for use on clothing), laundry pre- treatment solutions, enzymatic solutions (e.g., for improved cleaning or fabric conditioning), odor control agents, water proofing compounds, glass cleaners, antimicrobial compounds, wound care agents, medications (e.g., anti-acne medications), lotions and emollient, surfactants, mineral oil, glycerin and so forth, as well as combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing agents.
[0034] The cleaning pads can be provided dry or pre-moistened. These cleaning pads can be maintained in a sealable container prior to use, such as, for example, within a bucket with an attachable lid, sealable plastic pouches or bags, canisters, jars, tubs, and so forth. Desirably the wet, stacked cleaning sheets are maintained in a resealable container to inhibit drying out of the cleaning pad prior to use.
[0035] Desirably the cleaning pads can be removably attached to a handle, holder, or so forth, of a cleaning device. That is, the cleaning pad can be readily affixed to and thereafter readily released or removed from the cleaning device. Referring to Figure 7, in one embodiment, a first cleaning device 100 is illustrated that comprises a holder 102 and the cleaning pad 10 removably attached to the holder 102. When the cleaning pad 10 becomes soiled or otherwise spent, or when replacement is otherwise desired, the cleaning pad 10 can be quickly and easily removed and a new one put in its place.
[0036] Optionally, the cleaning device can comprise attachment layer(s) 206 (e.g., a hook and loop attachment with one portion e.g., the hook or the loop disposed on the holder and the other portion disposed on the cleaning pad); a plastic portion with hole(s) for receiving protrusions (e.g., plastic hooks extending from the cleaning pad; and so forth), disposed between holder 202 and a cleaning pad 10 as is illustrated on a second cleaning 200 in Figure 8. The attachment layer 206 can provide the engagement between the cleaning pad 10 and the holder 202. When the attachment layer 206 extends across the attachment surface of the cleaning pad 10 (disposed on a side opposite the cleaning surface 20), it can also function as a barrier to prevent liquid flow through that surface of the cleaning pad 10, and can further provide enhanced structural integrity to the pad.
[0037] The specific configuration of the cleaning device can vary in many respects. As examples, the size and/or shape of the holder can vary. The holder 102,202,302,402, can comprise an extension (e.g., an extension 310 of holder 302 as illustrated in Figure 9) to enable cleaning in areas otherwise not reachable; can comprise an ergonomic grip (e.g., a rounded shape e.g., conforming to a hand, a composition (such as gel, rubber, and so forth, that can enable conforming capabilities), and so forth); a rope, string, and the like, that can be wrapped around the hand or wrist; and so forth, as well as combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing. Also, the holder can be attached to the attachment layer 206 at various points (at two points (e.g., as illustrated in Figures 7 and 8), on one side (e.g., as illustrated in Figure 10), or across the surface (as illustrated in Figure 9). The holder should have sufficient structural integrity to withstand the pressures imparted during the cleaning process. Optionally, the holder can house a cleaning solution, or the like, such that the cleaning solution can be dispensed to the cleaning pad during a cleaning process.
[0038] The holder can be removably attached to the cleaning pad via various mechanisms. Desirably, the attachment mechanism can have sufficient structural integrity to retain the holder engaged with the cleaning pad during the cleaning process, to enable multiple attachment and detachment processes. The attachment can withstand periodic attachment or detachment of the cleaning pad 10 to the holder 102. Exemplary attachments include, but are not limited to, hook and loop type fasteners (e.g., VELCRO® fasteners), clamps, snaps, buttons, flaps, cinches, adhesives, locking engagements (e.g., tabs), other forms of engagements, and so forth, as well as combinations comprising at least one of the foregoing. For example, the holder can be removably attached to the cleaning pad using a push button that can be pressed to release a soiled cleaning pad. Such an attachment is convenient, non-messy, and the cleaning pad can be disposed without touching the cleaning surface.
[0039] The cleaning devices are well suited for a variety of dry and wet cleaning operations such as: cleaning (such as counters, tabletops or floors, sinks, tubs, walls, furniture, appliances, machinery, dishes, and so forth); sterilizing and/or disinfecting surfaces. The cleaning devices have numerous uses as a result of its combination of physical attributes, facile grip, replacability of the cleaning pad (e.g., single use) while retaining the holder (therefore more cost effective while being sanitary), design of the cleaning pad (i.e., a non-woven material essentially employed "on-end"; it is the edge of the nonwoven material that is employed as the cleaning surface, thereby attaining a desired roughness and, due to the multiple layers of nonwoven in the cleaning pad, an ability to uptake and retain dirt, dust, and/or debris. Further, the cleaning pads of are of a sufficiently low cost to allow disposal after either a single use or a limited number of uses. By providing a disposable cleaning pad it is possible to avoid problems associated with permanent or multi-use absorbent products such as, for example, cross-contamination and the formation of bad odors, mildew, mold, and so forth.
[0040] While the disclosure has been described with reference to exemplary embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the disclosure. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the disclosure without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the disclosure not be limited to the particular embodiment disclosed as the best mode contemplated for carrying out this disclosure, but that the disclosure will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims

CLAIMS:
1. A cleaning pad, comprising: a non-woven web having a length along a length dimension and a width along a width dimension, and having a height along a height dimension; wherein the length and the width define a cleaning surface, and the height and the length defining a side surface; and wherein the width is less than the height which is less than the length.
2. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein an average width along the width dimension is of about 0.1 mm to about 10 mm.
3. The cleaning pad of Claim 2, wherein the average width dimension is about 0.5 mm to about 5 mm.
4. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein the cleaning surface is substantially continuous.
5. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein the cleaning surface is partially segmented along the length dimension to form segments that extend a distance of less than or equal to about 85 % of the height dimension as measured from the cleaning surface.
6. The cleaning pad of Claim 5, wherein the distance is about 15% to about 75%.
7. The cleaning pad of Claim 6, wherein the distance is about 40% to about 70%.
8. The cleaning pad of Claim 5, wherein the segments have a length of about 1 mm to about 20 mm.
9. The cleaning pad of Claim 8, wherein the segments have a length of about 4 mm to about 15 mm.
10. The cleaning pad of Claim 1, wherein the cleaning surface comprises a spiral geometry.
11. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein the cleaning surface comprises a folded geometry.
12. The cleaning pad of Claim 1, wherein the nonwoven web has a density of less than or equal to about 0.01 g/cc to about 0.9 g/cc.
13. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein the nonwoven web comprises fibers having a length that is greater than or equal to 2 orders of magnitude greater than the width.
14. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein the cleaning pad further comprises a cleaning agent.
15. The cleaning pad of Claim 1 , wherein the cleaning pad is an exfoliant device.
16. A cleaning device, comprising: a holder; and a cleaning pad removably attached to the holder, wherein the cleaning pad comprises a non-woven web having a length along a length dimension and a width along a width dimension, and having a height along a height dimension, wherein the length and the width define a cleaning surface, wherein the height and the length defining a side surface, and wherein the width is less than the height which is less than the length.
17. The cleaning device of Claim 16, wherein the holder further comprises a mechanical attachment capable of attaching the cleaning pad to the holder, and a release capable of releasing the cleaning pad from the mechanical attachment.
18. The cleaning device of Claim 16, further comprising a cleaning agent.
19. The cleaning device of Claim 16, wherein the cleaning device further comprises an attachment layer for attaching the holder to the cleaning pad.
20. The cleaning pad of Claim 16, wherein the cleaning surface comprises a geometry selected from the group consisting of spiral and folded.
PCT/US2005/028347 2004-12-16 2005-08-10 Cleaning device WO2006065291A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/015,657 2004-12-16
US11/015,657 US20060130252A1 (en) 2004-12-16 2004-12-16 Cleaning device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2006065291A1 true WO2006065291A1 (en) 2006-06-22

Family

ID=35708861

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2005/028347 WO2006065291A1 (en) 2004-12-16 2005-08-10 Cleaning device

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20060130252A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2006065291A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2011084309A1 (en) * 2009-12-16 2011-07-14 3M Innovative Properties Company A cleaning material and a cleaning tool

Families Citing this family (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8850649B2 (en) * 2008-11-21 2014-10-07 3M Innovative Properties Company Cleaning tool with upstanding stems and method of cleaning a surface
WO2018194924A1 (en) * 2017-04-18 2018-10-25 Tietex International Ltd. Stitch bonded wipe
USD842568S1 (en) * 2017-12-14 2019-03-05 Global Material Technologies, Incorporated Scrubbing pad
USD842567S1 (en) * 2017-12-14 2019-03-05 Global Material Technologies, Incorporated Scrubbing pad
USD843074S1 (en) * 2017-12-14 2019-03-12 Global Material Technologies, Incorporated Scrubbing pad
USD842569S1 (en) * 2017-12-14 2019-03-05 Global Material Technologies, Incorporated Scrubbing pad

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE8403875U1 (en) * 1984-02-09 1984-05-10 Kolloch, Hardy, 4040 Neuss, De CLEANING DEVICE
US4741941A (en) * 1985-11-04 1988-05-03 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Nonwoven web with projections
US6087279A (en) * 1997-03-12 2000-07-11 Firma Carl Freudenberg Textile material for cleaning applications
US20030104750A1 (en) * 2001-12-19 2003-06-05 Kelly Albert R. Personal care and surface cleaning article
US20040040107A1 (en) * 2002-08-27 2004-03-04 Church & Dwight Co., Inc. Dual functional cleaning article
CA2431336A1 (en) * 2003-06-05 2004-12-05 Texel Inc. Non-woven fabrics useful for hard surface cleaning and body cleansing applications

Family Cites Families (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US676966A (en) * 1900-06-18 1901-06-25 Samuel J Simmons Piano-key cleaner.
US673254A (en) * 1900-12-04 1901-04-30 De Wayne Greenwood Blackboard-eraser.
US873327A (en) * 1903-02-24 1907-12-10 Martin W Perkins Blackboard-eraser.
US763888A (en) * 1903-07-08 1904-06-28 Hayden Implement Company Window-cleaner or the like.
US1277552A (en) * 1917-04-04 1918-09-03 Richard A Costello Blackboard-eraser and method of making same.
US1248675A (en) * 1917-10-31 1917-12-04 Max Kowinsky Tooth-brush.
US1344890A (en) * 1920-04-06 1920-06-29 Mary L Henry Window-polisher
US2667655A (en) * 1951-09-22 1954-02-02 Jr George C Halford Tooth cleaning device having absorbent laminations
US2759212A (en) * 1952-08-08 1956-08-21 Polaroid Corp Applicator devices for applying coatings to photographic prints
US2813286A (en) * 1954-02-02 1957-11-19 Forman E Strader Disposable dusters and methods of making them
US2805434A (en) * 1954-12-17 1957-09-10 Arthur C Hopkins Gun barrel cleaning device
US3338992A (en) * 1959-12-15 1967-08-29 Du Pont Process for forming non-woven filamentary structures from fiber-forming synthetic organic polymers
US3502763A (en) * 1962-02-03 1970-03-24 Freudenberg Carl Kg Process of producing non-woven fabric fleece
US3146479A (en) * 1962-04-30 1964-09-01 Stoker Annette Ornamental combined nylon net and sponge device for cleaning surfaces
US3110917A (en) * 1962-06-18 1963-11-19 Jr Lewis D Mcpeek Chalk board eraser
US3341394A (en) * 1966-12-21 1967-09-12 Du Pont Sheets of randomly distributed continuous filaments
US3542615A (en) * 1967-06-16 1970-11-24 Monsanto Co Process for producing a nylon non-woven fabric
US3849241A (en) * 1968-12-23 1974-11-19 Exxon Research Engineering Co Non-woven mats by melt blowing
DE2048006B2 (en) * 1969-10-01 1980-10-30 Asahi Kasei Kogyo K.K., Osaka (Japan)
DE1950669C3 (en) * 1969-10-08 1982-05-13 Metallgesellschaft Ag, 6000 Frankfurt, De
US3609789A (en) * 1970-01-12 1971-10-05 Frank W Slater Disposable toothbrush and method of making the same
GB1587411A (en) * 1976-07-22 1981-04-01 Iws Nominee Co Ltd Cleaning pad
US4171169A (en) * 1978-01-03 1979-10-16 Williams Stanley B Hand held washer
US4340563A (en) * 1980-05-05 1982-07-20 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Method for forming nonwoven webs
US4313774A (en) * 1980-07-10 1982-02-02 Wm. E. Hooper & Sons Co. Mophead and method of manufacturing
US4462135A (en) * 1983-01-24 1984-07-31 Sanford Howard R Cleaning and abrasive scrubbers and method for their preparation
US5090832A (en) * 1986-05-12 1992-02-25 Colgate-Palmolive Company Disposable cleaning pad and method
US5069970A (en) * 1989-01-23 1991-12-03 Allied-Signal Inc. Fibers and filters containing said fibers
US4812070A (en) * 1987-05-21 1989-03-14 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Brush and scraper attachment for faucet spray handle
US5162074A (en) * 1987-10-02 1992-11-10 Basf Corporation Method of making plural component fibers
US4951341A (en) * 1989-02-24 1990-08-28 Mary Shears Wall and ceiling mop
US5057368A (en) * 1989-12-21 1991-10-15 Allied-Signal Filaments having trilobal or quadrilobal cross-sections
CH681596A5 (en) * 1990-09-03 1993-04-30 Ulrich P Prof Dr Saxer
US5279015A (en) * 1990-10-19 1994-01-18 Meiring Hercules A Duster
US5277976A (en) * 1991-10-07 1994-01-11 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Oriented profile fibers
US5375287A (en) * 1992-07-27 1994-12-27 Dillahunt; Joan C. Scrub brush for flat and cornered surfaces
US5317779A (en) * 1993-01-11 1994-06-07 Vining Industries, Inc. Utility kitchen brush
US5551115A (en) * 1995-03-20 1996-09-03 Newville; Duane H. Brush head adapted for mechanical or manual engagement
US5626512A (en) * 1995-05-04 1997-05-06 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Scouring articles and process for the manufacture of same
US6233771B1 (en) * 1996-01-26 2001-05-22 The Procter & Gamble Company Stain removal device
US5956792A (en) * 1996-04-29 1999-09-28 Black & Decker, Inc. Hand held motorized cleaning apparatus with linear, orbital and/or dual motion
US5872090A (en) * 1996-10-25 1999-02-16 The Procter & Gamble Company Stain removal with bleach
US5987687A (en) * 1997-02-18 1999-11-23 Kilburn; Jacquelin Handle for a bristle holding portion of a brush
US6085380A (en) * 1997-09-22 2000-07-11 Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc. Bathing implement constructed of looped filaments
US6026534A (en) * 1997-09-22 2000-02-22 Lever Brothers Company Bathing ball
US6019537A (en) * 1998-10-05 2000-02-01 Hunt; Charles Timothy Accessory cleaning system for kitchen faucet hose spray
US6508602B1 (en) * 1999-10-08 2003-01-21 The Procter & Gamble Company Semi-enclosed applicator for distributing a substance onto a target surface
US6227740B1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2001-05-08 Roger K. Stear Scrubbing implement
US6463620B2 (en) * 2001-03-05 2002-10-15 Kandice A. Busha Brush assembly with removable/disposable head

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE8403875U1 (en) * 1984-02-09 1984-05-10 Kolloch, Hardy, 4040 Neuss, De CLEANING DEVICE
US4741941A (en) * 1985-11-04 1988-05-03 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Nonwoven web with projections
US6087279A (en) * 1997-03-12 2000-07-11 Firma Carl Freudenberg Textile material for cleaning applications
US20030104750A1 (en) * 2001-12-19 2003-06-05 Kelly Albert R. Personal care and surface cleaning article
US20040040107A1 (en) * 2002-08-27 2004-03-04 Church & Dwight Co., Inc. Dual functional cleaning article
CA2431336A1 (en) * 2003-06-05 2004-12-05 Texel Inc. Non-woven fabrics useful for hard surface cleaning and body cleansing applications

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2011084309A1 (en) * 2009-12-16 2011-07-14 3M Innovative Properties Company A cleaning material and a cleaning tool

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20060130252A1 (en) 2006-06-22

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
CA2448392C (en) Disposable cleaning sheets comprising a plurality of protrusions for removing debris from surfaces
US7891898B2 (en) Cleaning pad for wet, damp or dry cleaning
US7917985B2 (en) Wipes with hair and large particle pick-up capabilities
US20060272115A1 (en) Disposable cleaning sheets comprising a plurality of protrusions for removing debris from surfaces
US7566671B2 (en) Cleaning or dusting pad
US8851776B2 (en) Amphiphile surface treatment for a cleaning pad for improved dust adhesion
US20060130252A1 (en) Cleaning device
US8657515B2 (en) Cleaning kit including duster and spray
JP2005528945A (en) Melamine foam sheet supplies and manufacturing method thereof
US20090038092A1 (en) Hand held sponge implement
US8931971B2 (en) Cleaning pad impregnated with a volatile liquid for improved dust adhesion
JP2004523258A (en) Adapter plate for cleaning equipment
WO2008055015A2 (en) Hand-held cleaning tool assembly
US20070212157A1 (en) Fringeless cleaning or dusting pad
AU2011232788A1 (en) Cleaning pad

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BW BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE EG ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KM KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NA NG NI NO NZ OM PG PH PL PT RO RU SC SD SE SG SK SL SM SY TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VC VN YU ZA ZM ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GM KE LS MW MZ NA SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HU IE IS IT LT LU LV MC NL PL PT RO SE SI SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
NENP Non-entry into the national phase

Ref country code: DE

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase

Ref document number: 05807660

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1