WO2005090038A2 - Dispenser system with dispenser holster - Google Patents

Dispenser system with dispenser holster

Info

Publication number
WO2005090038A2
WO2005090038A2 PCT/US2005/008324 US2005008324W WO2005090038A2 WO 2005090038 A2 WO2005090038 A2 WO 2005090038A2 US 2005008324 W US2005008324 W US 2005008324W WO 2005090038 A2 WO2005090038 A2 WO 2005090038A2
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
dispenser
cradle
pan
holster
figure
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2005/008324
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2005090038A3 (en )
Inventor
George Bertram
Doug Walker
Original Assignee
Intellipack
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/60Arrangements for mounting, supporting or holding spraying apparatus
    • B05B15/62Arrangements for supporting spraying apparatus, e.g. suction cups
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/50Arrangements for cleaning; Arrangements for preventing deposits, drying-out or blockage; Arrangements for detecting improper discharge caused by the presence of foreign matter
    • B05B15/52Arrangements for cleaning; Arrangements for preventing deposits, drying-out or blockage; Arrangements for detecting improper discharge caused by the presence of foreign matter for removal of clogging particles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/60Arrangements for mounting, supporting or holding spraying apparatus
    • B05B15/62Arrangements for supporting spraying apparatus, e.g. suction cups
    • B05B15/628Arrangements for supporting spraying apparatus, e.g. suction cups of variable length
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/50Arrangements for cleaning; Arrangements for preventing deposits, drying-out or blockage; Arrangements for detecting improper discharge caused by the presence of foreign matter
    • B05B15/55Arrangements for cleaning; Arrangements for preventing deposits, drying-out or blockage; Arrangements for detecting improper discharge caused by the presence of foreign matter using cleaning fluids
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/60Arrangements for mounting, supporting or holding spraying apparatus
    • B05B15/62Arrangements for supporting spraying apparatus, e.g. suction cups
    • B05B15/625Arrangements for supporting spraying apparatus, e.g. suction cups designed to be placed on the ground

Abstract

A dispenser holster assembly having a support structure (89) as in a weighted base plate and a support arm with cantilever upper section which is attached to a cradle (86) for holding a dispenser (12) component within a V-shaped capture recess (90) of the cradle, preferably by way of magnetic attraction between cradle magnet(s) and a component of the motor as in the magnetic material in an electric motor of the dispenser positioned on the top of the dispenser and contacted by the downwardly facing V-shaped recess. The cradle is preferably attached to the support arm with a pivot connection. There is further preferably provided a solvent pan (102) supported by said support structure and a brush reception housing (104) which has multiple brush reception openings that place supported brushes within the solvent in the solvent pan. The solvent pan is supported by a pan holder that has slide rails and there is a pan locking device which holds the pan in place during use. The pan holder also supports the brush reception housing so that the brush device retained by the brush insert are placed in the solvent pool and have exposed bristle faces directly below the cradle. In a method of using the dispenser's motor is magnetically attached to the downwardly facing cradle when parked and the dispenser's tip is scraped on the bristles between uses.

Description

DISPENSER SYSTEM WITH DISPENSER HOLSTER

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS The present application claims priority to US Provisional Patent Application No. 60/552,210, filed March 12, 2004 which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. BACKGROUND A holster and a tool balancer are equipment utilized for hand held dispensing systems both individually and, advantageously, in combination as they interact with each other to enhance system usability. For example, the holsters and tool balancers find use in hand held foam packaging dispenser systems which typically comprise a chemical supply source (typically chemicals that upon mixing generate synthetic foams) such as polyurethane foam, often formed by mixing liquid organic resins and polyisocyanates in a mixing chamber (e.g., a liquid form of isocyanate, which is often referenced in the industry as chemical "A", and a multi-component liquid blend called polyurethane resin, which is often referenced in the industry as chemical "B"). The chemicals supplied from the chemical source are typically delivered along chemical conduit lines through use of a in-barrel or at chemical source pump systems or alternatively a downstream positioned "in-line" pumping system. The chemical conduits feed into a dispenser as in a hand held dispenser as in one that supports a mixing chamber where the chemicals A and B are mixed before being delivered to a desired location as in a receptacle (e.g., a package, mold, bag, product recess, etc.). Between dispensing shots, it is desirable to have a location where the dispenser "gun" can be temporarily retained. Also, because the in feed chemical hoses (which are often heated with electrical resistance means) can be both heavy and cumbersome, tool balancers are utilized as described below. Tool Balance To understand the requirements, limitations, and challenges relating to preferred holster designs which can be used with a tool balancer, an understanding of why a tool balancer mechanism is used and how it works is helpful. One of the tool balancer's functions is to make work easier by offsetting the weight of the dispenser and chemical hoses, which would otherwise be entirely supported by the hands, arms, and/or shoulders of the worker. There are multiple types of conventional tool balancers, although some types that are called tool balancers are more appropriately referred to as retractors. However, as used in the present application the term "tool balancer" is utilized in a broad sense to include, for example, tool retractors, absent an indication to the contrary. A typical conventional tool balancer applies a pulling force to a nylon covered, steel cable that can be extended (e.g., 6 to 9 feet maximum cable extension length) from a hole in a supporting cable supply housing. With no load on the cable, it will retract and rewind fully into the housing, with only its end stop fitting left accessible from the outside of the housing. There is generally provided a rubber or plastic end stop fitting at the working end of the cable to prevent it from pulling all the way inside of the housing, so that the end of the cable is always accessible. The tool balancer unit exerts a retractile force on the cable, and this pulling force is usually adjustable by means of an adjusting screw, shaft, or nut. The cable pull force set for hand-held dispensing applications is usually in the 12 to 20 lb range. When the motive force on the cable is less than the force setting of the balancer, the cable will not extend from the housing. If the motive force on the cable is equal to or greater than the force setting of the balancer, the cable will extend until the pull back force on the cable exceeds the motive force, the cable extends to its maximum limit, or the motive force is reduced. The cable's retractile force will preferably be set to the approximate weight of the items that have to be supported. Ideally, the retractile force will be constant over the full range of cable extension. However, in actuality, the retractile force will increase slightly as the cable is extended. In addition, the retractile force of balancers often have a dead-band in the one-pound range, which means that the cable will not extend unless the motive force is one pound greater than the setpoint retractile force of the balancer. Similarly, it is often the case that the cable will not retract unless the motive force is one pound less than the setpoint retractile force of the unit. In a majority of hand-held system installations, even though most people call them tool balancers, there is in fact being used what is more appropriately properly called a "retractor". Retractors are very similar to "true tool balancers" in that they both have an extendable and retractable cable that can be pulled out of a typically disc shaped housing. Retractors are typically thinner in cross section, because they do not employ the conical spring mechanism employed in a "true" tool balancer, and thus are generally less expensive than true tool balancers. Tool Balancers have means for providing a compensating force relative to the cable retraction means and thus provide a more constant retractile force over the entire length of cable extension than retractors. This constant retractile force profile is the result of, for example, a large conical spring mechanism compensating for the spring constant of the coil spring that provides the retractile force. Without the compensation factor of the conical design of the spring mechanism, a tool balancer would have the same retractile force versus extension distance profile as a retractor. A properly set tool balancer will make the attached tool feel almost weightless to the operator at any length of cable extension. Thus, if the operator moves the tool and extends the cable, and then releases the tool, the tool will stay at about the same height as where it was released, as long as the supported weight of the tool does not change with its orientation. Retractors provide a pull force that gradually increases as the cable is extended. This is analogous to the linear force versus distance profile of a standard coil spring. If an operator is extending the cable from the retractor housing, the retractile force will gradually increase in direct proportion to the length of extension. If the operator releases the tool, the retractor cable will try to pull back to its original position at which the weight of the tool is exactly balanced by the pull of the cable, minus whatever frictional loads exist in the mechanism. The combined weight of the components that must be supported by the balancer (the dispenser, the chemical hoses themselves, the hose hanger assembly, the heater wires that are installed inside of the hoses and the chemical that fills them) can easily exceed 20 lbs. The tool balancer is usually hung from a fixed point on the ceiling, which is not always directly above a holster used to hold a dispending gun between dispensing modes. The tool balancer is usually hung by a chain or cable, from a fixed point on the ceiling, and will usually be hung 8 to 10 feet off the floor. Its cable hangs down and connects to a hose hanger bracket that supports a section of the hoses. The hose hanger bracket is designed to support an upper curved section which is suspended below the bracket section of hoses that run through the hanger. The spring mechanism inside of the tool balancer housing is set to retract with approximately the same force as the opposing load that results from gravity acting on the mass of the hoses and dispenser. If perfectly adjusted and set, the tool balancer allows the dispenser to hang in space at any given vertical distance from the floor or workbench, when released by the hand of the user. Holster Holsters are useful devices for use with hand held dispenser (e.g., a urethane foam dispenser) in that they provide facilitating functions such as providing a mechanism for removing the urethane residues that tend to harden on and around the tip of the dispenser. In addition, they provide a secure, out-of-the-way place to "park" the dispenser when not in use. The removal of residues from the dispensers tip (which can be defined as the place at which the liquid stream comprised of the (two) mixed chemicals departs the dispenser) is required as the residue (e.g., urethane) quickly builds up and can harden rapidly on the tip (e.g., after a few minutes), if not removed or solvated. If this residue build-up is allowed to harden, it will negatively affect the output of the dispenser, as in causing it to spray and break up from the ideal "pencil pour" output stream, within a dozen shots or so. Eventually, if the spraying is ignored and the tip build-up is not removed, serious disruption of the pour pattern can occur. In the worst-case, the foam stream can actually shoot sideways, creating a major mess in the customer's facility. This worst-case scenario can occur in as few as 15 shots, if sufficient time is allowed between shots for hardening to occur, and no solvents or mechanical cleaning methods are employed. Standard holster designs, past and present, employ solvent to soften and partially dissolve the urethane build-up that forms on and around the tip. However, solvents alone are not typically sufficient for acceptable tip cleaning, and it if often been necessary to manually scrape, scratch or cut the softened residue from the tip in order to clean it adequately. If the dispenser tip is immersed in solvent immediately after a shot, before the residue has a chance to harden, the solvent will prevent the urethane on the tip from solidifying, which is beneficial. Immediate immersion makes the build-up much easier to remove with whatever abrasive device is employed in the holster. If the operator procrastinates, and the build-up gets a chance to harden, the solvent soak will gradually soften it, again making it easier to remove via scrapping. The solvents used in the early days of this industry were significantly more potent than those being used today, and they worked well to soften the buildup so that an operator could scrape it off with minimal effort. Today's solvents are milder, because of more restrictive environmental, health and safety standards, and do not have the same cleaning power, which makes the mechanical aspect of tip cleaning more important. Previously the tips were scratched clean on an abrasive "Scotch-Brite® pad of 3M of St. Paul, Minnesota, USA". This method was greatly improved by switching to a stainless steel, short bristle brush. The brush works best if it is immersed in the solvent bath, which greatly extends the life of the brush, because the solvent prevents the bristles from being clogged with hardened urethane. The urethane residues that collect in the bristles of the brush are prevented from hardening, or softened if they are already hard, by the solvent in the bath. Dry brushes, not immersed in solvent, cake with the hardened urethane residues very quickly, and become useless in short order. These tough, steel bristle brushes last much longer than the Scotch-Brite® style pads, which were shredded and torn by the hardened urethane, and were replaced so often that they were considered a disposable item. The stainless steel bristle brushes, last many times longer than the Scotch-Brite® style pads because they are tougher than the urethane build-up, and are easily cleanable if immersed in solvent. With proper use and cleaning, a steel brush assembly can survive for more than a year in a normal use situation. For additional background discussion concerning dispenser tip cleaning, reference is made to PCT Application No. PCT/US2004/14392 filed May 7, 2004 and US Patent Appln. No. 10/623,858 filed July 22, 2003, each of which are incoiporated herein by reference. The holster's other job, and the one that gives the holster its title, is to make available a secure parking place for the dispenser when it is not in use. Holsters have been assembled with various pockets, slots, or brackets that were designed to capture the dispenser manifold in order to hold the dispenser and its hoses away from where the operator is working. Without some means of parking the dispenser, the dispenser can swing like a pendulum, and present an obstruction to efficient workflow, or even a safety hazard. Early holsters were designed to park the dispenser so that the face of the manifold and the tip were immersed in the solvent. This approach was intended to let the tip soak in solvent for long periods, in order to soften the build-up to make it easier to remove. On units of this type, the parking means were designed so that the dispenser would be securely held in such a position so that the face and tip were immersed. Because of the constant immersion, the dispenser would have a tendency to drip solvent when it was removed from the holster for use. These solvent drips are undesirable because they would often contaminate the place of work, the packaging materials being used, and even the products being packaged. Later versions of the holster were designed to park the dispenser above or away from the solvent reservoir. This gives the dispenser an opportunity to dry off via evaporation and drip-dry, prior to the operator having to use it again, minimizing the tendency of the dispenser to drip solvent in the work area while being moved around. The new design did not solve the problem completely, but it did help to reduce the amount of solvent drip. The park- above-the-solvent feature was introduced at the same time as the steel bristle brush and became feasible because it was no longer necessary to soak the tip for extended periods in order to clean it adequately. However, conventional parking schemes have not worked very well due to problems that stem from the mechanics of the situation, such as, tool balancer characteristics, and lack of a means to deal with side loads and/or pull back loads that naturally occur in the setup. More often than not, the dispenser will be hung in a location that is not directly above the holster. This causes a horizontal force component, due to the weight of the chemical hoses, on the dispenser that must be counteracted by something in the holster if the parking feature is to be successful. Often times, this side load will pull the dispenser completely out of the parking mechanism, making the parking feature unusable. In addition, the dispenser and its tool balancer may not be oriented so that it can easily reach the holster area without extending the cable, which results in an increase in the pull back force, which tends to pull the dispenser out of its moorings. With current holster designs, many factors have to be considered in the setup in order for the parking feature to work properly. In actual installations, one or more of these factors will often cause the dispenser to break loose from its parked location. Often times, the setup of the system and its holster is such that the operator will never be able to use it for parking or not be inclined to use it for its intended use. Conventional holster system include a holster mount that uses screws to attach the holster (e.g., screwed down side flanges of a slideout solvent pan support with wire brush and cradle to park the dispenser) to the work surface. Usually these are wood screws that fasten down a flanged portion of the holster to a table or bench top. This is necessary to prevent the holster from being knocked or tipped over, which would result in a messy solvent spill. As a result, the holster is immobilized, which is a disadvantage if the work position is moved or reoriented for any reason. In addition, there is work required to install the holster, involving tools and fasteners. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Some features and benefits of preferred embodiments of the holster design of the present invention are summarized below. In an embodiment of the invention there is provided a reduced maintenance benefit through use of a dual brush system, as in one employing two wire bristle brushes (e.g., steel brushes). This is in place of current designs using only one brush and provide reduced maintenance as life of the holster is extended (e.g., doubled). While the dual brush system also provides for increased solvent volume (e.g., either through use of two individual pans sized for the brushes or a common large volume pan sized for the brush pair begin used with a single handle held dispenser. Also, if one brush were to become excessively worn or contaminated, the second is utilizable to prevent line down time while the defective one is serviced or replaced. In a preferred embodiment the solvent volume is at least doubled from current designs. The dual brush system also means that depletio from evaporation and dripping (solvent drip from the face of the dispenser will not deplete solvent volume if it flows back into the solvent pan, but is lost when it drips onto other parts of the work area) will have a lesser effect on cleaning performance because of the increased volume. An increased capacity for dissolved residue and gunk is also provided as, over usage time, the solvent loses its effectiveness, as the urethane based tip residue is dissolved into the solution (e.g., one pan will have, for example, only half the contamination, it its equally used with the other pan brush). An additional benefit featured under the subject mater of the present invention is the case in the dispenser can be properly parked in the holster. For example, through use of a preferred V-Shaped Cradle that preferably comprises a magnetic cradle, and more preferably a magnetic cradle that takes advantage of the magnetic attraction characteristic of a component of the dispenser being parked (e.g., an electric motor's magnetic attraction characteristic). The cradle design is preferably inherently self-centering via the V-shaped cradle design, making it easier to position the dispenser for parking. There is also reduced the fine motor control required from the operator to park: the dispenser, as the magnetic force pulls or draws the dispenser into proper position. In addition, the operator does not have to precisely and carefully position the dispenser for proper parking, as in the mechanical cradles of current designs. Instead, in a preferred combination, the operator need merely place the dispenser motor into close proximity to the V-shaped cradle, and the magnets will finish the job by pulling the motor into parked position. A preferred embodiment of the invention also includes a hinged cradle which provides, for example, an adjustment function as to the tilt angle of the V-shaped cradle to optimize a contact angle with dispenser motor or some other characteristic of the dispenser being parked. A preferred embodiment of the subject matter of the invention includes a weighted holster base that allows the user to easily reposition without tools the holster on the work surface to optimal position for easy access, and yet provides sufficient location maintenance during usage of the dispensing system at a desired location. In an embodiment featuring a magnetic cradle under the present invention, there is preferably utilized one that takes advantage of a magnetic quality in the dispensing gun to provide a highly effective hold down arcangement. For example, a significant improvement over the crude, ineffective, mechanical cradles of past holder deigns, includes an embodiment of the present invention that takes advantage of the iron in the rotor of the motor, and the often found Samarium Cobalt magnets in the stator of the motor assembly (e.g., an electric brush motor). These materials, which are already present in the dispenser motor, interact with the magnets in the cradle to create the holding force. In addition, there is preferably used in the cradle high strength magnets as in a rare earth magnet such as those composed of alloys of the Lanthanide group of elements. The two Lanthanide elements most prevalent in the production of permanent magnets are Neodymium and Samarium. There are numerous alloy formulations of rare earth magnets covered under many different patents but the most common commercial varieties are Neodymium-Iron-Boron (NdFeB) and Samarium Cobalt (SmCo) which are preferred choices for the cradle magnet (e.g., a block magnet of the same). Rare earth magnets are available in sintered and bonded forms. Sintered magnets are a type of ceramic composed of the compressed powder of the alloy material being used. Sintering involves the compaction of fine alloy powder in a die and then fusing the powder into a solid material. While the sintered magnets are solid, their physical properties are more similar to a ceramic and are easily broken and chipped. Bonded magnets use a polymer base to hold the alloy powder together. The energy product of bonded magnets is much lower than that of the sintered magnets. Sintered NdFeB magnets are generally plated or coated with a material to prevent corrosion. There are various coatings available. Nickel-Copper-Nickel plating has excellent corrosion resistance and durability as well as providing an clean and shiny appearance. A preferred embodiment of the present invention is a sintered Neodymium-Iron- Boron magnets plated in Nickel-Copper-Nickel although polymer base magnets are also featured under the inventive subject matter. A suitable protective casing can also be utilized as in a pocket recess in the holster to protect the magnet. The magnetic attraction between the dispenser motor and the magnets in the cradle is strong enough to resist the expected range of pull forces generated by the tool balancer in a normal installation. This force tends to pull the dispenser away from mechanical style cradles, unless everything is in near perfect balance, which is often not the case. A magnet grade range of 30 to 40 is preferred as in 35 ± 2 (e.g., a Neodymium grade 37 magnet). When the magnetic attraction is combined with the V-Shaped cradle under a preferred embodiment of the invention, the dispenser is held tenaciously to the cradle when properly set-up. Also, the positive magnetic grip of the V-shaped cradle resists the side load of the hoses that often tend to rotate the dispenser out of the cradle and the magnetic grip of the V- shaped cradle also resists the upward pull of the tool balancer that often tends to pull the dispenser out of the cradle. In addition, with an added hinged cradle feature, one can adjust tilt angle of the V-shaped cradle to optimize contact angle with a dispenser contact component as in a dispenser motor to enhance the cradle's magnetic grip on the dispenser. Further, with a weighted holster base the user can reposition the holster on the work surface to optimize its orientation and location to enhance the cradle's magnetic grip on the motor. An additional feature in a preferred embodiment of the present invention is the ease in disengaging the dispenser from its parked position. That is, even though the magnetic hold of the cradle (e.g., a V-shaped cradle) is strong, the attraction level is set such that the operator can still relatively easily overcome it under the preferred holster set up. For example, a preferred holster set up allows for an operator to use the dispenser handle as a lever to rotate the motor about its rear contact point on the cradle. This creates a mechanical advantage, which amplifies the force that the worker applies to the handle, to ease disengagement. The ease of use available in this preferred embodiment results in noticeable improvements to production efficiency. Also, in designing the holster, the magnet force of the cradle can be increased or decreased quite easily. This is true because there is sufficient space to use larger or more magnets (e.g., a larger or multiple similarly located Neodymium magnet) or higher attraction force magnets if the designer wants to increase holding power. Of course, the force can easily be reduced by using smaller or weaker magnets, or by simply repositioning the cradle magnets farther away from the motor. An additional feature of a preferred embodiment of the present invention lies in holster mobility and ease of installation. In one embodiment there is utilized weighted holster base sufficient to retain holster positioning during usage but also providing the holster with a degree of mobility and which is a position stabilizing means that is free of any fasteners or the like and thus free of a need to unfasten from a current resting position. Preferably the weighted holster is also provided with (e.g., Silicone rubber) anti-skid pads. The base stability is enhanced through use of a wide base as in a 25 lb steel plate forming the bottom base of the holster. The wide base also provides stability so that it will not tip over easily. The base has pads (e.g., high resistance silicone rubber) secured (e.g., glued) to the bottom surface to provide anti-skidding means. The heavy base with (silicone) anti-skid pads eliminates need for wood screws, which were required for previous holster designs, to secure them to a table or workbench. The base also thus reduces installation time, and eliminates the need for tools, screws, or other hardware. This combination of features allows the new holster to be very mobile. The holster can be repositioned as the job requirements change, or if the system has to be relocated. A preferred embodiment of the invention also provides a cradle support that has an arm option for left or right hand operation. The cradle support arm on the new holster preferably has two positions, one for a right-handed operator and one for a left-handed operator, through, for example, a modification that can be easily made as in removing two fasteners (e.g., socket head screws or head manipulateable threaded bolts with grip handle or wing-nuts, etc.) that hold the support arm to the holster base, and reinstalling the arm with the same two screws to the other side of the base.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Figure 1 shows a dispenser system featuring a hand held dispenser and means for supporting and means for supplying drive power and means for supplying dispenser material to the hand held dispenser. Figure 2 shows a closer view of the hand held dispenser with the chemical and electrical supply lines shown in cut-away fashion. Figure 3 shows a front perspective view of the hand held dispenser of Figure 2. Figure 4 shows, in front perspective, a preferred embodiment of a holster of the present invention. Figure 5 shows, in rear perspective, the holster. Figure 6 shows an exploded view of the holster. Figure 7 shows a similar view as that of Figure 4 with a parked dispenser. Figure 8 shows a rear perspective view of that which is shown in Figure 7. Figure 9 shows a view of the support ann. Figure 10 shows an exploded view of the support arm. Figure 11 shows a view of the cradle.

Figure 12 shows an exploded view of the cradle.

Figure 13 shows a end view of the cradle.

Figure 14 shows a cross-sectional view along cross-section line X-X in Figure 11. Figure 15 shows a perspective view of the brush holder insert.

Figure 16 shows a bottom view of the brush holder insert.

Figure 17 shows an exploded view of the brush holder insert.

Figure 18 shows a perspective view of the base platform.

Figure 19 shows a top plan view of the base platform. Figure 20 shows an end view of the illustrated rectangular base platform.

Figure 21 shows a perspective view of the magnet support main body of the cradle.

Figure 22 shows an end view of the main cradle body.

Figure 23 shows a side view of the cradle body.

Figure 24 shows a top plan view of the cradle body. Figures 25 and 26 provided alternate perspective views of the cradle body.

Figure 27 shows a top plan view of the magnet support block.

Figure 28 shows a cross sectional view of the support block.

Figure 29 shows a bottom plan view of the support block.

Figure 30 shows an end view of the support block. Figure 31 shows a top perspective view of the support block.

Figure 31 A shows a bottom perspective view of the support block.

Figure 3 IB shows the opposite side support block.

Figure 32 shows a bottom perspective view of the pan holder.

Figure 33 shows an under view of the pan holder. Figure 34 shows a rear elevational view of the pan holder. Figure 35 shows a cross-sectional view along cross section line XI-XI in Figure 34. Figure 36 shows a cut out blank metal sheet with fold pattern lines for forming the pan holder. Figure 37 shows a blank for forming a slide rail. Figure 38 shows a brush in perspective. Figure 39 shows a top plan view of the brush. Figure 40 shows a side elevatonal view of the brush. Figure 41 shows an end view of the brush. Figure 42 shows a blank used in forming a brush holder. Figures 43 to 46 show various views of the pan position locking device. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The following disclosure describes various renderings of preferred embodiments of a holster assembly for a dispenser system as in a hand held dispenser system (e.g., a urethane foam packaging dispensing system). Figure 1 shows dispenser system 10 which is illustrative of a dispensing system that finds advantages in utilizing a dispenser holster assembly as in holster assembly 80 in Figure 4 Dispenser system 10 is shown as having hand held dispenser 12, means for supporting the hand held dispenser 14 and base unit 16. In the illustrated embodiment, base unit 16 provides a housing for components of the supply means for providing a supply of dispenser material to the hand held dispenser. For example, base unit 16 houses a pump system as in a pair of "inline" pump assemblies such as the gerotor pumps exemplified in PCT publication WO 2004/101245 to IntelliPack of Tulsa Oklahoma, USA. These pumps (not shown) receive foam precursor chemical from chemical source lines 22, 24 feeding into base unit 16 and connected at origination end to chemical A and chemical B sources as in chemical drums or larger containers. Various other chemical feed systems for feeding chemical to, from and/or through base unit 16 are also featured as in an "in-barrel" system exemplified by Figure 5 of US Patent No. 5,996,848 to Charles Sperry. Base unit 16 also preferably houses the electronics as in the overall system's power board and control system (e.g., processor boards), chemical filtering means, power supply lines, chemical conduit manifolds and pressure sensors, etc. As seen from Figure 1, heated (e.g., 110 F to 140 F) and pressurized (e.g., at a pressure of 150 psi to 400 psi) chemical is fed through chemical dispenser supply hoses 28, 30 that extend out from the base unit are threaded through hollow or internally recessed mast 36 and extend out of mast apertures 38 and then on to the rear end of dispenser 12. Extending along together with chemical feed hoses 28, 30 is power supply conduit 29 which, in the illustrated embodiment, comprises electrical "umbilical" cabling. Attached to mast 36 is control unit interface 26 having means 27 for setting various parameters of the dispenser system 10 through communication with a processor or other control means preferably contained in base unit 16 (e.g., heated hose or dispenser manifold temperature and pressure settings and real time sensed levels). Figure 1 further shows boom 34 extending out from the top of mast 36 as part of support means 14 as well as hose hanger 32 receiving chemical feed hoses 28, 29 and electrical feed line supply 30. Hose hanger 32 includes a curving reception groove and is connected to a retraction or tool balancer mechanism 37 to provide for suspension of the hose in a balanced setting so that the operator can freely manipulate the hand held dispenser into a desired position relative to the container 20 represented by a box in Figure 1 , but can take on a variety of forms as in molds, bags, recessed product surfaces, and other foam reception receptacles. In addition, Figure 1 illustrates container support 18 which in the illustrated embodiment is a fixed platform, but can take on a variety of forms as in a conveyor system, a rotating mold die turntable, or other container support means. Figure 2 shows a closer view of a prefen-ed hand held dispenser 12 for use with the holster assembly 80 of the present invention (e.g., reference being made to US Provisional Appln. 60/552,207 which describes in greater detail dispenser 12 and which application is incorporated by reference). As shown, dispenser 12 includes handle assembly 39 which includes grasp handle 40 and trigger boot 42 covering trigger assembly 43. Secured to the upper end of grasp handle 40 is manifold assembly 44 which includes manifold 47 which converges along its axis of elongation from rear end 53 to its forward most dispensing end 490. The larger rear end 53 has a reception region for the chemical "A" and "B" valve assemblies with shut off valve handles 54 and 56. Between front end 490 and the intermediate border wall 51, which delineates the enlarged rear valve reception area from the streamlined front extension 55 of manifold 47, there is provided a centralized, upper recess 45 in which is received mixing module 46. Main transmission housing 49 extends within recess 45 The wing extensions 69 and 71 have at least an upper surface extending down and out from respective upper recess wall edges to provide a cross-sectionally converging wing section in manifold 47 and the wing extensions fiirther preferably included a curving edge both in cross section and the outer edge of elongation. Within wing extensions 69, 71 there is provided chemical passageways that lead to the mixing module near their end. The front end of the mixing module includes tip 50. Purging rod 510 is also shown extending out from the central exit passageway formed in tip 50. Solvent access port plug 48 is also illustrated in Figure 2 for solvent supply access as well as transmission cover 58 having a forward wall shown in direct contact with the rear of transmission housing 49. The housing 49 side wall edges are designed to provide a no gap, essentially seamless transition relative to the contacted section of the underlying portion of rear end 53 of the manifold assembly and the adjacent cover 58 and mixing module 46. The rear edge of transmission cover 58 also transcends in an essentially seamless fashion with motor cover 60 having a matching curvature/diameter with the contacting portion of transmission cover 56. Motor cover 60 also has side wall lower edging designed to conform to the rear end portion of manifold 47 with motor cover 60 also extending out in cantilever fashion away from the rear end of the manifold 47. Figure 3 shows a perspective view (opposite side as that shown in Figure 2) of the hand held dispenser 12 free of connected chemical and electrical supply lines 28, 29 and 30. In figure 2 there can be seen swivel fitting 62 extend out way from the rear wall of the rear end 53 of the manifold just upstream (in direct chemical feed relationship) of the valve assembly casing 53 having shut off handle 54. Figure 3 shows the opposite side swivel fitting 64 designed for connection with chemical feed hose 30 and also sharing a similar relationship with the valve assembly having shutoff handle 56. Figures 4 to 6 show front and rear perspective views and an exploded view of a preferred holster assembly 80 of the present invention. Holster assembly 80 comprises a holster base 82 that is preferably sufficiently heavy and of sufficient base dimension as to avoid tippage of the holster during norøial usage of the holster. A base unit having a greater than 1 square foot footprint (e.g., a surface area of 1 to 8 square feet (e.g. a 1 foot sided square plate), height of 1 to 3 inches and a weight in excess of 20 lb (e.g., a 25 -35 lb steel plate) is deemed sufficient to preclude tippage for a preferred dispensing system set up. The illustrated L-shaped holster support arm 84 extends up off the base and has a free end for supporting holster cradle 86 which has capture area exposed surface 88 (continuous or more preferably broken up into two surface section with a centralized slot) defining cavity 90 (preferably V-shaped) that faces down toward the base rather than up as in the prior art cradles (e.g., a cradle with an upward angle of 30 to 60 degrees from the horizontal with the cavity surface 88 on the underside). Support arm 84 with attached cradle 86 is also preferably multi-positionable relative to the base to, for example, accommodate left and right hand users. As shown, there is provided multiple arm securement locations 92 fastener reception locations (e.g., two - see the two pairs of bolt fastener apertures aligned with the two different brush pad pan depressions) which, with the releasable securement means 94 (e.g., a pair of screw fasteners for extension though aperture sets 92, 92' and into the threaded base 96 of arm 84 of into associated with the holster support arm provides for multi-positioning of the arm and cradle as shown or alternate securement means as in key-slot with twist in base or vice versa, as well as other means of securing the arm securely during operation while allowing for ready release and movement to a new location(s) on the base). As further shown in Figure 6 on the underside of the base there is provided enhanced friction anti-slip means 98 as in one or more (four corner pads shown) rubber or elastomeric pads or posts. As the holster is preferably free of any mechanical or adhesive fastening device for fastening to an underlying support, the user can readily pick up the holster assembly 80 and move to a new desired location without the user having to spend the time of releasing mechanical fasteners and/or a strong adhesive bond (e.g., the present invention can include a friction enhancing tacky adhesive surface which is not considered an adhesive holding bond under the context of the present invention). Rather than providing a separate friction enhancing pad, an elastomeric or other high friction material/surface can be applied, as for example a sprayed coating or an integrated material in the base itself. Figure 6 further illustrates holster pan holder 100 which is dimensioned as a holder for a solvent pan 102 and holster brash insert 104. Pan holder 100 is secured to the upper surface of the base plate through use of suitable fastening means 106 as in hand grip fasteners or tool reliant fasteners (e.g., a set of screws). Pan holder 100 is preferably formed with an upper rim ring 108, opposite sides 110, 112, an open front and back 114, 116 and flanges 118, 120 extending outwardly at the base of sides 110, 112 and through which fastening means 106 can extend in fastening pan holder 100 to base 82. Pan holder is preferably formed from a flat sheet of sheet metal that is manipulated into the described configuration. Figures 4 to 6 further illustrate pan lock device 122 which includes lock down device 124 which in a preferred embodiment is a knob fastener which is readily releasable in a tool-less manner. Locking base 126 has a first fastener section (e.g., a threaded upper aperture section which is designed to receive lock down device 124) and a pan retention section 130 as shown in

Figure 6 (e.g., a lipped section with groove to retain a turned down flange portion of the pan 102). Pan holder 100 includes pan slide retention means 128, 128' (e.g., inwardly extending side rails on respective interior surfaces of side walls which are designed to underlie and support corresponding peripheral pan flange sections 132, 134 (e.g., sections of a continuous, upper peripheral flange 133) so that the pan 102 is suspended by the holder and preferably slideable out in a direction toward the user (out of front opening 114)). Pan 102 is designed to receive a pool of solvent and holder brush insert 104 which has left and right brush pads 136, 138 that, in use, are preferably at least partly submerged in the solvent pool in the pan to avoid build up between the bristles. Holder brash insert 104 preferably is a unitary structure formed of, for example, a manipulated sheet metal panel that is provided with end capture extensions 140, 142 designed to overhang the corresponding pan ends (e.g., L-shaped wings 144 with vertical wall and outwardly hook or flanged upper catch ends 145 for resting on an upper surface of the pan and preferably of a common width so as to also be receivable over and supported by the rails 128, 128'). Insert 104 is shown provided with capture extension suspended main body 146 having peripheral border region 147 and intermediate section 148 that together define left and right brush insert reception cavities or cut-outs 150, 152 receiving brash inserts 136, 138. Main body 146 also includes fixing means 154, 156 for fixing brush inserts 136, 138 in position within cavities 150, 152. In a preferred embodiment fixing means 154 include fasteners that extend through down panels 156, 158 (left and right side walls for each cavity) and into the base 164 of brash inserts or brashes 136, 138 with end down panels 160, 162 also shown free of fasteners, although fasteners 154 can be put in the end walls as well. Also, fonnation of the cavities 150, 152 is preferably by way of manipulating a monolithic panel main body, with that single panel being cut and bent into its final configuration region. This manipulation also is utilizable to form positioning wall assembly 166 featuring tabbed downward extension surrounding pan lock device 122. Alternate brush fixing means include, for example, configuration of the down walls to provide inwardly bent catches or converging, downwardly turned panel sections which either frictionally retain and/or enter recess in the base or backbone of brushes 136, 138. Figures 7 and 8 provide views of holster assembly with dispenser 12 parked or held in stable position in holster cradle 86 (not inadvertently releasable during normal operation or subject to movement once properly positioned within holster cradle 86). In a preferred embodiment of the invention, cradle 86 is supported on the free end 168 of support arm 84 and more preferably is supported on pivot connection 170 which allows for manipulation of cradle 86 so as to increase and decrease angle such that the downwardly exposed recessed face 88 of cradle 86 can be adjusted to best suit the environmental best parking characteristics. This angle preferably varies from 90 degrees (the back wall 172 of cradle 86 being vertical and transverse to a horizontal plane extending through the pivot axis of pivot connection 170 to 180 degrees as in back wall 172 being essentially parallel with that horizontal plane). An angle range for the pivoting cradle of 110° to 160° is illustrative of a preferred usage range. Pivot connection 170 is also one that stays in the set angle position between adjustment. Figure 7 also illustrates a preferred arrangement wherein the component of dispenser 12 that is received in cradle 86 is an upper (in dispensing use) and mid to rear structure of the dispenser as in the illustrated motor cover 60 (as in a cylindrical motor cover body mounted in rearward extending cantilever fashion off away from the rear end of the supporting manifold 47 at the top of the dispenser). For example, as shown in Figure 7 motor cover 60 is preferably received such that its upper half surface bi-sect line BL (e.g. upper half cylinder for the cylindrical motor cover illustrated) is flush or within 1 to 2 cm of a plane contacting the underside opposite side corner edges of cradle 86 (for example, the contacting body of dispenser 12 being at least half in the cradle cavity). As further shown in Figure 7, contact points PI and P2 are preferably equally situated along the two side legs of exterior surface 88 defining the V-shaped recess. Also, when the motor cover 60 is properly received as shown, a preferred width wise symmetrical dispenser is bisected by a plane passing transverse to bi-sect line BL and midway between points PI and P2. Figures 9 and 10 illustrate the holster support arm 84 shown extending from the base in Figure 1. As seen from these figures, the holster support arm preferably has an upside down L-shape with more vertical leg section 174 (e.g., extending transverse to base upper surface) and more horizontal section 176 (e.g., horizontal to plus 60 degrees up from horizontal) extending off in cantilever fashion from the upper portion of leg section 174 to free end 168. The vertical portion's base 96 is releasably fixed to the base edge as previously described. Preferably the upper end of the vertical portion 174 has a forward notched section 178 for receipt of the outwardly extending more horizontal than vertical arm section 176 with the combination being fixed in position with the two fasteners 180 extending through the vertical back wall of notched section 178. The free end 168 of the extending arm section includes stepped section 182 that threadably receives one half of pivot connection 170, the other half being secured to cradle 86. Pivot connection 170 provides engagement means for the cradle and helps position the cradle such that upon attachment of the dispensing gun the tip of the gun is facing down and dripping solvent from the tip drips into the solvent pool preferably on to the bristles or other mechanical contact build up removal means. As explained below, for gun attachment there is preferably utilized a magnetic attachment, although other releasable attachment means are featured under the present invention as in hook and loop (corresponding VELCRO material) patches; however, relative to avoiding contamination build up, durability and smoother attachment and detachment a magnetic attachment is preferable to a hook and loop attachment. The attachment means utilized also should be sufficient to provide for the suspension of the gun in a region above the base plate and solvent pool and brashes and with the nozzle tip in free space so as avoid direct nozzle contact with the pool of solvent and provide for drip off into the solvent back into a solvent pool. The magnetic attraction or other attraction providing means thus should be sufficient to accommodate the suspended weight of the gun and any pull force (any direction) of a tool balancer, and yet still provide smooth operator attachment and detachment. In a preferred embodiment the magnets are attracted to the ferrous components of the dispenser guns motor so that no additional component needs to be added relative to the gun itself for the second part of the two part magnetic attraction means, which is a further benefit of a magnetic attraction attachment means, in that, use is made of a preexisting dispenser component. Figures 11 and 12 show a perspective and exploded view of a preferred embodiment of cradle 86 comprising main cradle body 186 generally featuring a U-shaped configuration, with a pair of downwardly and inwardly tapering walls 188, 190 representing the legs of the U-shaped main body. The tapering walls include upper and lower horizontal and vertical straight wall sections 192, 195 which are designed for mating with the magnet housings 194, 196 which are fastened in place on the tapered walls in laminate fashion and which have upper smooth contouring to avoid any sharp exterior cornering. The contact side of the magnet housing have reception cavities 197, 199 that have a base defined by a thinner segment of the magnet holders and in which are placed the magnets 198, 200. Thus the magnets have a surface that is covered over by a thin sheet of the holder material (preferably non-ferrous or non-disruptive to the magnetic field generated) and thicker portion(s) of the magnet holder provide a location for fasteners to the cradle main body, as seen from Fig. 14. The upper end 203 of the cradle is open ended for ease of downward insertion of the dispenser gun (e.g., the downward insertion of the cylindrical motor housing portion of the dispenser gun into the V-shaped cradle cavity). At the opposite, lower end of the cradle there is preferably positioned cradle stop 204 which blocks off the opposite open end and thus can abut the lower end of the motor housing (or some other inserted portion of the gun) and preclude improper positioning of the dispensing gun as well as any too extensive magnetic sliding action. Figures 12 and 14 also shows cradle stop 204 sandwiched between the end of the cradle main body 186 and adjustable connector 170 provided for connecting the cradle to the free end of the support arm. In a preferred embodiment a hinge mechanism is provided which also preferably is provided with a limited range of angle movement which, for example, provides for a range of 30 degrees off the horizontal with a rotation toward the support arm of 150 degrees or so such that the cradle is upwardly exposed and supported at the top of the support arm for servicing (e.g., cleaning) or the like. The weight of the dispenser gun will maintain the cradle in the desired holding position between usages and the hinge mechanism is preferably designed (e.g., friction or releasable mechanical stops or biasing means) to preclude too free a movement during attachment and removal of the gun from the cradle. Figures 15 to 17 show top, bottom and an exploded view of a preferred brash insert.

As seen, the brush insert has a foundation with a planar section and two upwardly extending hook segments at each end with the hook segments having a vertical component and a more horizontal contact flange component. Thus, upon insertion of the foundation into the base pan the foundation is suspended within the solvent pool provided to the pan. Figures 15 to 17 also illustrate downwardly turned cut out sections which define and extend about the periphery of the brash insert holes. Figure 17 also illustrates a preferred manner of attaching the bristle brashes in place with the base block of the bristle brushes 3 being provided with threaded apertures which align with apertures in one or more of the downwardly directed cutout flanges (e.g., 156, 158) such that the illustrated fasteners can secure the two brashes to the foundation with their bristles upwardly extending. This manner of attachment also allows for free flow of solvent about the open edges of the stubbed, V-shaped downwardly extending flanges. Various other bristle support means can also be utilized but the foregoing provides a highly efficient use of materials in that a common sheet of metal or the like can be bent following a cutting operation to form the foundation with fastener drill holes provided in the bent flanges (before manipulation or after) or reliance can be placed on the spring or retention effect of the downwardly turned flanges placed in abutment with the brashes with or without indents. Figures 18 to 20 show a perspective, top planar and side and end elevational view of a preferred base plate 82. As seen, the base plate is relatively thick (e.g., a half inch +/- a quarter inch or greater) and of a relatively heavy material as in steel to give a stable base weight as in 20 to 30 pounds (more weight is possible but not typically necessary and would degrade ease in user carrier mobility). The base plate further is provided with a plurality of support arm fastener locations 92, 92' as in the illustrated left and right fastener aperture pairs provided on one edge of the generally square configured plate. Figures 21 to 26 show various views of a prefened attachment cradle main body 186 of the present invention. The cradle's main body is preferably formed of a low carbon steel and is provided with a central flat recess 208 closing off* the V-cavity defined by the downwardly tapering walls 188, 190 and with these walls having a series of grooves 210 spaced apart along the exposed wall surface. Each end of the exposed tapered walls is also preferably provided with fastener holes 206 for fastening of the below described magnet housings. In addition, one end of the main cradle body has fastener hole sets 212 on the leg portions of the U-shaped cradle body for securement of the stop plate 204 and the hinged holder 170 described above and below. Figures 27 to 32 show various views of first magnet housing 194 and Figure 33 shows second magnet housing 196 (same as 194 but for the illustrated shift in magnet reception slot 214 to 214') for attachment to the above described tapered walls 188, 190 of the cradle main body. The main features of the first and second magnet housings 216, 216' are the same and include base 218 with stub like, lengthwise protrusions 220, 222 designed to mate with flat edge regions on the upper and lower edges of the tapered wall in a mesh or mating like anangement. The base of the magnet holder is provided with one or more magnet holding cavities 214 with the figures illustrating first and second pockets 223, 225 defining overall cavity 214 with intermediate spacing projection 224. As seen from the cross-section Fig. 28, the holding cavities extend relatively deep into the base section to leave a relatively thin facing section 226 which is placed in contact with the dispensing gun upon insertion of the gun into the cradle. Countersunk fastener holes 228 are also provided which provide for avoidance of gun contact by a fastener. The magnet holders are preferably formed of a non- ferrous or non-magnetic material as in a plastic material (e.g., Acetyl plastic which is of low friction and durable and easy to clean). Figures 32 to 35 show various views of a formed pan holder 100 which is attached to the upper surface of the base plate at flanges 118 and 120 and provides a resting and holding means for the solvent pan 102 (including preferably inwardly extending side rails 118, 120 attached (or integrally fornied by bending, for example) to the vertical walls 110, 112 at the end of the base pan holder which provides for sliding action. Figure 36 shows a preferred sheet (e.g. sheet metal) pattern for forming the pan holder upon manipulation. As seen from Figure 36, the pan holder 100 is formed from a planar cut out sheet of metal by bending side regions at two bend line locations 230, 232 on each side with the first defining one of the upstanding end extension (e.g., 110) and the other defining one of the flanges (e.g., 118) which facilitates attachment to the underlying base with fasteners threaded past flange apertures. In addition along one long side of the foundation there are provided bendable sections 234, 236 which upon being bent provide retention wall region 166 for insertion of the pan lock 122. Figure 37 shows the blank used for forming the internal side rails which are preferably L-shaped in cross-section once formed and welded or otherwise attached to an upstanding end section's interior. These side rails 118, 120 provide for easy sliding in and out of a pan with solvent and are preferably positioned low enough to accommodate the overlying thickness of the below described brash holder such that both can be removed as a unit for servicing and/or solvent filling. Figures 38 to 41 show various views of a preferced brash embodiment which features a base block 160 (e.g., a plastic block as in HDPE) into which is embedded (e.g., an overmoulding process) bristles 162 (e.g., stainless steel) preferably having the illustrated spacing and a '/_. inch extension up from the block. Fastener holes 164 are further provided in the sides to conform with those formed in the downwardly extending flanges in the brush holder. Figure 42 shows of the blank used for forming brash holder for supporting the cleaning brushes in the solvent pan of the holster assembly. The brash holder includes opposite end flanges 140, 142 extending outward from a main body 144 and having bend lines 146 and 148 (same on opposite side) for fonning respective vertical end walls 142, 144 and upper flange 145 designed for resting on the conesponding upper end edges of the pan. In the intermediate area of the main body there is provided multiple (two illustrated) brush holder formation sections 151 which feature a peripheral border 146 with bend lines 147 having corner cut-outs 148 and a central cut out 150 with slits 152 extending between the corner cutouts and the central cut out within which the brashes are placed and downwardly extending brash holder extensions which preferably are integral and of a monolithic nature (as are preferably the upstanding end walls and upper flanges). For example, a sheet of material subject to a stamping and/or die folding operation as carried out for the pan holder described above. As seen from the figures, the downwardly extending brash holder extensions preferably have tapered end edges with lowermost non-tapered sections (avoiding point formation) and are provided at each of the four sides of the prefened rectangular cut out in the main body. One or more (e.g. the two longer sides as shown) of these extensions is preferably provided with attachment means as in fastener apertures for fastening in position respective brashes received by each of the cutouts. Although two cutouts or apertures are provided the solvent pan below provides a single, large volume body of solvent fluid which thus provides for extended usage prior to becoming too full of dissolved residue as to become not sufficiently operative. Thus Figure 42 illustrates a suitable blank for use in fonnation of the above described brush holder from a single blank of sheet metal or the like following a stamp or cut out operation to form the illustrated blank from a solid sheet (e.g., forming the flange extensions at the end, a central rectangular area and curved border periphery sections at the interface of the rectangle's corners and the flange ends and the removal of two spaced apart parallel strips and from the corners of those strips slits are formed with bulbous (baseball diamond shaped) apertures at their outer ends with the slit/bulbous cut out ends being formed to extend out to confomi generally to the edge points of a brush to be received therein during use). In addition, fastener apertures are formed in the blank as shown. Figures 43 to 46 provide a closer view of the pan lock 150 forming part of pan lock device 152 which is designed to releasably retain a slid in pan with the assistance of the pan edge receiving groove 154 at the forward end and the threaded aperture hole 156 for receiving a threaded lock down knob which is extended through the base plate fixed pan holder. As seen from Figure 7 to park the dispenser 12 the user need only have the top portion of the dispenser in the general region of cradle 86 whereupon the magnetic attraction will draw the dispenser into a desired position. Also, cradle stop 204 provides a back wall for limiting the forward insertion of the dispenser into the cradle and can also provide a stop for facilitating the pushing down on the handle 40 toward ami 84 whereupon the dispenser can be easily disengaged as it is rotated toward arm 84. Also, the side walls of cradle 86 and magnetic locking of the dispenser can handle side loading brought about, for example, by hoses 28, 30 or cable 29 being extended into a stretch situation. Also, the positioning shown provides for any solvent on dispenser tip 50 dripping off into the pan below and, upon dispenser removal or just prior to insertion, there is positioned the brushes immediately below to provide for brushing off the tip and the removal of any build up with the assistance of the solvent in pan 102. With locking device 122 the pan is rendered fixed within the assembly and yet when it is desired for removal as in a refill of solvent, the pan can be readily moved together with the brushes 136 and 138 for cleaning or replacement.

Claims

What is claimed is: 1. A dispenser holster assembly comprising: a support structure; a cradle supported by said support structure, said cradle having a recessed section for receiving a dispenser and at least one magnet for retaining the dispenser upon insertion into the recessed section.
2. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said magnet is a rare earth magnet with a magnetic power of 30 or more.
3. The assembly of claim 1 or 2 wherein said cradle has opposing and converging side walls defining said recessed section and at least two magnets with at least one magnet on each side wall.
4. The assembly of claim 3 wherein said recessed section has a central clearance wall section extending between the lower ends of said two side walls.
5. The assembly of claims 1-4 wherein said cradle further includes a first open end and a second closed end.
6. The assembly of claim 5 wherein said closed end is closed off by an end plate extending across said recess.
7. The assembly of claim 6 further comprising a pivot connection connecting said support structure to said cradle and attached to the end plate.
8. The assembly of claims 1-5 further comprising a pivot connection connecting said support structure to said cradle.
9. The assembly of claims 1-8 wherein said support structure includes an ami with cantilever extension at an upper end of the arm.
10. The assembly of claim 1-8 wherein said support structure further comprises a base platform and an arm extending off said base platform and said arm having a free end suspended over said base platform and to which free end the cradle is attached.
11. The assembly of claim 10 wherein said base platform includes means for adjusting the arm to better suit left and right armed people.
12. The assembly of claim 11 wherein said means for adjusting includes fastener holes provided at opposing sides of the base platform.
13. The assembly of claims 1 to 12 further comprising a brash device supported by said support structure.
14. The assembly of claim 13 wherein said brash device comprises a pair of brashes.
15. The assembly of claim 1 to 14 further comprising a solvent pan supported by said support structure.
16. The assembly of claim 15 further comprising a pan holder which is supported by said support structure to lie under the cradle.
17. The assembly of claim 16 wherein said pan holder includes a pan slide device which receives said pan in sliding fashion and such that the pan is suspended.
18. The assembly of claim 17 wherein said pan holder includes two side walls and said slide device comprises slide rails positioned on an interior surfaces of said two side walls.
19. The assembly of 15-18 further comprising a pan position locking device.
20. The assembly of claim 19 wherein said locking device includes a grooved block which receives a flanged rim of said pan.
21. The assembly of claim 20 wherein said locking device further comprises a turn knob.
22. The assembly of claims 17 wherein said pan holder is formed entirely of one piece of bent metal with the possible exception of said slide rails.
23. The assembly of claims 17 to 22 wherein pan holder includes a top wall with cavity fonnation for accessing one or more brashes supported by said support structure.
24. The assembly of claims 1-23 further comprising a brash support insert supported by said support structure.
25. The assembly of claim 24 wherein said brash support insert includes a pair of cavities formed in an interior structure for receipt of brashes placed in said cavities.
26. The assembly of claim 25 wherein said brush support insert is formed of a single piece of bent metal.
27. A holster assembly for a hand held dispensing device, comprising: a base platform; a support arm extending up from said platform; a cradle supported by said support arm, said cradle having a dispensing device capture recess which faces down in use.
28. The assembly of claim 27 wherein said cradle includes a magnetic dispenser device releasable connector.
29. The assembly of claim 28 wherein said releasable connector includes a magnet having a magnetic power of greater than 30.
30. The assembly of claims 27 to 29 wherein said cradle has a pair of converging side walls to form a V-shaped capture recess.
31. The assembly of claims 27 to 30 wherein said cradle includes an end stop extending across said capture recess.
32. The assembly of claim 27 to 31 further comprising a pivot connector attaching said cradle to said arm.
33. A holster assembly for a hand held dispensing device, comprising: a support structure a cradle supported by said support structure and having a dispensing device capture recess; a solvent pan supported by said support structure; a brash reception housing supported by said support structure so as to extend over said solvent pan; a pair of brushes received by said brush reception housing.
34. A holster assembly for a hand held dispensing device, comprising: a support structure a cradle supported by said support structure and having a dispensing device capture recess; a solvent pan positioned under said cradle; a brash reception housing which is received by said solvent pan; and a pan holder which supports said brush reception housing and said solvent pan and which is supported by said support structure.
35. The assembly of claim 34 wherein said pan holder includes a slide device which slidingly supports said solvent pan.
36. A method of holstering a hand held dispensing device including: positioning a portion of a dispenser in a cradle which has a capture recess facing downward.
37. The method of claim 36 further comprising releasably attaching said dispenser by way of magnetism.
38. The method of claim 37 wherein said portion of the dispenser placed in the cradle is an electric motor casing and said magnetism is generated by one or more magnets in the cradle attracted to motor components in said cradle.
PCT/US2005/008324 2004-03-12 2005-03-14 Dispenser system with dispenser holster WO2005090038A3 (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110220159A1 (en) * 2010-03-09 2011-09-15 Dominic Joseph Ellickson Beverage Dispensing Gun Cleaning Apparatus

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