WO2005060601A2 - Head support having sleep-inhibits characteristics - Google Patents

Head support having sleep-inhibits characteristics Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2005060601A2
WO2005060601A2 PCT/US2004/041051 US2004041051W WO2005060601A2 WO 2005060601 A2 WO2005060601 A2 WO 2005060601A2 US 2004041051 W US2004041051 W US 2004041051W WO 2005060601 A2 WO2005060601 A2 WO 2005060601A2
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
support
projections
outer layer
side
head
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2004/041051
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2005060601B1 (en
WO2005060601A3 (en
Inventor
Susan Nichols
Original Assignee
Susan Nichols
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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Publication date
Priority to US52928303P priority Critical
Priority to US60/529,283 priority
Priority to US11/007,438 priority patent/US20050125901A1/en
Priority to US11/007,438 priority
Application filed by Susan Nichols filed Critical Susan Nichols
Publication of WO2005060601A2 publication Critical patent/WO2005060601A2/en
Publication of WO2005060601A3 publication Critical patent/WO2005060601A3/en
Publication of WO2005060601B1 publication Critical patent/WO2005060601B1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G9/00Bed-covers; Counterpanes; Travelling rugs; Sleeping rugs; Sleeping bags; Pillows
    • A47G9/10Pillows

Abstract

A head support (10) includes a resilient body section (16) having a body interior (20) and an outer layer (22), and a plurality of raised projections (18) that are positioned on the outer layer (22). The projections (18) extend away from the body interior (20). In one embodiment, the projections (18) have a higher coefficient of static friction than the outer layer (22) so that the projections (18) inhibit relative movement between the outer layer (22) and a surface (14) when the projections (18) are in contact with the surface (14). In another embodiment, the outer layer (22) has a first side (24) that generally faces the surface (14) and a second side (26) that is substantially opposite the first side (24). The body section (16) has a length (30), a maximum height (36) and a width (34). The width (34) is less than at least of the length (30) and the maximum height (36).

Description

PCT PATENT APPLICATION

HEAD SUPPORT HAVING SLEEP-INHIBITING CHARACTERISTICS

RELATED APPLICATIONS This Application claims the benefit on U.S. Provisional Application Serial No.

60/529,283 filed on December 9, 2003 and on U.S. Non-provisional Patent Application filed on December 8, 2004 by inventor Susan Nichols, entitled "HEAD SUPPORT HAVING SLEEP-INHIBITING CHARACTERISTICS", having Attorney Docket No. 30006.05. The contents of U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/529,283 and U.S. Non-provisional Patent Application filed on December 8, 2004 by inventor Susan Nichols, entitled "HEAD SUPPORT HAVING SLEEP- INHIBITING CHARACTERISTICS", having Attorney Docket No. 30006.05, are incorporated herein by reference. BACKGROUND

Various forms of yoga and meditation have recently gained acceptance within today's society. For example, "Pilates" is known to increase strength and flexibility through holding certain body positions, while different types of meditation exercises encourage relaxation of the mind and body. At various times while engaging in such exercises, a participant may wish to lie awake in a "Corpse Pose" or "savasana". These types of relaxation techniques often utilize a support, such as a pillow, for the head, neck or other parts of the body. Unfortunately, many such supports can result in the participant falling asleep rather than promoting a useful exercise or meditation session. Additionally, certain pillows can have the undesired result of changing a comfortable reading, movie watching or driving position into a position better suited for slumber, thereby defeating the intended purpose. SUMMARY

The present invention is directed to a support for supporting a head of an individual relative to a surface. In one embodiment, the support includes a resilient body section having a body interior and an outer layer, and a plurality of raised projections that are positioned on the outer layer. In one embodiment, the outer layer is removable from the body interior. The projections extend away from the body interior. In one embodiment, the projections have a higher coefficient of static friction than the outer layer so that the projections inhibit relative movement between the outer layer and the surface when the projections are in contact with the surface. Further, at least two of the projections can be secured to the outer layer in a discontinuous manner. In one embodiment, at least some of the projections are formed from a substantially non-liquid-absorbing material such as plastic or latex. In another embodiment, the outer layer of the body section has a first side that generally faces the surface and a second side that is substantially opposite the first side. Further, the body section has a length that is oriented substantially along a longitudinal axis of the head when the support is supporting the head of the individual. The body section also has a maximum height that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length in a direction between the first side and the second side. The body section further has a width that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length and the height. In one embodiment, the width is less than at least one of the length and the maximum height. This embodiment can also include a plurality of projections that are secured to the outer layer of the body section. The present invention also includes a method for manufacturing a support that supports the head or other body parts of an individual.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The novel features of this invention, as well as the invention itself, both as to its structure and its operation, will be best understood from the accompanying drawings, taken in conjunction with the accompanying description, in which similar reference characters refer to similar parts, and in which: Figure 1A is a partially cutaway, side view of one embodiment of a head support having features of the present invention, and a head of an individual; Figure 1B is an end view of the head support illustrated in Figure 1A, and the head of the individual; Figure 2 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the head support; Figure 3 is a cross-sectional view of the head support taken on line 3-3 in Figure 2; Figure 4A is a perspective view of a first embodiment of a projection; Figure 4B is a side view of the projection illustrated in Figure 4A; Figure 5A is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a projection; Figure 5B is a side view of the projection illustrated in Figure 5A; Figure 6A is a perspective view of a third embodiment of a projection; Figure 6B is a side view of the projection illustrated in Figure 6A; Figure 7A is a perspective view of a fourth embodiment of a projection; . Figure 7B is a side view of the projection illustrated in Figure 7A; and Figure 8 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a head support having features of the present invention; Figure 9 is a cross-sectional view of still another embodiment of a head support having features of the present invention; Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view of yet another embodiment of a head support having features of the present invention; and Figure 11 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a head support having features of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION Figure 1A is a side view of a head support 10 (also sometimes referred to herein simply as "support") supporting a head 12 of an individual relative to a surface 14. The configuration of the support 10 can vary depending upon the particular design requirements and upon the specific usage of the support 10. It is recognized that although the support 10 provided herein is particularly suited for supporting and/or positioning the head 12 of an individual, the support 10 can effectively be utilized for other purposes. For convenience of discussion, the support 10 is described in detail relative to supporting the head 12 of the individual. However, although not specifically illustrated in Figures, the support 10 can be positioned to support the cervical, thoracic or lumbar spine of the individual during exercise, sitting or during other activities. Further, the support 10 can be used between a hip and one or more ribs, under the chin, as a support for the midsection of a woman during pregnancy, between the knees of an individual, or for any other suitable usage. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the head 12 has a longitudinal axis 15. As used herein, and for orientation purposes, the longitudinal axis 15 of the head 12 runs substantially lengthwise along the support 10, as provided in greater detail below. As used herein, the surface 14 can have any orientation, i.e. horizontal (as shown in Figure 1A), vertical or any other suitable angle that can accommodate contact with the support 10. For example, the surface 14 can be any suitable type of yoga or other sports mat, a flooring material, a bed, a table or other furniture, the ground, the back of a chair, or any other type of surface 14, whether horizontal, vertical or some other angle. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the support 10 includes a resilient body section 16 and a plurality of raised projections 18 that project away from the body section 16 as described herein. In this embodiment, the body section 16 includes a body interior 20 and an outer layer 22. The body interior 20 can form the vast majority of the body section 16, essentially forming the core of the support 10. The material used to form the body interior 20 can vary. For example, the body interior 20 can be formed from a relatively firm, resilient material that is supportive, yet comfortable for the head 12 or other body parts. In one embodiment, the body interior 20 is formed from a foam rubber or a memory foam material. However, any suitably firm, resilient material can be used. Further, in this embodiment, the outer layer 22 substantially surrounds and/or envelopes the body interior 20. The thickness of the outer layer 22 can vary depending upon the material used to form the outer layer 22 and upon the design requirements of the support 10. The outer layer 22 can be formed from relatively absorbent materials that can vary depending upon the design requirements of the head support 10. For instance, the outer layer 22 can include any suitably absorbent natural fibers or fabrics, such as cotton, silk, wool, hemp, etc., and/or synthetic materials such as acrylics, polyester microfiber, nylon and/or rayon, as non-exclusive examples. With this design, moisture such as perspiration can be readily absorbed by the outer layer 22. Moreover, in accordance with one embodiment of the support 10, the outer layer 22 can be removable to be laundered or interchanged with another outer layer 22. Additionally, the outer layer 22 can include a decorative pattern or print to suit the style of the individual user. In addition, the body section 16 illustrated in Figure 1A has a first side 24 and a second side 26. In this embodiment, the first side 24 generally faces and/or is in contact with the surface 14. In one embodiment, the first side 24 is substantially flat to provide a greater surface area that remains in contact with the surface 14. However, the first side 24 can have any suitable configuration, depending upon the configuration of the surface 14, for example. The second side 26 is substantially opposite the first side 24, and generally faces away from the surface 14. Further, the second side 26 can be in direct contact with the head 12 or other body part of the individual, as illustrated in Figure 1 A. It is recognized, however, that either side 24, 26 can be the first side 24 or the second side 26. The body section 16 can be shaped to substantially provide the overall general shape of the support 10. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the body interior 20 is somewhat sleigh-shaped, and includes a depression 28 in the second side 26 of the body section 16. In this embodiment, the depression 28 can receive and/or somewhat cradle the head 12 of the individual to decrease the extent of unwanted movement of the head 12 relative to the support 10, and/or for greater comfort to the individual. The projections 18 can be secured to any portion of the outer layer 22 of the body section 16. For example, the projections 18 can be secured to the first side 24 and the second side 26, and/or any other portion of the body section 16, as shown in Figure 1A. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the head support 10 can be placed on top of or against the surface 14, which can become slick or slippery when moisture is introduced onto the surface 14. The material(s) used for the projections 18 can be varied. For example, the projections 18 can be formed from a substantially non-absorbent material such as various forms of plastic (e.g., latex), rubber, epoxy, or any other suitable material, as non-exclusive examples. The material used to form the projections 18 can have a relatively high coefficient of static friction. In one embodiment, the material used to form the projections 18 can have a coefficient of static friction that is greater then a coefficient of static friction of the outer layer 22. With this design, the relatively high static friction of the projections 18 decrease the likelihood that the support 10 will slip, slide or otherwise move relative to the surface 14 upon which the support 10 is positioned. Stated another way, the projections 18 provide greater traction between the outer layer 22 of the support 10 and the surface 14. The positioning, shape and size of the projections 18 can vary. In one embodiment, the projections 18 are positioned in a pattern. For example, in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the projections 18 are positioned in a grid-like arrangement on the outer layer 22. In this embodiment, the projections 18 are positioned in a plurality of substantially similar rows, each with a relatively consistent spacing between rows and between individual projections 18. Alternatively, the projections 18 can be positioned in a substantially random manner on the outer layer 22 of the body section 16. In an alternative embodiment, the projections 18 can be positioned in a repeated, somewhat diamond-shaped pattern on the outer layer 22 so that the rows are somewhat staggered from those illustrated in Figure 1A. Still alternatively, the projections 18 can be separately positioned to form concentric circles, triangles, or any other suitable geometric patterns. Further, in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, each projection 18 is separately secured to the outer layer 22 in an intermittent, unconnected and/or discontinuous manner. In one embodiment, the projections 18 can be secured to the outer layer 22 by using a heat treatment method, which can include melting the projections 18 into position on the outer layer 22. Examples of alternative methods that can be used to secure the projections 18 to the outer layer 22 include chemical bonding, adhesive, or any other suitable means, although these methods are not intended to be limiting in any manner. Because of the spacing between adjacent projections 18, the outer layer 22 can more readily absorb moisture from the surface 14 and/or the user, with reduced or no interference by the projections 18. Stated another way, any inhibition of moisture absorption caused by the projections 18 is reduced or eliminated because a substantially high portion of the outer layer 22 is still exposed, despite the relatively high quantity of projections 18 that are secured to the outer layer 22. For example, in one embodiment, the projections 18 are sized, shaped and positioned to cover less than approximately 20% of the total area of the outer layer 22. In alternative embodiments, the projections 18 are sized, shaped and positioned to cover less than approximately 25%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 75% or 90% of the total area of the outer layer 22. The spacing between the projections 18 can vary. In one embodiment, the spacing of the projections 18 can be approximately one-quarter inch on center. However, the spacing between the projections 18 can be greater or less than one- quarter inch on center achieve the desired level of inhibition of movement between the projections 18 (and thus the outer layer 22) and the surface 14. Additionally, because the projections 18 can be positioned relatively close to one another while not unduly inhibiting moisture absorption by the outer layer 22, there is less chance for the outer layer 22, and thus the entire support 10, to move relative to the surface 14. Consequently, injuries caused by slippage of the support 10 relative to the surface 14 are reduced. In still an alternative embodiment, two or more of the projections 18 can be continuous, e.g. secured together on the outer layer 22 to form lines, curves or other patterns on the body section 16. Further, the distance that each of the projections 18 projects or extends away from the outer layer 22 and/or body interior 20 can vary. For instance, in one embodiment, the projections 18 can project at least approximately 0.1 millimeters away from the outer layer 22 in a direction away from the body interior 20. In alternative embodiments, the projections 18 can project at least approximately 0.2 millimeters, 0.3 millimeters, 0.5 millimeters, 0.75 millimeters, 1.0 millimeters, 1.5 millimeters, 2.0 millimeters, 3.0 millimeters or 5.0 millimeters away from the first outer layer 22. In alternative embodiments, the projections 18 can project within the range of (i) greater than 0.1 millimeters and less than 5.0 millimeters, (ii) greater than 0.2 millimeters and less than 2.0 millimeters, or (iii) greater than 0.5 millimeters and less than 1.0 millimeter away from the outer layer 22. Still alternatively, the projections 18 can project less than or greater than the foregoing distances and ranges away from the outer layer 22. Moreover, depending upon the spacing of the projections 18, the height of the projections 18, and/or the thickness and/or weight of the outer layer 22, a user can receive various tactile sensations or stimuli when in static or dynamic contact with the head support 10. These stimuli can include a force on certain pressure points of the user's body or a massage of the bone and/or musculature of the user, as non-exclusive examples. With the designs provided herein, the tactile stimulus received by the user can maintain a requisite level of consciousness during usage of the support 10. Stated another way, using the support 10 can inhibit an individual from falling asleep even during relaxation and/or meditation exercises. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the support 10 has a length 30, a height 32 and a width 34 (illustrated in Figure 1 B). The length 30 is generally aligned with the longitudinal axis 15 of the head 12 of the individual. The length 30 of the support 10 can vary, although in this embodiment, the length is substantially constant. The height 32 is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length 30, and extends directly between the first side 24 and the second side 26. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, the height 32 varies over the length 30 of the support 10. In embodiments having a varying height 32, the height 32 can be measured at any location along the length 30 of the support. In these embodiments, the support 10 also has a maximum height 36, representing the greatest distance that extends directly between the first side 24 and the second side 26. Figure 1 B is an'end view of the head support 10 illustrated in Figure 1A. In this embodiment, the width 34 is substantially constant over the entire length 30 (illustrated in Figure 1A) of the support 10. However, in alternative embodiments, the width 34 can vary over the length 30 of the support 10. Further, in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1 B, the width 34 is relatively narrow. For example, a portion of or the entire width 34 of the support 10 can be approximately similar to or less than a width 12W of the head 12 of a typical individual, provided the width 34 is great enough to adequately support the head 12. In alternative non-exclusive embodiments, a portion of the width 34, a majority of the width 34, or the entire width 34 of the support 10 can be less than approximately 5.0 inches and/or greater than approximately 3.5 inches. In another embodiment, the width 34 of any portion of the support 10 can be greater than 5.0 inches or less than 3.5 inches. In addition, or in the alternative, in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1 B, the width 34 of the support 10 is less than the maximum height 36 and/or the length 30 of the support 10. For example, in one embodiment, the width 34 is less than approximately 90% of the maximum height 36 and/or the length 30 of the support 10. In alternative, non-exclusive embodiments, the width 34 is less than approximately 50%, 60%, 75%, 100%, 125%, or 150% of the maximum height 36 and/or the length 30 of the support 10. With these designs, the relative narrowness of the support 10 can provide one or more benefits. For example, the decreased width 34 of the support 10 allows for easier transport of the support 10. Additionally, in some embodiments, the width 34 of the support is insufficient to allow the user to turn his or her head 12 without the head 12 becoming unsupported by the support 10. Thus, during meditation exercises, a relatively common side effect is that a user can become relaxed to the point of falling asleep, which can be an undesirable and/or unintended result. If a user becomes drowsy and starts to doze off, any turn of the head 12 can result in a decrease in support offered by the support 10. As a consequence of the decrease in support, the reflexes of the user can cause the user to quickly awaken, thereby inhibiting sleep and allowing the user to resume meditation or other appropriate exercises. Moreover, the decreased width 34 can induce greater concentration by the user during exercise in order to maintain the proper position of the head 12 relative to the support 10. The dimensions of the support 10 can vary. The head support 10 can be sized to be substantially similar to the surface 14 upon which the support 10 is placed. In one non-exclusive embodiment, the support 10 can have a length 32 of approximately 8.0 inches, a maximum height 36 of approximately 4.5 inches, and a width 34 of approximately 4.0 inches. However, the support 10 can have suitable dimensions larger or smaller than these dimensions. Figure 2 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the head support 210, including the body section 216 and the projections 218. In this embodiment, the projections 218 are positioned on the outer layer 222 to provide one or more of the benefits indicated herein. Figure 3 is a cross-sectional view of the head support 210 illustrated in

Figure 2, taken on line 3-3. In this embodiment, the body interior 220 comprises the vast majority of the support 210. The outer layer 222 substantially surrounds and/or encloses the body interior 220. In this embodiment, the projections 218 are substantially uniformly and separately positioned on the outer layer 222. In an alternative embodiment, two or more of the projections 218 can be joined in a continuous manner. Figures 4A-7B show various representative shapes of several embodiments of the projections 18. The embodiments depicted in Figures 4A-7B are provided for convenience of discussion only, and are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention in any manner. The shape of the projections 18 can vary depending upon the level of tactile stimulus desired by the user in contact with the head support 10, and/or the extent to which the user desires or needs a greater level of friction between the projections 18 and the surface 14. Figure 4A is a top view of one embodiment of the shape of a projection 414. In this embodiment, the projection 414 has a round or circular footprint. Figure 4B is a side view of the projection 414 illustrated in Figure 4A. Figure 4B shows that the projection 414 can have a substantially dome or hemispherical shape, for example. Figure 5A is a top view of one embodiment of the shape of a projection 514. In this embodiment, the projection 514 has a rectangular footprint. Figure 5B is a side view of the projection 514 illustrated in Figure 5A. Figure 5B shows that the projections 514 have a substantially frusto-pyramidal shape. Figure 6A is a top view of one embodiment of the shape of a projection 614. In this embodiment, the projection 614 has a round or circular footprint. Figure 6B is a side view of the projection 614 illustrated in Figure 6A. Figure 6B shows that the projection 614 can have a substantially cylindrical, planar or flat shape. Figure 7A is a top view of one embodiment of the shape of a projection 714. In this embodiment, the projection 714 has a round or circular footprint. Figure 7B is a side view of the projection 714 illustrated in Figure 7A. Figure 7B shows that the projection 714 can have a substantially frusto-conical shape. Figure 8 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a head support 810. In this embodiment, the support 810 includes the body section 816 and a plurality of projections 818 that are secured to the body section 816. The body section 816 includes the body interior 820 and the outer layer 822. However, in this embodiment, the body interior 820 and the outer layer 822 are integrally formed as a unitary structure. Stated another way, the outer layer 822 is not a separate structure that encompasses the body interior 820. In one such embodiment, the entire body section 816 is formed from a homogeneous material. Thus, in this embodiment, the outer layer 822 is not removable from the body interior 820. Figure 9 is a cross-sectional view of still another embodiment of a head support 910. The support 910 includes the body section 916 and a plurality of projections 918 that are secured to the body section 916. However, in this embodiment, the projections 918 are secured only to a portion of the outer layer 922. For example, as illustrated in Figure 9, the projections 918 are secured to the second side 926 of the outer layer 922 to provide stimuli to the head 12 (illustrated in Figure 1A) or other body parts of the individual. With this design, the individual can manipulate the support 910 so that the projections 918 are either in contact with the individual or the surface 14 (illustrated in Figure 1A), depending upon the requirements of the individual. Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view of yet another embodiment of a head support 1010. The support 1010 includes the body section 1016 and a plurality of projections 1018 that are secured to the body section 1016. However, in this embodiment, the projections 1018 are secured only to a portion of the outer layer 1022. For example, as illustrated in Figure 10, the projections 1018 are secured to the first side 1024 of the outer layer 1022 to inhibit slippage of the support 1010 relative to the surface 14 (illustrated in Figure 1A). Figure 11 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a head support 1110. The head support 1110 includes the body section 1116, but does not include any projections. In this embodiment, the support 1110 can have features from previously described embodiments of the head support, such as a relatively narrow width 34 (illustrated in Figure 1B) to inhibit the individual from sleeping while using the support 1110. While the particular head support 10 as herein shown and disclosed in detail is fully capable of obtaining the objects and providing the advantages herein before stated, it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of some of the presently preferred embodiments of the invention and that no limitations are intended to the details of construction or design herein shown other than as described in the appended claims.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A support for supporting a head of an individual relative to a surface, the support comprising: a resilient body section having a body interior and an outer layer; and a plurality of raised projections that are positioned on the outer layer and extend away from the body interior, the projections having a higher coefficient of static friction than the outer layer so that the projections inhibit relative movement between the outer layer and the surface when the projections are in contact with the surface.
2. The support of claim 1 wherein at least two of the projections are discontinuously secured to the outer layer.
3. The support of claim 1 wherein the outer layer is removable from the body interior.
4. The support of claim 1 wherein the outer layer includes a microfiber material.
5. The support of claim 1 wherein at least some of the projections are formed from a substantially non-liquid-absorbing material.
6. The support of claim 1 wherein at least some of the projections are formed from a plastic material.
7. The support of claim 1 wherein at least some of the projections are formed at least partially from a latex material.
8. The support of claim 1 wherein the outer layer has a first side that generally faces the surface and a second side that is substantially opposite the first side, and wherein at least some of the projections are positioned on each of the first side and the second side.
9. The support of claim 8 wherein the projections cover less than approximately 50 percent of one of the first side and the second side of the outer layer.
10. The support of claim 1 wherein the outer layer has a first side that generally faces the surface and a second side that is substantially opposite the first side, and wherein the projections project within the range of between at least approximately 0.2 millimeters and less than approximately 5.0 millimeters away from the first side of the outer layer.
11. The support of claim 1 wherein at least some of the projections are substantially dome-shaped.
12. The support of claim 1 wherein the outer layer has a first side that generally faces the surface and a second side that is substantially opposite the first side, the body section having a longitudinal axis that is oriented substantially parallel to a longitudinal axis of the head when the support is supporting the head of the individual, the body section having (i) a length that is oriented substantially along the longitudinal axis of the body section, (ii) a height that is oriented substantially orthogonally to the length in a direction that extends between the first side and the second side, the height including a maximum height, and (iii) a width that is oriented substantially orthogonally to the length and the height, wherein a portion of the width is less than the maximum height.
13. The support of claim 12 wherein a majority of the width is less than approximately five inches.
14. The support of claim 1 wherein the body interior and the outer layer are integrally formed as a unitary structure.
15. A support for supporting a head of an individual relative to a surface, the head having a longitudinal axis, the support comprising: a resilient body section including a body interior and an outer layer, the outer layer having a first side that generally faces the surface and a second side that is substantially opposite the first side, the body section having (i) a length that is oriented substantially along the longitudinal axis of the head when the support is supporting the head of the individual, (ii) a height that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length in a direction between the first side and the second side, the height including a maximum height, and (iii) a width that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length and the height, the width being less than at least one of the length and the maximum height.
16. The support of claim 15 wherein the width is less than each of the length and the height.
17. The support of claim 15 wherein a majority of the width is less than approximately five inches.
18. The support of claim 15 wherein the width is substantially the same along the length of the body section.
19. The support of claim 15 further comprising a plurality of raised projections that are positioned on the outer layer and extend away from the body interior, the projections having a higher coefficient of static friction than the outer layer so that the projections inhibit relative movement between the outer layer and the surface when the projections are in contact with' the surface.
20. The support of claim 19 wherein at least some of the projections are formed from a substantially non-liquid-absorbing material.
21. The support of claim 19 wherein at least some of the projections are formed at least partially from a latex material.
22. The support of claim 19 wherein at least some of the projections are positioned on each of the first side and the second side.
23. The support of claim 19 wherein the projections cover less than approximately 75 percent of the outer layer.
24. The support of claim 19 wherein at least some of the projections are substantially hemispherical in shape.
25. A head support for supporting a head of an individual relative to a surface, the head support comprising: a resilient body section including a body interior and an outer layer, the outer layer having a first side that generally faces the surface and a second side that is substantially opposite the first side, the body section having (i) a length that is oriented substantially along the longitudinal axis of the head when the head support is supporting the head of the individual, (ii) a height that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length in a direction between the first side and the second side, the height including a maximum height, and (iii) a width that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length and the height, the width being less than at least one of the length and the maximum height; and a plurality of discontinuous, substantially dome-shaped, raised projections that are positioned on at least one of the first side and the second side of the outer layer, the projections extending away from the body interior, the projections covering less than approximately 50 percent of the outer layer, the projections being formed from a plastic material having a higher coefficient of static friction than the outer layer so that the projections inhibit relative movement between the outer layer and the surface when the projections are in contact with the surface.
26. A method for manufacturing a support that supports a head of an individual relative to a surface, the method comprising the steps of: providing a resilient body section having a body interior and an outer layer; and securing a plurality of raised projections to the outer layer, the projections extending in a direction away from the body interior, the projections having a higher coefficient of static friction than the outer layer to inhibit relative movement between the outer layer and the surface when the projections are in contact with the surface.
27. The method of claim 26 wherein the step of securing includes separately securing the plurality of projections so that the projections are discontinuous with one another.
28. The method of claim 26 wherein the step of providing includes the step of shaping the body section to have (i) a length that is oriented substantially along the longitudinal axis of the head when the head support is supporting the head of the individual, (ii) a height that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length in a direction between a first side of the outer layer that is adapted to contact the surface, and a second side of the outer layer that is substantially opposite the first side, the height including a maximum height, and (iii) a width that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length and the height, the width being less than the maximum height.
29. A method for manufacturing a support that supports a head of an individual relative to a surface, the method comprising the step of: providing a resilient body section having (i) a length that is oriented substantially along the longitudinal axis of the head when the head support is supporting the head of the individual, (ii) a height that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length in a direction between a first side of the outer layer that is adapted to contact the surface, and a second side of the outer layer that is substantially opposite the first side, the height including a maximum height, and (iii) a width that is oriented substantially orthogonal to the length and the height, the width being less than the maximum height.
30. The method of claim 29 further comprising the step of securing a plurality of raised projections to the outer layer.
PCT/US2004/041051 2003-12-15 2004-12-09 Head support having sleep-inhibits characteristics WO2005060601A2 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US52928303P true 2003-12-15 2003-12-15
US60/529,283 2003-12-15
US11/007,438 US20050125901A1 (en) 2003-12-15 2004-12-08 Head support having sleep inhibiting characteristics
US11/007,438 2004-12-08

Publications (3)

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WO2005060601A2 true WO2005060601A2 (en) 2005-07-07
WO2005060601A3 WO2005060601A3 (en) 2006-02-23
WO2005060601B1 WO2005060601B1 (en) 2006-05-04

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WO2005060601B1 (en) 2006-05-04
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