WO2005052161A2 - Serine proteases, nucleic acids encoding serine enzymes and vectors and host cells incorporating same - Google Patents

Serine proteases, nucleic acids encoding serine enzymes and vectors and host cells incorporating same Download PDF

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WO2005052161A2
WO2005052161A2 PCT/US2004/039006 US2004039006W WO2005052161A2 WO 2005052161 A2 WO2005052161 A2 WO 2005052161A2 US 2004039006 W US2004039006 W US 2004039006W WO 2005052161 A2 WO2005052161 A2 WO 2005052161A2
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atom
protease
seq id
asp
amino acid
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PCT/US2004/039006
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French (fr)
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WO2005052161A3 (en
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Brian Edward Jones
Marc Kolkman
Chris Leeflang
Ayrookaran J. Poulose
Andrew Shaw
Wilhelmus A. H. Van Der Kleij
Leo Van Marrewijk
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Genencor International, Inc.
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Priority to US60/523,609 priority
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Publication of WO2005052161A2 publication Critical patent/WO2005052161A2/en
Publication of WO2005052161A3 publication Critical patent/WO2005052161A3/en

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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12NMICROORGANISMS OR ENZYMES; COMPOSITIONS THEREOF; PROPAGATING, PRESERVING OR MAINTAINING MICROORGANISMS; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING; CULTURE MEDIA
    • C12N9/00Enzymes; Proenzymes; Compositions thereof; Processes for preparing, activating, inhibiting, separating or purifying enzymes
    • C12N9/14Hydrolases (3)
    • C12N9/48Hydrolases (3) acting on peptide bonds (3.4)
    • C12N9/50Proteinases, e.g. Endopeptidases (3.4.21-3.4.25)
    • C12N9/52Proteinases, e.g. Endopeptidases (3.4.21-3.4.25) derived from bacteria or Archaea
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D3/00Other compounding ingredients of detergent compositions covered in group C11D1/00
    • C11D3/16Organic compounds
    • C11D3/38Products with no well-defined composition, e.g. natural products
    • C11D3/386Preparations containing enzymes, e.g. protease, amylase
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07KPEPTIDES
    • C07K2299/00Coordinates from 3D structures of peptides, e.g. proteins or enzymes

Abstract

The present invention provides novel serine proteases, novel genetic material encoding these enzymes, and proteolytic proteins obtained from Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. and variant proteins developed therefrom. In particular, the present invention provides protease compositions obtained from a Cellulomonas spp, DNA encoding the protease, vectors comprising the DNA encoding the protease, host cells transformed with the vector DNA, and an enzyme produced by the host cells. The present invention also provides cleaning compositions (e.g., detergent compositions), animal feed compositions, and textile and leather processing compositions comprising protease(s) obtained from a Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides mutant (i.e., variant) proteases derived from the wild-type proteases described herein. These mutant proteases also find use in numerous applications.

Description

SERINE PROTEASES, NUCLEIC ACIDS

ENCODING SERINE ENZYMES

AND VECTORS AND HOST CELLS INCORPORATING SAME

The present application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119, to co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial Number 60/523,609, filed November19, 2003

FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides novel serine proteases, novel genetic material encoding these enzymes, and proteolytic proteins obtained from Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. and variant proteins developed therefrom. In particular, the present invention provides protease compositions obtained from a Cellulomonas spp, DNA encoding the protease, vectors comprising the DNA encoding the protease, host cells transformed with the vector DNA, and an enzyme produced by the host cells. The present invention also provides cleaning compositions (e.g., detergent compositions), animal feed compositions, and textile and leather processing compositions comprising protease(s) obtained from a Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides mutant (i.e., variant) proteases derived from the wild-type proteases described herein. These mutant proteases also find use in numerous applications.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Serine proteases are a subgroup of carbonyl hydrolases comprising a diverse class of enzymes having a wide range of specificities and biological functions (See e.g., Stroud, Sci. Amer., 131 :74-88). Despite their functional diversity, the catalytic machinery of serine proteases has been approached by at least two genetically distinct families of enzymes: 1 ) the subtilisins; and 2) the mammalian chymotrypsin-related and homologous bacterial serine proteases (e.g., trypsin and S. griseus trypsin). These two families of serine proteases show remarkably similar mechanisms of catalysis (See e.g., Kraut, Ann. Rev. Biochem., 46:331-358 [1977]). Furthermore, although the primary structure is unrelated, the tertiary structure of these two enzyme families brings together a conserved catalytic triad of amino acids consisting of serine, histidine and aspartate. The subtilisins and chymotrypsin-related serine proteases both have a catalytic triad comprising aspartate, histidine and serine. In the subtilisin-related proteases the relative order of these amino acids, reading from the , amino to carboxy terminus, is aspartate-histidine-serine. However, in the chymotrypsin- related proteases, the relative order is histidine-aspartate-serine. Much research has been conducted on the subtilisins, due largely to their usefulness in cleaning and feed applications. Additional work has been focused on the adverse environmental conditions (e.g., exposure to oxidative agents, chelating agents, extremes of temperature and/or pH) which can adversely impact the functionality of these enzymes in various applications. Nonetheless, there remains a need in the art for enzyme systems that are able to resist these adverse conditions and retain or have improved activity over those currently known in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides novel serine proteases, novel genetic material encoding these enzymes, and proteolytic proteins obtained from Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. and variant proteins developed therefrom. In particular, the present invention provides protease compositions obtained from a Cellulomonas spp, DNA encoding the protease, vectors comprising the DNA encoding the protease, host cells transformed with the vector DNA, and an enzyme produced by the host cells. The present invention also provides cleaning compositions (e.g., detergent compositions), animal feed compositions, and textile and leather processing compositions comprising protease(s) obtained from a Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides mutant (i.e., variant) proteases derived from the wild-type proteases described herein. These mutant proteases also find use in numerous applications.

The present invention provides isolated serine proteases obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some embodiments, the proteases are cellulomonadins. In some preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4. In further embodiments, the protease comprises the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In additional embodiments, the present invention provides isolated serine proteases comprising at least 45% amino acid identity with serine protease comprising SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the isolated serine proteases comprise at least 50% identity, preferably at least 55%, more preferably at least 60%, yet more preferably at least 65%, even more preferably at least 70%, more preferably at least 75%, still more preferably at least 80%, more preferably 85%, yet more preferably 90%, even more preferably at least 95%, and most preferably 99% identity.

The present invention also provides compositions comprising isolated serine proteases having immunological cross-reactivity with the serine proteases obtained from the Micrococcineae. In some preferred embodiments, the serine proteases have immunological cross-reactivity with serine protease obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4. In alternative embodiments, the serine proteases have immunological cross-reactivity with serine protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In still further embodiments, the serine proteases have cross-reactivity with fragments (i.e., portions) of any of the serine proteases obtained from the Micrococcineae, the Cellulomonas 69B4 protease, and/or serine protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.

In some embodiments, the present invention provides the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8, wherein the sequence comprises substitutions at least one amino acid position selected from the group comprising positions 2, 8, 10, 11 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 31 , 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 43, 46, 49, 51 , 54, 61 , 64, 65, 67, 70, 71, 76, 78, 79, 81 , 83, 85, 86, 90, 93, 99, 100, 105, 107, 109, 112, 113, 116, 118, 119, 121 , 123, 127, 145, 155, 159, 160, 163, 165, 170, 174, 179, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, and 188. In alternative embodiments, the sequence comprises substitutions at least one amino acid position selected from the group comprising positions 1, 4, 22, 27, 28, 30, 32, 41 , 47, 48, 55, 59, 63, 66, 69, 75, 77, 80, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 96, 110, 111 , 114, 115, 117, 128, 134, 144, 143, 146, 151 , 154, 156, 158, 161 , 166, 176, 177, 181 , 182, 187, and 189.

In some preferred embodiments, the present invention provides protease variants having an amino acid sequence comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides protease variants having an amino acid sequence comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising at least a portion of SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 2, 8, 10, 11 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 31, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 43, 46, 49, 51 , 54, 61 , 64, 65, 67, 70, 71 , 76, 78, 79, 81, 83, 85, 86, 90, 93, 99, 100, 105, 107, 109, 112, 113, 116, 118, 119, 121, 123, 127, 145, 155, 159, 160, 163, 165, 170, 174, 179, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, and 188 in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease having an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In alternative embodiments, the substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 1, 4, 22, 27, 28, 30, 32, 41 , 47, 48, 55, 59, 63, 66, 69, 75, 77, 80, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 96, 110, 111 , 114, 115, 117, 128, 134, 144, 143, 146, 151 , 154, 156, 158, 161 , 166, 176, 177, 181, 182, 187, and 189, in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease having an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some preferred embodiments, the protease variants comprise the amino acid sequence comprising SEQ ID NO:8, wherein at least one amino acid position at positions selected from the group consisting of 14, 16, 35, 36, 65, 75, 76, 79, 123, 127, 159, and 179, are substituted with another amino acid. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the proteases comprise at least one mutation selected from the group consisting of R14L, R16I, R16L, R16Q, R35F, T36S, G65Q, Y75G, N76L, N76V, R79T, R123L, R123Q, R127A, R127K, R127Q, R159K, R159Q, and R179Q. In some alternative preferred embodiments, the proteases comprise multiple mutations selected from the group consisting of R16Q/R35F/R159Q, R16Q/R123L, R14L/R127Q/R159Q, R14L/R179Q, R123L/R127Q/R179Q, R16Q/R79T/R127Q, and R16Q/R79T. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the proteases comprise the following mutations R123L, R127Q, and R179Q. The present invention also provides protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, A38R, N170Y, N73T, G77T, N24A, T36G, N24E, L69S, T36N, T36S, E119R, N74G, T36W, S76W, N24T, N24Q, T36P, S76Y, T36H, G54D, G78A, S187P, R179V, N24V, V90P, T36D, L69H, G65P, G65R, N7L, W103M, N55F, G186E, A70H, S76V, G186V, R159F, T36Y, T36V, G65V, N24M, S51A, G65Y, Q71 I, V66H, P118A, T116F, A38F, N24H, V66D, S76L, G177M, G186I, H85Q, Q71K, Q71G, G65S, A38D, P118F, A38S, G65T, N67G, T36R, P118R, S114G, Y75I, I181H, G65Q, Y75G, T36F, A38H, R179M, T183I, G78S, A64 , Y75F, G77S, N24L, W103I, V3L, Q81V, R179D, G54R, T36L, Q71 M, A70S, G49F, G54L, G54H, G78H, R179I, Q81 K, V90I, A38L, N67L, T109I, R179N, V66I, G78T, R179Y, S187T, N67K, N73S, E119K, V3I, Q71 H, 111Q, A64H, R14E, R179T, L69V, V150L, Q71A, G65L, Q71 N, V90S, A64N, 111A, N145I, H85T, A64Y, N145Q, V66L, S92G, S188M, G78D, N67A, N7S, V80H, G54K, A70D, P118H, D2G, G54M, Q81H, D2Q, V66E, R79P, A38N, N145E, R179L, T109H, R179K, V66A, G54A, G78N, T109A, R179A, N7A, R179E, H104K, A64R, and V80L. In further embodiments, wherein the amino acid sequence of the protease variants comprise at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of H85R, H85L, T62I, N67H, G54I, N24F, T40V, T86A, G63V, G54Q, A64F, G77Y, R35F, T129S, R61 M, I126L, S76N, T182V, R79G, T109P, R127F, R123E, P118I, T109R, 171S, T183K, N67T, P89N, F1T, A64K, G78I, T109L, G78V, A64M, A64S, T10G, G77N, A64L, N67D, S76T, N42H, D184F, D184R, S76I, S78R, A38K, V72I, V3T, T107S, A38V, F47I, N55Q, S76E, P118Q, T109G, Q71 D, P118K, N67S, Q167N, N145G, I28L, I11T, A64I, G49K, G49A, G65A, N170D, H85K, S185I, I181 N, V80F, L69W, S76R, D184H, V150M, T183M, N67Q, S51Q, A38Y, T107V, N145T, Q71 F, A83N, S76A, N67R, T151L, T163L, S51 F, Q81 I, F47M, A41N, P118E, N67Y, T107M, N73H, 67V, G63W, T10K, I181G, S187E, T107H, D2A, L142V, A143N, A8G, S187L, V90A, G49L, N170L, G65H, T36C, G12W, S76Q, A143S, F1A, N7H, S185V, A110T, N55K, N67F, N7I, A110S, N170A, Q81D, A64Q, Q71 L, A38I, N112I, V90T, N145L, A64T, 111S, A30S, R123I, D2H, V66M, Q71R, V90L, L68W, N24S, R159E, V66N, D184Q, E133Q, A64V, D2N, G13M, T40S, S76K, G177S, G63Q, S15F, A8K, A70G, and A38G. In some preferred embodiments, these variants have improved casein hydrolysis performance as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.

The present invention also provides protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of R35E, R35D, R14E, R14D, Q167E, G49C, S15R, S15H, 111W, S15C, G49Q, R35Q, R35V, G49E, R123D, R123Y, G49H, A38D, R35S, F47R, R123C, T151L, R14T, R35T, R123E, G49A, G49V, D56L, R35N, R35A, G12D, R35C, R123N, T46V, R123H, S155C, T121E, R127E, S113C, R123T, R16E, T46F, T121L, A38C, T46E, R123W, T44E, N55G, A8G, E119G, R35P, R14G, F59W, R127S, R61 E, R14S, S155W, R123F, R123S, G49N, R127D, E119Y, A48E, N170D, R159T, S99A, G12Q, P118R, F165W, R127Q, R35H, G12N, A22C, G12V, R16T, Y57G, T100A, T46Y, R159E, E119R, T107R, T151C, G54C, E119T, R61V, 111E, R14I, R61M, S15E, A22S, R16C, T36C, R16V, L125Q, M180L, R123Q, R14A, R14Q, R35M, R127K, R159Q, N112P, G124D, R179E, G49L, A41D, G177D, R123V, E119V, T10L, T109E, R179D, G12S, T10C, G91Q, S15Y, S155Y, R14C, T163D, T121 F, R14N, F165E, N24E, A41C, R61T, G12I, P118K, T46C, 111T, R159D, N170C, R159V, S155I, 111Q, D2P, T100R, R159S, S114C, R16D, and P134R. In alternative embodiments, the protease variants have amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of S99G, T100K, R127A, F1 P, S155V, T128A, F165H, G177E, A70M, S140P, A87E, D2I, R159K, T36V, R179C, E119N, T10Y, I172A, A8T, F47V, W103L, R61 K, D2V, R179V, D2T, R159N, E119A, G54E, R16Q, G49S, R16I, S51L, S155E, S15M, R179I, T10Q, G12H, R159C, R179T, T163C, R159A, A132S, N157D, G13E, L141M, A41T, R123M, R14M, A8R, Q81P, N24T, T10D, A88F, R61Q, S99K, R179Y, T121A, N112E, S155T, T151V, S99Q, T10E, S92T, T109K, T44C, R123A, A87C, S15F, S155F, D56F, T10F, A83H, R179M, T121 D, G13D, P118C, G49F, Q174C, S114E, T86E, F1N, T115C, R127C, R123K, V66N, G12Y, S113A, S15N, A175T, R79T, R123G, R179S, R179N, R123I, P118A, S187E, N112D, A70G, E119L, E119S, R159M, R14H, R179F, A64C, A41S, R179W, N24G, T100Q, P118W, Q81G, G49K, R14L, N55A, R35K, R79V, D2M, T160D, A83D, R179L, S51A, G12P, S99H, N42D, S188E, T10M, L125M, T116N, A70P, Q174S, G65D, S113D, E119Q, A83E, N170L, Q81A, S51C, P118G, Q174T, I28V, S15G, and T116G. In some preferred embodiments, these variants have improved LAS stability as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.

The present invention also provides protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of G26I, G26K, G26Q, G26V, G26W, F27V, F27W, I28P, T29E, T129W, T40D, T40Q, R43D, P43H, P43K, P43L, A22C, T40H, P89W, G91L, S18E, F59K, A30M, A30N, G31M, C33M, G161L, G161V, P43N, G26E, N73P, G84C, G84P, G45V, C33L, Y9E, Y9P, A147E, C158H, I28W, A48P, A22S, T62R, S137R, S155P, S155R, G156I, G156L, Q81A, R96C, I4D, I4P, A70P, C105E, C105G, C105K, C105M, C105N, C105S, T128A, T128V, T128G, S140P, G12D, C33N, C33E, T164G, G45A, G156P, S99A, Q167L, S155W, I28T, R96F, A30P, R123W, T40P, T39R, C105P, T100A, C105W, S155K, T46Y, R123F, I4G, S155Y, T46V, A93S, Y57N, Q81S, G186S, G31H, T10Y, G31V, A83H, A38D, R123Y, R79T, C158G, G31Y, Q81P, R96E, A30Y, R159K, A22T, T40N, Y57M, G31N, Q81G, T164L, T121E, T10F, Q146P, R123N, V3R, P43G, Q81H, Q81 D, G161 I, C158M, N24T, T10W, T128S, T160I, Y176P, S155F, T128C, L125A, P168Y, T62G, F166S, S188A, Q81 F, T46W, A70G, and A38G. In alternative embodiments, the protease variants have amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of S188E, S188V, Y117K, Y117Q, Y117R, Y117V, R127K, R127Q, R123L, T86S, R123I, Q81 E, L125M, H32A, S188T, N74F, C33D, F27I, A83M, Q71Y, R123T, V90A, F59W, L141C, N170E, T46F, S51V, G162P, S185R, A41S, R79V, T151C, T107S, T129Y, M180L, F166C, C105T, T160E, P89A, R159T, T183P, S188M, T10L, G25S, N24S, E119L, T107L, T107Q, G161K, G15Q, S15R, G153K, G153V, S188G, A83E, G186P, T121D, G49A, S15C, C105Y, C105A, R127F, Q71A, T10C, R179K, T86I, W103N, A87S, F166A, A83F, R123Q, A132C, A143H, T163I, T39V, A93D, V90M, R123K, P134W, G177N, V115I, S155T, T110D, G105L, N170D, T107A, G84V, G84M, L111K, P168I, G154L, T183I, S99G, S15T, A8G, S15N, P189S, S188C, T100Q, A110G, A121A, G12A, R159V, G31A, G154R, T182L, V115L, T160Q, T107F, R159Q, G144A, S92T, T101S, A83R, G12HM S15H, T116Q, T36V, G154, Q81C, V130T, T183A, P118T, A87E, T86M, V150N, and N24E. In some preferred embodiments, these variants have improved thermostability as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.

The present invention also provides protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, I172T, N24E, N170Y, G77T, G186N, I181 L, N73T, A38R, N74G, N24A, G54D, S76D, R123E, 159E, N112E, R35E, R179V, R123D, N24T, R179T, R14L, A38D, V90P, R14Q, R123I, R179D, S76V, R79G, R35L, S76E, S76Y, R79D, R79P, R35Q, R179N, N112D, R179E, G65P, Y75G, V90S, R179M, R35F, R123F, A64I, N24Q, R14I, R179A, R127A, R179I, N170D, R35A, R159F, T109E, R14D, N67D, G49A, N112Q, G78D, T121E, L69S, T116E, V90I, T36S, T36G, N145E, T86D, S51D, R179K, T107E, T129S, L142V, R79A, R79E, A38H, T107S, R123A, N55E, R123L, R159N, G65D, R14N, G65Q, R123Q, N24V, R14G, T116Q, A38N, R159Q, R179Y, A83E, N112L, S99N, G78A, T10N, H85Q, R35Q, N24L, N24H, G49S, R79L, S76T, S76L, G65S, N55F, R79V, G65T, R123N, T86E, Y75F, F1T, S76N, S99V, R79T, N112V, R79M, T107V, R79S, G54E, G65V, R127Q, R159D, T107H, H85T, R35T, T36N, Q81 E, R123H, S76I, A38F, V90T, and R14T. In alternative embodiments, the protease variants have amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of G65L, S99D, T107M, S113T, S99T, G77S, R14M, A64N, R61 M, A70D, Q71G, A93D, S92G, N112Y, S15W, R159K, N67G, T10E, R127H, A64Y, R159C, A38L, T160E, T183E, R127S, A8E, S51Q, N7L, G63D, A38S, R35H, R14K, T107I, G12D, A64L, S76W, A41 N, R35M, A64V, A38Y, T183I, W103M, A41D, R127K, T36D, R61T, G65Y, G13S, R35Y, R123T, A64H, G49H, A70H, A64F, R127Y, R61 E, A64P, T121D, V115A, R123Y, T101S, T182V, H85L, N24M, R127E, N145D, Q71 H, S76Q, A64T, G49F, A64Q, T10D, F1 D, A70G, R35W, Q71D, N121 I, A64M, T36H, A8G, T107N, R35S, N67T, S92A, N170L, N67E, S114A, R14A, R14S, Q81D, S51H, R123S, A93S, R127F, 119V, T40V, S185N, R123G, R179L, S51V, T163D, T109I, A64S, V72I, N67S, R159S, H85M, T109G, Q71S, R61H, T107A, Q81V, V90N, T109A, A38T, N145T, R159A, A110S, Q81 H, A48E, S51T, A64W, R159L, N67H, A93E, T116F, R61S, R123V, V3L, and R159Y. In some preferred embodiments, these variants have improved keratin hydrolysis activity as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.

The present invention also provides protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, P89D, A93T, A93S, T36N, N73T, T36G, R159F, T36S, A38R, S99W, S76W, T36P, G77T, G54D, R127A, R159E, H85Q, T36D, S76L, S99N, Y75G, S76Y, R127S, N24E, R127Q, D184F, N170Y, N24A, S76T, H85L, Y75F, S76V, L69S, R159K, R127K, G65P, N74G, R159H,

G65Q, G186V, A48Q, T36H, N67L, R14I, R127L, T36Y, S76I, S114G, R127H, S187P, V3L, G78D, R123I, I181Q, R35F, H85R, R127Y, N67S, Q81P, R123F, R159N, S99A, S76D, A132V, R127F, A143N, S92A, N24T, R79P, S76N, R14M, G186E, N24Q, N67A, R127T, H85K, G65T, G65Y, R179V, Y75I, 111Q, A38L, T36L, R159Y, R159D, N24V, G65S, N157D, G186I, G54Q, N67Y, R127G, S76A, A38S, T109E, V66H, T116F, R123L, G49A, A64H, T36W, D184H, S99D, G161K, P134E, A64F, N67G, S99T, D2Q, S76E, R16Q, G54N, N67V, R35L, Q71 I, N7L, N112E, L69H, N24H, G54I, R16L, N24M, A64Y, S113A, H85F, R79G, 111A, T121D, R61V, and G65L. In alternative embodiments, the protease variants have amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of N67Q, S187Q, Q71H, T163D, R61K, R159V, Q71 F, V31 F, V90I, R79D, T160E, R123Q, A38Y, S113G, A88F, A70G, 111T, G78A, N24L, S92G, R14L, D184R, G54L, N112L, H85Y, R16N, G77S, R179T, V80L, G65V, T121E, Q71D, R16G, P89N, N42H, G49F, I11S, R61 M, R159C, G65R, T183I, A93D, L111 E, S51Q, G78N, N67T, A38N, T40V, A64W, R159L, T10E, R179K, R123E, V90P, A64N, G161E, H85T, A8G, L142V,

A41 , S185I, Q71L, A64T, R16I, A38D, G54M, N112Q, R16A, R14E, V80H, N170D, S99G, R179N, S15E, G49H, A70P, A64S, G54A, S185W, R61H, T10Q, A38F, N170L, T10L, N67F, G12D, D184T, R14N, S187E, R14P, N112D, S140A, N112G G49S, L111D, N67M, V15OL, G12Y, R123K, P89V, V66D, G77N, S51T, A8D, I181 H, T86N, R179D, N55F, N24S, D184L, R61S, N67K, G186L, F1T, R159A, I11L, R61T, D184Q, A93E, Q71T, R179E, L69W, T163I, S188Q, L125V, A38V, R35A, P134G, A64V, N145D, V90T, and A143S. In some preferred embodiments, these variants have improved BMI performance as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.

The present invention also provides protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, N170Y,

A38R, R79P, G77T, L69S, N73T, S76V, S76Y, R179V, T36N, N55F, R159F, G54D, G65P, L69H, T36G, G177M, N24E, N74G, R159E, T36S, Y75G, S76I, S76D, A8R, A24A, V90P, R159C, G65Q, T121E, A8V, S76L, T109E, R179M, A8T, T107N, G186E, S76W, R123E, A38F, T36P, N67G, Y75F, S76N, R179I, S187P, N67V, V90S, R127A, R179Y, R35F, N145S, G65S, R61M, S51A, R179N, R123D, N24T, N55E, R79C, G186V, R123I, G161E, G65Y, A38S, R14L, V90I, R79G, N145E, N67L, R127S, R150Y, M180D, N67T, A93D, T121 D, Q81V, T109I, A93E; T107S, R179T, R179L, R179K, R159D, R179A, R79E, R123F, R79D, T36D, A64N, L142V, T109A, 1172V, A83N, T85A, R179D, A38L, I126L, R127Q, R127L, L69W, R127K, G65T, R127H, P134A, N67D, R14M, N24Q, A143N, N55S, N67M., S51 D, S76E, T163D, A38D, R159K, T183I, G63V, A8S, T107M, H85Q, N112E, N67F,

N67S, A64H, T86I, P134E, T182V, N67Y, A64S, G78D, V90T, R61T, R16Q, G65R, T86L, V90N, R159Q, G54I, S76C, R179E, V66D, L69V, R127Y, R35L, R14E, and T86F. In alternative embodiments, the protease variants have amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of G186I, A64Q, T109G, G64L, N24L, A8E, N112D, A38H, R179W, S114G, R123L, A8L, T129S, N170D, R159N, N67C, S92C, T107A, G54E, T107E, T36V, R127T, A8N, H85L, A110S, N170C, A64R, A132V, T36Y, G63D, W103M, T151V, R123P, W103Y, S76T, S187T, R127F, N67A, P171 M, A70S, R159H, S76Q, L125V, G54Q, G49L, R14I, R14Q, A83I, V90L, T183E, R159A, T101S,

5 G65D, G54A, T107Q, Q71M, T86E, N24M, N55Q, R61V, P134D, R96K, A88F, N145Q, A64M, A64T, N24V, S140A, A8H, A64I, R123Q, T183Q, N24H, A64W, T62I, T129G, R35A, T40V, 111T, A38N, N145G, A175T, G77Q, T109H, A8P, R35E, T109N, A110T, N67Q, G63P, H85R, S92G, A175V, S51Q, G63Q, T116F, G65A, R79L, N145P, L69Q, Q146D, A83D, F166Y, R123A, T121L, R123H, A70P, T182W, S76A, A64F, T107H, G186L,Q81 I,o R123K, A64L, N67R, V3L, S187E, S161 K, T86M, I4M, G77N, G49A, A41N, G54M, T107V, Q81 E, A38I, T109L, T183K, A70G, Q71D, T183L, Q81 H, A64V, A93Q, S188E, S51 F, ' G186P, G186T, R159L, P134G, N145T, N55V, V66E, R159V, Y176L, and R16L. . In some preferred embodiments, these variants have improved BMI performance under low pH conditions, as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. s The present invention also provides serine proteases comprising at least a portion of an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:8, SEQ ID NO:6, SEQ ID NO:7, and SEQ ID NO:9. In some embodiments, the nucleotide sequences encoding these serine proteases comprise a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:1, SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:4, and SEQ ID NO:5.o In some embodiments, the serine proteases are variants having amino acid sequences that are similar to that set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and 5 Promicromonospora. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from variants of Cellulomonas 69B4.

The present invention also provides isolated protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acido sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8, wherein the amino acid of the protease comprises Arg14, Ser15, Arg16, Cys17, His32, Cys33, Phe52, Asp56, ThMOO, Val115, Thr116, Tyr117, Pro118, Glu119, Ala132, Glu133, Pro134, Gly135, Asp136, Ser137, Thr151 , Ser152, Gly153, Gly154, Ser155, Gly156, Asn157, Thr164, and Phe165. In some embodiments, the catalytic triad of the proteases comprises His 32, Asp56, and Ser137. In altemative embodiments, the proteases comprise Cys131 , Ala132, Glu133, Pro134, Gly135, Thr151 , Ser152, Gly153, Gly154, Ser155, Gly156, Asn157 and Gly 162, Thr 163, and Thr164. In some preferred embodiments, the amino acid sequence of the proteases comprise Phe52, Tyr117, Pro118 and Glu119. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the amino acids sequences of the proteases have main-chain to main-chain hydrogen bonding from Gly 154 to the substrate main-chain.

In embodiments, the proteases of the present invention comprise three disulfide bonds. In some preferred embodiments, the disulfide bonds are located between C17 and C38, C95 and C105, and C131 and C158. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the disulfide bonds are located between C17 and C38, C95 and C105, and C131 and C158 of SEQ ID NO:8. In alternative protease variant embodiments, the disulfide bonds are located at positions equivalent to the disulfide bonds in SEQ ID NO:8.

The present invention also provides isolated protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8, wherein the variants have altered substrate specificities as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. In some further preferred embodiments, the variants have altered pis as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. In additional preferred embodiments, the variants have improved stability as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. In still further preferred embodiments, the variants exhibit altered surface properties. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the variants exhibit altered surface properties as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. In additional particularly preferred embodiments, the variants comprise mutations at least one substitution at sites selected from the group consisting of 1 , 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 22, 24, 25, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41 , 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51 , 52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 59, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 71 , 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81 , 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91 , 92, 93, 95, 99, 100, 101 , 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111 , 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 123, 124, 126, 127, 128, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 137, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161 , 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 170, 171, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181 , 182, 183, and 184.

The present invention also provides protease variants having at least one improved property as compared to the wild-type protease. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the variants are variants of a serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from variants of Cellulomonas 69B4. In some preferred embodiments, at least one improved property is selected from the group consisting of acid stability, thermostability, casein hydrolysis, keratin hydrolysis, cleaning performance, and LAS stability.

The present invention also provides expression vectors comprising a polynucleotide sequence encoding protease variants having amino acid sequences comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In further embodiments, the present invention provides host cells comprising these expression vectors. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the host cells are selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp. The present invention also provides the serine proteases produced by the host cells.

The present invention also provides variant proteases comprising an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 78, In some preferred embodiments, the amino acid sequence is encoded by a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:53, 55, 57, 59, 61 , 63, 65, 67, 69, 71 , 73, 75, and 77. In further embodiments, the present invention provides expression vectors comprising a polynucleotide sequence encoding at least one protease variant. In additional embodiments, the present invention provides host cells comprising these expression vectors. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the host cells are selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp. The present invention also provides the serine proteases produced by the host cells.

The present invention also provides compositions comprising at least a portion of an isolated serine protease of obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae, wherein the protease is encoded by a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:1 , SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:3, and SEQ ID NO:4. In some preferred embodiments, the sequence comprises at least a portion of SEQ ID NO:1. In further embodiments, the present invention provides host cells comprising these expression vectors. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the host cells are selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp. The present invention also provides the serine proteases produced by the host cells.

The present invention also provides variant serine proteases, wherein the proteases comprise at least one substitution corresponding to the amino acid positions in SEQ ID NO:8, and wherein variant proteases have better performance in at least one property

5 selected from the group consisting of keratin hydrolysis, thermostability, casein activity, LAS stability, and cleaning, as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.

The present invention also provides isolated polynucleotides comprising a nucleotide sequence (i) having at least 70% identity to SEQ ID NO:4, or (ii) being capable of hybridizing to a probe derived from the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, under conditionso of intermediate to high stringency, or (iii) being complementary to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:4. In embodiments, the present invention provides expression vectors encoding at least one such polynucleotide. In further embodiments, the present invention provides host cells comprising these expression vectors. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the host cells are selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp.,s Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp. The present invention also provides the serine proteases produced by the host cells. In further embodiments, the present invention provides polynucleotides that are complementary to at least a portion of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:4.

The present invention also provides methods of producing an enzyme havingo protease activity, comprising: transforming a host cell with an expression vector comprising a polynucleotide having at least 70% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4; cultivating the transformed host cell under conditions suitable for host cell. In some embodiments, the host cell is selected from the group consisting of Streptomyces, Aspergillus, Trichoderma and Bacillus species. 5 The present invention also provides probes comprising 4 to 150 nucleotide sequence substantially identical to a corresponding fragment of SEQ ID NO:4, wherein the probe is used to detect a nucleic acid sequence coding for an enzyme having proteolytic activity, and wherein the nucleic acid sequence is obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some embodiments, the Micrococcineae is a Cellulomonas spp. In some preferredo embodiments, the Cellulomonas is Cellulomonas strain 69B4.

The present invention also provides cleaning compositions comprising at least one serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some embodiments, ate least one protease is obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora. In some preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4. In some particularly preferred embodiments, at least one protease comprises the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some further embodiments, the present invention provides isolated serine proteases comprising at least 45% amino acid identity with serine protease comprising SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the isolated serine proteases comprise at least 50% identity, preferably at least 55%, more preferably at least 60%, yet more preferably at least 65%, even more preferably at least 70%, more preferably at least 75%, still more preferably at least 80%, more preferably 85%, yet more preferably 90%, even more preferably at least 95%, and most preferably 99% identity. 75. The present invention further provides cleaning compositions comprising at least one serine protease, wherein at least one of the serine proteases has immunological cross- reactivity with the serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some preferred embodiments, the serine proteases have immunological cross-reactivity with serine protease obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4. In alternative embodiments, the serine proteases have immunological cross-reactivity with serine protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In still further embodiments, the serine proteases have cross-reactivity with fragments (i.e., portions) of any of the serine proteases obtained from the Micrococcineae, the Cellulomonas 69B4 protease, and/or serine protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. The present invention further provides cleaning compositions comprising at least one serine protease, wherein the protease is a variant protease having an amino acid sequence comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease having an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 2, 8, 10, 1 1 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 31 , 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 43, 46, 49, 51, 54, 61 , 64, 65, 67, 70, 71 , 76, 78, 79, 81 , 83, 85, 86, 90, 93, 99, 100, 105, 107, 109, 112, 113, 116, 118, 119, 121 , 123, 127, 145, 155, 159, 160, 163, 165, 170, 174, 179, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, and 188 in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In alternative embodiments, the substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 1 , 4, 22, 27, 28, 30, 32, 41 , 47, 48, 55, 59, 63, 66, 69, 75, 77, 80, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 96, 110, 111 , 114, 115, 117, 128, 134, 144, 143, 146, 151, 154, 156, 158, 161 , 166, 176, 177, 181 , 182, 187, and 189, in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In further embodiments, the protease comprises at least one amino acid substitutions at positions 14, 16, 35, 36, 65, 75, 76, 79, 123, 127, 159, and 179, in an equivalent amino acid sequence to that set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.. In still further embodiments, the protease comprises at least one mutation selected from the group consisting of R14L, R16I, R16L, R16Q, R35F, T36S, G65Q, Y75G, N76L, N76V, R79T, R123L, R123Q, R127A, R127K, R127Q, R159K, R159Q, and R179Q. In yet additional embodiments, the protease comprises a set of mutations selected from the group consisting of the sets R16Q/R35F/R159Q, R16Q/R123L, R14L/R127Q/R159Q, R14L/R179Q, R123L/R127Q/R179Q, R16Q/R79T/R127Q, and R16Q/R79T. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the protease comprises the following mutations R123L, R127Q, and R179Q. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the variant serine proteases comprise at least one substitution corresponding to the amino acid positions in SEQ ID NO:8, and wherein the variant proteases have better performance in at least one property selected from the group consisting of keratin hydrolysis, thermostability, casein activity, LAS stability, and cleaning, as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. In some embodiments, the variant protease comprises an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 78. In alternative embodiments, the variant protease amino acid sequence is encoded by a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:53, 55, 57, 59, 61 , 63, 65, 67, 69, 71 , 73, 75, and 77.

The present invention also provides cleaning compositions comprising a cleaning effective amount of a proteolytic enzyme, the enzyme comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 70 % sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4, and a suitable cleaning formulation. In some preferred embodiments, the cleaning compositions further comprise one or more additional enzymes or enzyme derivatives selected from the group consisting of proteases, amylases, lipases, mannanases, pectinases, cutinases, oxidoreductases, hemicellulases, and cellulases.

The present invention also provides compositions comprising at least one serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae, wherein the compositions further comprise at least one stabilizer. In some embodiments, the stabilizer is selected from the group consisting of borax and glycerol. In some embodiments, the present invention provides competitive inhibitors suitable to stablize the enzyme of the present invention to anionic surfactants. In some embodiments, at least one protease is obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora. In some preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4. In some particularly preferred embodiments, at least one protease comprises the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.

The present invention also provides animal feed comprising at least one serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae. In some embodiments, at least

5 one protease is obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of

Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora. In some preferred embodiments, the protease is obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4. In some particularly preferred embodiments, at least one protease comprises the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ I D NO:8. o The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide having proteolytic activity,

(e.g., a protease) having the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the present invention provides isolated polypeptides having approximately 40% to 98% identity with the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some preferred embodiments, the polypeptides have approximately 50% to 95% identity with the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some additional preferred embodiments, the polypeptides have approximately 60% to 90% identity with the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In yet additional embodiments, the polypeptides have approximately 65% to 85% identity with the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the polypeptides have approximately 90% to 95% identity with the sequence set forth in SEQ IDo NO:8.

The present invention further provides proteases obtained from bacteria of the suborder Micrococcineae. In some preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from members of the family Rromicromonosporaceae. In yet further embodiments, the proteases are obtained from any member of the genera Xylanimicrobium, Xylanibacterium,5 Xylanimonas, Myceligenerans, and Promicromonospora. In some preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from members of the family Cellulomonadaceae. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from members of the genera Cellulomonas and Oerskovia. In some further preferred embodiments, the proteases are derived from Cellulomonas spp. In some embodiments, the Cellulomonas spp. is selectedo from Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas biazotea, Cellulomonas cellasea, Cellulomonas hominis, Cellulomonas flavigena, Cellulomonas persica, Cellulomonas iranensis, Cellulomonas gelida, Cellulomonas humilata, Cellulomonas turbata, Cellulomonas uda, Cellulomonas fermentans, Cellulomonas xylanilytica, Cellulomonas humilata and Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). In alternative embodiments, the proteases are derived from Oerskovia spp. In some preferred embodiments, the Oerskovia spp. is selected from Oerskovia jenensis, Oerskovia paurometabola, Oerskovia enterophila, Oerskovia turbata and Oerskovia turbata strain DSM 20577. In some embodiments, the proteases have apparent molecular weights of about

17kD to 21 kD as determined by a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionizaton - time of flight ("MALDI-TOF") spectrophotometer.

The present invention further provides isolated polynucleotides that encode proteases comprise an amino acid sequence comprising at least 40% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the proteases have at least 50% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the proteases have at least 60% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the proteases have at least 70% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the proteases have at least 80% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the proteases have at least 90% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the proteases have at least 95% amino acid sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8. The present invention also provides expression vectors comprising any of the polynucleotides provided above.

The present invention further provides host cells transformed with the expression vectors of the present invention, such that at least one protease is expressed by the host cells. In some embodiments, the host cells are bacteria, while in other embodiments, the host cells are fungi. In some preferred embodiments, the bacterial host cells are selected from the group consisting of the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces. In some alternative preferred embodiments, the fungal host cells are members of the genus Trichoderma, while in other alternative preferred embodiments, the fungal host cells are members of the genus Aspergillus.

The present invention also provides isolated polynucleotides comprising a nucleotide sequence (i) having at least 70% identity to SEQ ID NOS:3 or 4, or (ii) being capable of hybridizing to a probe derived from the nucleotide sequence disclosed in SEQ ID NOS: 3 or 4, under conditions of medium to high stringency, or (iii) being complementary to the nucleotide sequence disclosed in SEQ ID NOS:3 or 4. In some embodiments, the present invention provides vectors comprising such polynucleotide. In further embodiments, the present invention provides host cells transformed with such vector.

The present invention further provides methods for producing at least one enzyme having protease activity, comprising: the steps of transforming a host cell with an expression vector comprising a polynucleotide comprising at least 70% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4, cultivating the transformed host cell under conditions suitable for the host cell to produce the protease; and recovering the protease. In some preferred embodiments, the host cell is a Streptomyces spp, while in other embodiments, the host cell is a Bacillus spp,, a Trichoderma spp., and/or a Aspergillus spp. In some embodiments, the Streptomyces spp. is Streptomyces lividans. In alternative embodiments, the host cell is T. reesei. In further embodiments, the Aspergillus spp. is A. niger.

The present invention also provides fragments (i.e., portions) of the DNA encoding the proteases provided herein. These fragments find use in obtaining partial length DNA fragments capable of being used to isolate or identify polynucleotides encoding mature protease enzyme described herein from Cellulomonas 69B4, or a segment thereof having proteolytic activity. In some embodiments, portions' of the DNA provided in SEQ ID NO:1 find use in obtaining homologous fragments of DNA from other species, and particularly from Micrococcineae spp. which encode a protease or portion thereof having proteolytic activity.

The present invention further provides at least one probe comprising a polynucleotide substantially identical to a fragment of SEQ ID NOS:1 , 2, 3 or 4, wherein the probe is used to detect a nucleic acid sequence coding for an enzyme having proteolytic activity, and wherein the nucleic acid sequence is obtained from a bacterial source. In some embodiments, the bacterial source is a Cellulomonas spp. In some preferred embodiments, the bacterial source is Cellulomonas strain 69B4.

The present invention further provides compositions comprising at least one of the proteases provided herein. In some preferred embodiments, the compositions are cleaning compositions. In some embodiments, the present invention provides cleaning compositions comprising a cleaning effective amount of at least one protease comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 40% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, at least 90% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, and/or having an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:8. In some embodiments, the cleaning compositions further comprise at least one suitable cleaning adjunct. In some embodiments, the protease is derived from a Cellulomonas sp. In some preferred embodiments, the Cellulomonas spp. is selected from Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas biazotea, Cellulomonas cellasea, Cellulomonas hominis, Cellulomonas flavigena, Cellulomonas persica, Cellulomonas iranensis, Cellulomonas gelida, Cellulomonas humilata, Cellulomonas turbata, Cellulomonas uda, and Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). In some particularly preferred embodiments, the Cellulomonas spp is Cellulomonas. strain 69B4. In still further embodiments, the cleaning composition further comprises at least one additional enzymes or enzyme derivatives selected from the group consisting of protease, amylase, lipase, mannanase and cellulase. The present invention also provides isolated naturally occurring proteases comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 45% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, at least 60% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, at least 75% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, at least 90% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, at least 95% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:8, and/or having the sequence identity of SEQ ID NO:8, the protease being isolated from a Cellulomonas spp.. In some embodiments, the protease is isolated from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035).

In additional embodiments, the present invention provides engineered variants of the serine proteases of the present invention. In some embodiments, the engineered variants are genetically modified using recombinant DNA technologies, while in other embodiments, the variants are naturally occurring. The present invention further encompasses engineered variants of homologous enzymes. In some embodiments, the engineered variant homologous proteases are genetically modified using recombinant DNA technologies, while in other embodiments, the variant homologous proteases are naturally occurring.

The present invention also provides serine proteases that immunologically cross- react with the Cellulomonas 69B4 protease (i.e., ASP) of the present invention. Indeed, it is intended that the present invention encompass fragments (e.g., epitopes) of the ASP protease that stimulate an immune response in animals (including, but not limited to humans) and/or are recognized by antibodies of any class. The present invention further encompasses epitopes on proteases that are cross-reactive with ASP epitopes. In some embodiments, the ASP epitopes are recognized by antibodies, but do not stimulate an immune response in animals (including, but not limited to humans), while in other embodiments, the ASP epitopes stimulate an immune response in at least one animal species (including, but not limited to humans) and are recognized by antibodies of any class. The present invention also provides means and compositions for identifying and assessing cross-reactive epitopes.

The present invention further provides at least one polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide (i) having at least 70% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:9, or (ii) being capable of hybridizing to a probe derived from the polypeptide sequence encoding SEQ ID NO:9, under conditions of medium to high stringency, or (iii) being complementary to the polypeptide sequence provided in SEQ ID NO:9. In further embodiments, the present invention provides at vectors comprising the polynucleotide described above. In yet additional embodiments, a host cell is provided that is transformed with the vector.

The present invention also provides methods for producing proteases, comprising: (a) transforming a host cell with an expression vector comprising a polynucleotide having at least 70% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4, at least 95% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4, and/or having a polynucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:4; (b) cultivating the transformed host cell under conditions suitable for the host cell to produce the protease; and (c) recovering the protease. In some embodiments, the host cell is a Bacillus species (e.g., β. subtilis, B. clausii, or B. licheniformis). In alternative embodiments, the host cell is a Streptomyces spp., (e.g., Streptomyces lividans). In additional embodiments, the host cell is a Trichoderma spp., (e.g., Trichoderma reesei). In yet further embodiments, the host cell is a Aspergillus spp., (e.g., Aspergillus niger).

As will be appreciated, an advantage of the present invention is that a polynucleotide has been isolated which provides the capability of isolating further polynucleotides which encode proteins having serine protease activity, wherein the backbone is substantially identical to that of the Cellulomonas protease of the present invention.

In further embodiments, the present invention provides means to produce host cells that are capable of producing the serine proteases of the present invention in relatively large quantities. In particularly preferred embodiments, the present invention provides means to produce protease with various commercial applications where degradation or synthesis of polypeptides are desired, including cleaning compositions, as well as feed components, textile processing, leather finishing, grain processing, meat processing, cleaning, preparation of protein hydrolysates, digestive aids, microbicidal compositions, bacteriostatic composition, fungistatic compositions, personal care products, including oral care, hair care, and/or skin care.

The present invention further provides enzyme compositions have comparable or improved wash performance, as compared to presently used subtilisin proteases. Other objects and advantages of the present invention are apparent from the present Specification.

DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

Figure 1 provides an unrooted phylogenetic tree illustrating the relationship of novel strain 69B4 to members of the family Cellulomonadaceae and other related genera of the suborder Micrococcineae.

Figure 2 provides a phylogenetic tree for ASP protease.

Figure 3 provides a MALDI TOF spectrum of a protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 Figure 4 shows the sequence of N-terrninal most tryptic peptide from C. flavigena

Figure 5 provides the plasmid map of the pSEGCT vector.

Figure 6 provides the plasmid map of the pSEGCT69B4 vector.

Figure 7 provides the plasmid map of the pSEA469BCT vector.

Figure 8 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-Asp-C1-1 vector. Figure 9 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-Asp-C1-2 vector.

Figure 10 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-Asp-C2-1 vector.

Figure 11 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-Asp-C2-2 vector.

Figure 12 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-ASP-lll vector.

Figure 13 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-ASP-IV vector. Figure 14 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT-ASP-VII vector.

Figure 15 provides the plasmid map of the pXX-Kpnl vector.

Figure 16 provides the plasmid map of the p2JM103-DNNP1 vector.

Figure 17 provides the plasmid map of the pHPLT vector.

Figure 18 provides the map and MXL-prom sequences for the opened pHPLT-ASP- C1-2.

Figure 19 provides the plasmid map of the pENMx3 vector. Figure 20 provides the plasmid map of the plCatH vector.

Figure 21 provides the plasmid map of the pTREX4 vector.

Figure 22 provides the plasmid map of the pSLGAMpR2 vector. Figure 23 provides the plasmid map of the pRAXdes2-ASP vector.

Figure 24 provides the plasmid map of the pAPDI vector.

Figure 25 provides graphs showing ASP autolysis. Panel A provides a graph showing the ASP autolysis peptides observed in a buffer without LAS. Panel B provides a graph showing the ASP autolysis peptides observed in a buffer with 0.1% LAS. Figure 26 compares the cleaning activity (absorbance at 405 nm) dose (ppm) response curves of certain serine proteases (69B4 [-x-]; PURAFECT® [ -♦- ]; RELASE™ [- A-]; and OPTIMASE™ [-■-] in liquid TIDE® detergent under North American wash conditions.

Figure 27 provides a graph that compares the cleaning activity (absorbance at 405 nm) dose (ppm) response curves of certain serine proteases (69B4 [-x-]; PURAFECT® [-♦- ]; RELASE™ [-A-]; and OPTIMASE™ [-■-] in powder detergent (0.66 g/l) North American concentration/detergent formulation under Japanese wash conditions.

Figure 28 provides a graph that compares the cleaning activity (absorbance at 405 nm) dose (ppm) response curves of certain serine proteases (69B4 [-x-]; PURAFECT® [-♦- ]; RELASE™ [-A-]; and OPTIMASE™ [-■-] in ARIEL® REGULAR detergent powder under European wash conditions. Figure 29 provides a graph that compares the cleaning activity (absorbance at 405 nm) dose (ppm) response curves of certain serine protease (69B4 [-x-]; PURAFECT® [-♦- ]; RELASE™ [-A-]; and OPTIMASE™ [-■-] in PURE CLEAN detergent powder under Japanese conditions.

Figure 30 provides a graph that compares the cleaning activity (absorbance at 405 nm) dose (ppm) response curves of certain serine proteases (69B4 [-x-]; PURAFECT® [-♦- ]; RELASE™ [-A-]; and OPTIMASE™ [-■-] in powder detergent (1.00 g/l) under North American conditions.

Figure 31 provides a graph that shows comparative oxidative inactivation of various serine proteases (100 ppm) as a measure of per cent enzyme activity over time (minutes) (69B4 [-*]; BPN' variant 1 [-♦- ]; PURAFECT® [-A-]; and GG36-variant 1 [-■-]) with 0.1 M H2O2 at pH 9.45, 25°C.

Figure 32 provides a graph that shows comparative chelator inactivation of various serine proteases (100 ppm) as a measure of per cent enzyme activity over time (minutes) (69B4 [-*]; BPN'-variant 1 [-♦- ]; PURAFECT® [-A-]; and GG36-variant 1 [-■-] with 10mM EDTA at pH 8.20, 45°C.

Figure 33 provides a graph that shows comparative thermal inactivation of various serine proteases (100 ppm) as a measure of percent enzyme activity over time (minutes) (69B4 [-X-]; BPN'-variant [-♦- ]; PURAFECT® [- A-]; and GG36-variant 1 [-■-] with 50 mM Tris at pH 8.0, 45°C. Figure 34 provides a graph that shows comparative thermal inactivation of certain serine proteases (69B4 [-x-]; BPN'-variant [-♦- ]; PURAFECT® [-A-]; and GG36-variant-1 [- ■-] at pH 8.60, over a temperature gradient of 57°C to 62°C.

Figure 35 provides a graph that shows enzyme activity (hydrolysis of di-methyl casein measured by absorbance at 405 nm) of certain serine proteases (2.5 ppm) (69B4 [- ■- ]; BPN'-variant [-♦- PURAFECT® [-A-]; and GG36-variant 1 [ -• -] at pH 's ranging from 5 to 12 at 37°C.

Figure 36 provides a bar graph that shows enzyme stability as indicated by % remaining activity (hydrolysis of di-methyl casein measured by absorbance at 405 nm) of certain serine proteases (2.5 ppm) (69B4, BPN'- variant; PURAFECT® and GG36-variant 1 at pHs ranging from 3 (| ), 4 (gj| ), 5 ( § ) to 6 ( βg ) at 25°, 35°, and 45'C, respectively.

Figure 37 provides a graph that shows enzyme stability as indicated by % remaining activity of a BPN'-variant at pH ranges from 3 (-♦-), 4 (-■--), 5 ( - A-- ) to 6 (-X-) at 25°, 35°, and 45°C, respectively

Figure 38 provides a graph that shows enzyme stability as indicated by % remaining activity of PURAFECT® TM protease at pH ranges from 3 (-♦- ), 4 (-■--), 5 (~A- ) to 6 (-- X") at 25°, 35°, and 45°C, respectively

Figure 39 provides a graph that shows enzyme stability as indicated by % remaining activity of 69B4 protease at pH ranges from 3 (-♦- ), 4 (-■-), 5 ( --A- ) to 6 (-X-) at 25 °, 35° and 45°C, respectively

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides novel serine proteases, novel genetic material encoding these enzymes, and proteolytic proteins obtained from Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. and variant proteins developed therefrom. In particular, the present invention provides protease compositions obtained from a Cellulomonas spp, DNA encoding the protease, vectors comprising the DNA encoding the protease, host cells transformed with the vector DNA, and an enzyme produced by the host cells. The present invention also provides cleaning compositions (e.g., detergent compositions), animal feed compositions, and textile and leather processing compositions comprising protease(s) obtained from a Micrococcineae spp., including but not limited to Cellulomonas spp. In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides mutant (i.e., variant) proteases derived from the wild-type proteases described herein. These mutant proteases also find use in numerous applications.

Gram-positive alkaliphilic bacteria have been isolated from in and around alkaline soda lakes (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,401 ,657, herein incorporated by reference). These alkaliphiles were analyzed according to the principles of numerical taxonomy with respect to each other and also a collection of known bacteria, and taxonomically characterized. Six natural clusters or phenons of alkaliphilic bacteria were generated. Amongst the strains isolated was a strain identified as 69B4.

Cellulomonas spp. are Gram-positive bacteria classified as members of the family Cellulomonadaceae, Suborder Micrococcineae, Order Actinomycetales, Class

5 Actinobacteria. Cellulomonas grows as slender, often irregular rods that may occasionally show branching, but no mycelium is formed. In addition, there is no aerial growth and no spores are formed. Cellulomonas and Streptomyces are only distantly related at a genetic level. The large genetic (genomic) distinction between Cellulomonas and Streptomyces is reflected in a great difference in phenotypic properties. While serine proteases ino Streptomyces have been previously examined, there apparently have been no reports of any serine proteases (approx. MW 18,000 to 20,000) secreted by Cellulomonas spp. In addition, there apparently have been no previous reports of Cellulomonas proteases being used in the cleaning and/or feed industry.

Streptomyces are Gram-positive bacteria classified as members of the Familys Streptomycetaceae, Suborder Streptomycineae, Order Actinomycetales, class

Actinobacteria. Streptomyces grows as an extensively branching primary or substrate mycelium and an abundant aerial mycelium that at maturity bear characteristic spores. Streptogrisins are serine proteases secreted in large amounts from a wide variety of Streptomyces species. The amino acid sequences of Streptomyces proteases have beeno determined from at least 9 different species of Streptomyces including Streptomyces griseus Streptogrisin C (accession no. P52320); alkaline proteinase (EC 3.4.21.-) from Streptomyces sp. (accession no. PC2053); alkaline serine proteinase I from Streptomyces sp. (accession no. S34672), serine protease from Streptomyces lividans (accession no. CAD4208); putative serine protease from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (accession no.5 NP_625129); putative serine protease from Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 (accession no. NP_822175); serine protease from Streptomyces lividans (accession no. CAD42809); putative serine protease precursor from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (accession no. NP_628830)). A purified native alkaline protease having an apparent molecular weight of 19,000 daltons and isolated from Streptomyces griseus var. alkaliphilus protease ando cleaning compositions comprised thereof have been described (See e.g., U.S. Patent No. 5,646,028, incorporated herein by reference).

The present invention provides protease enzymes produced by these organisms. Importantly, these enzymes have good stability and proteolytic activity. These enzymes find use in various applications, including but not limited to cleaning compositions, animal feed, textile processing and etc. The present invention also provides means to produce these enzymes. In some preferred embodiments, the proteases of the present invention are in pure or relatively pure form.

The present invention also provides nucleotide sequences which are suitable to produce the proteases of the present invention in recombinant organisms. In some embodiments, recombinant production provides means to produce the proteases in quantities that are commercially viable.

Unless otherwise indicated, the practice of the present invention involves conventional techniques commonly used in molecular biology, microbiology, and recombinant DNA, which are within the skill of the art. Such techniques are known to those of skill in the art and are described in numerous texts and reference works (See e.g., Sambrook et al., "Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual", Second Edition (Cold Spring Harbor), [1989]); and Ausubel et al, "Current Protocols in Molecular Biology" [1987]). All patents, patent applications, articles and publications mentioned herein, both supra and infra, are hereby expressly incorporated herein by reference.

Unless defined otherwise herein, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention pertains. For example, Singleton and Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d Ed., John Wiley and Sons, NY (1994); and Hale and Marham, The Harper Collins Dictionary of Biology, Harper Perennial, NY (1991 ) provide those of skill in the art with a general dictionaries of many of the terms used in the invention. Although any methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein find use in the practice of the present invention, the preferred methods and materials are described herein. Accordingly, the terms defined immediately below are more fully described by reference to the Specification as a whole. Also, as used herein, the singular "a", "an" and "the" includes the plural reference unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. Numeric ranges are inclusive of the numbers defining the range. Unless otherwise indicated, nucleic acids are written left to right in 5' to 3' orientation; amino acid sequences are written left to right in amino to carboxy orientation, respectively. It is to be understood that this invention is not limited to the particular methodology, protocols, and reagents described, as these may vary, depending upon the context they are used by those of skill in the art.

The practice of the present invention employs, unless otherwise indicated, conventional techniques of protein purification, molecular biology, microbiology, recombinant DNA techniques and protein sequencing, all of which are within the skill of those in the art. Furthermore, the headings provided herein are not limitations of the various aspects or embodiments of the invention which can be had by reference to the specification as a whole. Accordingly, the terms defined immediately below are more fully defined by reference to the specification as a whole. Nonetheless, in order to facilitate understanding of the invention, a number of terms are defined below.

I. Definitions

As used herein, the terms "protease," and "proteolytic activity" refer to a protein or peptide exhibiting the ability to hydrolyze peptides or substrates having peptide linkages. Many well known procedures exist for measuring proteolytic activity (Kalisz, "Microbial Proteinases," In: Fiechter (ed.), Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology. [1988]). For example, proteolytic activity may be ascertained by comparative assays which analyze the respective protease's ability to hydrolyze a commercial substrate. Exemplary substrates useful in the such analysis of protease or protelytic activity, include, but are not limited to di-methyl casein (Sigma C-9801), bovine collagen (Sigma C-9879), bovine elastin (Sigma E-1625), and bovine keratin (ICN Biomedical 902111). Colorimetric assays utilizing these substrates are well known in the art (See e.g., WO 99/34011 ; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450, both of which are incorporated herein by reference. The pNA assay (See e.g., Del Mar et al., Anal. Biochem., 99:316-320 [1979]) also finds use in determining the active enzyme concentration for fractions collected during gradient elution. This assay measures the rate at which p-nitroaniline is released as the enzyme hydrolyzes the soluble synthetic substrate, succinyl-alanine-alanine-proline-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide (sAAPF-pNA). The rate of production of yellow color from the hydrolysis reaction is measured at 410 nm on a spectrophotometer and is proportional to the active enzyme concentration. In addition, absorbance measurements at 280 nm can be used to determine the total protein concentration. The active enzyme/total-protein ratio gives the enzyme purity.

As used herein, the terms "ASP protease," "Asp protease," and "Asp," refer to the serine proteases described herein. In some preferred embodiments, the Asp protease is the protease designed herein as 69B4 protease obtained from Cellulomonas strain 69B4. Thus, in preferred embodiments, the term "69B4 protease" refers to a naturally occurring mature protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035) having substantially identical amino acid sequences as provided in SEQ ID NO:8. In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides portions of the ASP protease.

The term "Cellulomonas protease homologues" refers to naturally occurring proteases having substantially identical amino acid sequences to the mature protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 or polynucleotide sequences which encode for such naturally occurring proteases, and which proteases retain the functional characteristics of a serine protease encoded by such nucleic acids. In some embodiments, these protease

5 homologues are referred to as "cellulomonadins."

As used herein, the terms "protease variant," "ASP variant," "ASP protease variant," . and "69B protease variant" are used in reference to proteases that are similar to the wild- type ASP, particularly in their function, but have mutations in their amino acid sequence that make them different in sequence from the wild-type protease. o As used herein, "Cellulomonas ssp." refers to all of the species within the genus

"Cellulomonas," which are Gram-positive bacteria classified as members of the Family Cellulomonadaceae, Suborder Micrococcineae, Order Actinomycetales, Class Actinobacteria. It is recognized that the genus Cellulomonas continues to undergo taxonomical reorganization. Thus, it is intended that the genus include species that haves been reclassified

As used herein, "Streptomyces ssp." refers to all of the species within the genus "Streptomyces," which are Gram-positive bacteria classified as members of the Family Streptomycetaceae, Suborder Streptomycineae, Order Actinomycetales, class Actinobacteria. It is recognized that the genus Streptomyces continues to undergoo taxonomical reorganization. Thus, it is intended that the genus include species that have been reclassified

As used herein, "the genus Bacillus" includes all species within the genus "Bacillus," as known to those of skill in the art, including but not limited to B. subtilis, B. licheniformis, B. lentus, B. brevis, B. stearothermophilus, B. alkalophilus, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. clausii, B.5 halodurans, B. megaterium, B. coagulans, B. circulans, B. lautus, and B. thuringiensis. It is recognized that the genus Bacillus continues to undergo taxonomical reorganization. Thus, it is intended that the genus include species that have been reclassified, including but not limited to such organisms as B. stearothermophilus, which is now named "Geobacillus stearothermophilus." The production of resistant endospores in the presence of oxygen is0 considered the defining feature of the genus Bacillus, although this characteristic also applies to the recently named AHcyclobacillus, Amphibacillus, Aneurinibacillus, Anoxybacillus, Brevibacillus, Filobacillus, Gracilibacillus, Halobacillus, Paenibacillus, Salibacillus, Thermobacillus, Ureibacillus, and Virgibacillus.

The terms "polynucleotide" and "nucleic acid", used interchangeably herein, refer to a polymeric form of nucleotides of any length, either ribonucleotides or deoxyribonucleotides. These terms include, but are not limited to, a single-, double- or triple-stranded DNA, genomic DNA, cDNA, RNA, DNA-RNA hybrid, or a polymer comprising purine and pyrimidine bases, or other natural, chemically, biochemically modified, non- natural or derivatized nucleotide bases. The following are non-limiting examples of polynucleotides: genes, gene fragments, chromosomal fragments, ESTs, exons, introns, mRNA, tRNA, rRNA, ribozymes, cDNA, recombinant polynucleotides, branched polynucleotides, plasmids, vectors, isolated DNA of any sequence, isolated RNA of any sequence, nucleic acid probes, and primers. In some embodiments, polynucleotides comprise modified nucleotides, such as methylated nucleotides and nucleotide analogs, uracyl, other sugars and linking groups such as fluororibose and thioate, and nucleotide branches. In alternative embodiments, the sequence of nucleotides is interrupted by non- nucleotide components.

As used herein, the terms "DNA construct" and "transforming DNA" are used interchangeably to refer to DNA used to introduce sequences into a host cell or organism. The DNA may be generated in vitro by PCR or any other suitable technique(s) known to those in the art. In particularly preferred embodiments, the DNA construct com prises a sequence of interest (e.g., as an incoming sequence). In some embodiments, the sequence is operably linked to additional elements such as control elements (e.g., promoters, etc.). The DNA construct may further comprise a selectable marker. It may further comprise an incoming sequence flanked by homology boxes. In a further embodiment, the transforming DNA comprises other non-homologous sequences, added to the ends (e.g., stuffer sequences or flanks). In some embodiments, the ends of the incoming sequence are closed such that the transforming DNA forms a closed circle. The transforming sequences may be wild-type, mutant or modified. In some embodiments, the DNA construct comprises sequences homologous to the host cell chromosome. In other embodiments, the DNA construct comprises non-homologous sequences. Once the DNA construct is assembled in vitro it may be used to: 1) insert heterologous sequences into a desired target sequence of a host cell, and/or 2) mutagenize a region of the host cell chromosome (i.e., replace an endogenous sequence with a heterologous sequence), 3) delete target genes; and/or introduce a replicating plasmid into the host.

As used herein, the terms "expression cassette" and "expression vector" refer to nucleic acid constructs generated recombinantly or synthetically, with a series of specified nucleic acid elements that permit transcription of a particular nucleic acid in a target cell. The recombinant expression cassette can be incorporated into a plasmid, chromosome, mitochondrial DNA, plastid DNA, virus, or nucleic acid fragment. Typically, the recombinant expression cassette portion of an expression vector includes, among other sequences, a nucleic acid sequence to be transcribed and a promoter. In preferred embodiments, expression vectors have the ability to incorporate and express heterologous DNA fragments in a host cell. Many prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression vectors are commercially available. Selection of appropriate expression vectors is within the knowledge of those of skill in the art. The term "expression cassette" is used interchangeably herein with "DNA construct," and their grammatical equivalents. Selection of appropriate expression vectors is within the knowledge of those of skill in the art.

As used herein, the term "vector" refers to a polynucleotide construct designed to introduce nucleic acids into one or more cell types. Vectors include cloning vectors, expression vectors, shuttle vectors, plasmids, cassettes and the like. In some embodiments, the polynucleotide construct comprises a DNA sequence encoding the protease (e.g., precursor or mature protease) that is operably linked to a suitable prosequence (e.g., secretory, etc.) capable of effecting the expression of the DNA in a suitable host.

As used herein, the term "plasmid" refers to a circular double-stranded (ds) DNA construct used as a cloning vector, and which forms an extrachromosomal self-replicating genetic element in some eukaryotes or prokaryotes, or integrates into the host chromosome.

As used herein in the context of introducing a nucleic acid sequence into a cell, the term "introduced" refers to any method suitable for transferring the nucleic acid sequence into the cell. Such methods for introduction include but are not limited to protoplast fusion, transfection, transformation, conjugation, and transduction (See e.g., Ferrari et al, "Genetics," in Hardwood et al, (eds.), Bacillus. Plenum Publishing Corp., pages 57-72, [1989]).

As used herein, the terms "transformed" and "stably transformed" refers to a cell that has a non-native (heterologous) polynucleotide sequence integrated into its genome or as an episomal plasmid that is maintained for at least two generations.

As used herein, the term "selectable marker-encoding nucleotide sequence" refers to a nucleotide sequence which is capable of expression in the host cells and where expression of the selectable marker confers to cells containing the expressed gene the ability to grow in the presence of a corresponding selective agent or lack of an essential nutrient.

As used herein, the terms "selectable marker" and "selective marker" refer to a nucleic acid (e.g., a gene) capable of expression in host cell which allows for ease of selection of those hosts containing the vector. Examples of such selectable markers include but are not limited to antimicrobials. Thus, the term "selectable marker" refers to genes that provide an indication that a host cell has taken up an incoming DNA of interest or some other reaction has occurred. Typically, selectable markers are genes that confer antimicrobial resistance or a metabolic advantage on the host cell to allow cells containing the exogenous DNA to be distinguished from cells that have not received any exogenous sequence during the transformation. A "residing selectable marker" is one that is located on the chromosome of the microorganism to be transformed. A residing selectable marker encodes a gene that is different from the selectable marker on the transforming DNA construct. Selective markers are well known to those of skill in the art. As indicated above, preferably the marker is an antimicrobial resistant marker (e.g., ampR; phleoR; specR ; kanR; eryR; tetR; cmpR; and neoR; See e.g., Guerot-Fleury, Gene, 167:335-337 [1995]; Palmeros et al., Gene 247:255-264 [2000]; and Trieu-Cuot et al, Gene, 23:331-341 [1983]). Other markers useful in accordance with the invention include, but are not limited to auxotrophic markers, such as tryptophan; and detection markers, such as β- galactosidase.

As used herein, the term "promoter" refers to a nucleic acid sequence that functions to direct transcription of a downstream gene. In preferred embodiments, the promoter is appropriate to the host cell in which the target gene is being expressed. The promoter, together with other transcriptional and translational regulatory nucleic acid sequences (also termed "control sequences") is necessary to express a given gene. In general, the transcriptional and translational regulatory sequences include, but are not limited to, promoter sequences, ribosomal binding sites, transcriptional start and stop sequences, translational start and stop sequences, and enhancer or activator sequences.

A nucleic acid is "operably linked" when it is placed into a functional relationship with another nucleic acid sequence. For example, DNA encoding a secretory leader (i.e., a signal peptide), is operably linked to DNA for a polypeptide if it is expressed as a preprotein that participates in the secretion of the polypeptide; a promoter or enhancer is operably linked to a coding sequence if it affects the transcription of the sequence; or a ribosome binding site is operably linked to a coding sequence if it is positioned so as to facilitate translation. Generally, "operably linked" means that the DNA sequences being linked are contiguous, and, in the case of a secretory leader, contiguous and in reading phase. However, enhancers do not have to be contiguous. Linking is accomplished by ligation at convenient restriction sites. If such sites do not exist, the synthetic oligonucleotide adaptors or linkers are used in accordance with conventional practice.

As used herein the term "gene" refers to a polynucleotide (e.g., a DNA segment), that encodes a polypeptide and includes regions preceding and following the coding regions as well as intervening sequences (introns) between individual coding segments (exons). As used herein, "homologous genes" refers to a pair of genes from different, but usually related species, which correspond to each other and which are identical or very similar to each other. The term encompasses genes that are separated by speciation (i.e. , the development of new species) (e.g., orthologous genes), as well as genes that have been separated by genetic duplication (e.g., paralogous genes).

As used herein, "ortholog" and "orthologous genes" refer to genes in different species that have evolved from a common ancestral gene (i.e., a homologous gene) by speciation. Typically, orthologs retain the same function during the course of evolution. Identification of orthologs finds use in the reliable prediction of gene function in newly sequenced genomes.

As used herein, "paralog" and "paralogous genes" refer to genes that are related by duplication within a genome. While orthologs retain the same function through the course of evolution, paralogs evolve new functions, even though some functions are often related to the original one. Examples of paralogous genes include, but are not limited to genes encoding trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and thrombin, which are all serine proteinases and occur together within the same species.

As used herein, "homology" refers to sequence similarity or identity, with identity being preferred. This homology is determined using standard techniques known in the art (See e.g., Smith and Waterman, Adv. Appl. Math., 2:482 [1981]; Needleman and Wunsch, J. Mol. Biol., 48:443 [1970]; Pearson and Lipman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:2444 [1988]; programs such as GAP, BESTFIT, FASTA, and TFASTA in the Wisconsin Genetics Software Package (Genetics Computer Group, Madison, WI); and Devereux et al., Nucl. Acid Res., 12:387-395 [1984]). As used herein, an "analogous sequence" is one wherein the function of the gene is essentially the same as the gene based on the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease. Additionally, analogous genes include at least 45%, 50%, 55%, 60%, 65%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 97%, 98%, 99% or 100% sequence identity with the sequence of the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease. Alternately, analogous sequences have an alignment of between 70 to 100% of the genes found in the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease region and/or have at least between 5 - 10 genes found in the region aligned with the genes in the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 chromosome. In additional embodiments more than one of the above properties applies to the sequence. Analogous sequences are determined by known methods of sequence alignment. A commonly used alignment method is BLAST, although as indicated above and below, there are other methods that also find use in aligning sequences.

One example of a useful algorithm is PILEUP. PILEUP creates a multiple sequence alignment from a group of related sequences using progressive, pair-wise alignments. It can also plot a tree showing the clustering relationships used to create the alignment. PILEUP uses a simplification of the progressive alignment method of Feng and Doolittle (Feng and Doolittle, J. Mol. Evol., 35:351-360 [1987]). The method is similar to that described by Higgins and Sharp (Higgins and Sharp, CABIOS 5:151-153 [1989]). Useful PILEUP parameters including a default gap weight of 3.00, a default gap length weight of 0.10, and weighted end gaps.

Another example of a useful algorithm is the BLAST algorithm, described by Altschul etal, (Altschul et al., J. Mol. Biol., 215:403-410, [1990]; and Karlin et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:5873-5787 [1993]). A particularly useful BLAST program is the WU-BLAST-2 program (See, Altschul etal, Meth. Enzymol., 266:460-480 [1996]). WU-BLAST-2 uses several search parameters, most of which are set to the default values. The adjustable parameters are set with the following values: overlap span =1, overlap fraction = 0.125, word threshold (T) = 11. The HSP S and HSP S2 parameters are dynamic values and are established by the program itself depending upon the composition of the particular sequence and composition of the particular database against which the sequence of interest is being searched. However, the values may be adjusted to increase sensitivity. A % amino acid sequence identity value is determined by the number of matching identical residues divided by the total number of residues of the "longer" sequence in the aligned region. The "longer" sequence is the one having the most actual residues in the aligned region (gaps introduced by WU-Blast-2 to maximize the alignment score are ignored). Thus, "percent (%) nucleic acid sequence identity" is defined as the percentage of nucleotide residues in a candidate sequence that are identical with the nucleotide residues of the starting sequence (i.e., the sequence of interest). A preferred method utilizes the BLASTN module of WU-BLAST-2 set to the default parameters, with overlap span and overlap fraction set to 1 and 0.125, respectively. As used herein, the term "hybridization" refers to the process by which a strand of nucleic acid joins with a complementary strand through base pairing, as known in the art.

A nucleic acid sequence is considered to be "selectively hybridizable" to a reference nucleic acid sequence if the two sequences specifically hybridize to one another under moderate to high stringency hybridization and wash conditions. Hybridization conditions are based on the melting temperature (Tm) of the nucleic acid binding complex or probe. For example, "maximum stringency" typically occurs at about Tm-5°C (5° below the Tm of the probe); "high stringency" at about 5-10°C below the Tm; "intermediate stringency" at about 10-20°C below the Tm of the probe; and "low stringency" at about 20-25°C below the Tm. Functionally, maximum stringency conditions may be used to identify sequences having strict identity or near-strict identity with the hybridization probe; while an intermediate or low stringency hybridization can be used to identify or detect polynucleotide sequence homologs.

Moderate and high stringency hybridization conditions are well known in the art. An example of high stringency conditions includes hybridization at about 42°C in 50% formamide, 5X SSC, 5X Denhardt's solution, 0.5% SDS and 100 μg/ml denatured carrier DNA followed by washing two times in 2X SSC and 0.5% SDS at room temperature and two additional times in 0.1 X SSC and 0.5% SDS at 42°C. An example of moderate stringent conditions include an overnight incubation at 37°C in a solution comprising 20% formamide, 5 x SSC (150mM NaCl, 15 mM trisodium citrate), 50 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.6), 5 x Denhardt's solution, 10% dextran sulfate and 20 mg/ml denaturated sheared salmon sperm DNA, followed by washing the filters in 1x SSC at about 37 - 50°C. Those of skill in the art know how to adjust the temperature, ionic strength, etc. as necessary to accommodate factors such as probe length and the like. As used herein, "recombinant" includes reference to a cell or vector, that has been modified by the introduction of a heterologous nucleic acid sequence or that the cell is derived from a cell so modified. Thus, for example, recombinant cells express genes that are not found in identical form within the native (non-recombinant) form of the cell or •> express native genes that are otherwise abnormally expressed, under expressed or not expressed at all as a result of deliberate human intervention. "Recombination,"

"recombining," and generating a "recombined" nucleic acid are generally the assembly of two or more nucleic acid fragments wherein the assembly gives rise to a chimeric gene.

In a preferred embodiment, mutant DNA sequences are generated with site saturation mutagenesis in at least one codon. In another preferred embodiment, site saturation mutagenesis is performed for two or more codons. In a further embodiment, mutant DNA sequences have more than 50%, more than 55%, more than 60%, more than 65%, more than 70%, more than 75%, more than 80%, more than 85%, more than 90%, more than 95%, or more than 98% homology with the wild-type sequence. In alternative

5 embodiments, mutant DNA is generated in vivo using any known mutagenic procedure such as, for example, radiation, nitrosoguanidine and the like. The desired DNA sequence is then isolated and used in the methods provided herein.

As used herein, the term "target sequence" refers to a DNA sequence in the host cell that encodes the sequence where it is desired for the incoming sequence to be inserted intoo the host cell genome. In some embodiments, the target sequence encodes a functional wild-type gene or operon, while in other embodiments the target sequence encodes a functional mutant gene or operon, or a non-functional gene or operon.

As used herein, a "flanking sequence" refers to any sequence that is either upstream or downstream of the sequence being discussed (e.g., for genes A-B-C, gene B is flankeds by the A and C gene sequences). In a preferred embodiment, the incoming sequence is flanked by a homology box on each side. In another embodiment, the incoming sequence and the homology boxes comprise a unit that is flanked by stuffer sequence on each side. In some embodiments, a flanking sequence is present on only a single side (either 3' or 5'), but in preferred embodiments, it is on each side of the sequence being flanked. In someo embodiments, a flanking sequence is present on only a single side (either 3' or 5'), while in preferred embodiments, it is present on each side of the sequence being flanked.

As used herein, the term "stuffer sequence" refers to any extra DNA that flanks homology boxes (typically vector sequences). However, the term encompasses any non- homologous DNA sequence. Not to be limited by any theory, a stuffer sequence provides a5 noncritical target for a cell to initiate DNA uptake.

As used herein, the terms "amplification" and "gene amplification" refer to a process by which specific DNA sequences are disproportionately replicated such that the amplified gene becomes present in a higher copy number than was initially present in the genome. In some embodiments, selection of cells by growth in the presence of a drug (e.g., an inhibitoro of an inhibitable enzyme) results in the amplification of either the endogenous gene encoding the gene product required for growth in the presence of the drug or by amplification of exogenous (i.e., input) sequences encoding this gene product, or both.

"Amplification" is a special case of nucleic acid replication involving template specificity. It is to be contrasted with non-specific template replication (i.e., replication that is template-dependent but not dependent on a specific template). Template specificity is here distinguished from fidelity of replication (i.e., synthesis of the proper polynucleotide sequence) and nucleotide (ribo- or deoxyribo-) specificity. Template specificity is frequently described in terms of "target" specificity. Target sequences are "targets" in the sense that they are sought to be sorted out from other nucleic acid. Amplification techniques have been designed primarily for this sorting out.

As used herein, the term "co-amplification" refers to the introduction into a single cell of an amplifiable marker in conjunction with other gene sequences (i.e., comprising one or more non-selectable genes such as those contained within an expression vector) and the application of appropriate selective pressure such that the cell amplifies both the amplifiable marker and the other, non-selectable gene sequences. The amplifiable marker may be physically linked to the other gene sequences or alternatively two separate pieces of DNA, one containing the amplifiable marker and the other containing the non-selectable marker, may be introduced into the same cell. As used herein, the terms "amplifiable marker," "amplifiable gene," and "amplification vector" refer to a gene or a vector encoding a gene which permits the amplification of that gene under appropriate growth conditions.

"Template specificity" is achieved in most amplification techniques by the choice of enzyme. Amplification enzymes are enzymes that, under conditions they are used, will process only specific sequences of nucleic acid in a heterogeneous mixture of nucleic acid. For example, in the case of Qβ replicase, MDV-1 RNA is the specific template for the replicase (See e.g., Kacian et al, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69:3038 [1972]). Other nucleic acids are not replicated by this amplification enzyme. Similarly, in the case of T7 RNA polymerase, this amplification enzyme has a stringent specificity for its own promoters (See, Chamberlin et al., Nature 228:227 [1970]). In the case of T4 DNA ligase, the enzyme will not ligate the two oligonucleotides or polynucleotides, where there is a mismatch between the oligonucleotide or polynucleotide substrate and the template at the ligation junction (See, Wu and Wallace, Genomics 4:560 [1989]). Finally, Taq and Pfu polymerases, by virtue of their ability to function at high temperature, are found to display high specificity for the sequences bounded and thus defined by the primers; the high temperature results in thermodynamic conditions that favor primer hybridization with the target sequences and not hybridization with non-target sequences.

As used herein, the term "amplifiable nucleic acid" refers to nucleic acids which may be amplified by any amplification method. It is contemplated that "amplifiable nucleic acid" will usually comprise "sample template."

As used herein, the term "sample template" refers to nucleic acid originating from a sample which is analyzed for the presence of "target" (defined below). In contrast, "background template" is used in reference to nucleic acid other than sample template which may or may not be present in a sample. Background template is most often inadvertent. It may be the result of carryover, or it may be due to the presence of nucleic acid contaminants sought to be purified away from the sample. For example, nucleic acids from organisms other than those to be detected may be present as background in a test sample. As used herein, the term "primer" refers to an oligonucleotide, whether occurring naturally as in a purified restriction digest or produced synthetically, which is capable of acting as a point of initiation of synthesis when placed under conditions in which synthesis of a primer extension product which is complementary to a nucleic acid strand is induced, (i.e., in the presence of nucleotides and an inducing agent such as DNA polymerase and at a suitable temperature and pH). The primer is preferably single stranded for maximum efficiency in amplification, but may alternatively be double stranded. If double stranded, the primer is first treated to separate its strands before being used to prepare extension products. Preferably, the primer is an oligodeoxyribonucleotide. The primer must be sufficiently long to prime the synthesis of extension products in the presence of the inducing agent. The exact lengths of the primers will depend on many factors, including temperature, source of primer and the use of the method.

As used herein, the term "probe" refers to an oligonucleotide (i.e., a sequence of nucleotides), whether occurring naturally as in a purified restriction digest or produced synthetically, recombinantly or by PCR amplification, which is capable of hybridizing to another oligonucleotide of interest. A probe may be single-stranded or double-stranded. Probes are useful in the detection, identification and isolation of particular gene sequences. It is contemplated that any probe used in the present invention will be labeled with any "reporter molecule," so that is detectable in any detection system, including, but not limited to enzyme (e.g., ELISA, as well as enzyme-based histochemical assays), fluorescent, radioactive, and luminescent systems. It is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular detection system or label.

As used herein, the term "target," when used in reference to the polymerase chain reaction, refers to the region of nucleic acid bounded by the primers used for polymerase chain reaction. Thus, the "target" is sought to be sorted out from other nucleic acid sequences. A "segment" is defined as a region of nucleic acid within the target sequence. As used herein, the term "polymerase chain reaction" ("PCR") refers to the methods of U.S. Patent Nos. 4,683,195 4,683,202, and 4,965,188, hereby incorporated by reference, which include methods for increasing the concentration of a segment of a target sequence in a mixture of genomic DNA without cloning or purification. This process for amplifying the target sequence consists of introducing a large excess of two oligonucleotide primers to the DNA mixture containing the desired target sequence, followed by a precise sequence of thermal cycling in the presence of a DNA polymerase. The two primers are complementary to their respective strands of the double stranded target sequence. To effect amplification, the mixture is denatured and the primers then annealed to their complementary sequences within the target molecule. Following annealing, the primers are extended with a polymerase so as to form a new pair of complementary strands. The steps of denaturation, primer annealing and polymerase extension can be repeated many times (i.e., denaturation, annealing and extension constitute one "cycle"; there can be numerous "cycles") to obtain a high concentration of an amplified segment of the desired target sequence. The length of the amplified segment of the desired target sequence is determined by the relative positions of the primers with respect to each other, and therefore, this length is a controllable parameter. By virtue of the repeating aspect of the process, the method is referred to as the "polymerase chain reaction" (hereinafter "PCR"). Because the desired amplified segments of the target sequence become the predominant sequences (in terms of concentration) in the mixture, they are said to be "PCR amplified".

As used herein, the term "amplification reagents" refers to those reagents (deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates, buffer, etc.), needed for amplification except for primers, nucleic acid template and the amplification enzyme. Typically, amplification reagents along with other reaction components are placed and contained in a reaction vessel (test tube, microwell, etc.).

With PCR, it is possible to amplify a single copy of a specific target sequence in genomic DNA to a level detectable by several different methodologies (e.g., hybridization with a labeled probe; incorporation of biotinylated primers followed by avidin-enzyme conjugate detection; incorporation of 32P-labeled deoxynucleotide triphosphates, such as dCTP or dATP, into the amplified segment). In addition to genomic DNA, any oligonucleotide or polynucleotide sequence can be amplified with the appropriate set of primer molecules. In particular, the amplified segments created by the PCR process itself are, themselves, efficient templates for subsequent PCR amplifications. As used herein, the terms "PCR product," "PCR fragment," and "amplification product" refer to the resultant mixture of compounds after two or more cycles of the PCR steps of denaturation, annealing and extension are complete. These terms encompass the case where there has been amplification of one or more segments of one or more target sequences.

As used herein, the term "RT-PCR" refers to the replication and amplification of RNA sequences. In this method, reverse transcription is coupled to PCR, most often using a one enzyme procedure in which a thermostable polymerase is employed, as described in U.S. Patent No. 5,322,770, herein incorporated by reference. In RT-PCR, the RNA template is converted to cDNA due to the reverse transcriptase activity of the polymerase, and then amplified using the polymerizing activity of the polymerase (i.e., as in other PCR methods).

As used herein, the terms "restriction endonucleases" and "restriction enzymes" refer to bacterial enzymes, each of which cut double-stranded DNA at or near a specific nucleotide sequence. A "restriction site" refers to a nucleotide sequence recognized and cleaved by a given restriction endonuclease and is frequently the site for insertion of DNA fragments. In certain embodiments of the invention restriction sites are engineered into the selective marker and into 5' and 3' ends of the DNA construct.

As used herein, the term "chromosomal integration" refers to the process whereby an incoming sequence is introduced into the chromosome of a host cell. The homologous regions of the transforming DNA align with homologous regions of the chromosome. Subsequently, the sequence between the homology boxes is replaced by the incoming sequence in a double crossover (i.e., homologous recombination). In some embodiments of the present invention, homologous sections of an inactivating chromosomal segment of a DNA construct align with the flanking homologous regions of the indigenous chromosomal region of the Bacillus chromosome. Subsequently, the indigenous chromosomal region is deleted by the DNA construct in a double crossover (i.e., homologous recombination).

"Homologous recombination" means the exchange of DNA fragments between two DNA molecules or paired chromosomes at the site of identical or nearly identical nucleotide sequences. In a preferred embodiment, chromosomal integration is homologous recombination.

"Homologous sequences" as used herein means a nucleic acid or polypeptide sequence having 100%, 99%, 98%, 97%, 96%, 95%, 94%, 93%, 92%, 91%, 90%, 88%, 85%, 80%, 75%, or 70% sequence identity to another nucleic acid or polypeptide sequence when optimally aligned for comparison. In some embodiments, homologous sequences have between 85% and 100% sequence identity, while in other embodiments there is between 90% and 100% sequence identity, and in more preferred embodiments, there is 95% and 100% sequence identity. As used herein "amino acid" refers to peptide or protein sequences or portions thereof. The terms "protein," "peptide," and "polypeptide" are used interchangeably.

As used herein, "protein of interest" and "polypeptide of interest" refer to a protein/polypeptide that is desired and/or being assessed. In some embodiments, the protein of interest is expressed intracellularly, while in other embodiments, it is a secreted polypeptide. In particularly preferred embodiments, these enzyme include the serine proteases of the present invention. In some embodiments, the protein of interest is a secreted polypeptide which is fused to a signal peptide (i.e., an amino-terminal extension on a protein to be secreted). Nearly all secreted proteins use an amino- terminal protein extension which plays a crucial role in the targeting to and translocation of precursor proteins across the membrane. This extension is proteolytically removed by a signal peptidase during or immediately following membrane transfer.

As used herein, the term "heterologous protein" refers to a protein or polypeptide that does not naturally occur in the host cell. Examples of heterologous proteins include enzymes such as hydrolases including proteases. In some embodiments, the gene encoding the proteins are naturally occurring genes, while in other embodiments, mutated and/or synthetic genes are used.

As used herein, "homologous protein" refers to a protein or polypeptide native or naturally occurring in a cell. In preferred embodiments, the cell is a Gram-positive cell, while in particularly preferred embodiments, the cell is a Bacillus host cell. In alternative embodiments, the homologous protein is a native protein produced by other organisms, including but not limited to E. coli, Streptomyces, Trichoderma, and Aspergillus. The invention encompasses host cells producing the homologous protein via recombinant DNA technology.

As used herein, an "operon region" comprises a group of contiguous genes that are transcribed as a single transcription unit from a common promoter, and are thereby subject to co-regulation. In some embodiments, the operon includes a regulator gene. In most preferred embodiments, operons that are highly expressed as measured by RNA levels, but have an unknown or unnecessary function are used. As used herein, an "antimicrobial region" is a region containing at least one gene that encodes an antimicrobial protein.

A polynucleotide is said to "encode" an RNA or a polypeptide if, in its native state or when manipulated by methods known to those of skill in the art, it can be transcribed and/or translated to produce the RNA, the polypeptide or a fragment thereof. The anti-sense strand of such a nucleic acid is also said to encode the sequences.

As is known in the art, a DNA can be transcribed by an RNA polymerase to produce RNA, but an RNA can be reverse transcribed by reverse transcriptase to produce a DNA. Thus a DNA can encode a RNA and vice versa. The term "regulatory segment" or "regulatory sequence" or "expression control sequence" refers to a polynucleotide sequence of DNA that is operatively linked with a polynucleotide sequence of DNA that encodes the amino acid sequence of a polypeptide chain to effect the expression of the encoded amino acid sequence. The regulatory sequence can inhibit, repress, or promote the expression of the operably linked polynucleotide sequnce encoding the amino acid.

"Host strain" or "host cell" refers to a suitable host for an expression vector comprising DNA according to the present invention.

An enzyme is "overexpressed" in a host cell if the enzyme is expressed in the cell at a higher level that the level at which it is expressed in a corresponding wild-type cell. The terms "protein" and "polypeptide" are used interchangeability herein. The 3-letter code for amino acids as defined in conformity with the IUPAC-IUB Joint Commission on Biochemical Nomenclature (JCBN) is used through out this disclosure. It is also understood that a polypeptide may be coded for by more than one nucleotide sequence due to the degeneracy of the genetic code. A "prosequence" is an amino acid sequence between the signal sequence and mature protease that is necessary for the secretion of the protease. Cleavage of the pro sequence will result in a mature active protease.

The term "signal sequence" or "signal peptide" refers to any sequence of nucleotides and/or amino acids which may participate in the secretion of the mature or precursor forms of the protein. This definition of signal sequence is a functional one, meant to include all those amino acid sequences encoded by the N-terminal portion of the protein gene, which participate in the effectuation of the secretion of protein. They are often, but not universally, bound to the N-terminal portion of a protein or to the N-terminal portion of a precursor protein. The signal sequence may be endogenous or exogenous. The signal sequence may be that normally associated with the protein (e.g., protease), or may be from a gene encoding another secreted protein. One exemplary exogenous signal sequence comprises the first seven amino acid residues of the signal sequence from Bacillus subtilis subtilisin fused to the remainder of the signal sequence of the subtilisin from Bacillus lentus (ATCC 21536).

The term "hybrid signal sequence" refers to signal sequences in which part of sequence is obtained from the expression host fused to the signal sequence of the gene to be expressed. In some embodiments, synthetic sequences are utilized.

The term "substantially the same signal activity" refers to the signal activity, as indicated by substantially the same secretion of the protease into the fermentation medium, for example a fermentation medium protease level being at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95%, at least 98% of the secreted protease levels in the fermentation medium as provided by the signal sequence of SEQ ID NOS:5 and/or 9. The term "mature" form of a protein or peptide refers to the final functional form of the protein or peptide. To exemply, a mature form of the protease of the present invention at least includes the amino acid sequence identical to residue positions 1-189 of SEQ ID NO:8.

The term "precursor" form of a protein or peptide refers to a mature form of the protein having a prosequence operably linked to the amino or carbonyl terminus of the protein. The precursor may also have a "signal" sequence operably linked, to the amino terminus of the prosequence. The precursor may also have additional polynucleotides that are involved in post-translational activity (e.g., polynucleotides cleaved therefrom to leave the mature form of a protein or peptide).

"Naturally occurring enzyme" refers to an enzyme having the unmodified amino acid sequence identical to that found in nature. Naturally occurring enzymes include native enzymes, those enzymes naturally expressed or found in the particular microorganism.

The terms "derived from" and "obtained from" refer to not only a protease produced or producible by a strain of the organism in question, but also a protease encoded by a DNA sequence isolated from such strain and produced in a host organism containing such DNA sequence. Additionally, the term refers to a protease which is encoded by a DNA sequence of synthetic and/or cDNA origin and which has the identifying characteristics of the protease in question. To exemplify, "proteases derived from Cellulomonas" refers to those enzymes having proteolytic activity which are naturally-produced by Cellulomonas, as well as to serine proteases like those produced by Cellulomonas sources but which through the use of genetic engineering techniques are produced by

Figure imgf000042_0001
organisms transformed with a nucleic acid encoding said serine proteases.

A "derivative" within the scope of this definition generally retains the characteristic proteolytic activity observed in the wild-type, native or parent form to the extent that the derivative is useful for similar purposes as the wild-type, native or parent form. Functional derivatives of serine protease encompass naturally occurring, synthetically or recombinantly produced peptides or peptide fragments which have the general characteristics of the serine protease of the present invention.

The term "functional derivative" refers to a derivative of a nucleic acid which has the functional characteristics of a nucleic acid which encodes serine protease. Functional derivatives of a nucleic acid which encode serine protease of the present invention encompass naturally occurring, synthetically or recombinantly produced nucleic acids or fragments and encode serine protease characteristic of the present invention. Wild type nucleic acid encoding serine proteases according to the invention include naturally occurring alleles and homologues based on the degeneracy of the genetic code known in the art. The term "identical" in the context of two nucleic acids or polypeptide sequences refers to the residues in the two sequences that are the same when aligned for maximum correspondence, as measured using one of the following sequence comparison or analysis algorithms. The term "optimal alignment" refers to the alignment giving the highest percent identity score.

"Percent sequence identity," "percent amino acid sequence identity," "percent gene sequence identity," and/or "percent nucleic acid/polynucloetide sequence identity," with respect to two amino acid, polynucleotide and/or gene sequences (as appropriate), refer to the percentage of residues that are identical in the two sequences when the sequences are optimally aligned. Thus, 80% amino acid sequence identity means that 80% of the amino acids in two optimally aligned polypeptide sequences are identical.

The phrase "substantially identical" in the context of two nucleic acids or polypeptides thus refers to a polynucleotide or polypeptide that comprising at least 70% sequence identity, preferably at least 75%, preferably at least 80%, preferably at least 85%, preferably at least 90%, preferably at least 95% , preferably at least 97% , preferably at least 98% and preferably at least 99% sequence identity as compared to a reference sequence using the programs or algorithms (e.g., BLAST, ALIGN, CLUSTAL) using standard parameters. One indication that two polypeptides are substantially identical is that the first polypeptide is immunologically cross-reactive with the second polypeptide. Typically, polypeptides that differ by conservative amino acid substitutions are immunologically cross-reactive. Thus, a polypeptide is substantially identical to a second polypeptide, for example, where the two peptides differ only by a conservative substitution. Another indication that two nucleic acid sequences are substantially identical is that the two molecules hybridize to each other under stringent conditions (e.g., within a range of medium to high stringency).

The phrase "equivalent," in this context, refers to serine proteases enzymes that are encoded by a polynucleotide capable of hybridizing to the polynucleotide having the sequence as shown in SEQ ID NO:1, under conditions of medium to maximal stringency. For example, being equivalent means that an equivalent mature serine protease comprises at least 70%, at least 75%, at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91%, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98% and/or at least 99% sequence identity to the mature Cellulomonas serine protease having the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:8.

The term "isolated" or "purified" refers to a material that is removed from its original environment (e.g., the natural environment if it is naturally occurring). For example, the material is said to be "purified" when it is present in a particular composition in a higher or lower concentration than exists in a naturally occurring or wild type organism or in combination with components not normally present upon expression from a naturally occurring or wild type organism. For example, a naturally-occurring polynucleotide or polypeptide present in a living animal is not isolated, but the same polynucleotide or polypeptide, separated from some or all of the coexisting materials in the natural system, is isolated. Such polynucleotides could be part of a vector, and/or such polynucleotides or polypeptides could be part of a composition, and still be isolated in that such vector or composition is not part of its natural environment. In preferred embodiments, a nucleic acid or protein is said to be purified, for example, if it gives rise to essentially one band in an electrophoretic gel or blot.

The term "isolated", when used in reference to a DNA sequence, refers to a DNA sequence that has been removed from its natural genetic milieu and is thus free of other extraneous or unwanted coding sequences, and is in a form suitable for use within genetically engineered protein production systems. Such isolated molecules are those that are separated from their natural environment and include cDNA and genomic clones. Isolated DNA molecules of the present invention are free of other genes with which they are ordinarily associated, but may include naturally occurring 5' and 3' untranslated regions such as promoters and terminators. The identification of associated regions will be evident to one of ordinary skill in the art (See e.g., Dynan and Tijan, Nature 316:774-78 [1985]). The term "an isolated DNA sequence" is alternatively referred to as "a cloned DNA sequence". The term "isolated," when used in reference to a protein, refers to a protein that is found in a condition other than its native environment. In a preferred form, the isolated protein is substantially free of other proteins, particularly other homologous proteins. An isolated protein is more than 10% pure, preferably more than 20% pure, and even more preferably more than 30% pure, as determined by SDS-PAGE. Further aspects of the invention encompass the protein in a highly purified form (i.e., more than 40% pure, more than 60% pure, more than 80% pure, more than 90% pure, more than 95% pure, more than97% pure, and even more than 99% pure), as determined by SDS-PAGE.

As used herein, the term, "combinatorial mutagenesis" refers to methods in which libraries of variants of a starting sequence are generated. In these libraries, the variants contain one or several mutations chosen from a predefined set of mutations. In addition, the methods provide means to introduce random mutations which were not members of the predefined set of mutations. In some embodiments, the methods include those set forth in U.S. Patent Appln. Ser. No. 09/699.250, filed October 26, 2000, hereby incorporated by reference. In alternative embodiments, combinatorial mutagenesis methods encompass commercially available kits (e.g., QuikChange® Multisite, Stratagene, San Diego, CA).

As used herein, the term "library of mutants" refers to a population of cells which are identical in most of their genome but include different homologues of one or more genes. Such libraries can be used, for example, to identify genes or operons with improved traits. As used herein, the term "starting gene" refers to a gene of interest that encodes a protein of interest that is to be improved and/or changed using the present invention. As used herein, the term "multiple sequence alignment" ("MSA") refers to the sequences of multiple homologs of a starting gene that are aligned using an algorithm (e.g., Clustal W).

As used herein, the terms "consensus sequence" and "canonical sequence" refer to an archetypical amino acid sequence against which all variants of a particular protein or sequence of interest are compared. The terms also refer to a sequence that sets forth the nucleotides that are most often present in a DNA sequence of interest. For each position of a gene, the consensus sequence gives the amino acid that is most abundant in that position in the MSA. As used herein, the term "consensus mutation" refers to a difference in the sequence of a starting gene and a consensus sequence. Consensus mutations are identified by comparing the sequences of the starting gene and the consensus sequence resulting from an MSA. In some embodiments, consensus mutations are introduced into the starting gene such that it becomes more similar to the consensus sequence. Consensus mutations also include amino acid changes that change an amino acid in a starting gene to an amino acid that is more frequently found in an MSA at that position relative to the frequency of that amino acid in the starting gene. Thus, the term consensus mutation comprises all single amino acid changes that replace an amino acid of the starting gene with an amino acid that is more abundant than the amino acid in the MSA.

As used herein, the term "initial hit" refers to a variant that was identified by screening a combinatorial consensus mutagenesis library. In preferred embodiments, initial hits have improved performance characteristics, as compared to the starting gene.

As used herein, the term "improved hit" refers to a variant that was identified by screening an enhanced combinatorial consensus mutagenesis library.

As used herein, the terms "improving mutation" and "performance-enhancing mutation" refer to a mutation that leads to improved performance when it is introduced into the starting gene. In some preferred embodiments, these mutations are identified by sequencing hits that were identified during the screening step of the method. In most embodiments, mutations that are more frequently found in hits are likely to be improving mutations, as compared to an unscreened combinatorial consensus mutagenesis library.

As used herein, the term "enhanced combinatorial consensus mutagenesis library" refers to a CCM library that is designed and constructed based on screening and/or sequencing results from an earlier round of CCM mutagenesis and screening. In some embodiments, the enhanced CCM library is based on the sequence of an initial hit resulting from an earlier round of CCM. In additional embodiments, the enhanced CCM is designed such that mutations that were frequently observed in initial hits from earlier rounds of mutagenesis and screening are favored. In some preferred embodiments, this is accomplished by omitting primers that encode performance-reducing mutations or by increasing the concentration of primers that encode performance-enhancing mutations relative to other primers that were used in earlier CCM libraries.

As used herein, the term "performance-reducing mutations" refer to mutations in the combinatorial consensus mutagenesis library that are less frequently found in hits resulting from screening as compared to an unscreened combinatorial consensus mutagenesis library. In preferred embodiments, the screening process removes and/or reduces the abundance of variants that contain "performance-reducing mutations."

As used herein, the term "functional assay" refers to an assay that provides an indication of a protein's activity. In particularly preferred embodiments, the term refers to assay systems in which a protein is analyzed for its ability to function in its usual capacity. For example, in the case of enzymes, a functional assay involves determining the effectiveness of the enzyme in catalyzing a reaction.

As used herein, the term "target property" refers to the property of the starting gene that is to be altered. It is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular target property. However, in some preferred embodiments, the target property is the stability of a gene product (e.g., resistance to denaturation, proteolysis or other degradative factors), while in other embodiments, the level of production in a production host is altered. Indeed, it is contemplated that any property of a starting gene will find use in the present invention. The term "property" or grammatical equivalents thereof in the context of a nucleic acid, as used herein, refer to any characteristic or attribute of a nucleic acid that can be selected or detected. These properties include, but are not limited to, a property affecting binding to a polypeptide, a property conferred on a cell comprising a particular nucleic acid, a property affecting gene transcription (e.g., promoter strength, promoter recognition, promoter regulation, enhancer function), a property affecting RNA processing (e.g., RNA splicing, RNA stability, RNA conformation, and post-transcriptional modification), a property affecting translation (e.g., level, regulation, binding of mRNA to ribosomal proteins, post- translational modification). For example, a binding site for a transcription factor, polymerase, regulatory factor, etc., of a nucleic acid may be altered to produce desired characteristics or to identify undesirable characteristics.

The term "property" or grammatical equivalents thereof in the context of a polypeptide, as used herein, refer to any characteristic or attribute of a polypeptide that can be selected or detected. These properties include, but are not limited to oxidative stability, substrate specificity, catalytic activity, thermal stability, alkaline stability, pH activity profile, resistance to proteolytic degradation, KM, kcat, kcat/k ratio, protein folding, inducing an immune response, ability to bind to a ligand, ability to bind to a receptor, ability to be secreted, ability to be displayed on the surface of a cell, ability to oligomerize, ability to signal, ability to stimulate cell proliferation, ability to inhibit cell proliferation, ability to induce apoptosis, ability to be modified by phosphorylation or glycosylation, ability to treat disease. As used herein, the term "screening" has its usual meaning in the art and is, in general a multi-step process. In the first step, a mutant nucleic acid or variant polypeptide therefrom is provided. In the second step, a property of the mutant nucleic acid or variant polypeptide is determined. In the third step, the determined property is compared to a property of the corresponding precursor nucleic acid, to the property of the corresponding naturally occurring polypeptide or to the property of the starting material (e.g., the initial sequence) for the generation of the mutant nucleic acid.

It will be apparent to the skilled artisan that the screening procedure for obtaining a nucleic acid or protein with an altered property depends upon the property of the starting material the modification of which the generation of the mutant nucleic acid is intended to facilitate. The skilled artisan will therefore appreciate that the invention is not limited to any specific property to be screened for and that the following description of properties lists illustrative examples only. Methods for screening for any particular property are generally described in the art. For example, one can measure binding, pH, specificity, etc., before and after mutation, wherein a change indicates an alteration. Preferably, the screens are performed in a high-throughput manner, including multiple samples being screened simultaneously, including, but not limited to assays utilizing chips, phage display, and multiple substrates and/or indicators.

As used herein, in some embodiments, screens encompass selection steps in which variants of interest are enriched from a population of variants. Examples of these embodiments include the selection of variants that confer a growth advantage to the host organism, as well as phage display or any other method of display, where variants can be captured from a population of variants based on their binding or catalytic properties. In a preferred embodiment, a library of variants is exposed to stress (heat, protease, denaturation) and subsequently variants that are still intact are identified in a screen or enriched by selection. It is intended that the term encompass any suitable means for selection. Indeed, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular method of screening.

As used herein, the term "targeted randomization" refers to a process that produces a plurality of sequences where one or several positions have been randomized. In some embodiments, randomization is complete (i.e., all four nucleotides, A, T, G, and C can occur at a randomized position. In alternative embodiments, randomization of a nucleotide is limited to a subset of the four nucleotides. Targeted randomization can be applied to one or several codons of a sequence, coding for one or several proteins of interest. When expressed, the resulting libraries produce protein populations in which one or more amino acid positions can contain a mixture of all 20 amino acids or a subset of amino acids, as determined by the randomization scheme of the randomized codon. In some embodiments, the individual members of a population resulting from targeted randomization differ in the number of amino acids, due to targeted or random insertion or deletion of codons. In further embodiments, synthetic amino acids are included in the protein populations produced. In some preferred embodiments, the majority of members of a population resulting from targeted randomization show greater sequence homology to the consensus sequence than the starting gene. In some embodiments, the sequence encodes one or more proteins fo interest. In alternative embodiments, the proteins have differing biological functions. In some preferred embodiments, the incoming sequence comprises at least one selectable marker.

The terms "modified sequence" and "modified genes" are used interchangeably herein to refer to a sequence that includes a deletion, insertion or interruption of naturally occurring nucleic acid sequence. In some preferred embodiments, the expression product of the modified sequence is a truncated protein (e.g., if the modification is a deletion or interruption of the sequence). In some particularly preferred embodiments, the truncated protein retains biological activity. In alternative embodiments, the expression product of the modified sequence is an elongated protein (e.g., modifications comprising an insertion into the nucleic acid sequence). In some embodiments, an insertion leads to a truncated protein (e.g., when the insertion results in the formation of a stop codon). Thus, an insertion may result in either a truncated protein or an elongated protein as an expression product.

As used herein, the terms "mutant sequence" and "mutant gene" are used interchangeably and refer to a sequence that has an alteration in at least one codon occurring in a host cell's wild-type sequence. The expression product of the mutant sequence is a protein with an altered amino acid sequence relative to the wild-type. The expression product may have an altered functional capacity (e.g., enhanced enzymatic activity).

The terms "mutagenic primer" or "mutagenic oligonucleotide" (used interchangeably herein) are intended to refer to oligonucleotide compositions which correspond to a portion of the template sequence and which are capable of hybridizing thereto. With respect to mutagenic primers, the primer will not precisely match the template nucleic acid, the mismatch or mismatches in the primer being used to introduce the desired mutation into the nucleic acid library. As used herein, "non-mutagenic primer" or "non-mutagenic oligonucleotide" refers to oligonucleotide compositions which will. match precisely to the template nucleic acid. In one embodiment of the invention, only mutagenic primers are used. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the primers are designed so that for at least one region at which a mutagenic primer has been included, there is also non- mutagenic primer included in the oligonucleotide mixture. By adding a mixture of mutagenic primers and non-mutagenic primers corresponding to at least one of the mutagenic primers, it is possible to produce a resulting nucleic acid library in which a variety of combinatorial mutational patterns are presented. For example, if it is desired that some of the members of the mutant nucleic acid library retain their precursor sequence at certain positions while other members are mutant at such sites, the non-mutagenic primers provide the ability to obtain a specific level of non-mutant members within the nucleic acid library for a given residue. The methods of the invention employ mutagenic and non-mutagenic oligonucleotides which are generally between 10-50 bases in length, more preferably about 15-45 bases in length. However, it may be necessary to use primers that are either shorter than 10 bases or longer than 50 bases to obtain the mutagenesis result desired. With respect to corresponding mutagenic and non-mutagenic primers, it is not necessary that the corresponding oligonucleotides be of identical length, but only that there is overlap in the region corresponding to the mutation to be added.

Primers may be added in a pre-defined ratio according to the present invention. For example, if it is desired that the resulting library have a significant level of a certain specific mutation and a lesser amount of a different mutation at the same or different site, by adjusting the amount of primer added, it is possible to produce the desired biased library. Alternatively, by adding lesser or greater amounts of non-mutagenic primers, it is possible to adjust the frequency with which the corresponding mutation(s) are produced in the mutant nucleic acid library.

As used herein, the phrase "contiguous mutations" refers to mutations which are presented within the same oligonucleotide primer. For example, contiguous mutations may be adjacent or nearby each other, however, they will be introduced into the resulting mutant template nucleic acids by the same primer. As used herein, the phrase "discontiguous mutations" refers to mutations which are presented in separate oligonucleotide primers. For example, discontiguous mutations will be introduced into the resulting mutant template nucleic acids by separately prepared oligonucleotide primers. The terms "wild-type sequence," or "wild-type gene" are used interchangeably herein, to refer to a sequence that is native or naturally occurring in a host cell. In some embodiments, the wild-type sequence refers to a sequence of interest that is the starting point of a protein engineering project. The wild-type sequence may encode either a homologous or heterologous protein. A homologous protein is one the host cell would produce without intervention. A heterologous protein is one that the host cell would not produce but for the intervention.

As used herein, the term "antibodies" refers to immunoglobulins. Antibodies include but are not limited to immunoglobulins obtained directly from any species from which it is desirable to produce antibodies. In addition, the present invention encompasses modified antibodies. The term also refers to antibody fragments that retain the ability to bind to the epitope that the intact antibody binds and include polyclonal antibodies, monoclonal antibodies, chimeric antibodies, anti-idiotype (anti-ID) antibodies. Antibody fragments include, but are not limited to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs), single-chain fragment variable regions (scFv), heavy chain variable region (VH), light chain variable region (VL). Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies are also encompassed by the present invention. Preferably, the antibodies are monoclonal antibodies.

The term "oxidation stable" refers to proteases of the present invention that retain a specified amount of enzymatic activity over a given period of time under conditions prevailing during the proteolytic, hydrolyzing, cleaning or other process of the invention, for example while exposed to or contacted with bleaching agents or oxidizing agents. In some embodiments, the proteases retain at least 50%, 60%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 92%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% proteolytic activity after contact with a bleaching or oxidizing agent over a given time period, for example, at least 1 minute, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 8 minutes, 12 minutes, 16 minutes, 20 minutes, etc. In some embodiments, the stability is measured as described in the Examples.

The term "chelator stable" refers to proteases of the present invention that retain a specified amount of enzymatic activity over a given period of time under conditions prevailing during the proteolytic, hydrolyzing, cleaning or other process of the invention, for example while exposed to or contacted with chelating agents. In some embodiments, the proteases retain at least 50%, 60%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 92%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% proteolytic activity after contact with a chelating agent over a given time period, for example, at least 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 40 minutes, 60 minutes, 100 minutes, etc. In some embodiments, the chelator stability is measured as described in the Examples. The terms "thermally stable" and "thermostable" refer to proteases of the present invention that retain a specified amount of enzymatic activity after exposure to identified temperatures over a given period of time under conditions prevailing during the proteolytic, hydrolyzing, cleaning or other process of the invention, for example while exposed altered temperatures. Altered temperatures includes increased or decreased temperatures. In some embodiments, the proteases retain at least 50%, 60%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 92%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% proteolytic activity after exposure to altered temperatures over a given time period, for example, at least 60 minutes, 120 minutes, 180 minutes, 240 minutes, 300 minutes, etc. In some embodiments, the thermostability is determined as described in the Examples.

The term "enhanced stability" in the context of an oxidation, chelator, thermal and/or pH stable protease refers to a higher retained proteolytic activity over time as compared to other serine proteases (e.g., subtilisin proteases) and/or wild-type enzymes.

The term "diminished stability" in the context of an oxidation, chelator, thermal and/or pH stable protease refers to a lower retained proteolytic activity over time as compared to other serine proteases (e.g., subtilisin proteases) and/or wild-type enzymes.

The term "cleaning activity" refers to the cleaning performance achieved by the protease under conditions prevailing during the proteolytic, hydrolyzing, cleaning or other process of the invention. In some embodiments, cleaning performance is determined by the application of various cleaning assays concerning enzyme sensitive stains, for example grass, blood, milk, or egg protein as determined by various chromatographic, spectrophotometric or other quantitative methodologies after subjection of the stains to standard wash conditions. Exemplary assays include, but are not limited to those described in WO 99/34011, and U.S. Pat. 6,605,458 (both of which are herein incorporated by reference), as well as those methods included in the Examples.

The term "cleaning effective amount" of a protease refers to the quantity of protease described hereinbefore that achieves a desired level of enzymatic activity in a specific cleaning composition. Such effective amounts are readily ascertained by one of ordinary skill in the art and are based on many factors, such as the particular protease used, the cleaning application, the specific composition of the cleaning composition, and whether a liquid or dry (e.g., granular, bar) composition is required, etc.

The term "cleaning adjunct materials," as used herein, means any liquid, solid or gaseous material selected for the particular type of cleaning composition desired and the form of the product (e.g., liquid, granule, powder, bar, paste, spray, tablet, gel; or foam composition), which materials are also preferably compatible with the protease enzyme used in the composition. In some embodiments, granular compositions are in "compact" form, while in other embodiments, the liquid compositions are in a "concentrated" form.

The term "enhanced performance" in the context of cleaning activity refers to an increased or greater cleaning activity of certain enzyme sensitive stains such as egg, milk, grass or blood, as determined by usual evaluation after a standard wash cycle and/or multiple wash cycles.

The term "diminished performance" in the context of cleaning activity refers to an decreased or lesser cleaning activity of certain enzyme sensitive stains such as egg, milk, grass or blood, as determined by usual evaluation after a standard wash cycle.

The term "comparative performance" in the context of cleaning activity refers to at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80% at least 90% at least 95% of the cleaning activity of a comparative subtilisin protease (e.g., commercially available proteases), including but not limited to OPTIMASE™ protease (Genencor), PURAFECT ™ protease products (Genencor), SAVINASE ™ protease (Novozymes), BPN'-variants (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. Re 34,606), RELASE™, DURAZYME™, EVERLASE™, KANNASE ™ protease (Novozymes), MAXACAL™, MAXAPEM™, PROPERASE ™ proteases (Genencor; See also, U.S. Pat. No. Re 34,606, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,700,676; 5,955,340; 6,312,936; 6,482,628), and B. lentus variant protease products [for example those described in WO 92/21760, WO 95/23221 and/or WO 97/07770 (Henkel). Exemplary subtilisin protease variants include, but are not limited to those having substitutions or deletions at residue positions equivalent to positions 76, 101 , 103, 104, 120, 159, 167, 170, 194, 195, 217, 232, 235, 236, 245, 248, and/or 252 of BPN'. Cleaning performance can be determined by comparing the proteases of the present invention with those subtilisin proteases in various cleaning assays concerning enzyme sensitive stains such as grass, blood or milk as determined by usual spectrophotometric or analytical methodologies after standard wash cycle conditions.

As used herein, a "low detergent concentration" system includes detergents where less than about 800 ppm of detergent components are present in the wash water. Japanese detergents are typically considered low detergent concentration systems, as they have usually have approximately 667 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water.

As used herein, a "medium detergent concentration" systems includes detergents wherein between about 800 ppm and about 2000ppm of detergent components are present in the wash water. North American detergents are generally considered to be medium detergent concentration systems as they have usually approximately 975 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water. Brazilian detergents typically have approximately 1500 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water.

As used herein, "high detergent concentration" systems includes detergents wherein greater than about 2000 ppm of detergent components are present in the wash water. European detergents are generally considered to be high detergent concentration systems as they have approximately 3000-8000 ppm of detergent components in the wash water. As used herein, "fabric cleaning compositions" include hand and machine laundry detergent compositions including laundry additive compositions and compositions suitable for use in the soaking and/or pretreatment of stained fabrics (e.g., clothes, linens, and other textile materials).

As used herein, "non-fabric cleaning compositions" include non-textile (i.e., fabric) surface cleaning compositions, including but not limited to dishwashing detergent compositions, oral cleaning compositions, denture cleaning compositions, and personal cleansing compositions.

The "compact" form of the cleaning compositions herein is best reflected by density and, in terms of composition, by the amount of inorganic filler salt. Inorganic filler salts are conventional ingredients of detergent compositions in powder form. In conventional detergent compositions, the filler salts are present in substantial amounts, typically 17-35% by weight of the total composition. In contrast, in compact compositions, the filler salt is present in amounts not exceeding 15% of the total composition. In some embodiments, the filler salt is present in amounts that do not exceed 10%, or more preferably, 5%, by weight of the composition. In some embodiments, the inorganic filler salts are selected from the alkali and alkaline-earth-metal salts of sulfates and chlorides. A preferred filler salt is sodium sulfate.

II. Serine Protease Enzymes and Nucleic Acid Encoding Serine Protease Enzymes The present invention provides isolated polynucleotides encoding amino acid sequences, encoding proteases. In some embodiments, these polynucleotides comprise at least 65% amino acid sequence identity, preferably at least 70% amino acid sequence identity, more preferably at least 75% amino acid sequence identity, still more preferably at least 80% amino acid sequence identity, more preferably at least 85% amino acid sequence identity, even more preferably at least 90% amino acid sequence identity, more preferably at least 92% amino acid sequence identity, yet more preferably at least 95% amino acid sequence identity, more preferably at least 97% amino acid sequence identity, still more preferably at least 98% amino acid sequence identity, and most preferably at least 99% amino acid sequence identity to an amino acid sequence as shown in SEQ ID NOS:6-8, (e.g., at least a portion of the amino acid sequence encoded by the polynucleotide having proteolytic activity, including the mature protease catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide linkages of substrates), and/or demonstrating comparable or enhanced washing performance under identified wash conditions. In some embodiments, the percent identity (amino acid sequence, nucleic acid sequence, gene sequence) is determined by a direct comparison of the sequence information between two molecules by aligning the sequences, counting the exact number of matches between the two aligned sequences, dividing by the length of the shorter sequence, and multiplying the result by 100. Readily available computer programs find use in these analysis, such as those described above. Programs for determining nucleotide sequence identity are available in the Wisconsin Sequence Analysis Package, Version 8 (Genetics Computer Group, Madison, WI) for example, the BESTFIT, FASTA and GAP programs, which also rely on the Smith and Waterman algorithm. These programs are readily utilized with the default parameters recommended by the manufacturer and described in the Wisconsin Sequence Analysis Package referred to above.

An example of an algorithm that is suitable for determining sequence similarity is the BLAST algorithm, which is described in Altschul, et al., J. Mol. Biol., 215:403-410 (1990). Software for performing BLAST analyses is publicly available through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). This algorithm involves first identifying high scoring sequence pairs (HSPs) by identifying short words of length W in the query sequence that either match or satisfy some positive-valued threshold score T when aligned with a word of the same length in a database sequence. These initial neighborhood word hits act as starting points to find longer HSPs containing them. The word hits are expanded in both directions along each of the two sequences being compared for as far as the cumulative alignment score can be increased. Extension of the word hits is stopped when: the cumulative alignment score falls off by the quantity X from a maximum achieved value; the cumulative score goes to zero or below; or the end of either sequence is reached. The BLAST algorithm parameters W, T, and X determine the sensitivity and speed of the alignment. The BLAST program uses as defaults a wordlength (W) of 11 , the BLOSUM62 scoring matrix (See, Henikoff & Henikoff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 10915 (1989)) alignments (B) of 50, expectation (E) of 10, M'5, N'-4, and a comparison of both strands. The BLAST algorithm then performs a statistical analysis of the similarity between two sequences (See e.g., Karlin and Altschul, Proc. Nat'l. Acad. Sci. USA 90:5873-5787 [1993]). One measure of similarity provided by the BLAST algorithm is the smallest sum probability (P(N)), which provides an indication of the probability by which a match between two nucleotide or amino acid sequences would occur by chance. For example, a nucleic acid is considered similar to a serine protease nucleic acid of this invention if the smallest sum probability in a comparison of the test nucleic acid to a serine protease nucleic acid is less than about 0.1 , more preferably less than about 0.01 , and most preferably less than about 0.001. Where the test nucleic acid encodes a serine protease polypeptide, it is considered similar to a specified serine protease nucleic acid if the comparison results in a smallest sum probability of less than about 0.5, and more preferably less than about 0.2.

In some embodiments of the present invention, sequences were analyzed by BLAST and protein translation sequence tools. In some experiments, the preferred version was BLAST (Basic BLAST version 2.0). The program chosen was "BlastX", and the database chosen was "nr". Standard/default parameter values were employed.

In some preferred embodiments, the present invention encompasses the approximately 1621 base pairs in length polynucleotide set forth in SEQ. ID NO:1. A start codon is shown in bold in SEQ ID NO:1. In another embodiment of the present invention, the polynucleotides encoding these amino acid sequences comprise a 1485 base pair portion (residues 1-1485 of SEQ ID NO:2) that, if expressed, is believed to encode a signal sequence (nucleotides 1-84 of SEQ ID NO:5) encoding amino acids 1-28 of SEQ ID NO:9; an N-terminal prosequence (nucleotides 84-594 encoding amino acid residues 29-198 of SEQ ID NO:6); a mature protease sequence (nucleotides 595-1161 of SEQ ID NO:2 encoding amino acid residues 1-189 of SEQ ID NO:8); and a C-terminal pro-sequence (nucleotides 1162-1486 encoding amino acid residues 388-495 of SEQ ID NO:6). Alternatively, the signal peptide, the N-terminal pro-sequence, mature serine protease sequence and C-terminal pro-sequence is numbered in relation to the amino acid residues of the mature protease of SEQ ID NO:6 being numbered 1-189, i.e., signal peptide (residues -198 to -171 ), an N-terminal pro sequence (residues -171 to -1), the mature serine protease sequence (residues 1-189) and a C-terminal pro-sequence (residues 190-298). In another embodiment of the present invention, the polynucleotide encoding an amino acid sequence having proteolytic activity comprises a nucleotide sequence of nucleotides 1 to 1485 of the portion of SEQ ID NO:2 encoding the signal peptide and precursor protease. In another embodiment of the present invention, the polynucleotide encoding an amino acid sequence comprises the sequence of nucleotides 1 to 1412 of the polynucleotide encoding the precursor Cellulomonas protease (SEQ ID NO:3). In yet another embodiment, the polynucleotide encoding an amino acid sequence comprises the sequence of nucleotides 1 to 587 of the portion of the polynucleotide encoding the mature Cellulomonas protease (SEQ ID NO:4).

As will be understood by the skilled artisan, due to the degeneracy of the genetic code, a variety of polynucleotides can encode the signal peptide, precursor protease and/or mature protease provided in SEQ ID NOS:6, 7, and/or 8, respectively, or a protease having the % sequence identity described above. Another embodiment of the present invention encompasses a polynucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence having at least 70% sequence identity, at least 75% sequence identity, at least 80% sequence identity, at least 85% sequence identity, at least 90% sequence identity, at least 92% sequence identity, at least 95% sequence identity, at least 97% sequence identity, at least 98% sequence identity and at least 99% sequence identity to the polynucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NOS:2, 3, and/or 4, respectively, encoding the signal peptide and precursor protease, the precursor protease and/or the mature protease, respectively.

In additional embodiments, the present invention provides fragments or portions of DNA that encodes proteases, so long as the encoded fragment retains proteolytic activity. Another embodiment of the present invention encompasses polynucleotides having at least 20% of the sequence length, at least 30% of the sequence length, at least 40% of the sequence length, at least 50% of the sequence length, at least 60% of the sequence length, 70% of the sequence length, at least 75% of the sequence length, at least 80% of the sequence length, at least 85% of the sequence length, at least 90% of the sequence length, at least 92% of the sequence length, at least 95% of the sequence length, at least 97% of the sequence length, at least 98% of the sequence length and at least 99% of the sequence of the polynucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:2, or residues 185-1672 of SEQ ID NO:1, encoding the precursor protease. In alternative embodiments, these fragments or portions of the sequence length are contiguous portions of the sequence length, useful for shuffling of the DNA sequence in recombinant DNA sequences (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,132,970)

Another embodiment of the invention includes fragments of the DNA described herein that find use according to art recognized techniques in obtaining partial length DNA fragments capable of being used to isolate or identify polynucleotides encoding mature protease enzyme described herein from Cellulomonas 69B4, or a segment thereof having proteolytic activity. Moreover, the DNA provided in SEQ ID NO:1 finds use in identifying homologous fragments of DNA from other species, and particularly from Cellulomonas spp. which encode a protease or portion thereof having proteolytic activity. In addition, the present invention encompasses using primer or probe sequences constructed from SEQ ID NO:1 , or a suitable portion or fragment thereof (e.g., at least about 5-20 or 10-15 contiguous nucleotides), as a probe or primer for screening nucleic acid of either genomic or cDNA origin. In some embodiments, the present invention provides DNA probes of the desired length (i.e., generally between 100 and 1000 bases in length), based on the sequences in SEQ ID NOS1 , 2, 3, and/or 4.

In some embodiments, the DNA fragments are electrophoretically isolated, cut from the gel, and recovered from the agar matrix of the gel. In preferred embodiments, this purified fragment of DNA is then labeled (using, for example, the Megaprime labeling system according to the instructions of the manufacturer) to incorporate P32 in the DNA. The labeled probe is denatured by heating to 95°C for a given period of time (e.g., 5 minutes), and immediately added to the membrane and prehybridization solution. The hybridization reaction proceeds for an appropriate time and under appropriate conditions (e.g., 18 hours at 37 °C), with gentle shaking or rotation. The membrane is rinsed (e.g., twice in SSC/0.3% SDS) and then washed in an appropriate wash solution with gentle agitation. The stringency desired is a reflection of the conditions under which the membrane (filter) is washed. In some embodiments herein, "low-stringency" conditions involve washing with a solution of 0.2X SSC/0.1% SDS at 20°C for 15 minutes, while in other embodiments, "medium-stringency" conditions, involve a further washing step comprising washing with a solution of 0.2X SSC/0.1% SDS at 37°C for 30 minutes, while in other embodiments, "high-stringency" conditions involve a further washing step comprising washing with a solution of 0.2X SSC/0.1% SDS at 37°C for 45 minutes, and in further embodiments, "maximum-stringency" conditions involve a further washing step comprising washing with a solution of 0.2X SSC/0.1% SDS at 37°C for 60 minutes. Thus, various embodiments of the present invention provide polynucleotides capable of hybridizing to a probed derived from the nucleotide sequence provided in SEQ ID NOS:1, 2, 3, 4, and/or 5, under conditions of medium, high and/or maximum stringency.

After washing, the membrane is dried and the bound probe detected. If P32 or another radioisotope is used as the labeling agent, the bound probe is detected by autoradiography. Other techniques for the visualization of other probes are welLknown to those of skill in the art. The detection of a bound probe indicates a nucleic acid sequence has the desired homology, and therefore identity to SEQ ID NOS:1 , 2, 3, 4, and/or 5, and is encompassed by the present invention. Accordingly, the present invention provides methods for the detection of nucleic acid encoding a protease encompassed by the present invention which comprises hybridizing part or all of a nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NOS:1 , 2, 3, 4, and/or 5 with other nucleic acid of either genomic or cDNA origin.

As indicated above, in other embodiments, hybridization conditions are based on the melting temperature (Tm) of the nucleic acid binding complex, to confer a defined "stringency" as explained below. "Maximum stringency" typically occurs at about Tm-5°C (5°C below the Tm of the probe); "high stringency" at about 5°C to 10°C below Tm;

"intermediate stringency" at about 10°C to 20°C below Tm; and "low stringency" at about 20° C to 25°C below Tm. As known to those of skill in the art, medium, high and/or maximum stringency hybridization are chosen such that conditions are optimized to identify or detect polynucleotide sequence homologues or equivalent polynucleotide sequences. In yet additional embodiments, the present invention provides nucleic acid constructs

(i.e., expression vectors) comprising the polynucleotides encoding the proteases of the present invention. In further embodiments, the present invention provides host cells transformed with at least one of these vectors.

In further embodiments, the present invention provides polynucleotide sequences further encoding a signal sequence. In some embodiments, invention encompasses polynucleotides having signal activity comprising a nucleotide sequence having at least 65% sequence identity, at least 70% sequence identity, preferably at least 75% sequence identity, more preferably at least 80% sequence identity, still further preferably at least 85% sequence identity, even more preferably at least 90% sequence identity, more preferably at least 95% sequence identity, more preferably at least 97% sequence identity, at least 98% sequence identity, and most preferably at least 99% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:5. Thus, in these embodiments, the present invention provides a sequence with a putative signal sequence, and polynucleotides being capable of hybridizing to a probe derived from the nucleotide sequence disclosed in SEQ ID NO:5 under conditions of medium, high and/or maximal stringency, wherein the signal sequences have substantially the same signal activity as the signal sequence encoded by the polynucleotide of the present invention.

In some embodiments, the signal activity is indicated by substantially the same level of secretion of the protease into the fermentation medium, as the starting material. For example, in some embodiments, the present invention provides fermentation medium protease levels at least 50%, at least 60%, at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, at least 95%, or at least 98% of the secreted protease levels in the fermentation medium as provided by the signal sequence of SEQ ID NO:3. In some embodiments, the secreted protease levels are ascertained by protease activity analyses such as the pNA assay (See

5 e.g., Del Mar, [1979], infra). Additional means for determining the levels of secretion of a heterologous or homologous protein in a Gram-positive host cell and detecting secreted proteins include using either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies specific for the protein. Examples include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioimmunoassay (RIA) and fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS), as well-known those in the art. o In further embodiments, the present invention provides polynucleotides, encoding an amino acid sequence of a signal peptide (nucleotides 1-84 of SEQ ID NO:5), as shown in SEQ ID NO:9, nucleotide residue positions 1 to 85 of SEQ ID NO:2, and /or SEQ ID NO:5. The invention further encompasses nucleic acid sequences which hybridize to the nucleic acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:5 under low, medium, high stringency and/or maximums stringency conditions, but which have substantially the same signal activity as the sequence. The present invention encompasses all such polynucleotides.

In further embodiments, the present invention provides polynucleotides that are complementary to the nucleotide sequences described herein. Exemplary complementary nucleotide sequences include those that are provided in SEQ ID NOS:1-5. o Further aspects of the present invention encompass polypeptides having proteolytic activity comprising 65% amino acid sequence identity, at least 70% sequence identity, at least 75% amino acid sequence identity, at least 80% amino acid sequence identity, at least 85% amino acid sequence identity, at least 90% amino acid sequence identity, at least 92% amino acid sequence identity, at least 95% amino acid sequence identity, at least 97%5 amino acid sequence identity, at least 98% amino acid sequence identity and at least 99% amino acid sequence identity to the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 (i.e., the signal and precursor protease), SEQ ID NO:7 (i.e., the precursor protease), and/or of SEQ ID NO:8 (i.e., the mature protease). The proteolytic activity of these polypeptides is determined using methods known in the art and include such methods as those used to assesso detergent function. In further embodiments, the polypeptides are isolated. In additional embodiments of the present invention, the polypeptides comprise amino acid sequences that identical to amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of the amino acid sequences of SEQ ID NOS:6, 7, or 8. In some further embodiments, the polypeptides are identical to portions of SEQ ID NOS:6, 7 or 8. ln some embodiments, the present invention provides isolated polypeptides having proteolytic activity, comprising the amino acid sequence approximately 495 amino acids in length, as provided in SEQ ID NO:6. In further embodiments, the present invention encompasses polypeptides having proteolytic activity comprising the amino acid sequence 5 approximately 467 amino acids in length provided in SEQ ID NO:7. In some embodiments, these amino acid sequences comprise a signal sequence (amino acids 1-28 of SEQ ID NO:9); and a precursor protease (amino acids 1-467 of SEQ ID NO:7). In additional embodiments, the present invention encompasses polypeptides comprising an N-terminal prosequence (amino acids 1-170 of SEQ ID NO:7), a mature protease sequence (aminoo acids 1-189 of SEQ ID NO:8), and a C-terminal prosequence (amino acids 360 -467 of SEQ ID NO:7). In still further embodiments, the present invention encompasses polypeptides comprising a precursor protease sequence (e.g., amino acids 1-467 of SEQ ID NO:7). In yet another embodiment, the present invention encompasses polypeptides comprising a mature protease sequence comprising amino acids (e.g., 1-189 of SEQ ID NO:8). 5 In further embodiments, the present invention provides polypeptides and/or proteases comprising amino acid sequences of the above described sequence derived from bacterial species including, but not limited to Micrococcineae which are identified through amino acid sequence homology studies. In some embodiments, an amino acid residue of a precursor Micrococcineae protease is equivalent to a residue of Cellulomonas strain 69B4, ifo it is either homologous (i.e., corresponding in position in either primary or tertiary structure) or analogous to a specific residue or portion of that residue in Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease (i.e., having the same or similar functional capacity to combine, react, or interact chemically).

In some preferred embodiments, in order to establish homology to primary structure,5 the amino acid sequence of a precursor protease is directly compared to the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 mature protease amino acid sequence and particularly to a set of conserved residues which are discerned to be invariant in all or a large majority of Cellulomonas like proteases for which sequence is known. After aligning the conserved residues, allowing for necessary insertions and deletions in order to maintain alignment (i.e., avoiding theo elimination of conserved residues through arbitrary deletion and insertion), the residues corresponding to particular amino acids in the mature protease (SEQ ID NO:8) and Cellulomonas 69B4 protease are determined. Alignment of conserved residues preferably should conserve 100% of such residues. However, alignment of greater than 75% or as little as 45% of conserved residues is also adequate to define equivalent residues. However, conservation of the catalytic triad, His32/Asp56/Ser137 of SEQ ID NO:8 should be maintained.

For example, in some embodiments, the amino acid sequence of proteases from Cellulomonas strain 69B4, and other Micrococcineae spp. described above are aligned to provide the maximum amount of homology between amino acid sequences. A comparison of these sequences indicates that there are a number of conserved residues contained in each sequence. These are the residues that are identified and utilized to establish the equivalent residue positions of amino acids identified in the precursor or mature Micrococcineae protease in question. These conserved residues are used to ascertain the corresponding amino acid residues of Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease in one or more in Micrococcineae homologues (e.g., Cellulomonas cellasea (DSM 20118) and/or a Cellulomonas homologue herein). These particular amino acid sequences are aligned with the sequence of Cellulomonas 69B4 protease to produce the maximum homology of conserved residues. By this alignment, the sequences and particular residue positions of Cellulomonas 69B4 are observed in comparison with other Cellulomonas spp. Thus, the equivalent amino acid for the catalytic triad (e.g., in Cellulomonas 69B4 protease) is identifiable in the other Micrococcineae spp. In some embodiments of the present invention, the protease homologs comprise the equivalent of His32/Asp56/Ser137 of SEQ ID NO:8. Another indication that two polypeptides are substantially identical is that the first polypeptide is immunologically cross-reactive with the second polypeptide. Methodologies for determining immunological cross-reactivity are described in the art and are described in the Examples herein. Typically, polypeptides that differ by conservative amino acid substitutions are immunologically cross-reactive. Thus, a polypeptide is substantially identical to a second polypeptide, for example, where the two peptides differ only by a conservative substitution.

The present invention encompasses proteases obtained from various sources. In some preferred embodiments, the proteases are obtained from bacteria, while in other embodiments, the proteases are obtained from fungi. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the bacterial source is selected from the members of the suborder Micrococcineae. In some embodiments, the bacterial source is the family Promicromonosporaceae. In some preferred embodiments, the Promicromonosporaceae spp. includes and/or is selected from the group consisting of Promicromonospora citrea (DSM 43110), Promicromonospora sukumoe (DSM 44121), Promicromonospora aerolata (CCM 7043), Promicromonospora vindobonensis (CCM 7044), Myceligenerans xiligouense (DSM 15700), Isoptericola variabilis (DSM 10177, basonym Cellulosimicrobium variabile), Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (DSM 20424, basonym Nocardia cellulans, Cellulomonas cellulans), Cellulosimicrobium funkei, Xylanimonas cellulosilytica (LMG 20990), Xylanibacterium ulmi (LMG 21721 ), and Xylanimicrobium pachnodae (DSM 12657, basonym Promicromonospora pachnodae).

In other particularly preferred embodiments, the bacterial source is the family Cellulomonadaceae. In some preferred embodiments, the Cellulomonadaceae spp. includes and/or is selected from the group of Cellulomonas fimi (ATCC 484, DSM 20113), Cellulomonas biazotea (ATCC 486, DSM 20112), Cellulomonas cellasea (ATCC 487, 21681, DSM 20118), Cellulomonas denverensis, Cellulomonas hominis (DSM 9581), Cellulomonas flavigena (ATCC 482, DSM 20109), Cellulomonas persica (ATCC 700642, DSM 14784), Cellulomonas iranensis (ATCC 700643, DSM 14785); Cellulomonas fermentans (ATCC 43279, DSM 3133), Cellulomonas gelida (ATCC 488, DSM 20111 , DSM 20110), Cellulomonas humilata (ATCC 25174, basonym Actinomyces humiferus), Cellulomonas uda (ATCC 491, DSM 20107), Cellulomonas xylanilytica (LMG 21723), Cellulomonas septica, Cellulomonas parahominis, Oerskovia turbata (ATCC 25835, DSM 20577, synonym Cellulomonas turbata), Oerskovia jenensis (DSM 46000), Oerskovia enterophila (ATCC 35307, DSM 43852, basonym Promicromonospora enterophila), Oerskovia paurometabola (DSM 14281), and Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). In further embodiments, the bacterial source also includes and/or is selected from the group of Thermobifida spp., Rarobacter spp., and/or Lysobacter spp. In yet additional embodiments, the Thermobifida spp. is Thermobifida fusca (basonym Thermomonospora fusca) (tfpA, AAC23545; See, Lao et. al, Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 62: 4256-4259 [1996]). In an alternative embodiment, the Rarobacter spp. is Rarobacter faecitabidus (RPI, A45053; See e.g., Shimoi et al., J. Biol. Chem., 267:25189-25195 [1992]). In yet another embodiment, the Lysobacter spp. is Lysobacter enzymogenes.

In further embodiments, the present invention provides polypeptides and/or polynucleotides obtained and/or isolated from fungal sources. In some embodiments, the fungal source includes a Metarhizium spp. In some preferred embodiments, the fungal source is a Metarhizium anisopliae (CHY1 (CAB60729).

In another embodiment, the present invention provides polypeptides and/or polynucleotides derived from a Cellulomonas strain selected from cluster 2 of the taxonomic classification described in U.S. Pat. No 5,401,657, herein incorporated by reference. In US Patent 5,401,657, twenty strains of bacteria isolated from in and around alkaline lakes were assigned to the type of bacteria known as Gram-positive bacteria on the basis of: (1) the Dussault modification of the Gram's staining reaction (Dussault, J. Bacteriol., 70:484-485 [1955]); (2) the KOH sensitivity test (Gregersen, Eur. J. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 5:123- 127 [1978]; Halebian et al, J. Clin. Microbiol., 13:444-448 [1981]; and (3) the aminopeptidase reaction (Cerny, Eur. J. Appl. Microbiol., 3:223-225 [1976]; Cerny, Eur. J. Appl. Microbiol., 5:113-122 [1978]). In addition, in most cases, confirmation was also made on the basis of quinone analysis (Collins and Jones, Microbiol. Rev, 45:316-354 [1981]) using the method described by Collins (See, Collins, In Goodfellow and Minnikin (eds), Chemical Methods in Bacterial Svstematics, Academic Press, London [1985], pp. 267-288). In addition, strains can be tested for 200 characters and the results analyzed using the principles of numerical taxonomy (See e.g., Sneath and Sokal, Numerical Taxonomy, W.H. Freeman & Co.,. San Francisco, CA [1973]). Exemplary characters tested, testing methods, and codification methods are also described in U.S. Pat. 5,401,657. As described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,401,657, the phenetic data, consisting of 200 unit characters was scored and set out in the form of an "n.times.t" matrix, whose t columns represent the "t" bacterial strains to be grouped on the basis of resemblances, and whose "n" rows are the unit characters. Taxonomic resemblance of the bacterial strains was estimated by means of a similarity coefficient (Sneath and Sokal, supra, pp. 114-187). Although many different coefficients have been used for biological classification, only a few have found regular use in bacteriology. Three association coefficients (See e.g., Sneath and Sokal, supra, at p. 129), namely, the Gower, Jaccard and Simple Matching coefficients were applied. These have been frequently applied to the analysis of bacteriological data and are widely accepted by those skilled in the art, as they have been shown to result in robust classifications.

The coded data were analyzed using the TAXPAK program package (Sackin, Meth. Microbiol., 19:459-494 [1987]), run on a DEC VAX computer at the University of Leicester, U.K.

A similarity matrix was constructed for all pairs of strains using the Gower Coefficient (SG) with the option of permitting negative matches (See, Sneath and Sokal, supra, at pp. 135-136), using the RTBNSIM program in TAXPAK. As the primary instrument of analysis and the one upon which most of the taxonomic data presented herein are based, the Gower Coefficient was chosen over other coefficients for generating similarity matrices because it is applicable to all types of characters or data, namely, two-state, multistate (ordered and qualitative), and quantitative.

Cluster analysis of the similarity matrix was accomplished using the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Averages (UPGMA) algorithm, also known as the Unweighted Average Linkage procedure, by running the SMATCLST sub-routine in TAXPAK. Dendrograms illustrate the levels of similarity between bacterial strains In some embodiments, dendrograms are obtained by using the DENDGR program in TAXPAK. The phenetic data were re-analyzed using the Jaccard Coefficient (Sj) (Sneath and Sokal, supra, at p.131) and Simple Matching Coefficient (SS ) (Sneath, P.H.A. and Sokal, R.R., ibid, p. 132) by running the RTBNSIM program in TAXPAK. An additional two dendrograms were obtained by using the SMATCLST with UPGMA option and DENDGR sub-routines in TAXPAK.

Using the SG /UPGMA method, six natural clusters or phenons of alkaliphilic bacteria were generated at the 79% similarity level. These six clusters included 15 of the 20 alkaliphilic bacteria isolated from alkaline lakes. Although the choice of 79% for the level of delineation was arbitrary, it was in keeping with current practices in numerical taxonomy (See e.g., Austin Priest, Modern Bacterial Taxonomy. Van Nostrand Reinhold, Wokingham, U.K., [1986], p. 37). Placing the delineation at a lower percentage would combine groups of clearly unrelated organisms whose definition is not supported by the data. At the 79% level, 3 of the clusters exclusively contain novel alkaliphilic bacteria representing 13 of the newly isolated strains (potentially representing new taxa). Protease 69B4 was classified as in cluster 2 by this method.

The significance of the clustering at this level was supported by the results of the TESTDEN program. This program tests the significance of all dichotomous pairs of clusters (comprising 4 or more strains) in a UPGMA generated dendrogram with Squared Euclidean distances, or their complement as a measurement and assuming that the clusters are hyperspherical. The critical overlap was set at 0.25%. The separation of the clusters is highly significant.

The Sj coefficient is a useful adjunct to the SG coefficient, as it can be used to detect phenons in the latter that are based on negative matches or distortions owing to undue weight being put on potentially subjective qualitative data. Consequently, the Sj coefficient is useful for confirming the validity of clusters defined initially by the use of the SG coefficient. The Jaccard Coefficient is particularly useful in comparing biochemically unreactive organisms (Austin and Priest, supra, at p. 37). In addition, there may be some question about the admissibility of matching negative character states (See, Sneath and Sokal, supra, at p. 131), in which case the Simple Matching Coefficient is a widely applied alternative. Strain 69B4 was classified as in cluster 2 by this method.

In the main, all of the clusters (especially the clusters of the new bacteria) generated by the SG /UPGMA method were recovered in the dendrograms produced by the Sj /UPGMA method (cophenetic correlation, 0.795), and the SSM /UPGMA method (cophenetic correlation, 0.814). The main effect of these transformations was to gather all the Bacillus strains in a single large cluster which further serves to emphasize the separation between the alkaliphilic Bacillus species and the new alkaliphilic bacteria, and the uniqueness of the latter. Based on these methodologies, 69B4 is considered to be a cluster 2 bacterium. In other aspects of the present invention, the polynucleotide is derived from a bacteria having a 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence at least 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 88%, 90%, 92%, 95%, 98% sequence identity with the 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence of Cellulomonas strain 69B4. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene is deposited at GenBank under Accession Number X92152. Figure 1 provides an unrooted phylogenetic tree illustrating the relationship of novel strain 69B4 to members of the family Cellulomonadaceae (including Cellulomonas strain 69B4) and other related genera of the suborder Micrococcineae. The dendrogram was constructed from aligned 16S rDNA sequences (1374 nt) using TREECONW v.1.3b (Van de Peer and De Wachter, Comput. Appl. Biosci., 10: 569-570 [1994]). Distance estimations were calculated using the substitution rate calibration of Jukes and Cantor (Jukes and Cantor, "Evolution of protein molecules," In, Munro (ed.), Mammalian Protein Metabolism. Academic Press, NY, at pp.21-132, [1969]) and tree topology inferred by the Neighbor- Joining algorithm (Saitou and Nei, Mol. Biol. Evol., 4:406-425 [1987]). The numbers at the nodes refer to bootstrap values from 100 resampled data sets (Felsenstein, Evol., 39:783- 789 [1985]) and the scale bar indicates 2 nucleotide substitutions in 100 nt.

The strain 69B4 exhibits the closest 16S rDNA relationship to members of Cellulomonas and Oerskovia of the family Cellulomonadaceae. The closest relatives are believed to be C. cellasea (DSM 20118) and C. fimi (DSM 20113), with at least 95% sequence identity with the 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence of Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (e.g., 96% and 95% identity respectively) to strain 69B4 16S rRNA gene sequence. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, the Cellulomonas spp. is Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM16035). This strain was originally isolated from a sample of sediment and water from the littoral zone of Lake Bogoria, Kenya at Acacia Camp (Lat. 0° 12'N, Long. 36° 07Ε) collected on 10 October 1988. The water temperature was 33°C, pH 10.5 with a conductivity of 44 mS/cm. Cellulomonas strain 69B4 was determined to have the phenotypic characteristics described below. Fresh cultures were Gram-positive, slender, generally straight, rod-shaped bacteria, approximately 0.5-0.7μm x 1.8-4μm. Older cultures contained mainly short rods and coccoid cells. Cells occasionally occurred in pairs or as V- forms, but primary branching was not observed. Endospores were not detected. On alkaline GAM agar the strain forms opaque, glistening, pale-yellow coloured, circular and convex or domed colonies, with entire margins, about 2 mm in diameter after 2-3 days incubation at 37°C. The colonies were viscous or slimy with a tendency to clump when scraped with a loop. On neutral Tryptone Soya Agar, strain growth was less vigorous, giving translucent yellow colonies, generally <1 mm in diameter. The cultures were facultatively anaerobic, as they were capable of growth under strictly anaerobic conditions. However, growth under anaerobic conditions was markedly reduced compared to aerobic growth. The strain also appeared to be negative in standard oxidase, urease, aminopeptidase, and KOH tests. In addition, nitrate was not reduced, although the organisms were catalase positive and DNase was produced under alkaline conditions. The preferred temperature range for growth was 20 - 37°C, with an optimum temperature at around 30-37°C. No growth was observed at 15°C or 45°C.

The strain is alkaliphilic and slightly halophilic. The strain may also be characterized as having growth occurring at pH values between 6.0 and 10.5 with an optimum around pH 9-10. No growth was observed at pH 11 or pH 5.5. Growth below pH 7 was less vigorous and abundant than that of cultures grown at the optimal temperature. The strain was observed to grow in medium containing 0-8% (w/v) NaCl. Furthermore, the strain may also be characterized as a chemo-organotroph, since it grew on complex substrates such as yeast extract and peptone; and hydrolyzed starch, gelatin, casein, carboxymethylcellulose and amorphous cellulose.

The strain was observed to have metabolism that was respiratory and also fermentative. Acid was produced both aerobically and anaerobically from (API 50CH): L- arabinose, D-xylose, D-glucose, D-fructose, D-mannose, rhamnose (weak), cellobiose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose, gentiobiose, D-turanose, D-lyxose and 5-keto-gluconate (weak). Amygdalin, arbutin, salicin and esculin are also utilized. The strain was unable to utilize: ribose, lactose, galactose, melibiose, D-raffinose, glycogen, glycerol, erythritol, inositol, mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, arabitol, gluconate and lactate.

The strain was determined to be susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, fusidic acid, methicillin, novobiocin, streptomycin, tetracycline, sulphafurazole, oleandomycin, polymixin, rifampicin, vancomycin and bacitracin; but resistant to gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, nalidixic acid, sulphmethoxazole, trimethoprim, penicillin G, neomycin and kanamycin.

The following enzymes, aside from the protease of the present invention, were observed to be produced (ApiZym, API Coryne); C4-esterase, C8-esterase/lipase, leueine arylamidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, alpha-glucosidase, beta-glucosidase and pyrazinamidase.

The strain was observed to exhibit the following chemotaxonomic characteristics. Major fatty acids (>10% of total) were C16:1 (28.1%), C18:0 (31.1%), C18:1 (13.9%). N- saturated (79.1%), n-unsaturated (19.9%). Fatty acids with even numbers of carbons accounted for 98%. Main polar lipid components: phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and 3 unidentified glycolipids (alpha-napthol positive) were present; DPG, PGP, PI and PE were not detected. Menaquinones MK-4, MK-6, MK-7 and MK-9 were the main isoprenoids present- The cell wall peptidoglycan type was A4β with L-ornithine as diamino acid and D- aspartic acid in the interpeptide bridge. With regard to toxicity evaluation, there are no known toxicity or pathogenicity issues associated with bacteria of the genus Cellulomonas. Although there may be variations in the sequence of a naturally occurring enzyme within a given species of organism, enzymes of a specific type produced by organisms of the same species generally are substantially identical with respect to substrate specificity and/or proteolytic activity levels under given conditions (e.g., temperature, pH, water hardness, oxidative conditions, chelating conditions, and concentration), etc. Thus, for the purposes of the present invention, it is contemplated that other strains and species of Cellulomonas also produce the Cellulomonas protease of the present invention and thus provide useful sources for the proteases of the present invention. Indeed, as presented herein, it is contemplated that other members of the Micrococcineae will find use in the present invention.

In some embodiments, the proteolytic polypeptides of this invention are characterized physicochemically, while in other embodiments, they are characterized based on their functionally, while in further embodiments, they are characterized using both sets of properties. Physicochemical characterization takes advantages of well known techniques such as SDS electrophoresis, gel filtration, amino acid composition, mass spectrometry (e.g,. MALDI-TOF-MS, LC-ES-MS/MS, etc.), and sedimentation to determine the molecular weight of proteins, isoelectric focusing to determine the pi of proteins, amino acid sequencing to determine the amino acid sequences of protein, crystallography studies to determine the tertiary structures of proteins, and antibody binding to determine antigenic epitopes present in proteins.

In some embodiments, functional characteristics are determined by techniques well known to the practitioner in the protease field and include, but are not limited to, hydrolysis of various commercial substrates, such as di-methyl casein ("DMC") and/or AAPF-pNA. This preferred technique for functional characterization is described in greater detail in the Examples provided herein.

In some embodiments of the present invention, the protease has a molecular weight of about 17kD to about 21 kD, for example about 18kD to 19kD, for example 18700 daltons to 18800 daltons, for example about 18764 daltons, as determined by MALDI-TOF-MS). In another aspect of the present invention, the protease measured MALDI-TOF-MS spectrum as set forth in Figure 3.

The mature protease also displays proteolytic activity (e.g., hydrolytic activity on a substrate having peptide linkages) such as DMC. In further embodiments, proteases of the present invention provide enhanced wash performance under identified conditions. Although the present invention encompasses the protease 69B as described herein, in some embodiments, the proteases of the present invention exhibit at least 50%, 60%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 92%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% proteolytic activity as compared to the proteolytic activity of 69B4. In some embodiments, the proteases display at least 50%, 60%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 92%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% proteolytic activity as compared to the proteolytic activity of proteases sold under the tradenames

SAVINASE® (Novzymes) or PURAFECT® (Genencor) under the same conditions. In some embodiments, the proteases of the present invention display comparative or enhanced wash performance under identified conditions as compared to 69B4 under the same conditions. In some preferred embodiments, the proteases of the present invention display comparative or enhanced wash performance under identified conditions, as compared to proteases sold under the tradenames SAVINASE® (Novozymes) or PURAFECT® (Genencor) under the same conditions.

In yet further embodiments, the proteases and/or polynucleotides encoding the proteases of the present invention are provided purified form (i.e., present in a particular composition in a higher or lower concentration than exists in a naturally occurring or wild type organism), or in combination with components not normally present upon expression from a naturally occurring or wild-type organism. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to proteases of any specific purity level, as ranges of protease purity find use in various applications in which the proteases of the present invention are suitable.

III. Obtaining Polynucleotides Encoding Micrococcineae (e.g., Cellulomonas) Proteases of the Present Invention

In some embodiments, nucleic acid encoding a protease of the present invention is obtained by standard procedures known in the art from, for example, cloned DNA (e.g., a DNA "library"), chemical synthesis, cDNA cloning, PCR, cloning of genomic DNA or fragments thereof, or purified from a desired cell, such as a bacterial or fungal species (See, for example, Sambrook et al., supra [1989]; and Glover and Hames (eds.), DNA Cloning: A Practical Approach. Vols 1 and 2, Second Edition). Synthesis of polynucleotide sequences is well known in the art (See e.g., Beaucage and Caruthers, Tetrahedron Lett., 22:1859- 1862 [1981]), including the use of automated synthesizers (See e.g., Needham- VanDevanter et al., Nucl. Acids Res., 12:6159-6168 [1984]). DNA sequences can also be custom made and ordered from a variety of commercial sources. As described in greater detail herein, in some embodiments, nucleic acid sequences derived from genomic DNA contain regulatory regions in addition to coding regions.

In some embodiments involving the molecular cloning of the gene from genomic DNA, DNA fragments are generated, some of which comprise at least a portion of the desired gene. In some embodiments, the DNA is cleaved at specific sites using various restriction enzymes. In some alternative embodiments, DNAse is used in the presence of manganese to fragment the DNA, or the DNA is physically sheared (e.g., by sonication). The linear DNA fragments created are then be separated according to size and amplified by standard techniques, including but not limited to, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, PCR and column chromatography.

Once nucleic acid fragments are generated, identification of the specific DNA fragment encoding a protease may be accomplished in a number of ways. For example, in some embodiments, a proteolytic hydrolyzing enzyme encoding the asp gene or its specific RNA, or a fragment thereof, such as a probe or primer, is isolated, labeled, and then used in hybridization assays well known to those in the art, to detect a generated gene (See e.g., Benton and Davis, Science 196:180 [1977]; and Grunstein and Hogness, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72:3961 [1975]). In preferred embodiments, DNA fragments sharing substantial sequence similarity to the probe hybridize under medium to high stringency. In some preferred embodiments, amplification is accomplished using PCR, as known in the art. In some preferred embodiments, a nucleic acid sequence of at least about 4 nucleotides and as many as about 60 nucleotides from SEQ ID NOS:1 , 2, 3 and/or 4 (i.e., fragments), preferably about 12 to 30 nucleotides, and more preferably about 25 nucleotides are used in any suitable combinations as PCR primer. These same fragments also find use as probes in hybridization and product detection methods.

In some embodiments, isolation of nucleic acid constructs of the invention from a cDNA or genomic library utilizes PCR with using degenerate oligonucleotide primers prepared on the basis of the amino acid sequence of the protein having the amino acid sequence as shown in SEQ ID NOS:1 -5. The primers can be of any segment length, for example at least 4, at least 5, at least 8, at least 15, at least 20, nucleotides in length. Exemplary probes in the present application utilized a primer comprising a TTGWHCGT and a GDSGG polynucleotide sequence as more fully described in Examples.

In view of the above, it will be appreciated that the polynucleotide sequences provided herein and based on the polynucleotide sequences provided in SEQ ID NOS:1-5 are useful for obtaining identical or homologous fragments of polynucleotides from other species, and particularly from bacteria that encode enzymes having the serine protease activity expressed by protease 69B4.

IV. Expression and Recovery of Serine Proteases of the Present Invention

Any suitable means for expression and recovery of the serine proteases of the present invention find use herein. Indeed, those of skill in the art know many methods suitable for cloning a Cellulomonas-deήved polypeptide having proteolytic activity, as well as an additional enzyme (e.g., a second peptide having proteolytic activity, such as a protease, cellulase, mannanase, or amylase, etc.). Numerous methods are also known in the art for introducing at least one (e.g., multiple) copies of the polynucleotide(s) encoding the enzyme(s) of the present invention in conjunction with any additional sequences desired, into the genes or genome of host cells.

In general, standard procedures for cloning of genes and introducing exogenous proteases encoding regions (including multiple copies of the exogenous encoding regions) into said genes find use in obtaining a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease derivative or homologue thereof. Indeed, the present Specification, including the Examples provides such teaching. However, additional methods known in the art are also suitable (See e.g., Sambrook et al. supra (1989); Ausubel et al., supra [1995]; and Harwood and Cutting, (eds.) Molecular Biological Methods for Bacillus." John Wiley and Sons, [1990]; and WO 96/34946).

In some preferred embodiments, the polynucleotide sequences of the present invention are expressed by operatively linking them to an expression control sequence in an appropriate expression vector and employed by that expression vector to transform an appropriate host according to techniques well established in the art. In some embodiments, the polypeptides produced on expression of the DNA sequences of this invention are isolated from the fermentation of cell cultures and purified in a variety of ways according to well established techniques in the art. Those of skill in the art are capable of selecting the most appropriate isolation and purification techniques.

More particularly, the present invention provides constructs, vectors comprising polynucleotides described herein, host cells transformed with such vectors, proteases expressed by such host cells, expression methods and systems for the production of serine protease enzymes derived from microorganisms, in particular, members of the Micrococcineae, including but not limited to Cellulomonas species. In some embodiments, the polynucleotide(s) encoding serine protease(s) are used to produce recombinant host cells suitable for the expression of the serine protease(s). In some preferred embodiments, the expression hosts are capable of producing the protease(s) in commercially viable quantities.

IV. Recombinant Vectors

As indicated above, in some embodiments, the present invention provides vectors comprising the aforementioned polynucleotides. In some embodiments, the vectors (i.e., constructs) of the invention encoding the protease are of genomic origin (e.g., prepared though use of a genomic library and screening for DNA sequences coding for all or part of the protease by hybridization using synthetic oligonucleotide probes in accordance with standard techniques). In some preferred embodiments, the DNA sequence encoding the protease is obtained by isolating chromosomal DNA from the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 and amplifying the sequence by PCR methodology (See, the Examples). In alternative embodiments, the nucleic acid construct of the invention encoding the protease is prepared synthetically by established standard methods (See e.g., Beaucage and Caruthers, Tetra. Lett. 22:1859-1869 [1981]; and Matthes et al., EMBO J., 3:801-805 [1984]). According to the phosphoramidite method, oligonucleotides are synthesized (e.g., in an automatic DNA synthesizer), purified, annealed, ligated and cloned in suitable vectors.. ln additional embodiments, the nucleic acid construct is of mixed synthetic and genomic origin. In some embodiments, the construct is prepared by ligating fragments of synthetic or genomic DNA (as appropriate), wherein the fragments correspond to various parts of the entire nucleic acid construct, in accordance with standard techniques. In further embodiments, the present invention provides vectors comprising at least one DNA construct of the present invention. In some embodiments, the present invention encompasses recombinant vectors. It is contemplated that any suitable vector will find use in the present invention, including autonomously replicating vector a well as vectors that integrate (either transiently or stably) within the host cell genome). Indeed, a wide variety of vectors, and expression cassettes suitable for the cloning, transformation and expression in fungal (mold and yeast), bacterial, insect and plant cells are known to those of skill in the art. Typically, the vector or cassette contains sequences directing transcription and translation of the nucleic acid, a selectable marker, and sequences allowing autonomous replication or chromosomal integration. In some embodiments, suitable vectors comprise a region 5' of the gene which harbors transcriptional initiation controls and a region 3' of the DNA fragment which controls transcriptional termination. These control regions may be derived from genes homologous or heterologous to the host as long as the control region selected is able to function in the host cell.

The vector is preferably an expression vector in which the DNA sequence encoding the protease of the invention is operably linked to additional segments required for transcription of the DNA. In some preferred embodiments, the expression vector is derived from plasmid or viral DNA, or in alternative embodiments, contains elements of both. Exemplary vectors include, but are not limited to pSEGCT, pSEACT, and/or pSEA4CT, as well as all of the vectors described in the Examples herein. Construction of such vectors is described herein, and methods are well known in the art (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,287,839; and WO 02/50245). In some preferred embodiments, the vector pSEGCT (about 8302 bp; See, Figure 5) finds use in the construction of a vector comprising the polynucleotides described herein (e.g., pSEG69B4T; See, Figure 6). In alternative preferred embodiments, the vector pSEA469B4CT (See, Figure 7) finds use in the construction of a vector comprising the polynucleotides described herein. Indeed, it is intended that all of the vectors described herein will find use in the present invention.

In some embodiments, the additional segments required for transcription include regulatory segments (e.g., promoters, secretory segments, inhibitors, global regulators, etc.), as known in the art. One example includes any DNA sequence that shows transcriptional activity in the host cell of choice and is derived from genes encoding proteins either homologous or heterologous to the host cell. Specifically, examples of suitable promoters for use in bacterial host cells include but are not limited to the promoter of the Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase gene, the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAN) amylase gene, the Bacillus subtilis alkaline protease gene, the Bacillus clausii alkaline protease gene the Bacillus pumilus xylosidase gene, the Bacillus thuringiensis crylllA, and the Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase gene. Additional promoters include the A4 promoter, as described herein. Other promoters that find use in the present invention include, but are not limited to phage Lambda PR or P promoters, as well as the E. coli lac, trp or tac promoters.

In some embodiments, the promoter is derived from a gene encoding said protease or a fragment thereof having substantially the same promoter activity as said sequence. The invention further encompasses nucleic acid sequences which hybridize to the promoter sequences under intermediate, high, and/or maximum stringency conditions, or which have at least about 90% homology and preferably about 95% homology to such promoter, but which have substantially the same promoter activity. In some embodiments, this promoter is used to promote the expression of either the protease and/or a heterologous DNA sequence (e.g., another enzyme in addition to the protease of the present invention). In additional embodiments, the vector also comprises at least one selectable marker. In some embodiments, the recombinant vectors of the invention further comprise a

DNA sequence enabling the vector to replicate in the host cell. In some preferred embodiments involving bacterial host cells, these sequences comprise all the sequences needed to allow plasmid replication (e.g., ori and/or rep sequences).

In some particularly preferred embodiments, signal sequences (e.g., leader sequence or pre sequence) are also included in the vector, in order to direct a polypeptide of the present invention into the secretory pathway of the host cells. In some more preferred embodiments, a secretory signal sequence is joined to the-DNA sequence encoding the precursor protease in the correct reading frame (See e.g., SEQ ID NOS:1 and 2). Depending on whether the protease is to be expressed intracellularly or is secreted, a polynucleotide sequence or expression vector of the invention is engineered with or without a natural polypeptide signal sequence or a signal sequence which functions in bacteria (e.g., Bacillus sp.), fungi (e.g., Trichoderma), other prokaryotes or eukaryotes. In some embodiments, expression is achieved by either removing or partially removing the signal sequence ln some embodiments involving secretion from bacterial cells, the signal peptide is a naturally occurring signal peptide, or a functional part thereof, while in other embodiments, it is a synthetic peptide. Suitable signal peptides include but are not limited to sequences derived from Bacillus Hchenifornmis alpha-amylase, Bacillus clausii alkaline protease, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens amylase. One preferred signal sequence is the signal peptide derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4, as described herein. Thus, in some particularly preferred embodiments, the signal peptide comprises the signal peptide from the protease described herein. This signal finds use in facilitating the secretion of the 69B4 protease and/or a heterologous DNA sequence (e.g. a second protease, such as another wild-type protease, a BPN' variant protease, a GG36 variant protease, a lipase, a cellulase, a mannanases, etc.). In some em odiments, these second enzymes are encoded by the DNA sequence and/or the amino acid sequences known in the art (See e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,465,235, 6,287,839, 5,965,384, and 5,795,764; as well as WO 98/22500, WO 92/05249, EP 0305216B1 , and WO 94/25576). Furthermore, it is contemplated that in some embodiments, the signal sequence peptide is also be operatively linked to an endogenous sequence to activate and secrete such endogenous encoded protease.

The procedures used to ligate the DNA sequences coding for the present protease, the promoter and/or secretory signal sequence, respectively, and to insert them into suitable vectors containing the information necessary for replication, are well known to those skilled in the art. As indicated above, in some embodiments, the nucleic acid construct is prepared using PCR with specific primers.

V. Host Cells

As indicated above, in some embodiments, the present invention also provides host cells transformed with the vectors described above. In some embodiments, the polynucleotide encoding the protease(s) of the present invention that is introduced into the host cell is homologous, while in other embodiments, the polynucleotide is heterologous to the host. In some embodiments in which the polynucleotide is homologous to the host cell (e.g., additional copies of the native protease produced by the host cell are introduced), it is operably connected to another homologous or heterologous promoter sequence. In alternative embodiments, another secretory signal sequence, and/or terminator sequence find use in the present invention. Thus, in some embodiments, the polypeptide DNA sequence comprises multiple copies of a homologous polypeptide sequence, a heterologous polypeptide sequence from another organism, or synthetic polypeptide sequence(s). Indeed, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular host cells and/or vectors.

Indeed, the host cell into which the DNA construct of the present invention is introduced may be any cell which is capable of producing the present alkaline protease,

5 including, but not limited to bacteria, fungi, and higher eukaryotic cells.

Examples of bacterial host cells which find use in the present invention include, but are not limited to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus, Streptomyces, and Thermobifida, for example strains of B. subtilis, B. licheniformis, B. lentus, B. brevis, B. stearothermophilus, B. clausii, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. coagulans, B. circulans, B. lautus, B.o megaterium, B. thuringiensis, S. griseus, S. lividans, S. coelicolor; S. avermitilis and T. fusca; as well as Gram-negative bacteria such as members of the Enterobacteriaceae (e.g., Escherichia coli). In some particularly preferred embodiments, the host cells are B. subtilis, B. clausii, and/or B. licheniformis. In additional preferred embodiments, the host cells are strains of S. lividans (e.g., TK23 and/or TK21). Any suitable method for transformation of5 the bacteria find use in the present invention, including but not limited to protoplast transformation, use of competent cells, etc., as known in the art. In some preferred embodiments, the method provided in U.S. Pat. No. 5,264,366 (incorporated by reference herein), finds used in the present invention. For S. lividans, one preferred means for transformation and protein expression is that described by Fernandez-Abalos ef al. (See,o Fernandez-Abalos et al., Microbiol., 149:1623-1632 [2003]; See also, Hopwood, etal., Genetic Manipulation of Streptomyces: Laboratory Manual, Innis [1985], both of which are incorporated by reference herein). Of course, the methods described in the Example herein find use in the present invention.

Examples of fungal host cells which find use in the present invention include, but are5 not limited to Trichoderma spp. and Aspergillus spp. In some particularly preferred embodiments, the host cells are Trichoderma reesei and/or Aspergillus niger. In some embodiments, transformation and expression in Aspergillus is performed as described in U.S. Pat. 5,364,770, herein incorporated by reference. Of course, the methods described in the Example herein find use in the present invention. o In some embodiments, particular promoter and signal sequences are needed to provide effective transformation and expression of the protease(s) of the present invention. Thus, in some preferred embodiments involving the use of Bacillus host cells, the aprE promoter is used in combination with known Bac///ws-derived signal and other regulatory sequences. In some preferred embodiments involving expression in Aspergillus, the glaA promoter is used. In some embodiments involving Streptomyces host cells, the glucose isomerase (Gl) promoter of Actinoplanes missouriensis is used, while in other embodiments, the A4 promoter is used.

In some embodiments involving expression in bacteria such as E. coli, the protease

5 is retained in the cytoplasm, typically as insoluble granules (i.e., inclusion bodies). However, in other embodiments, the protease is directed to the periplasmic space by a bacterial secretion sequence. In the former case, the cells are lysed, and the granules are recovered and denatured after which the protease is refolded by diluting the denaturing agent. In the latter case, the protease is recovered from the periplasmic space by disruptingo the cells (e.g., by sonication or osmotic shock), to release the contents of the periplasmic space and recovering the protease! "

In preferred embodiments, the transformed host cells of the present invention are cultured in a suitable nutrient medium under conditions permitting the expression of the present protease, after which the resulting protease is recovered from the culture. Thes medium used to culture the cells comprises any conventional medium suitable for growing the host cells, such as minimal or complex media containing appropriate supplements. Suitable media are available from commercial suppliers or may be prepared according to published recipes (e.g., in catalogues of the American Type Culture Collection). In some embodiments, the protease produced by the cells is recovered from the culture medium byo conventional procedures, including, but not limited to separating the host cells from the medium by centrifugation or filtration, precipitating the proteinaceous components of the supernatant or filtrate by means of a salt (e.g., ammonium sulfate), chromatographic purification (e.g., ion exchange, gel filtration, affinity, etc.). Thus, any method suitable for recovering the protease(s) of the present invention will find use. Indeed, it is not intended5 that the present invention be limited to any particular purification method.

VI. Applications for Serine Protease Enzymes

As described in greater detail herein, the proteases of the present invention have important characteristics that make them very suitable for certain applications. For example,o the proteases of the present invention have enhanced thermal stability, enhanced oxidative stability, and enhanced chelator stability, as compared to some currently used proteases. Thus, these proteases find use in cleaning compositions. Indeed, under certain wash conditions, the present proteases exhibit comparative or enhanced wash performance as compared with currently used subtilisin proteases. Thus, it is contemplated that the cleaning and/or enzyme compositions of the present invention will be provided in a variety of cleaning compositions. In some embodiments, the proteases of the present invention are utilized in the same manner as subtilisin proteases (/'.e., proteases currently in use). Thus, the present proteases find use in various cleaning compositions, as well as animal feed applications, leather processing (e.g., bating), protein hydrolysis, and in textile uses. The identified proteases also find use in personal care applications. .

Thus, the proteases of the present invention find use in a number of industrial applications, in particular within the cleaning, disinfecting, animal feed, and textile/leather industries. In some embodiments, the protease(s) of the present invention are combined with detergents, builders, bleaching agents and other conventional ingredients to produce a variety of novel cleaning compositions useful in the laundry and other cleaning arts such as, for example, laundry detergents (both powdered and liquid), laundry pre-soaks, all fabric bleaches, automatic dishwashing detergents (both liquid and powdered), household cleaners, particularly bar and liquid soap applications, and drain openers. In addition, the protease find use in the cleaning of contact lenses, as well as other items, by contacting such materials with an aqueous solution of the cleaning composition. In addition these naturally occurring proteases can be used, for example in peptide hydrolysis, waste treatment, textile applications, medical device cleaning, biofilm removal and as fusion- cleavage enzymes in protein production, etc. The composition of these products is not critical to the present invention, as long as the protease(s) maintain their function in the setting used. In some embodiments, the compositions are readily prepared by combining a cleaning effective amount of the protease or an enzyme composition comprising the protease enzyme preparation with the conventional components of such compositions in their art recognized amounts. The proteases of the present invention find particular use in the cleaning industry, including, but not limited to laundry and dish detergents. These applications place enzymes under various environmental stresses. The proteases of the present invention provide advantages over many currently used enzymes, due to their stability under various conditions. Indeed, there are a variety of wash conditions including varying detergent formulations, wash water volumes, wash water temperatures, and lengths of wash time, to which proteases involved in washing are exposed. In addition, detergent formulations used in different geographical areas have different concentrations of their relevant components present in the wash water. For example, a European detergent typically has about 4500- 5000 ppm of detergent components in the wash water, while a Japanese detergent typically has approximately 667 ppm of detergent components in the wash water. In North America, particularly the United States, detergents typically have about 975 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water.

5 A low detergent concentration system includes detergents where less than about 800 ppm of detergent components are present in the wash water. Japanese detergents are typically considered low detergent concentration system as they have approximately 667 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water.

A medium detergent concentration includes detergents where between about 800o ppm and about 2000ppm of detergent components are present in the wash water. North American detergents are generally considered to be medium detergent concentration systems as they have approximately 975 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water. Brazil typically has approximately 1500 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water. s A high detergent concentration system includes detergents where greater than about

2000 ppm of detergent components are present in the wash water. European detergents are generally considered to be high detergent concentration systems as they have approximately 4500-5000 ppm of detergent components in the wash water.

Latin American detergents are generally high suds phosphate builder detergents ando the range of detergents used in Latin America can fall in both the medium and high detergent concentrations as they range from 1500 ppm to 6000 ppm of detergent components in the wash water. As mentioned above, Brazil typically has approximately 1500 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water. However, other high suds phosphate builder detergent geographies, not limited to other Latin American countries, may5 have high detergent concentration systems up to about 6000 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water.

In light of the foregoing, it is evident that concentrations of detergent compositions in typical wash solutions throughout the world varies from less than about 800 ppm of detergent composition ("low detergent concentration geographies"), for example about 667o ppm in Japan, to between about 800 ppm to about 2000 ppm ("medium detergent concentration geographies" ), for example about 975 ppm in U.S. and about 1500 ppm in Brazil, to greater than about 2000 ppm ("high detergent concentration geographies"), for example about 4500 ppm to about 5000 ppm in Europe and about 6000 ppm in high suds phosphate builder geographies. The concentrations of the typical wash solutions are determined empirically. For example, in the U.S., a typical washing machine holds a volume of about 64.4 L of wash solution. Accordingly, in order to obtain a concentration of about 975 ppm of detergent within the wash solution about 62.79 g of detergent composition must be added to the 64.4 L of wash solution. This amount is the typical amount measured into the wash water by the consumer using the measuring cup provided with the detergent.

As a further example, different geographies use different wash temperatures. The temperature of the wash water in Japan is typically less than that used in Europe. For example, the temperature of the wash water in North America and Japan can be between 10 and 30°C (e.g., about 20°C), whereas the temperature of wash water in Europe is typically between 30 and 60°C (e.g., about 40°C).

As a further example, different geographies typically have different water hardness. Water hardness is usually described in terms of the grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+. Hardness is a measure of the amount of calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) in the water. Most water in the United States is hard, but the degree of hardness varies. Moderately hard (60-120 ppm) to hard (121-181 ppm) water has 60 to 181 parts per million (parts per million converted to grains per U.S. gallon is ppm # divided by 17.1 equals grains per gallon) of hardness minerals.

Figure imgf000079_0001

European water hardness is typically greater than 10.5 (for example 10.5-20.0) grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+ (e.g., about 15 grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+ ). North American water hardness is typically greater than Japanese water hardness, but less than European water hardness. For example, North American water hardness can be between 3 to10 grains, 3-8 grains or about 6 grains. Japanese water hardness is typically lower than North American water hardness, usually less than 4, for example 3 grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+. Accordingly, in some embodiments, the present invention provides proteases that show surprising wash performance in at least one set of wash conditions (e.g., water temperature, water hardness, and/or detergent concentration). In some embodiments, the proteases of the present invention are comparable in wash performance to subtilisin proteases. In some embodiments, the proteases of the present invention exhibit enhanced wash performance as compared to subtilisin proteases. Thus, in some preferred embodiments of the present invention, the proteases provided herein exhibit enhanced oxidative stability, enhanced thermal stability, and/or enhanced chelator stability.

In some preferred embodiments, the present invention provides the ASP protease, as well as homologues and variants fo the protease. These proteases find use in any applications in which it is desired to clean protein based stains from textiles or fabrics. In some embodiments, the cleaning compositions of the present invention are formulated as hand and machine laundry detergent compositions including laundry additive compositions, and compositions suitable for use in the pretreatment of stained fabrics, rinse- added fabric softener compositions, and compositions for use in general household hard surface cleaning operations, as well as dishwashing operation's. Those in the art are familiar with different formulations which can be used as cleaning compositions. In preferred embodiments, the proteases of the present invention comprise comparative or enhanced performance in detergent compositions (i.e., as compared to other proteases). In some embodiments, cleaning performance is evaluated by comparing the proteases of the present invention with subtilisin proteases in various cleaning assays that utilize enzyme- sensitive stains such as egg, grass, blood, milk, etc., in standard methods. Indeed, those in the art are familiar with the spectrophotometric and other analytical methodologies used to assess detergent performance under standard wash cycle conditions. Assays that find use in the present invention include, but are not limited to those described in WO 99/34011, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,605,458 (See e.g., Example 3). In U.S. Pat. No. 6,605,458, at Example 3, a detergent dose of 3.0 g/l at pH10.5, wash time 15 minutes, at 15 C, water hardness of 6°dH, 10nM enzyme concentration in 150 ml glass beakers with stirring rod, 5 textile pieces (phi 2.5 cm) in 50 ml, EMPA 117 test material from Center for Test Materials Holland are used. The measurement of reflectance "R" on the test material was done at 460 nm using a Macbeth ColorEye 7000 photometer. Additional methods are provided in the Examples herein. Thus, these methods also find use in the present invention.

The addition of proteases of the invention to conventional cleaning compositions does not create any special use limitation. In other words, any temperature and pH suitable for the detergent is also suitable for the present compositions, as long as the pH is within the range set forth herein, and the temperature is below the described protease's denaturing temperature. In addition, proteases of the present invention find use in cleaning compositions that do not include detergents, again either alone or in combination with builders and stabilizers.

When used in cleaning compositions or detergents, oxidative stability is a further consideration. Thus, in some applications, the stability is enhanced, diminished, or comparable to subtilisin proteases as desired for various uses. In some preferred embodiments, enhanced oxidative stability is desired. Some of the proteases of the present invention find particular use in such applications.

When used in cleaning compositions or detergents, thermal stability is a further consideration. Thus, in some applications, the stability is enhanced, diminished, or comparable to subtilisin proteases as desired for various uses. In some preferred embodiments, enhanced thermostability is desired. Some of the proteases of the present invention find particular use in such applications.

When used in cleaning compositions or detergents, chelator stability is a further consideration. Thus, in some applications, the stability is enhanced, diminished, or comparable to subtilisin proteases as desired for various uses. In some preferred embodiments, enhanced chelator stability is desired. Some of the proteases of the present invention find particular use in such applications.

In some embodiments of the present invention, naturally occurring proteases are provided which exhibit modified enzymatic activity at different pHs when compared to subtilisin proteases. A pH-activity profile is a plot of pH against enzyme activity and may be constructed as described in the Examples and/or by methods known in the art. In some embodiments, it is desired to obtain naturally occurring proteases with broader profiles (i.e., those having greater activity at range of pHs than a comparable subtilisin protease). In other embodiments, the enzymes have no significantly greater activity at any pH, or naturally occurring homologues with sharper profiles (i.e., those having enhanced activity when compared to subtilisin proteases at a given pH, and lesser activity elsewhere). Thus, in various embodiments, the proteases of the present invention have differing pH optima and/or ranges. It is not intended that the present invention be limited to any specific pH or pH range.

In some embodiments of the present invention, the cleaning compositions comprise, proteases of the present invention at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of 69B4 and/or other protease of the present invention by weight of the composition and the balance (e.g., 99.999% to 90.0%) comprising cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other aspects of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention comprise, the 69B4 and/or other proteases at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001% to 5%, 0.001 % to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% 69B4 or other protease of the present invention by weight of the composition and the balance of the cleaning composition (e.g., 99.9999% to 90.0%, 99.999 % to 98%, 99.995% to 99.5% by weight) comprising cleaning adjunct materials.

In some embodiments, preferred cleaning compositions, in addition to the protease preparation of the invention, comprise one or more additional enzymes or enzyme derivatives which provide cleaning performance and/or fabric care benefits. Such enzymes include, but are not limited to other proteases, lipases, cutinases, amylases, cellulases, peroxidases, oxidases (e.g. laccases), and/or mannanases.

Any other protease suitable for use in alkaline solutions finds use in the compositions of the present invention. Suitable proteases include those of animal, vegetable or microbial origin. In particularly preferred embodiments, microbial proteases are used. In some embodiments, chemically or genetically modified mutants are included. In some embodiments, the protease is a serine protease, preferably an alkaline microbial protease or a trypsin-like protease. Examples of alkaline proteases include subtilisins, especially those derived from Bacillus (e.g., subtilisin, lentus, amyloliquefaciens, subtilisin Carlsberg, subtilisin 309, subtilisin 147 and subtilisin 168). Additional examples include those mutant proteases described in U.S. Pat. Nos. RE 34,606, 5,955,340, 5,700,676, 6,312,936, and 6,482,628, all of which are incorporated herein by reference. Additional protease examples include, but are not limited to trypsin (e.g., of porcine or bovine origin), and the Fusarium protease described in WO 89/06270. Preferred commercially available protease enzymes include those sold under the trade names MAXATASE®, MAXACAL™, MAXAPEM™, OPTICLEAN®, OPTIMASE®, PROPERASE®, PURAFECT® and PURAFECT® OXP (Genencor), those sold under the trade names ALCALASE®, SAVINASE®, PRIMASE®, DURAZYM™, RELASE® and ESPERASE® (Novozymes); and those sold under the trade name BLAP™ (Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft auf Aktien, Duesseldorf, Germany. Various proteases are described in WO95/23221, WO 92/21760, and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,801,039, 5,340,735, 5,500,364, 5,855,625. An additional BPN' variant ("BPN'-var 1" and "BPN- variant 1"; as referred to herein) is described in US RE 34,606. An additional GG36-variant ("GG36-var.1" and "GG36-variant 1"; as referred to herein) is described in US 5,955,340 and 5,700,676. A further GG36-variant is described in US Patents 6,312,936 and 6,482,628. In one aspect of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention comprise additional protease enzymes at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of additional protease by weight of the composition and 99.999% to 90.0% of cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other embodiments of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention also comprise, proteases at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001% to 5%, 0.001% to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% 69B4 protease (or its homologues or variants) by weight of the composition and the balance of the cleaning composition (e.g., 99.9999% to 90.0%, 99.999 % to 98%, 99.995% to 99.5% by weight) comprising cleaning adjunct materials.

In addition, any lipase suitable for use in alkaline solutions finds use in the present invention. Suitable lipases include, but are not limited to those of bacterial or fungal origin. Chemically or genetically modified mutants are encompassed by the present invention. Examples of useful lipases include Humicola lanuginosa lipase (See e.g., EP 258 068, and EP 305 216), Rhizomucor miehei lipase (See e.g., EP 238 023), Candida lipase, such as C. antarctica lipase (e.g., the C. antarctica lipase A or B; See e.g., EP 214 761), a Pseudomonas lipase such as P. alcaligenes and P. pseudoalcaligenes lipase (See e.g., EP 218 272), P. cepacia lipase (See e.g., EP 331 376), P. stutzeri lipase (See e.g., GB 1,372,034), P. fluorescens lipase, Bacillus lipase (e.g., B. subtilis lipase [Dartois et al., Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1131:253-260 [1993]); B. stearothermophilus lipase [See e.g., JP 64/744992]; and B. pumilus lipase [See e.g., WO 91/16422]).

Furthermore, a number of cloned lipases find use in some embodiments of the present invention, including but not limited to Penicillium camembertii lipase (See, Yamaguchi et al., Gene 103:61-67 [1991]), Geotricum candidum lipase (See, Schimada et al., J. Biochem., 106:383-388 [1989]), and various Rhizopus lipases such as R. delemar lipase (See, Hass et al., Gene 109:117-113 [1991]), a R. niveus lipase (Kugimiya et al., Biosci. Biotech. Biochem. 56:716-719 [1992]) and R. oryzae lipase.

Other types of lipolytic enzymes such as cutinases also find use in some embodiments of the present invention, including but not limited to the cutinase derived from Pseudomonas mendocina (See, WO 88/09367), or cutinase derived from Fusarium solani pisi (See, WO 90/09446).

Additional suitable lipases include commercially available lipases such as M1 LIPASE™, LUMA FAST™, and LIPOMAX™ (Genencor); LIPOLASE® and LIPOLASE® ULTRA (Novozymes); and LIPASE P™ "Amano" (Amano Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Japan). In some embodiments of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention further comprise lipases at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of additional lipase by weight of the composition and the balance of cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other aspects of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the

5 present invention also comprise, lipases at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001% to 5%, 0.001% to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% lipase by weight of the composition.

Any amylase (alpha and/or beta) suitable for use in alkaline solutions also find use in some embodiments of the present invention. Suitable amylases include, but are not limited to those of bacterial or fungal origin. Chemically or genetically modified mutants areo included in some embodiments. Amylases that find use in the present invention, include, but are not limited to α-amylases obtained from B. licheniformis (See e.g., GB 1,296,839). Commercially available amylases that find use in the present invention include, but are not limited to DURAMYL®, TERMAMYL®, FUNGAMYL® and BAN™ (Novozymes) and RAPIDASE® and MAXAMYL® P (Genencor International). 5 In some embodiments of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention further comprise amylases at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of additional amylase by weight of the composition and the balance of cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other aspects of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention also comprise, amylases at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001% too 5%, 0.001 % to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% amylase by weight of the composition.

Any cellulase suitable for use in alkaline solutions find use in embodiments of the present invention. Suitable cellulases include, but are not limited to those of bacterial or fungal origin. Chemically or genetically modified mutants are included in some embodiments. Suitable cellulases include, but are not limited to Humicola insolens 5 cellulases (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 4,435,307). Especially suitable cellulases are the cellulases having color care benefits (See e.g., EP 0 495 257).

Commercially available cellulases that find use in the present include, but are not limited to CELLUZYME® (Novozymes), and KAC-500(B)™ (Kao Corporation). In some embodiments, cellulases are incorporated as portions or fragments of mature wild-type or0 variant cellulases, wherein a portion of the N-terminus is deleted (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,874,276).

In some embodiments, the cleaning compositions of the present invention can further comprise cellulases at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of additional cellulase by weight of the composition and the balance of cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other aspects of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention also comprise cellulases at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001 % to 5%, 0.001% to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% cellulase by weight of the composition.

Any mannanases suitable for use in detergent compositions and or alkaline solutions find use in the present invention. Suitable mannanases include, but are not limited to those of bacterial or fungal origin. Chemically or genetically modified mutants are included in some embodiments. Various mannanases are known which find use in the present invention (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,566,114, U.S. Pat. No.6,602,842, and US Patent No. 6,440,991 , all of which are incorporated herein by reference). In some embodiments, the cleaning compositions of the present invention can further comprise mannanases at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of additional mannanase by weight of the composition and the balance of cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other aspects of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention also comprise, mannanases at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001% to 5%, 0.001 % to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% mannanases by weight of the composition.

In some embodiments, peroxidases are used in combination with hydrogen peroxide or a source thereof (e.g., a percarbonate, perborate or persulfate). In alternative embodiments, oxidases are used in combination with oxygen. Both types of enzymes are used for "solution bleaching" (i.e., to prevent transfer of a textile dye from a dyed fabric to another fabric when the fabrics are washed together in a wash liquor), preferably together with an enhancing agent (See e.g., WO 94/12621 and WO 95/01426). Suitable peroxidases/oxidases include, but are not limited to those of plant, bacterial or fungal origin. Chemically or genetically modified mutants are included in some embodiments.

In some embodiments, the cleaning compositions of the present invention can further comprise peroxidase and/or oxidase enzymes at a level from 0.00001 % to 10% of additional peroxidase and/or oxidase by weight of the composition and the balance of cleaning adjunct materials by weight of composition. In other aspects of the present invention, the cleaning compositions of the present invention also comprise, peroxidase and/or oxidase enzymes at a level of 0.0001 % to 10%, 0.001% to 5%, 0.001% to 2%, 0.005% to 0.5% peroxidase and/or oxidase enzymes by weight of the composition.

Mixtures of the above mentioned enzymes are encompassed herein, in particular a mixture of a the 69B4 enzyme, one or more additional proteases, at least one amylase, at least one lipase, at least one mannanase, and/or at least one cellulase. Indeed, it is contemplated that various mixtures of these enzymes will find use in the present invention. It is contemplated that the varying levels of the protease and one or more additional enzymes may both independently range to 10%, the balance of the cleaning composition being cleaning adjunct materials. The specific selection of cleaning adjunct materials are readily made by considering the surface, item, or fabric to be cleaned, and the desired form of the composition for the cleaning conditions during use (e.g., through the wash detergent use).

Examples of suitable cleaning adjunct materials include, but are not limited to, surfactants, builders, bleaches, bleach activators, bleach catalysts, other enzymes, enzyme stabilizing systems, chelants, optical brighteners, soil release polymers, dye transfer agents, dispersants, suds suppressors, dyes, perfumes, colorants, filler salts, hydrotropes, photoactivators, fluorescers, fabric conditioners, hydrolyzable surfactants, preservatives, anti-oxidants, anti-shrinkage agents, anti-wrinkle agents, germicides, fungicides, color speckles, silvercare, anti-tarnish and/or anti-corrosion agents, alkalinity sources, solubilizing agents, carriers, processing aids, pigments, and pH control agents (See e.g., U.S. Pat. Nlos. 6,610,642, 6,605,458, 5,705,464, 5,710, 115, 5,698,504, 5,695,679, 5,686,014 and 5,646,101, all of which are incorporated herein by reference). Embodiments of specific cleaning composition materials are exemplified in detail below.

If the cleaning adjunct materials are not compatible with the proteases of the present invention in the cleaning compositions, then suitable methods of keeping the cleaning adjunct materials and the protease(s) separated (i.e., not in contact with each other) until combination of the two components is appropriate are used. Such separation methods include any suitable method known in the art (e.g., gelcaps, encapulation, tablets, physical separation, etc.).

Preferably an effective amount of one or more protease(s) provided herein are included in compositions useful for cleaning a variety of surfaces in need of proteinaceous stain removal. Such cleaning compositions include cleaning compositions for such applications as cleaning hard surfaces, fabrics, and dishes. Indeed, in some embodiments, the present invention provides fabric cleaning compositions, while in other embodiments, the present invention provides non-fabric cleaning compositions. Notably, the present invention also provides cleaning compositions suitable for personal care, including oral care (including dentrifices, toothpastes, mouthwashes, etc., as well as denture cleaning compositions), skin, and hair cleaning compositions. It is intended that the present invention encompass detergent compositions in any form (i.e., liquid, granular, bar, semi-solid, gels, emulsions, tablets, capsules, etc.). By way of example, several cleaning compositions wherein the protease of the present invention find use are described in greater detail below. In embodiments in which the cleaning compositions of the present invention are formulated as compositions suitable for use in laundry machine washing method(s), the compositions of the present invention preferably contain at least one surfactant and at least one builder compound, as well as one or more cleaning adjunct materials preferably selected from organic polymeric compounds, bleaching agents, additional enzymes, suds suppressors, dispersants, lime-soap dispersants, soil suspension and anti-redeposition agents and corrosion inhibitors. In some embodiments, laundry compositions also contain softening agents (i.e., as additional cleaning adjunct materials).

The compositions of the present invention also find use detergent additive products in solid or liquid form. Such additive products are intended to supplement and/or boost the performance of conventional detergent compositions and can be added at any stage of the cleaning process. In embodiments formulated as compositions for use in manual dishwashing methods, the compositions of the invention preferably contain at least one surfactant and preferably at least one additional cleaning adjunct material selected from organic polymeric compounds, suds enhancing agents, group II metal ions, solvents, hydrotropes and additional enzymes. In some embodiments, the density of the laundry detergent compositions herein ranges from 400 to 1200 g/liter, while in other embodiments, it ranges from 500 to 950 g/liter of composition measured at 20°C.

In some embodiments, various cleaning compositions such as those provided in U.S, Pat. No. 6,605,458 find use with the proteases of the present invention. Thus, in some embodiments, the compositions comprising at least one protease of the present invention is a compact granular fabric cleaning composition, while in other embodiments, the composition is a granular fabric cleaning composition useful in the laundering of colored fabrics, in further embodiments, the composition is a granular fabric cleaning composition which provides softening through the wash capacity, in additional embodiments, the composition is a heavy duty liquid fabric cleaning composition.

In some embodiments, the compositions comprising at least one protease of the present invention are fabric cleaning compositions such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,610,642 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450. In addition, the proteases of the present invention find use in granular laundry detergent compositions of particular utility under European or Japanese washing conditions (See e.g., US Patent 6,610,642).

In alternative embodiments, the present invention provides hard surface cleaning compositions comprising at least one protease provided herein. Thus, in some embodiments, the compositions comprising at least one protease of the present invention is a hard surface cleaning composition such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,610,642, U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450.

In yet further embodiments, the present invention provides dishwashing compositions comprising at least one protease provided herein. Thus, in some embodiments, the compositions comprising at least one protease of the present invention is a hard surface cleaning composition such as those in U.S. Pat. No. 6,610,642, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450.

In still further embodiments, the present invention provides dishwashing compositions comprising at least one protease provided herein. Thus, in some embodiments, the compositions comprising at least one protease of the present invention comprise oral care compositions such as those in U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,450.

The formulations and descriptions of the compounds and cleaning adjunct materials contained in the aforementioned US Patent Nos. 6,376,450; 6,605,458; 6,605,458; and 6,610,642 are expressly incorporated by reference herein. Still further examples are set forth in the Examples below.

Still further, the present invention provides compositions and methods for the production of a food or animal feed, characterized in that protease according to the invention is mixed with food or animal feed. In some embodiments, the protease is added as a dry product before processing, while in other embodiments it is added as a liquid before or after processing. In some embodiments, in which a dry powder is used, the enzyme is diluted as a liquid onto a dry carrier such as milled grain. The proteases of the present invention find use as components of animal feeds and/or additives such as those described U.S. Pat. No. 5,612,055, U.S. Pat. No. 5,314,692. and U.S. Pat No. 5,147,642, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference. The enzyme feed additive according to the present invention is suitable for preparation in a number of methods. For example, in some embodiments, it is prepared simply by mixing different enzymes having the appropriate activities to produce an enzyme mix. In some embodiments, this enzyme mix is mixed directly with a feed, while in other embodiments, it is impregnated onto a cereal-based carrier material such as milled wheat, maize or soya flour. The present invention also encompasses these impregnated carriers, as they find use as enzyme feed additives.

In some alternative embodiments, a cereal-based carrier (e.g., milled wheat or maize) is impregnated either simultaneously or sequentially with enzymes having the appropriate activities. For example, in some embodiments, a milled wheat carrier is first sprayed with a xylanase, secondly with a protease, and optionally with a β-glucanase. The present invention also encompasses these impregnated carriers, as they find use as enzyme feed additives. In preferred embodiments, these impregnated carriers comprise at least one protease of the present invention. In some embodiments, the feed additive of the present invention is directly mixed with the animal feed, while in alternative embodiments, it is mixed with one or more other feed additives such as a vitamin feed additive, a mineral feed additive, and/or an amino acid feed additive. The resulting feed additive including several different types of components is then mixed in an appropriate amount with the feed. In some preferred embodiments, the feed additive of the present invention, including cereal-based carriers is normally mixed in amounts of 0.01-50 g per kilogram of feed, more preferably 0.1-10 g/kilogram, and most preferably about 1 g/kilogram.

In alternative embodiments, the enzyme feed additive of the present invention involves construction of recombinant microorganisms that produces the desired enzyme(s) in the desired relative amounts. In some embodiments, this is accomplished by increasing the copy number of the gene encoding at least one protease of the present invention, and/or by using a suitably strong promoter operatively linked to the polynucleotide encoding the protease(s). In further embodiments, the recombinant microorganism strain has certain enzyme activities deleted (e.g., cellulases, endoglucanases, etc.), as desired. In additional embodiments, the enzyme feed additives provided by the present invention also include other enzymes, including but not limited to at least one xylanase, α- amylase, glucoamylase, pectinase, mannanase, α-galactosidase, phytase, and/or lipase. In some embodiments, the enzymes having the desired activities are mixed with the xylanase and protease either before impregnating these on a cereal-based carrier or alternatively such enzymes are impregnated simultaneously or sequentially on such a cereal-based carrier. The carrier is then in turn mixed with a cereal-based feed to prepare the final feed. In alternative embodiments, the enzyme feed additive is formulated as a solution of the individual enzyme activities and then mixed with a feed material pre-formed as pellets or as a mash. ln still further embodiments, the enzyme feed additive is included in animals' diets by incorporating it into a second (i.e., different) feed or the animals' drinking water. Accordingly, it is not essential that the enzyme mix provided by the present invention be incorporated into the cereal-based feed itself, although such incorporation forms a particularly preferred embodiment of the present invention. The ratio of the units of xylanase activity per g of the feed additive to the units of protease activity per g of the feed additive is preferably 1:0.001-1 ,000, more preferably 1 :0.01-100, and most preferably 1 :0.1- 10. As indicated above, the enzyme mix provided by the present invention is preferably finds use as a feed additive in the preparation of a cereal-based feed. In some embodiments, the cereal-based feed comprises at least 25% by weight, or more preferably at least 35% by weight, wheat or maize or a combination of both of these cereals. The feed further comprises a protease (i.e., at least one protease of the present invention) in such an amount that the feed includes a protease in such an amount that the feed includes 100-100,000 units of protease activity per kg. Cereal-based feeds provided the present invention according to the present invention find use as feed for a variety of non-human animals, including poultry (e.g., turkeys, geese, ducks, chickens, etc.), livestock (e.g., pigs, sheep, cattle, goats, etc.), and companion animals (e.g., horses, dogs, cats, rabbits, mice, etc.). The feeds are particularly suitable for poultry and pigs, and in particular broiler chickens. The present invention also provides compositions for the treatment of textiles that include at least one of the proteases of the present invention. In some embodiments, at least one protease of the present invention is a component of compositions suitable for the treatment of silk or wool (See e.g., U.S. RE Pat. No. 216,034, EP 134,267, U.S. Pat. No. 4,533,359, and EP 344,259). In addition, the proteases of the present invention find use in a variety of applications where it is desirable to separate phosphorous from phytate. Accordingly, the present invention also provides methods producing wool or animal hair material with improved properties. In some preferred embodiments, these methods comprise the steps of pretreating wool, wool fibres or animal hair material in a process selected from the group consisting of plasma treatment processes and the Delhey process; and subjecting the pretreated wool or animal hair material to a treatment with a proteolytic enzyme (e.g., at least one protease of the present invention) in an amount effective for improving the properties. In some embodiments, the proteolytic enzyme treatment occurs prior to the plasma treatment, while in other embodiments, it occurs after the plasma treatment. In some further embodiments, it is conducted as a separate step, while in other embodiments, it is conducted in combination with the scouring or the dyeing of the wool or animal hair material. In additional embodiments, at least one surfactant and/or at least one softener is present during the enzyme treatment step, while in other embodiments, the surfactant(s) and/or softener(s) are incorporated in a separate step wherein the wool or animal hair material is subjected to a softening treatment.

In some embodiments, the compositions of the present invention find us in methods for shrink-proofing wool fibers (See e.g., JP 4-327274). In some embodiments, the compositions are used in methods for shrink-proofing treatment of wool fibers by subjecting the fibers to a low-temperature plasma treatment, followed by treatment with a shrink- proofing resin such as a block-urethane resin, polyamide epochlorohydrin resin, glyoxalic resin, ethylene-urea resin or acrylate resin, and then treatment with a weight reducing proteolytic enzyme for obtaining a softening effect). In some embodiments, the plasma treatment step is a low-temperature treatment, preferably a corona discharge treatment or a glow discharge treatment.

In some embodiments, the low-temperature plasma treatment is carried out by using a gas, preferably a gas selected from the group consisting of air, oxygen, nitrogen, ammonia, helium, or argon. Conventionally, air is used but it may be advantageous to use any of the other indicated gasses. Preferably, the low-temperature plasma treatment is carried out at a pressure between about 0.1 torr and 5 torr for from about 2 seconds to about 300 seconds, preferably for about 5 seconds to about 100 seconds, more preferably from about 5 seconds to about 30 seconds.

As indicated above, the present invention finds use in conjunction with methods such as the Delhey process (See e.g., DE-A-43 32 692). In this process, the wool is treated in an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of soluble wolframate, optionally followed by treatment in a solution or dispersion of synthetic polymers, for improving the anti-felting properties of the wool. In this method, the wool is treated in an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (0.1-35% (w/w), preferably 2-10% (w/w)), in the presence of a 2-60% (w/w), preferably 8-20% (w/w) of a catalyst (preferably Na2 WO ), and in the presence of a nonionic wetting agent. Preferably, the treatment is carried out at pH 8-11 , and room temperature. The treatment time depends on the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and catalyst, but is preferably 2 minutes or less. After the oxidative treatment, the wool is rinsed with water. For removal of residual hydrogen peroxide, and optionally for additional bleaching, the wool is further treated in acidic solutions of reducing agents (e.g., sulfites, phosphites etc.).

In some embodiments, the enzyme treatment step carried out for between about 1 minute and about 120 minutes. This step is preferably carried out at a temperature of between about 20°C. and about 60°C, more preferably between about 30°C. and about 50°C. Alternatively, the wool is soaked in or padded with an aqueous enzyme solution and then subjected to steaming at a conventional temperature and pressure, typically for about 30 seconds to about 3 minutes. In some preferred embodiments, the proteolytic enzyme treatment is carried out in an acidic or neutral or alkaline medium which may include a buffer.

In alternative embodiments, the enzyme treatment step is conducted in the presence of one or more conventional anionic, non-ionic (e.g., Dobanol; Henkel AG) or cationic surfactants. An example of a useful nonionic surfactant is Dobanol (from Henkel AG). In further embodiments, the wool or animal hair material is subjected to an ultrasound treatment, either prior to or simultaneous with the treatment with a proteolytic enzyme. In some preferred embodiments, the ultrasound treatment is carried out at a temperature of about 50°C for about 5 minutes. In some preferred embodiments, the amount of proteolytic enzyme used in the enzyme treatment step is between about 0.2 w/w % and about 10 w/w %, based on the weight of the wool or animal hair material. In some embodiments, in order to the number of treatment steps, the enzyme treatment is carried out during dyeing and/or scouring of the wool or animal hair material, simply by adding the protease to the dyeing, rinsing and/or scouring bath. In some embodiments, enzyme treatment is carried out after the plasma treatment but in other embodiments, the two treatment steps are carried out in the opposite order. Softeners conventionally used on wool are usually cationic softeners, either organic cationic softeners or silicone based products, but anionic or non-inoc softeners are also useful. Examples of useful softeners include, but are not limited to polyethylene softeners and silicone softeners (i.e., dimethyl polysiloxanes (silicone oils)), H-polysiloxanes, silicone elastomers, aminofunctional dimethyl polysiloxanes, aminofunctional silicone elastomers, and epoxyfunctional dimethyl polysiloxanes, and organic cationic softeners (e.g. alkyl quarternary ammonium derivatives).

In additional embodiments, the present invention provides compositions for the treatment of an animal hide that includes at least one protease of the present invention. In some embodiments, the proteases of the present invention find use in compositions for treatment of animal hide, such as those described in WO 03/00865 (Insect Biotech Co., Taejeon-Si, Korea). In additional embodiments, the present invention provides methods for processing hides and/or skins into leather comprising enzymatic treatment of the hide or skin with the protease of the present invention (See e.g., WO 96/11285). In additional embodiments, the present invention provides compositions for the treatment of an animal skin or hide into leather that includes at least one protease of the present invention.

Hides and skins are usually received in the tanneries in the form of salted or dried raw hides or skins. The processing of hides or skins into leather comprises several different process steps including the steps of soaking, unhairing and bating. These steps constitute the wet processing and are performed in the beamhouse. Enzymatic treatment utilizing the proteases of the present invention are applicable at any time during the process involved in the processing of leather. However, proteases are usually employed during the wet processing (i.e., during soaking, unhairing and/or bating). Thus, in some preferred embodiments, the enzymatic treatment with at least one of the proteases of the present invention occurs during the wet processing stage.

In some embodiments, the soaking processes of the present invention are performed under conventional soaking conditions (e.g., at a pH in the range pH 6.0 - 11). In some preferred embodiments, the range is pH 7.0 -10.0. In alternative embodiments, the temperature is in the range of 20-30 °C, while in other embodiments it is preferably in the range 24-28 °C. In yet further embodiments, the reaction time is in the range 2-24 hours, while preferred range is 4-16 hours. In additional embodiments, tensides and/or preservatives are provided as desired.

The second phase of the bating step usually commences with the addition of the bate itself. In some embodiments, the enzymatic treatment takes place during bating. In some preferred embodiments, the enzymatic treatment takes place during bating, after the deliming phase. In some embodiments, the bating process of the presents invention is performed using conventional conditions (e.g., at a pH in the range pH 6.0 -9.0). In some preferred embodiments, the pH range is 6.0 to 8.5. In further embodiments, the temperature is in the range of 20-30° C, while in preferred embodiments, the temperature is in the range of 25-28°C. In some embodiments, the reaction time is in the range of 20-90 minutes, while in other embodiments, it is in the range 40-80 minutes. Processes for the manufacture of leather are well known to those skilled in the art (See e.g., WO 94/069429 WO 90/1121189, U.S. Pat. No. 3,840,433, EP 505920, GB 2233665, and U.S. Pat. No. 3,986,926, all of which are herein incorporated by reference). ln further embodiments, the present invention provides bates comprising at least one protease of the present invention. A bate is an agent or an enzyme-containing preparation comprising the chemically active ingredients for use in beamhouse processes, in particular in the bating step of a process for the manufacture of leather. In some embodiments, the 5 present invention provides bates comprising protease and suitable excipients. In some embodiments, agents including, but not limited to chemicals known and used in the art, e.g. diluents, emulgators, delimers and carriers. In some embodiments, the bate comprising at least one protease of the present invention is formulated as known in the art (See e.g. , GB- A2250289, WO 96/11285, and EP 0784703). o In some embodiments, the bate of the present invention contains from 0.00005 to

0.01 g of active protease peTg~δf bate", while in other embodiments", the bate contains from 0.0002 to 0.004 g of active protease per g of bate.

Thus, the proteases of the present invention find use in numerous applications and settings. 5

EXPERIMENTAL

The present invention is described in further detail in the following Examples which are not in any way intended to limit the scope of the invention as claimed. The attachedo Figures are meant to be considered as integral parts of the specification and description of the invention. All references cited are herein specifically incorporated by reference for all that is described therein. The following Examples are offered to illustrate, but not to limit the claimed invention

In the experimental disclosure which follows, the following abbreviations apply: PI5 (proteinase inhibitor), ppm (parts per million); M (molar); mM (millimolar); μM (micromolar); nM (nanomolar); mol (moles); mmol (millimoles); μmol (micromoles); nmol (nanomoles); gm (grams); mg (milligrams); μg (micrograms); pg (picograms); L (liters); ml and mL (milliliters); μl and μL (microliters); cm (centimeters); mm (millimeters); μm (micrometers); nm (nanometers); U (units); V (volts); MW (molecular weight); sec (seconds); min(s) 0 (minute/minutes); h(s) and hr(s) (hour/hours); °C (degrees Centigrade); QS (quantity sufficient); ND (not done); NA (not applicable); rpm (revolutions per minute); H2O (water); dH2O (deionized water); (HCl (hydrochloric acid); aa (amino acid); bp (base pair); kb (kilobase pair); kD (kilodaltons); cDNA (copy or complementary DNA); DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid); ssDNA (single stranded DNA); dsDNA (double stranded DNA); dNTP (deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate); RNA (ribonucleic acid); MgCI2 (magnesium chloride); NaCl (sodium chloride); w/v (weight to volume); v/v (volume to volume); g (gravity); OD (optical density); Dulbecco's phosphate buffered solution (DPBS); SOC (2% Bacto-Tryptone, 0.5% Bacto Yeast Extract, 10 mM NaCl, 2.5 mM KCI); Terrific Broth (TB; 12 g/l Bacto Tryptone, 24 g/l glycerol, 2.31 g/l KH2PO4, and 12.54 g/l K2HPO4); OD280 (optical density at 280 nm); OD60o (optical density at 600 nm); A405 (absorbance at 405 nm); Vmax (the maximum initial velocity of an enzyme catalyzed reaction); PAGE (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis); PBS (phosphate buffered saline [150 mM NaCl, 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.2]); PBST (PBS+0.25% TWEEN® 20); PEG (polyethylene glycol); PCR (polymerase chain reaction); RT-PCR (reverse transcription PCR); SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate); Tris (tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane); HEPES (N-[2-Hydroxyethyl]piperazine- N-[2-ethanesulfonic acid]); HBS (HEPES buffered saline); SDS (sodium dodecylsulfate); Tris-HCl (tris[Hydroxymethyl]aminomethane-hydrochloride); Tricine (N-[tris-(hydroxymethyl)- methyl]-glycine); CHES (2-(N-cyclo-hexylamino) ethane-sulfonic acid); TAPS (3-{[tris- (hydroxymethyl)-methyl]-amino}-propanesulfonic acid); CAPS (3-(cyclo-hexylamino)- propane-sulfonic acid; DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide); DTT (1,4-dithio-DL-threitol); SA (sinapinic acid (s,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid); TCA (trichloroacetic acid); Glut and GSH (reduced glutathione); GSSG (oxidized glutathione); TCEP (Tris[2-carboxyethyl] phosphine); Ci (Curies); mCi (milliCuries); μCi (microCuries); HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography); RP-HPLC (reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography); TLC (thin layer chromatography); MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight); Ts (tosyl); Bn (benzyl); Ph (phenyl); Ms (mesyl); Et (ethyl), Me (methyl); Taq (Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase); Klenow (DNA polymerase I large (Klenow) fragment); rpm (revolutions per minute); EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether) N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid); EDTA (ethylenediaminetetracetic acid); bla (β-lactamase or ampicillin-resistance gene); HDL (high density liquid); MJ Research (MJ Research, Reno, NV); Baseclear (Baseclear BV, Inc., Leiden, the Netherlands); PerSeptive (PerSeptive Biosystems, Framingham, MA); ThermoFinnigan (ThermoFinnigan, San Jose, CA); Argo (Argo BioAnalytica, Morris Plains, NJ);Seitz EKS (SeitzSchenk Filtersystems GmbH, Bad Kreuznach, Germany); Pall (Pall Corp., East Hills, NY); Spectrum (Spectrum Laboratories, Dominguez Rancho, CA); Molecular Structure (Molecular Structure Corp., Woodlands, TX); Accelrys (Accelrys, Inc., San Diego, CA); Chemical Computing (Chemical Computing Corp., Montreal, Canada); New Brunswick (New Brunswick Scientific, Co., Edison, NJ); CFT (Center for Test Materials, Vlaardingeng, the Netherlands); Procter & Gamble (Procter & Gamble, Inc., Cincinnati, OH); GE Healthcare (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, United Kingdom); DNA2.0 (DNA2.0, Menlo Park, CA); OXOID (Oxoid, Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK); Megazyme (Megazyme International Ireland Ltd., Bray Business Park, Bray, Co., Wicklow, Ireland); Finnzymes (Finnzymes Oy, Espoo, Finland); Kelco (CP Kelco,

5 Wilmington, DE); Corning (Corning Life Sciences, Corning, NY); (NEN (NEN Life Science Products, Boston, MA); Pharma AS (Pharma AS, Oslo, Norway); Dynal (Dynal, Oslo, Norway); Bio-Synthesis (Bio-Synthesis, Lewisville, TX); ATCC (American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD); Gibco/BRL (Gibco/BRL, Grand Island , NY); Sigma (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, MO); Pharmacia (Pharmacia Biotech, Piscataway, NJ); NCBIo (National Center for Biotechnology Information); Applied Biosystems (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA); BD Biosciences and/or Clontech (BD Biosciences CLONTECH Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA); Operon Technologies (Operon Technologies, Inc., Alameda, CA); MWG Biotech (MWG Biotech, High Point, NC); Oligos Etc (Oligos Etc. Inc, Wilsonville, OR); Bachem (Bachem Bioscience, Inc., King of Prussia, PA); Difco (Difco Laboratories,s Detroit, Ml); Mediatech (Mediatech, Herndon, VA; Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc., Santa Cruz, CA); Oxoid (Oxoid Inc., Ogdensburg, NY); Worthington (Worthington Biochemical Corp., Freehold, NJ); GIBCO BRL or Gibco BRL (Life Technologies, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD); Millipore (Millipore, Billerica, MA); Bio-Rad (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA); Invitrogen (Invitrogen Corp., San Diego, CA); NEB (New England Biolabs, Beverly, MA);0 Sigma (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, MO); Pierce (Pierce Biotechnology, Rockford, IL); Takara (Takara Bio Inc. Otsu, Japan); Roche (Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland); EM Science (EM Science, Gibbstown, NJ); Qiagen (Qiagen, Inc., Valencia, CA); Biodesign (Biodesign Intl., Saco, Maine); Aptagen (Aptagen, Inc., Herndon, VA); Sorvall (Sorvall brand, from Kendro Laboratory Products, Asheville, NC); Molecular Devices (Molecular Devices,5 Corp., Sunnyvale, CA); R&D Systems (R&D Systems, Minneapolis, MN); Stratagene (Stratagene Cloning Systems, La Jolla, CA); Marsh (Marsh Biosciences, Rochester, NY); Bio-Tek (Bio-Tek Instruments, Winooski, VT); (Biacore (Biacore, Inc., Piscataway, NJ); PeproTech (PeproTech, Rocky Hill, NJ); SynPep (SynPep, Dublin, CA); New Objective (New Objective brand; Scientific Instrument Services, Inc., Ringoes, NJ); Waters (Waters,o Inc., Milford, MA); Matrix Science (Matrix Science, Boston, MA); Dionex (Dionex, Corp., Sunnyvale, CA); Monsanto (Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO); Wintershall (Wintershall AG, Kassel, Germany); BASF (BASF Co., Florham Park, NJ); Huntsman (Huntsman Petrochemical Corp., Salt Lake City, UT); Enichem (Enichem Iberica, Barcelona, Spain); Fluka Chemie AG (Fluka Chemie AG, Buchs, Switzerland); Gist-Brocades (Gist-Brocades, NV, Delft, the Netherlands); Dow Corning (Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Ml); and Microsoft (Microsoft, Inc., Redmond, WA).

EXAMPLE 1

Assays

In the following Examples, various assays were used, such as protein determinations, application-based tests, and stability-based tests. For ease in reading, the following assays are set forth below and referred to in the respective Examples. Any deviations from the protocols provided below in any of the experiments performed during the development of the present invention are indicated in the Examples.

A; TCA Assay for Protein Content Determination in 96-well Microtiter Plates

This assay was started using filtered culture supernatant from microtiter plates grown 4 days at 33 °C with shaking at 230 RPM and humidified aeration. A fresh 96-well flat bottom plate was used for the assay. First, 100 μL/well of 0.25 N HCl were placed in the wells. Then, 50 μL filtered culture broth were added to the wells. The light scattering/absorbance at 405 nm (use 5 sec mixing mode in the plate reader) was then determined, in order to provide the "blank" reading.

For the test, 100 μL/well 15% (w/v) TCA was placed in the plates and incubated between 5 and 30 min at room temperature. The light scattering/absorbance at 405 nm (use 5 sec mixing mode in the plate reader) was then determined.

The calculations were performed by subtracting the blank (i.e., no TCA) from the test reading with TCA. If desired, a standard curve can be created by calibrating the TCA readings with AAPF assays of clones with known conversion factors. However, the TCA results are linear with respect to protein concentration from 50 to 500 ppm and can thus be plotted directly against enzyme performance for the purpose of choosing good-performing variants.

B. suc-AAPF-pNA Assay of Proteases in 96-well Microtiter Plates In this assay system, the reagent solutions used were:

1. 100 mM Tris/HCI, pH 8.6, containing 0.005% TWEEN®-80 (Tris buffer) 2. 100 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.6, containing 10 mM CaCI2 and 0.005% TWEEN®-80 (Tris buffer)

3. 160 mM suc-AAPF-pNA in DMSO (suc-AAPF-pNA stock solution) (Sigma: S-7388)

To prepare suc-AAPF-pNA working solution, 1 ml AAPF stock was added to 100 ml

5 Tris/Ca buffer and mixed well for at least 10 seconds.

The assay was performed by adding 10 μl of diluted protease solution to each well, followed by the addition (quickly) of 190 μl 1 mg/ml AAPF-working solution. The solutions were mixed for 5 sec, and the absorbance change was read at 410 nm in an MTP reader, at 25°C. The protease activity was expressed as AU (activity = ιo δOD-min"1 .ml"1).

C. Keratin Hydrolysis Assay

In this assay system, the chemical and reagent solutions used were:

15

Keratin ICN 902111

Detergent 1.6 g. detergent was dissolved in 1000 ml water (pH = 8.2)

0.6 ml. CaCI2/MgCI2 of 10,000 gpg was also added, as well as 1190 mg HEPES, giving a hardness and buffer strength of 6 gpg and 5 mM

2o respectively. The pH was adjusted to 8.2 with NaOH.

Picrylsulfonic acid (TNBS)

Sigma P-2297 (5% solution in water)

Reagent A 45.4 g Na2B4O7.10 H2O (Merck 6308) and 15 ml of 4N NaOH were dissolved together to a final volume of 1000 ml (by heating if needed)

25 Reagent B 35.2 g NaH2PO .1 H2O (Merck 6346) and 0.6 g Na2SO3 (Merck 6657) were dissolved together to a final volume of 1000 ml.

Method:

Prior to the incubations, keratin was sieved on a 100 μm sieve in small portions at a 30 time. Then, 10 g of the < 100 μm keratin was stirred in detergent solution for at least 20 minutes at room temperature with regular adjustment of the pH to 8.2. Finally, the suspension was centrifuged for 20 minutes at room temperature (Sorvall, GSA rotor, 13,000 rpm). This procedure was then repeated. Finally, the wet sediment was suspended in detergent to a total volume of 200 ml., and the suspension was kept stirred during pipetting. S5 Prior to incubation, microtiter plates (MTPs) were filled with 200 μl substrate per well with a Biohit multichannel pipette and 1200 μl tip (6 dispenses of 200 μl and dispensed as fast as possible to avoid settling of keratin in the tips). Then, 10μl of the filtered culture was added to the substrate containing MTPs. The plates were covered with tape, placed in an incubator and incubated at 20 °C for 3 hours at 350 rpm (Innova 4330 [New Brunswick]). Following incubation, the plates were centrifuged for 3 minutes at 3000 rpm (iSigma 6K 15 centrifuge). About 15 minutes before removal of the 1st plate from the incubator, the TNBS reagent was prepared by mixing 1 ml TNBS solution per 50 ml of reagent A.

MTPs were filled with 60 μl TNBS reagent A per well. From the incubated plates, 10 μl was transferred to the MTPs with TNBS reagent A. The plates were covered with tape and shaken for 20 minutes in a bench shaker (BMG Thermostar) at room temperature and 500 rpm. Finally, 200 μl of reagent B was added to the wells, mixed for 1 minute on a shaker, and the absorbance at 405 nm was measured with the MTP-reader.

Calculation of the Keratin Hydrolyzing Activity:

The obtained absorbance value was corrected for the blank value (substrate without enzyme). The resulting absorbance provides a measure for the hydrolytic activity. For each sample (variant) the performance index was calculated. The performance index compares the performance of the variant (actual value) and the standard enzyme (theoretical value) at the same protein concentration. In addition, the theoretical values can be calculated, using the parameters of the Langmuir equation of the standard enzyme. A performance index (PI) that is greater than 1 (Pl>1 ) identifies a better variant (as compared to the standard [e.g., wild-type]), while a PI of 1 (Pl=1 ) identifies a variant that performs the same as the standard, and a PI that is less than 1 (Pl<1) identifies a variant that performs worse than the standard. Thus, the PI identifies winners, as well as variants that are less desirable for use under certain circumstances.

D. Microswatch Assay for Testing Protease Performance

All of the detergents used in these assays did not contain enzymes.

Detergent Preparations:

1. European Detergent Solution:

Milli-Q water was adjusted to 15 gpg water hardness (Ca/Mg=4/1), add 7.6 g/l ARIEL® Regular detergent and stir the detergent solution vigorously for at least 30 minutes. The detergent was filtered before use in the assay through a 0.22μm filter (e.g. Nalgene top bottle filter).

2. Japanese Detergent Solution Milli-Q water was adjusted to 3 gpg water hardness (Ca/Mg=3/1 ), 0.66 g/l detergent was added, and the detergent solution was stirred viigorously for at least 30 minutes. The detergent was filtered before use in the assay through a 0.22μm filter (e.g. Nalgene top bottle filter).

3. Cold Water Liquid Detergent (US Conditions):

Milli-Q water was adjusted to 6 gpg water hardness (Ca/Mg=3/1), 1.60 g/l detergent was added, and the detergent solution was vigorously for at least 15 minutes. Then, 5mM Hepes buffer was added and the pH adjusted to 8.2. The detergent was filtered before use in the assay through a 0.22μm filter (e.g. Nalgene top bottle filter).

4. Low pH Liquid Detergent (US Conditions):

Milli-Q water was adjusted to 6 gpg water hardness (Ca/Mg=3/1 ), 1.60 g/l detergent was added, and the detergent solution stirred vigorously for at least 15 minutes. The pH was adjusted to 6.0 using 1N NaOH.solution. The detergent was filtered before use in the assay through a 0.22μm filter (e.g. Nalgene top bottle filter).

Microswatches:

Microswatches of %" circular diameter were ordered and delivered by CFT Vlaardingen. The microswatches were pretreated using the fixation method described below. Single microswatches were placed in each well of a 96-well microtiter plate vertically to expose the whole surface area (i.e., not flat on the bottom of the well).

Bleach Fixation ("Superfixed"):

In a 10 L stainless steel beaker containing 10L of water, the water was heated to 60°C for fixation of swatches used in European conditions (=Super fixed). For Japanese condition(s) and other conditions, the swatches were fixed at room temperature (=3K). Then, 10 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide (1 ml/L of H2O2, final cone, of H2O2 is 300 ppm) were added. Then, 100 swatches (10 swatches/L) were added to the solution. The solution was allowed to sit for 30 minutes with occasional stirring and monitoring of the temperature. The swatches were rinsed 7-8 times with cold water and placed on bench to dry. A towel was placed on top of swatches, as this prevents the swatches from curling up. For the 3K swatches, the procedure is repeated (except the water was not heated andlOx the amount of hydrogen peroxide was added).

Alternative Fixation ("3K" Swatch Fixation):

This particular swatch fixation was done at room temperature, however the amount of 30% H2O2 added is 10X more than in the Superfixed Swatch Fixation. Bubble formation (frothing) will be visible and therefore it is necessary to use a bigger beaker to account for this. First, 8 liters of distilled water are placed in a 10 L beaker, and 80 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide are added. The water and peroxide are mixed well with a ladle. Then, 40 pieces of EMPA 116 swatches were spread into a fan before adding into the solution to ensure uniform fixation. The swatches were swirled in the solution (using the ladle) for 30 minutes, continuously for the first five minutes and occasionally for the remaining 25 minutes. The solution was discarded and the swatches were rinsed 6 times with approximately 6 liters of distilled water each time. The swatches were placed on top of paper towels to dry. The air- dried swatches were punched using a %" circular die on an expulsion press. A single microswatch was placed vertically into each well of a 96-well microtiter plate to expose the whole surface area (i.e. not flat on the bottom of the well).

Enzyme Samples:

The enzyme samples were tested at appropriate concentrations for the respective geography, and diluted in 10 mM NaCl, 0.005% TWEEN®-80 solution.

Test Method:

The incubator was set at the desired temperature: -20°C for cold water liquid conditions; 30°C for low-pH liquid conditions; 40°C for European conditions; 20°C for Japanese and North American conditions. The pretreated and precut swatches were placed into the wells of a 96-well MTP, as described above. The enzyme samples were diluted, if needed, in 10 mM NaCl, 0.005% TWEEN®-80 to 20x the desired concentration. The desired detergent solutions were prepared as described above. Then, 190 μl of detergent solution were added to each well of the MTP. To this mixture, 10 μl of enzyme solution were added to each well (to provide a total volume to 200 μl/well). The MTP was sealed with a plate sealer and placed in an incubator for 60 minutes, with agitation at 350 rpm. Following incubation under the appropriate conditions, 100 μl of solution from each well were removed

« and placed into a fresh MTP. The new MTP containing 100 μl of solution/well was read at 405 nm in a MTP reader. Blank controls, as well as a control containing a microswatch and detergent but no enzyme were also included.

Table 1-1 Detergent Composition and Incubation Conditions in the μSwatch Assay.

Figure imgf000102_0001

The stock solution was used at a concentration of 15,000 gpg stock #1 = Ca/Mg 3:1

(1.92 M Ca2+ = 282.3 g/L CaCI2.2H2O; 0.64 M Mg2+ = 30.1 g/L MgCI2.6H2O) stock #2 = Ca/Mg 4:1

(2.05 M Ca2+ = 301.4 g/L CaCI2.2H2O; 0.51 M Mg2+ =103.7 g/L MgCI2.6H2O)

Calculation of the BMI Performance:

The obtained absorbance value was corrected for the blank value (obtained after incubation of microswatches in the absence of enzyme). The resulting absorbance was a measure for the hydrolytic activity. For each sample (variant) the performance index was calculated. The performance index compares the performance of the variant (actual value) and the standard enzyme (theoretical value) at the same protein concentration. In addition, the theoretical values can be calculated, using the parameters of the Langmuir equation of the standard enzyme. A performance index (PI) that is greater than 1 (Pl>1 ) identifies a better variant (as compared to the standard [e.g., wild-type]), while a PI of 1 (Pl=1) identifies a variant that performs the same as the standard, and a PI that is less than 1 (Pl<1) identifies a variant that performs worse than the standard.

Thus, the PI identifies winners, as well as variants that are less desirable for use under certain circumstances.

P. Dimethylcasein Hydrolysis Assay (96 wells)

In this assay system, the chemical and reagent solutions used were: o Dimethylcasein (DMC): Sigma C-9801

TWEEN®-8O: Sigma P-8074

PIPES buffer (free acid): Sigma P-1851 ; 15.1 g is dissolved in about 960 ml water; pH is adjusted : to 7.0 with 4N NaOH, 1 ml 5% TWEEN®- 80 is added and the volume brought up to 1000 ml. The final5 concentration of PIPES and TWEEN®-80 is 50 mM and

0.005% respectively. Picrylsulfonic acid (TNBS): Sigma P-2297 (5% solution in water) Reagent A: 45.4 g Na2B4O7.10 H2O (Merck 6308) and 15 ml of 4N NaOH are dissolved together to a final volume of 1000 ml (byo heating if needed)

Reagent B: 35.2 g NaH2PO .1 H2O (Merck 6346) and 0.6 g Na2SO3 (Merck

6657) are dissolved together to a final volume of 1000 ml. 5 Method:

To prepare the substrate, 4 g DMC were dissolved in 400 ml PIPES buffer. The filtered culture supematants were diluted with PIPES buffer; the final concentration of the controls in the growth plate was 20 ppm. Then, 10 μl of each diluted supernatant were added to 200 μl substrate in the wells of a MTP. The MTP plate was covered with tape, shaken for a fewo seconds and placed in an oven at 37°C for 2 hours without agitation.

About 1 5 minutes before removal of the 1st plate from the oven, the TNBS reagent was prepared by mixing 1 ml TNBS solution per 50 ml of reagent A. MTPs were filled with 60 μl TNBS reagent A per well. The incubated plates were shaken for a few seconds, after which 10 μl were transferred to the MTPs with TNBS reagent A. The plates were covered with5 tape and shaken for 20 minutes in a bench shaker (BMG Thermostar) at room temperature and 500 rpm. Finally, 200 μl reagent B were added to the wells, mixed for 1 minute on a shaker, and the absorbance at 405 nm was determined using an MTP-reader.

Calculation of Dimethylcasein Hydrolyzing Activity: 0 The obtained absorbance value was corrected for the blank value (substrate without enzyme). The resulting absorbance is a measure for the hydrolytic activity. The (arbitrary) specific activity of a sample was calculated by dividing the absorbance and the determined protein concentration.

5 E. Thermostability Assay

This assay is based on the dimethylcasein hydrolysis, before and after heating of the buffered culture supernatant. The same chemical and reagent solutions were used as described in the dimethylcasein hydrolysis assay. o Method:

The filtered culture supematants were diluted to 20 ppm in PIPES buffer (based on the concentration of the controls in the growth plates). Then, 50 μl of each diluted supernatant were placed in the empty wells of a MTP. The MTP plate was incubated in an iEMS incubator/shaker HT (Thermo Labsystems) for 90 minutes at 60°C and 400 rpm. Thes plates were cooled on ice for 5 minutes. Then, 10 μl of the solution was added to a fresh MTP containing 200 μl dimethylcasein substrate/well. This MTP was covered with tape, shaken for a few seconds and placed in an oven at 37 °C for 2 hours without agitation. The same detection method as used for the DMC hydrolysis assay was used. o Calculation of Thermostability:

The residual activity of a sample was expressed as the ratio of the final absorbance and the initial absorbance, both corrected for blanks.

5 F. LAS Stability Assay

LAS stability was measured after incubation of the test protease in the presence of 0.06% LAS (dodecylbenzenesulfonate sodium), and the residual activity was determined using the AAPF assay. 0

Reagents:

Dodecylbenzenesulfonate, Sodium salt (=LAS): Sigma D-2525

TWEEN®-80: Sigma P-8074

TRIS buffer (free acid): Sigma T-1378); 6.35 g is dissolved in about 960 ml water; pH is5 adjusted to 8.2 with 4N HCl. Final concentration of TRIS is 52.5 mM.

LAS stock solution: Prepare a 10.5 % LAS solution in MQ water (=10.5 g per 100 ml MQ) TRIS buffer-100 mM / pH 8.6 (100mM Tris/0.005% TweenδO) TRIS-Ca buffer, pH 8.6 (100mM Tris/10mM CaCI2/0.005% TweenδO)

Hardware: s Flat bottom MTPs: Costar (#9017)

Biomek FX

ASYS Multipipettor

Spectramax MTP Reader iEMS Incubator/Shaker o Innova 4330 Incubator/Shaker

Biohit multichannel pipette

BMG Thermostar Shaker 5 Method:

A 10 μl 0.063% LAS solution was prepared in 52.5 mM Tris buffer pH 8.2. The AAPF working solution was prepared by adding 1 ml of 100 mg/ml AAPF stock solution (in DMSO) to 100 ml (100 mM) TRIS buffer, pH 8.6. To dilute the supematants, flat-bottomed plates were filled with dilution buffer and an aliquot of the supernatant was added ando mixed well. The dilution ratio depended on the concentration of the ASP-controls in the growth plates (AAPF activity). The desired protein concentration was 80 ppm.

Ten μl of the diluted supernatant was added to 190 μl 0.063% LAS buffer/well. The MTP was covered with tape, shaken for a few seconds and placed in an incubator (Innova 4230) at 25°C, for 60 minutes at 200 rpm agitation. The initial activity (f=10 minutes) was5 determined after 10 minutes of incubation by transferring 10 μl of the mixture in each well to a fresh MTP containing 190μl AAPF work solution. These solutions were mixed well and the AAPF activity was measured using a MTP Reader (20 readings in 5 minutes and 25°C).

The final activity (f=60 minutes) was determined by removing another 10 μl of solution from the incubating plate after 60 minutes of incubation. The AAPF activity was0 then determined as described above. The calculations were performed as follows: the % Residual Activity was [f-60 value]*100 / [M0 value].

5

EXAMPLE 2 Production of 69B4 protease From the Gram-Positive Alkaliphilic Bacterium 69B4

This Example provides a description of the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 used to initiallyo isolate the novel protease 69B4 provided by the present invention. The alkaliphilic micro- organism Cellulomonas strain 69B.4, (DSM 16035) was isolated at 37°C on an alkaline casein medium containing (g L"1) (See e.g., Duckworth et al., FEMS Microbiol. Ecol., 19:181- 191 [1996]).

Glucose (Merck 1.08342) 10

Peptone (Difco 0118) 5

Yeast extract (Difco 0127) 5

K2HPO4 1

MgSO4.7H2O 0.2

NaCl 40

Na2CO3 10

Casein 20

Agar 20

An additional alkaline cultivation medium (Grant Alkaliphile Medium) was also used to cultivate Cellulomonas strain 69B.4, as provided below:

Grant Alkaliphile Medium ("GAM") solution A (g L"1) Glucose (Merck 1.08342) 10 Peptone (Difco 0118) 5

Yeast extract (Difco 0127) 5

K2HPO4 1

MgSO4.7H2O 0.2

Dissolved in 800 ml distilled water and sterilized by autoclaving

GAM solution B (g L1 )

NaCl 40

Na2CO3 10

Dissolved in 200 ml distilled water and sterilized by autoclaving.

Complete GAM medium was prepared by mixing Solution A (800 ml) with Solution B (200 ml). Solid medium is prepared by the addition of agar (2% w/v).

Growth Conditions From a freshly thawed glycerol vial of culture (stored as a frozen glycerol (20% v/v, stock stored at -80°C), the micro-organisms were inoculated using an inoculation loop on Grant Alkaliphile Medium (GAM) described above in agar plates and grown for at least 2 days at 37°C. One colony was then used to inoculate a 500 ml shake flask containing 100 ml of GAM at pH 10. This flask was then incubated at 37°C in a rotary shaker at 280 rpm for 1-2 days until good growth (according to visual observation) was obtained. Then, 100 ml of broth culture was subsequently used to inoculate a 7 L fermentor containing 5 liters of GAM. The fermentations were run at 37°C for 2-3 days in order to obtain maximal production of protease. Fully aerobic conditions were maintained throughout by injecting air, at a rate of 5 L/min, into the region of the impeller, which was rotating at about 500 rpm. The pH was set at pH 10 at the start, but was not controlled during the fermentation.

Preparation of 69B4 Crude Enzyme Samples

Culture broth was collected from the fermentor, and cells were removed by centrifugation for 30 min at 5000 x g at 10°C. The resulting supernatant was clarified by depth filtration over Seitz EKS (SeitzSchenk Filtersystems). The resulting sterile culture supernatant was further concentrated approximately 10 times by ultra filtration using an ultrafiltration cassette with a 10kDa cut-off (Pall Omega 10kDa Minisette; Pall). The resulting concentrated crude 69B4 samples were frozen and stored at -20°C until further use. Purification

The cell separated culture broth was dialyzed against 20mM (2-(4-morpholino)- ethane sulfonic acid ("MES") ,pH 5.4, 1mM CaCI2 using 8K Molecular Weight Cut Off (MWCO) Spectra-Por7 (Spectrum) dialysis tubing. The dialysis was performed overnight or until the conductivity of the sample was less than or equal to the conductivity of the MES buffer. The dialyzed enzyme sample was purified using a BioCad VISION(Applied Biosystems) with a 10x100mm(7.845 mL) POROS High Density Sulfo-propyl (HS) 20 (20micron) cation-exchange column (PerSeptive Biosystems). After loading the enzyme on the previously equilibrated column at 5mL/min, the column was washed at 40mL/min with a pH gradient from 25mM MES, pH 6.2, 1mM CaCI2 to 25mM (N-[2-hydroxyethyl] piperazine- N'-[2-ethane] sulfonic acid [C8H18N204S, CAS # 7365-45-9]) ("HEPES") pH 8.0, 1mM CaCI2 in 25 column volumes. Fractions (8mL) were collected across the run. The pH 8.0 wash step was held for 5 column volumes and then the enzyme was eluted using a gradient (0- 100 mM NaCl in the same buffer in 35 column volumes). Protease activity in the fractions was monitored using the pNA assay (sAAPF-pNA assay; DelMar, et ai, supra). Protease activity which eluted at 40mM NaCl was concentrated and buffer exchanged(using a 5K MWCO VIVA Science 20mL concentrator) into 20mM MES, pH 5.8, 1mMCaCI2. This material was used for further characterization of the enzyme.

EXAMPLE 3

PCR Amplification of a Serine Protease Gene Fragment

In this Example, PCR amplification of a serine protease gene fragment is described.

Degenerate Primer Design Based on alignments of published serine protease amino acid sequences, a range of degenerate primers were designed against conserved structural and catalytic regions. Such regions included those that were highly conserved among the serine proteases, as well as those known to be important for enzyme structure and function.

During the development of the present invention, protein sequences of nine published serine proteases (Streptogrisin C homologues) were aligned, as shown in below. The sequences were Streptomyces griseus Streptogrisin C (accession no. P52320); alkaline serine protease precursor from Thermobifida fusca (accession no. AAC23545); alkaline proteinase (EC 3.4.21.-) from Streptomyces sp. (accession no. PC2053); alkaline serine proteinase I from Streptomyces sp. (accession no. S34672); serine protease from Streptomyces lividans (accession no. CAD4208); putative serine protease from

Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (accession no. NP_625129); putative serine protease from Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 (accession no. NP__822175); serine protease from Streptomyces lividans (accession no. CAD42809); putative serine protease precursor from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (accession no. NP_628830). All of these sequences are publicly available from GENbank. These alignments are provided below. In this alignment, two conserved boxes are underlined and shown in bold.

AAC23545 ( 1 ) -MNHSSR--RTTSLLFTAALAATALVAATTPAS

PC2053 ( 1 ) -- RHTGR-NAI GAAIAAS A AFALVPSQAAAN DT TERAEAAV

S34672 ( 1 ) — MR KGRTVAIGSALAASA A S VPANASSE P SAETAKADALV

CAD42808 ( 1) MVGRHAAR-SRRAALTALGALVLTA PSAASAAPPPVPGPRPAVARTPDA

NP_625129 ( 1 ) MVGRHAAR-SRRAALTALGA VLTA PSAASAAPPPVPGPRPAVARTPDA

NP_822175 ( 1 ) MVHRHVG—AGCAG SVLAT VLTGTjPAAAAIEPP-GPAPAPSAVQP GA

CAD42809 ( 1 ) MPHRHRHH-RAVGAAVAATAALLVAGLSGSASAGTAPAGSAPTAAETLRT

NP_628830 ( 1 ) MPHRHRHH-RAVGAAVAAT AA LVAGLSGSASAGTAPAGSAPTAAET RT

P52320 ( 1 ) MERT T-BRRRA VAGTATVAVGA A AG TGVASADPAATAAPPVSA

51 100

AAC23545 (31) AQE ALKRD GLSDAEVAELRAAEAEAVE EEE RDSLGSDFGGV PC2053 (42) AD PAGV DAMERD GLSEQEAGLKLVAEHDAA LGETLSAD DAFAGSW

S34672 (45) EQLPAGMVDAMERD GVPAAEVGNQ VAEHEAAV EESLSEDLSGYAGSW

CAD42808 (50) ATAPAR SAMERDLRLAPGQAAARPVNEAEAGTRAGMLRNTLGDRFAGA

NP 625129 (50) ATAPARMLSAMERD RLAPGQAAAR VNEAEAGTRAGMLRNTLGDRFAGA NP_822175 (48 GNPSTAVLGALQRDLHLTDTQAKTRLVNEMEAGTRAGRLQNALGKHFAGA

CAD42809 (50 DAAPPALLKA QRDLGIDRRQAERRIJVNEAEAGATAGR RAALGGDFAGA

NPJ528830 (50 DAAPPALLKAMQRDLGLDRRQAERRLVNEAEAGATAGRLRAALGGDFAGA

P52320 (47 DSLSPGMLAALERD G DEDAARSRIANEYRAAAVAAGLEKS GARYAGA

101 150

AAC23545 (76 YLDADT-TEITVAVTDPAAVSRVDADDVTVDVVDFGETA NDFVAS NAI

PC2053 (92 LAEGT ELVVATTΞEΑEAAEITEAGATAEVVDHTLAELDSVKDALDTA

S34672 (95 IVEGTS—EHVVATTDRAEAAEITAAGATATVVEHSLAELEAVKDILDEA

CAD42808 (100 WVSGATSAELTVATTDAADTAAIEAQGAKAAVVGRNLAELRAVKEKLDAA

NPJ525129 (100 WVSGATSAELTVATTDAA.DTAAIEAQGAKAAVVGRNLAELRAVKEKLDAA

NP_822175 (98 VHGAASADLTVATTHATDIPAITAGGATAVVVKTGLDDLKGAKKKLDSA

CAD42809 (100 WVRGAESGTLTVATTDAGDVAAVEARGAEAKVVRHSLADLDAAKARLDTA

NP_628830 (100 WVRGAESGTLTVATTDAGDVAAIEARGAEAKVVRHSLADLDAAKARLDTA

P52320 (97 RVSGAK-AT TVATTDASEAARITEAGARAEVVGHSLDRFEGVKKSLDKA

151 200

AAC23545 (125 AD —ADPKVTGWYTDLESDAVVITTLRGGTPAAEELAERAGLDERAVRI

PC2053 (139 AES-YDTTDAPVWYVDVTTNGVVLLTSD— TEAEGFVEAAGVNAAAVDI

S34672 (143 ATA-NPEDAAPVWYVDVTTNEVVVLASD—VPAAEAFVAASGADASTVRV

CAD42808 (150 AVR-TRTRQTPVWYVDVKTNRVTVQATG—ASAAAAFVEAAGVPAADVGV

NP_625129 (150 AVR-TRTRQTPVWYVDVKTNRVTVQATG—ASAAAAFVEAAGVPAADVGV

NP_822175 (148 VAHGGTAVNTPVRYVDVRTNRVTLQARS—RAAADA IAAAGVDSGLVDV

CAD42809 (150 AAG-LNTADAPVWYVDTRTNTVVVEAI — AAARSL TAAGVDGS AHV

NP_628830 (150 AAG- NTADAPV YVDTRTNTVVVEAI —PAAARSLLTAAGVDGSLAHV

P52320 (146 ALD-KAPKNVPV YVDVAANRVVVNAAS—PAAGQAFLKVAGVDRGLVTV

201 250

AAC23545 (173 VEEDEEPQSLAAIIGGNPYYFGN-YRCSIGFSVRQGSQTGFATAGHCGST

PC2053 (186 QTSDEQPQAFYDLVGGDAYYMGG-GRCSVGFSVTQGSTPGFATAGHCGTV

S34672 (190 ERSDESPQPFYDLVGGDAYYIGN-GRCSIGFSVRQGSTPGFVTAGHCGSV

CAD42808 (197 RVSPDQPRVLEDLVGGDAYYIDDQARCSIGFSVTKDDQEGFATAGHCGDP

NP_625129 (197 RVSPDQPRVLEDLVGGDAYYlDDQARCSIGFSVTKDDQEGFATAGHCGDP

NP_822175 (196 KVΞEDRPRALFDIRGGDAYYIDNTARCSVGFSVTKGNQQGFATAGHCGRA

CAD42809 (197 KNRTERPRTFYDLRGGEAYYINNSSRCSIGFPITKGTQQGFATAGHCDRA

NP_628830 (197 KNRTERPRTFYDLRGGEAYYINNSSRCSIGFPITKGTQQGFATAGHCGRA

P52320 (193 ARSAEQPRALADIRGGDAYYMNGSGRCSVGFSVTRGTQNGFATAGHCGRV

251 300

AAC23545 (222 GTRVS SPSGTVAGSYFPGRDMGWVRITSADTVTPLVNRYNGGTVTV

PC2053 (235 GTSTTGYNQAAQGTFEESSFPGDDMA VSVNSDWNTTPTVNE—GE-VTV

S34672 (239 GNATTGFNRVSQGTFRGS FPGRDMAWVAVNSN TPTSLVRNS-GSGVRV

CAD42808 (247 GATTTGYNEADQGTFQASTFPGKDMA VGVNSDWTATPDVKAEGGEKIQL

NP_625129 (247 GATTTGYNEADQGTFQASTFPGKDMA VGVNSD TATPDVKAEGGEKIQL

NP_822175 (246 GAPTAGFNEVAQGTVQASVFPGHD A VGVNΞD TATPDVAGAAGQNVΞI

CAD42809 (247 GSSTTGANRVAQGTFQGSIFPGRDMA VATNSS TATPYVLGAGGQNVQV

NP_628830 (247 GSSTTGANRVAQGTFQGSIFPGRDMA VATNSSWTATPYVLGAGGQNVQV

P52320 (243 GTTTNGVNQQAQGTFQGΞTFPGRDIAWVATNANWTPRPLVNGYGRGDVTV

301 350

AAC23545 (268 TGSQEAATGSSVCRSGATTGWRCGTIQSKNQTVRYAEGTVTGLTRTTACA

PC2053 (282 SGSTEAAVGASICRSGSTTC3 HCGTIQQHNTSVTYPEGTITGVTRTSVCA

S34672 (288 TGSTQATVGSSICRSGSTTGWRCGTIQQHNTSVTYPQGTXTGVTRTSACA

CAD42808 (297 AGSVEALVGASVCRSGSTTG HCG.TIQQHDTSVTYPEGTVDGLTGTTVCA

NP_625129 (297 AGSVEALVGASVCRSGSTTCSWHCGTIQQHDTSVTYPEGTVDGLTETTVCA

NP_822175 (296 AGSVQAIVGAAICRSGSTTCSWHCGTVEEHDTΞVTYEEGTVDGLTRTTVCA

CAD42809 (297 TGSTASPVGASVCRSGSTTC3 HCGTVTQLNTSVTYQEGTISPVTRTTVCA

NP_628830 (297 TGSTASPVGASVCRSGSTTC3WHCGTVTQLNTSVTYQEGTISPVTRTTVCA

P52320 (293 AGSTASVVGASVCRSGST GWHCGTIQQLNTΞVTYPEGTISGVTRTSVCA

351 400

AAC23545 (318) EGGDSGGPWLTGSQAQGVTSGGTGDCRSGGITFFQPINPLLSYFGLQLVT

PC2053 (332) EPGDSGGSYISGΞQAQGVTSGGSGNCTSGGTTYHQPINPLLSAYGLDLVT

S34672 (338) QPGDSGGSFISGTQAQGVTSGGSGNCSIGGTTFHQPVNPILSQYGLTLVR

CAD42808 (347) EPGDSGGPFVSGVQAQGTTSGGSGDCTNGGTTFYQPVNPLLSDFGLTLKT

NP_625129 (347) EPGDSGGPFVSGVQAQGTTSGGSGDCTNGGTTFYQPVNPLLSDFGLTLKT

NP_822175 (346) EPGDSGGSFVSGSQAQGVTSGGSGDCTRGGTTYYQPVNPILSTYGLTLKT

CAD42809 (347) EPGDSGGSFISGSQAQGVTSGGSGDCRTGGGTFFQPINALLQNYGLTLKT

NP_628830 (347) EPGDSGGSFISGSQAQGVTSGGSGDCRTGGETFFQPINALLQNYGLTLKT

P52320 (343) EPGDSGGSYISGSQAQGVTSGGSGNCSSGGTTYFQPINPLLQAYGLTLVT

401 450

AAC23545 (368) G

PC2053 (382) G

S34672 (388) S CAD42808 (397) TSAATQTPAPQDNAAA DAWTAGRVYEVGTTVSYDGVRYRCLQSH

NP_625129 (397) TSAATQTPAPQDNAAA DAWTAGRVYEVGTTVSYDGVRYRCLQSH

NP_822175 (396) STAPTDTPSDPVDQSG VWAAGRVYEVGAQVTΥAGVTYQCLQSH

CAD42809 (397) TGGDDGGGDDGG EEPGG-TWAAGTVYQPGDTVTΥGGATFRCLQGH

NP_628830 (397) TGGDDGGGDDGGGDDGGEEPGG-TWAAGTVYQPGDTVTYGGATFRCLQGH

P52320 (393) SGGGTPTDPPTTPPTDSP GGTWAVGTAYAAGATVTYGGATYRCLQAH

451 468

AAC23545 (369) (SEQ ID NO 648)

PC2053 (383) (SEQ ID NO 649)

S34672 (389) (SEQ ID NO 650)

CAD42808 (441) QAQGVGSPASVPALWQRV (SEQ ID NO 651)

NP_625129 (441) QAQGVGSPASVPALWQRV (SEQ ID NO 652)

NP_822175 (439) QAQGVWQPAATPALWQRL (SEQ ID NO 653)

CAD42809 (441) QAYAGWEPPNVPALWQRV (SEQ ID NO 654)

NP_628830 (446) QAYAGWEPPNVPALWQRV (SEQ ID NO 655)

P52320 (440) TAQPGWTPADVPALWQRV (SEQ ID NO 656)

Two particular regions were chosen to meet the criteria above, and a forward and a reverse primer were designed based on these amino acid regions. The specific amino acid regions used to design the primers are highlighted in black in the sequences shown in the alignments directly above. Using the genetic code for codon usage, degenerate nucleotide PCR primers were synthesized by MWG-Biotech. The degenerate primer sequences produced were:

forward primer TTGWXCGT_FW: 5' ACNACSGGSTGGCRGTGCGGCAC 3' (SEQ ID

NO:10) reverse primer GDSGGX_RV: 5'-ANGNGCCGCCGGAGTCNCC-3' (SEQ ID NO:11)

As all primers were synthesized in the 5'-3' direction and standard IUB code for mixed base sites was used (e.g., to designate "N" for A/C/T/G). Degenerate primers TTGWXCGT_FW and GDSGGX_RV successfully amplified a 177 bp region from Cellulomonas sp. isolate 69B4 by PCR, as described below.

PCR Amplification of a Serine Protease Gene Fragment

Cellulomonas sp. isolate 69B4 genomic DNA was used as a template for PCR amplification of putative serine protease gene fragments using the above-described primers. PCR was carried out using High Fidelity Platinum Taq polymerase (Catalog number 11304- 102; Invitrogen). Conditions were determined by individual experiments, but typically thirty cycles were run in a thermal cycler (MJ Research). Successful amplification was verified by electrophoresis of the PCR reaction on a 1 % agarose TBE gel. A PCR product that was amplified from Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 with the primers TTGWXCGT_FW and GDSGGXJ V was purified by gel extraction using the Qiaquick Spin Gel Extraction kit (Catalogue 28704; Qiagen) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The purified PCR product was cloned into the commercially available pCR2.1TOPO vector System (Invitrogen) according to the manufacturer's instructions, and transformed into competent E.coli TOP10 cells. Colonies containing recombinant plasmids were visualized using blue/white selection. For rapid screening of recombinant transformants, plasmid DNA was prepared from cultures of putative positive (i.e., white) colonies. DNA was isolated using the Qiagen plasmid purification kit, and was sequenced by Baseclear. One of the clones contained a DNA insert of 177 bp that showed some homology with several streptogrisin-like protease genes of various Streptomyces species and also with serine protease genes from other bacterial species. The DNA and protein coding sequence of this 177 bp fragment is provided in Fig. 13.

Sequence Analysis

The sequences were analyzed by BLAST and other protein translation sequence tools. BLAST comparison at the nucleotide level showed various levels of identity to published serine protease sequences. Initially, nucleotide sequences were submitted to BLAST (Basic BLAST version 2.0). The program chosen was "BlastX", and the database chosen was "nr." Standard/default parameter values were employed. Sequence data for putative Cellulomonas 69B4 protease gene fragment was entered in FASTA format and the query submitted to BLAST to compare the sequences of the present invention to those already in the database. The results returned for the 177 bp fragment a high number of hits for protease genes from various Streptomyces spp., including S. griseus, S. lividans, S. coelicolor, S. albogriseolus, S. platensis, S. fradiae, and Streptomyces sp. It was concluded that further analysis of the 177 bp fragment cloned from Cellulomonas sp. isolate 69B4 was desired.

EXAMPLE 4 Isolation of a Polynucleotide Sequence from the Genome of Cellulomonas 69B4 Encoding a Serine Protease by Inverse PCR

In this Example, experiments conducted to isolate a polynucleotide sequence encoding a serine protease produced by Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 are described. Inverse PCR of Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 Genomic DNA to Isolate the Gene Encoding Cellulomonas strain 69B4 Protease

Inverse PCR was used to isolate and clone the full-length serine protease gene from Cellulomonas sp. 69B4. Based on the DNA sequence of the 177 bp fragment of the 5 Cellulomonas protease gene described in Example 3, novel DNA primers were designed:

69B4int_RV1 δ'-CGGGGTAGGTGACCGAGGAGTTGAGCGCAGTG-S' (SEQ ID NO: 14) 69B4int_FW2 5'-GCTCGCCGGCAACCAGGCCCAGGGCGTCACGTC-3' (SEQ ID NO: 15)o Chromosomal DNA of Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 was digested with the restriction enzymes Apal, SamHI, BssHW, Kpn\, Naή, Nco\, Nhe\, Pvu\, Sail or SstJI, purified using the Qiagen PCR purification kit (Qiagen, Catalogue # 28106) and self-ligated with T4 DNA ligase (Invitrogen) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Ligation mixtures were purified using the Qiagen PCR purification kit, and PCR was performed with primers5 69B4int_RV1 and 69B4int_FW2. PCR on DNA fragments that were digested with Nco\, and then self-ligated, resulting in a PCR product of approximately 1.3 kb. DNA sequence analysis (BaseClear) revealed that this DNA fragment covers the main part of a streptogrisin-like protease gene from Cellulomonas. This protease was designated as "69B4 protease," and the gene encoding Cellulomonas 69B4 protease was designated aso the "asp gene." The entire sequence of the asp gene was derived by additional inverse PCR reactions with primer 69B40int_FW2 and an another primer: 69B4-for4 (5' AAC GGC GGG TTC ATC ACC GCC GGC CAC TGC GGC C 3' {SEQ ID NO: 6). Inverse PCR with these primers on Λ/col, SssHII, Apal and Pvul digested and self-ligated DNA fragments of genomic DNA of Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 resulted in the identification of the entire sequence5 of the asp gene.

Nucleotide and Amino Acid Sequences

For convenience, various sequences are included below. First, the DNA sequence of the asp gene (SEQ ID NO:1) provided below encodes the signal peptide (SEQ ID NO:9)o and the precursor serine protease (SEQ ID NO:7) derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). The initiating polynucleotide encoding the signal peptide of the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease is in bold (ATG).

1 GCGCGCTGCG CCCACGACGA CGCCGTCCGC CGTTCGCCGG CGTACCTGCG TTGGCTCACC 5 CGCGCGACGC GGGTGCTGCT GCGGCAGGCG GCAAGCGGCC GCATGGACGC AACCGAGTGG

61 ACCCACCAGA TCGACCTCCA TAACGAGGCC GTATGACCAG AAAGGGATCT GCCACCGCCC TGGGTGGTCT AGCTGGAGGT ATTGCTCCGG CATACTGGTC TTTCCCTAGA CGGTGGCGGG

121 ACCAGCACGC TCCTAACCTC CGAGCACCGG CGACCGCCGG GTGCGATGAA AGGGACGAAC

TGGTCGTGCG AGGATTGGAG GCTCGTGGCC GCTGGCGGCC CACGCTACTT TCCCTGCTTG

181 CGAGATGACA CCACGCACAG TCACGCGGGC CCTGGCCGTG GCCACCGCAG CCGCCACACT GCTCTACTGT GGTGCGTGTC AGTGCGCCCG GGACCGGCAC CGGTGGCGTC GGCGGTGTGA

241 CCTGGCAGGC GGCATGGCCG CCCAGGCCAA CGAGCCCGCA CCACCCGGGA GCGCGAGCGC

GGACCGTCCG CCGTACCGGC GGGTCCGGTT GCTCGGGCGT GGTGGGCCCT CGCGCTCGCG

301 ACCGCCACGC CTGGCCGAGA AGCTCGACCC CGACCTCCTC GAGGCCATGG AGCGCGACCT

TGGCGGTGCG GACCGGCTCT TCGAGCTGGG GCTGGAGGAG CTCCGGTACC TCGCGCTGGA 361 GGGCCTCGAC GCGGAGGAAG CCGCCGCCAC CCTGGCGTTC CAGCACGACG CAGCCGAGAC

CCCGGAGCTG CGCCTCCTTC GGCGGCGGTG GGACCGCAAG GTCGTGCTGC GTCGGCTCTG

421 CGGCGAGGCC CTCGCCGAAG AGCTCGACGA GGACTTCGCC GGCACCTGGG TCGAGGACGA

GCCGCTCCGG GAGCGGCTTC TCGAGCTGCT CCTGAAGCGG CCGTGGACCC AGCTCCTGCT

481 CGTCCTGTAC GTCGCCACCA CCGACGAGGA CGCCGTCGAG GAGGTCGAGG GCGAAGGCGC GCAGGACATG CAGCGGTGGT GGCTGCTCCT GCGGCAGCTC CTCCAGCTCC CGCTTCCGCG

541 CACGGCCGTC ACCGTCGAGC ACTCCCTGGC CGACCTCGAG GCCTGGAAGA CCGTCCTCGA

GTGCCGGCAG TGGCAGCTCG TGAGGGACCG GCTGGAGCTC CGGACCTTCT GGCAGGAGCT

601 CGCCGCCCTC GAGGGCCACG ACGACGTGCC CACCTGGTAC GTCGACGTCC CGACCAACAG

GCGGCGGGAG CTCCCGGTGC TGCTGCACGG GTGGACCATG CAGCTGCAGG GCTGGTTGTC 661 CGTCGTCGTC GCCGTCAAGG CCGGAGCCCA GGACGTCGCC GCCGGCCTCG TCGAAGGTGC

GCAGCAGCAG CGGCAGTTCC GGCCTCGGGT CCTGCAGCGG CGGCCGGAGC AGCTTCCACG

721 CGACGTCCCG TCCGACGCCG TGACCTTCGT CGAGACCGAC GAGACCCCGC GGACCATGTT

GCTGCAGGGC AGGCTGCGGC ACTGGAAGCA GCTCTGGCTG CTCTGGGGCG CCTGGTACAA

781 CGACGTGATC GGCGGCAACG CCTACACCAT CGGGGGGCGC AGCCGCTGCT CGATCGGGTT GCTGCACTAG CCGCCGTTGC GGATGTGGTA GCCCCCCGCG TCGGCGACGA GCTAGCCCAA

841 CGCGGTCAAC GGCGGGTTCA TCACCGCCGG CCACTGCGGC CGCACCGGCG CCACCACCGC

GCGCCAGTTG CCGCCCAAGT AGTGGCGGCC GGTGACGCCG GCGTGGCCGC GGTGGTGGCG

901 CAACCCCACC GGGACCTTCG CCGGGTCCAG CTTCCCGGGC AACGACTACG CGTTCGTCCG

GTTGGGGTGG CCCTGGAAGC GGCCCAGGTC GAAGGGCCCG TTGCTGATGC GCAAGCAGGC 961 TACCGGGGCC GGCGTGAACC TGCTGGCCCA GGTCAACAAC TACTCCGGTG GCCGCGTCCA

ATGGCCCCGG CCGCACTTGG ACGACCGGGT CCAGTTGTTG ATGAGGCCAC CGGCGCAGGT

1021 GGTCGCCGGG CACACCGCGG CCCCCGTCGG CTCGGCCGTG TGCCGGTCCG GGTCGACCAC

CCAGCGGCCC GTGTGGCGCC GGGGGCAGCC GAGCCGGCAC ACGGCCAGGC CCAGCTGGTG

1081 CGGGTGGCAC TGCGGCACCA TCACTGCGCT CAACTCCTCG GTCACCTACC CCGAGGGCAC GCCCACCGTG ACGCCGTGGT AGTGACGCGA GTTGAGGAGC CAGTGGATGG GGCTCCCGTG

1141 CGTCCGCGGC CTGATCCGCA CCACCGTCTG CGCCGAGCCC GGCGACTCCG GTGGCTCGCT

GCAGGCGCCG GACTAGGCGT GGTGGCAGAC GCGGCTCGGG CCGCTGAGGC CACCGAGCGA

1201 GCTCGCCGGC AACCAGGCCC AGGGCGTCAC GTCCGGCGGC TCCGGCAACT GCCGCACCGG

CGAGCGGCCG TTGGTCCGGG TCCCGCAGTG CAGGCCGCCG AGGCCGTTGA CGGCGTGGCC 1261 TGGCACCACG TTCTTCCAGC CGGTCAACCC CATCCTCCAG GCGTACGGCC TGAGGATGAT

ACCGTGGTGC AAGAAGGTCG GCCAGTTGGG GTAGGAGGTC CGCATGCCGG ACTCCTACTA

1321 CACCACGGAC TCGGGCAGCA GCCCGGCCCC TGCACCGACC TCCTGCACCG GCTACGCCCG

GTGGTGCCTG AGCCCGTCGT CGGGCCGGGG ACGTGGCTGG AGGACGTGGC CGATGCGGGC

1381 CACCTTCACC GGGACCCTCG CGGCCGGCCG GGCCGCCGCC CAGCCCAACG GGTCCTACGT GTGGAAGTGG CCCTGGGAGC GCCGGCCGGC CCGGCGGCGG GTCGGGTTGC CCAGGATGCA

1441 GCAGGTCAAC CGGTCCGGGA CCCACAGCGT GTGCCTCAAC GGGCCCTCCG GTGCGGACTT

CGTCCAGTTG GCCAGGCCCT GGGTGTCGCA CACGGAGTTG CCCGGGAGGC CACGCCTGAA

1501 CGACCTCTAC GTGCAGCGCT GGAACGGCAG CTCCTGGGTG ACCGTCGCCC AGAGCACCTC

GCTGGAGATG CACGTCGCGA CCTTGCCGTC GAGGACCCAC TGGCAGCGGG TCTCGTGGAG 1561 CCCCGGCTCC AACGAGACCA TCACCTACCG CGGCAACGCC GGCTACTACC GCTACGTGGT

GGGGCCGAGG TTGCTCTGGT AGTGGATGGC GCCGTTGCGG CCGATGATGG CGATGCACCA

1621 CAACGCCGCG TCCGGCTCCG GTGCCTACAC CATGGGGCTC ACCCTCCCCT GACGTAGCGC

GTTGCGGCGC AGGCCGAGGC CACGGATGTG GTACCCCGAG TGGGAGGGGA CTGCATCGCG (SEQ ID N0:1) The following DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:2) encodes the signal peptide (SEQ ID NO:9) that is operatively linked to the precursor protease (SEQ ID NO:7) derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). The initiating polynucleotide encoding the signal peptide of the Cellulomonas strain 69B4 protease is in bold (ATG). The asterisk indicates the termination codon (TGA), beginning with residue 1486. Residues 85, 595, and 1162, relate to the initial residues of the N terminal prosequence, mature sequence and Carboxyl terminal prosequence, respectively, are bolded and underlined.

1 ATGACACCAC GCACAGTCAC GCGGGCCCTG GCCGTGGCCA CCGCAGCCGC CACACTCCTG

TACTGTGGTG CGTGTCAGTG CGCCCGGGAC CGGCACCGGT GGCGTCGGCG GTGTGAGGAC . 85

61 GCAGGCGGCA TGGCCGCCCA GGCCAACGAG CCCGCACCAC CCGGGAGCGC GAGCGCACCG

CGTCCGCCGT ACCGGCGGGT CCGGTTGCTC GGGCGTGGTG GGCCCTCGCG CTCGCGTGGC

121 CCACGCCTGG CCGAGAAGCT CGACCCCGAC CTCCTCGAGG CCATGGAGCG CGACCTGGGC

GGTGCGGACC GGCTCTTCGA GCTGGGGCTG GAGGAGCTCC GGTACCTCGC GCTGGACCCG 181 CTCGACGCGG AGGAAGCCGC CGCCACCCTG GCGTTCCAGC ACGACGCAGC CGAGACCGGC

GAGCTGCGCC TCCTTCGGCG GCGGTGGGAC CGCAAGGTCG TGCTGCGTCG GCTCTGGCCG

241 GAGGCCCTCG CCGAAGAGCT CGACGAGGAC TTCGCCGGCA CCTGGGTCGA GGACGACGTC

CTCCGGGAGC GGCTTCTCGA GCTGCTCCTG AAGCGGCCGT GGACCCAGCT CCTGCTGCAG

301 CTGTACGTCG CCACCACCGA CGAGGACGCC GTCGAGGAGG TCGAGGGCGA AGGCGCCACG GACATGCAGC GGTGGTGGCT GCTCCTGCGG CAGCTCCTCC AGCTCCCGCT TCCGCGGTGC

361 GCCGTCACCG TCGAGCACTC CCTGGCCGAC CTCGAGGCCT GGAAGACCGT CCTCGACGCC

CGGCAGTGGC AGCTCGTGAG GGACCGGCTG GAGCTCCGGA CCTTCTGGCA GGAGCTGCGG

421 GCCCTCGAGG GCCACGACGA CGTGCCCACC TGGTACGTCG ACGTCCCGAC CAACAGCGTC

CGGGAGCTCC CGGTGCTGCT GCACGGGTGG ACCATGCAGC TGCAGGGCTG GTTGTCGCAG 481 GTCGTCGCCG TCAAGGCCGG AGCCCAGGAC GTCGCCGCCG GCCTCGTCGA AGGTGCCGAC

CAGCAGCGGC AGTTCCGGCC TCGGGTCCTG CAGCGGCGGC CGGAGCAGCT TCCACGGCTG

595

541 GTCCCGTCCG ACGCCGTGAC CTTCGTCGAG ACCGACGAGA CCCCGCGGAC CATGTTCGAC

CAGGGCAGGC TGCGGCACTG GAAGCAGCTC TGGCTGCTCT GGGGCGCCTG GTACAAGCTG 601 GTGATCGGCG GCAACGCCTA CACCATCGGG GGGCGCAGCC GCTGCTCGAT CGGGTTCGCG

CACTAGCCGC CGTTGCGGAT GTGGTAGCCC CCCGCGTCGG CGACGAGCTA GCCCAAGCGC

661 GTCAACGGCG GGTTCATCAC CGCCGGCCAC TGCGGCCGCA CCGGCGCCAC CACCGCCAAC

CAGTTGCCGC CCAAGTAGTG GCGGCCGGTG ACGCCGGCGT GGCCGCGGTG GTGGCGGTTG

721 CCCACCGGGA CCTTCGCCGG GTCCAGCTTC CCGGGCAACG ACTACGCGTT CGTCCGTACC GGGTGGCCCT GGAAGCGGCC CAGGTCGAAG GGCCCGTTGC TGATGCGCAA GCAGGCATGG

781 GGGGCCGGCG TGAACCTGCT GGCCCAGGTC AACAACTACT CCGGTGGCCG CGTCCAGGTC

CCCCGGCCGC ACTTGGACGA CCGGGTCCAG TTGTTGATGA GGCCACCGGC GCAGGTCCAG

841 GCCGGGCACA CCGCGGCCCC CGTCGGCTCG GCCGTGTGCC GGTCCGGGTC GACCACCGGG

CGGCCCGTGT GGCGCCGGGG GCAGCCGAGC CGGCACACGG CCAGGCCCAG CTGGTGGCCC 0901 TGGCACTGCG GCACCATCAC TGCGCTCAAC TCCTCGGTCA CCTACCCCGA GGGCACCGTC

ACCGTGACGC CGTGGTAGTG ACGCGAGTTG AGGAGCCAGT GGATGGGGCT CCCGTGGCAG

0961 CGCGGCCTGA TCCGCACCAC CGTCTGCGCC GAGCCCGGCG ACTCCGGTGG CTCGCTGCTC

GCGCCGGACT AGGCGTGGTG GCAGACGCGG CTCGGGCCGC TGAGGCCACC GAGCGACGAG

1021 GCCGGCAACC AGGCCCAGGG CGTCACGTCC GGCGGCTCCG GCAACTGCCG CACCGGTGGC CGGCCGTTGG TCCGGGTCCC GCAGTGCAGG CCGCCGAGGC CGTTGACGGC GTGGCCACCG

1081 ACCACGTTCT TCCAGCCGGT CAACCCCATC CTCCAGGCGT ACGGCCTGAG GATGATCACC

TGGTGCAAGA AGGTCGGCCA GTTGGGGTAG GAGGTCCGCA TGCCGGACTC CTACTAGTGG

1162

1141 ACGGACTCGG GCAGCAGCCC GGCCCCTGCA CCGACCTCCT GCACCGGCTA CGCCCGCACC TGCCTGAGCC CGTCGTCGGG CCGGGGACGT GGCTGGAGGA CGTGGCCGAT GCGGGCGTGG 1201 TTCACCGGGA CCCTCGCGGC CGGCCGGGCC GCCGCCCAGC CCAACGGGTC CTACGTGCAG

AAGTGGCCCT GGGAGCGCCG GCCGGCCCGG CGGCGGGTCG GGTTGCCCAG GATGCACGTC

1261 GTCAACCGGT CCGGGACCCA CAGCGTGTGC CTCAACGGGC CCTCCGGTGC GGACTTCGAC

CAGTTGGCCA GGCCCTGGGT GTCGCACACG GAGTTGCCCG GGAGGCCACG CCTGAAGCTG 1321 CTCTACGTGC AGCGCTGGAA CGGCAGCTCC TGGGTGACCG TCGCCCAGAG CACCTCCCCC

GAGATGCACG TCGCGACCTT GCCGTCGAGG ACCCACTGGC AGCGGGTCTC GTGGAGGGGG

1381 GGCTCCAACG AGACCATCAC CTACCGCGGC AACGCCGGCT ACTACCGCTA CGTGGTCAAC

CCGAGGTTGC TCTGGTAGTG GATGGCGCCG TTGCGGCCGA TGATGGCGAT GCACCAGTTG

1486* 1441 GCCGCGTCCG GCTCCGGTGC CTACACCATG GGGCTCACCC TCCCCTGA (SEQ ID N0:2) CGGCGCAGGC CGAGGCCACG GATGTGGTAC CCCGAGTGGG AGGGGACT

The following DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:3) encodes the precursor protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). 1 AACGAGCCCG CACCACCCGG GAGCGCGAGC GCACCGCCAC GCCTGGCCGA GAAGCTCGAC

TTGCTCGGGC GTGGTGGGCC CTCGCGCTCG CGTGGCGGTG CGGACCGGCT CTTCGAGCTG

61 CCCGACCTCC TCGAGGCCAT GGAGCGCGAC CTGGGCCTCG ACGCGGAGGA AGCCGCCGCC

GGGCTGGAGG AGCTCCGGTA CCTCGCGCTG GACCCGGAGC TGCGCCTCCT TCGGCGGCGG

121 ACCCTGGCGT TCCAGCACGA CGCAGCCGAG ACCGGCGAGG CCCTCGCCGA AGAGCTCGAC TGGGACCGCA AGGTCGTGCT GCGTCGGCTC TGGCCGCTCC GGGAGCGGCT TCTCGAGCTG

181 GAGGACTTCG CCGGCACCTG GGTCGAGGAC GACGTCCTGT ACGTCGCCAC CACCGACGAG

CTCCTGAAGC GGCCGTGGAC CCAGCTCCTG CTGCAGGACA TGCAGCGGTG GTGGCTGCTC

241 GACGCCGTCG AGGAGGTCGA GGGCGAAGGC GCCACGGCCG TCACCGTCGA GCACTCCCTG

CTGCGGCAGC TCCTCCAGCT CCCGCTTCCG CGGTGCCGGC AGTGGCAGCT CGTGAGGGAC 301 GCCGACCTCG AGGCCTGGAA GACCGTCCTC GACGCCGCCC TCGAGGGCCA CGACGACGTG

CGGCTGGAGC TCCGGACCTT CTGGCAGGAG CTGCGGCGGG AGCTCCCGGT GCTGCTGCAC

361 CCCACCTGGT ACGTCGACGT CCCGACCAAC AGCGTCGTCG TCGCCGTCAA GGCCGGAGCC

GGGTGGACCA TGCAGCTGCA GGGCTGGTTG TCGCAGCAGC AGCGGCAGTT CCGGCCTCGG

421 CAGGACGTCG CCGCCGGCCT CGTCGAAGGT GCCGACGTCC CGTCCGACGC CGTGACCTTC GTCCTGCAGC GGCGGCCGGA GCAGCTTCCA CGGCTGCAGG GCAGGCTGCG GCACTGGAAG

481 GTCGAGACCG ACGAGACCCC GCGGACCATG TTCGACGTGA TCGGCGGCAA CGCCTACACC

CAGCTCTGGC TGCTCTGGGG CGCCTGGTAC AAGCTGCACT AGCCGCCGTT GCGGATGTGG

541 ATCGGGGGGC GCAGCCGCTG CTCGATCGGG TTCGCGGTCA ACGGCGGGTT CATCACCGCC

TAGCCCCCCG CGTCGGCGAC GAGCTAGCCC AAGCGCCAGT TGCCGCCCAA GTAGTGGCGG 601 GGCCACTGCG GCCGCACCGG CGCCACCACC GCCAACCCCA CCGGGACCTT CGCCGGGTCC

CCGGTGACGC CGGCGTGGCC GCGGTGGTGG CGGTTGGGGT GGCCCTGGAA GCGGCCCAGG

661 AGCTTCCCGG GCAACGACTA CGCGTTCGTC CGTACCGGGG CCGGCGTGAA CCTGCTGGCC

TCGAAGGGCC CGTTGCTGAT GCGCAAGCAG GCATGGCCCC GGCCGCACTT GGACGACCGG

721 CAGGTCAACA ACTACTCCGG TGGCCGCGTC CAGGTCGCCG GGCACACCGC GGCCCCCGTC GTCCAGTTGT TGATGAGGCC ACCGGCGCAG GTCCAGCGGC CCGTGTGGCG CCGGGGGCAG

781 GGCTCGGCCG TGTGCCGGTC CGGGTCGACC ACCGGGTGGC ACTGCGGCAC CATCACTGCG

CCGAGCCGGC ACACGGCCAG GCCCAGCTGG TGGCCCACCG TGACGCCGTG GTAGTGACGC

841 CTCAACTCCT CGGTCACCTA CCCCGAGGGC ACCGTCCGCG GCCTGATCCG CACCACCGTC

GAGTTGAGGA GCCAGTGGAT GGGGCTCCCG TGGCAGGCGC CGGACTAGGC GTGGTGGCAG 901 TGCGCCGAGC CCGGCGACTC CGGTGGCTCG CTGCTCGCCG GCAACCAGGC CCAGGGCGTC

ACGCGGCTCG GGCCGCTGAG GCCACCGAGC GACGAGCGGC CGTTGGTCCG GGTCCCGCAG

961 ACGTCCGGCG GCTCCGGCAA CTGCCGCACC GGTGGCACCA CGTTCTTCCA GCCGGTCAAC

TGCAGGCCGC CGAGGCCGTT GACGGCGTGG CCACCGTGGT GCAAGAAGGT CGGCCAGTTG

1021 CCCATCCTCC AGGCGTACGG CCTGAGGATG ATCACCACGG ACTCGGGCAG CAGCCCGGCC GGGTAGGAGG TCCGCATGCC GGACTCCTAC TAGTGGTGCC TGAGCCCGTC GTCGGGCCGG

1081 CCTGCACCGA CCTCCTGCAC CGGCTACGCC CGCACCTTCA CCGGGACCCT CGCGGCCGGC

GGACGTGGCT GGAGGACGTG GCCGATGCGG GCGTGGAAGT GGCCCTGGGA GCGCCGGCCG

1141 CGGGCCGCCG CCCAGCCCAA CGGGTCCTAC GTGCAGGTCA ACCGGTCCGG GACCCACAGC GCCCGGCGGC GGGTCGGGTT GCCCAGGATG CACGTCCAGT TGGCCAGGCC CTGGGTGTCG 1201 GTGTGCCTCA ACGGGCCCTC CGGTGCGGAC TTCGACCTCT ACGTGCAGCG CTGGAACGGC

CACACGGAGT TGCCCGGGAG GCCACGCCTG AAGCTGGAGA TGCACGTCGC GACCTTGCCG 1261 AGCTCCTGGG TGACCGTCGC CCAGAGCACC TCCCCCGGCT CCAACGAGAC CATCACCTAC

TCGAGGACCC ACTGGCAGCG GGTCTCGTGG AGGGGGCCGA GGTTGCTCTG GTAGTGGATG 1321 CGCGGCAACG CCGGCTACTA CCGCTACGTG GTCAACGCCG CGTCCGGCTC CGGTGCCTAC

GCGCCGTTGC GGCCGATGAT GGCGATGCAC CAGTTGCGGC GCAGGCCGAG GCCACGGATG 1381 ACCATGGGGC TCACCCTCCC CTGA ( SEQ ID N0: 3 )

TGGTACCCCG AGTGGGAGGG GACT

The following DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:4) encodes the mature protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035).

1 TTCGACGTGA TCGGCGGCAA CGCCTACACC ATCGGGGGGC GCAGCCGCTG CTCGATCGGG

AAGCTGCACT AGCCGCCGTT GCGGATGTGG TAGCCCCCCG CGTCGGCGAC GAGCTAGCCC

61 TTCGCGGTCA ACGGCGGGTT CATCACCGCC GGCCACTGCG GCCGCACCGG CGCCACCACC

AAGCGCCAGT TGCCGCCCAA GTAGTGGCGG CCGGTGACGC CGGCGTGGCC GCGGTGGTGG

121 GCCAACCCCA CCGGGACCTT CGCCGGGTCC AGCTTCCCGG GCAACGACTA CGCGTTCGTC CGGTTGGGGT GGCCCTGGAA GCGGCCCAGG TCGAAGGGCC CGTTGCTGAT GCGCAAGCAG

181 CGTACCGGGG CCGGCGTGAA CCTGCTGGCC CAGGTCAACA ACTACTCCGG TGGCCGCGTC

GCATGGCCCC GGCCGCACTT GGACGACCGG GTCCAGTTGT TGATGAGGCC ACCGGCGCAG

241 CAGGTCGCCG GGCACACCGC GGCCCCCGTC GGCTCGGCCG TGTGCCGGTC CGGGTCGACC GTCCAGCGGC CCGTGTGGCG CCGGGGGCAG CCGAGCCGGC ACACGGCCAG GCCCAGCTGG

301 ACCGGGTGGC ACTGCGGCAC CATCACTGCG CTCAACTCCT CGGTCACCTA CCCCGAGGGC

TGGCCCACCG TGACGCCGTG GTAGTGACGC GAGTTGAGGA GCCAGTGGAT GGGGCTCCCG

361 ACCGTCCGCG GCCTGATCCG CACCACCGTC TGCGCCGAGC CCGGCGACTC CGGTGGCTCG

TGGCAGGCGC CGGACTAGGC GTGGTGGCAG ACGCGGCTCG GGCCGCTGAG GCCACCGAGC 421 CTGCTCGCCG GCAACCAGGC CCAGGGCGTC ACGTCCGGCG GCTCCGGCAA CTGCCGCACC

GACGAGCGGC CGTTGGTCCG GGTCCCGCAG TGCAGGCCGC CGAGGCCGTT GACGGCGTGG

481 GGTGGCACCA CGTTCTTCCA GCCGGTCAAC CCCATCCTCC AGGCGTACGG CCTGAGGATG

CCACCGTGGT GCAAGAAGGT CGGCCAGTTG GGGTAGGAGG TCCGCATGCC GGACTCCTAC

561 ATCACCACGG ACTCGGGCAG CAGCCCG ( SEQ ID NO : ) TAGTGGTGCC TGAGCCCGTC GTCGGGC

The following DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:5) encodes the signal peptide derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035) 1 ATGACACCAC CACAGTCAC GCGGGCCCTG GCCGTGGCCA CCGCAGCCGC CACACTCCTG TACTGTGGTG CGTGTCAGTG CGCCCGGGAC CGGCACCGGT GGCGTCGGCG GTGTGAGGAC 61 GCAGGCGGCA TGGCCGCCCA GGCC (SEQ ID NO: 5) CGTCCGCCGT ACCGGCGGGT CCGG

The following sequence is the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:6) of the signal sequence and precursor protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035), including the signal sequence [segments 1a-c] (residues 1-28 [-198 to -171]), an N-terminal prosequence [segments 2a-r] (residues 29-198 [-170 to -1]), a mature protease [segments 3a-t] (residues 199-387 [1-189]), and a C-terminal prosequence [segments 4a-l] (residues 388-495 [190-398]) encoded by the DNA sequences set forth in SEQ ID NOS:1, 2, 3 and 4. The N-terminal sequence of the mature protease amino acid sequence is in bold.

1 M PRTVTRAL AVATAAATLL AG6MAAQA NE PAPPGSASAP PRLAEKLDPD la lb lc 2a 2b 2c

51 L EAMERD G LDAEEAAAT AFQHDAAETG EA AEELDED FAGT VEDDV 2d 2e 2f 2g 2h 101 LYVATTDEDA VEEVEGEGAT AVTVEHSLAD LEAWKTVLDA ALEGHDDVPT 2i 2j 2k 21 2m

151 YVDVPTNSV VVAVKAGAQD VAAGLVEGAD VPSDAVTFVE TDETPRTM FD 2n 2o 2p 2q 2r

3a 201 VIGGNAYTIG GRSRCSIGFA VNGGFITAGH CGRTGATTAN PTGTFAGSSF 3b 3c 3d 3e 3f

251 PGNDYAFVRT GAGVNLLAQV NNYSGGRVQV AGHTAAPVGS AVCRSGSTTG 3g 3h 3i 3j 3k

301 HCGTITALN SSVTYPEGTV RGLIRTTVCA EPGDSGGS L AGNQAQGVTS 31 3m 3n 3o 3p

351 GGSGNCRTGG TTFFQPVNPI LQAYGLRMIT TDSGSSP APA PTSCTGYART

3q 3r 3s 3t 4a 4b

401 FTGTLAAGRA AAQPNGSYVQ VNRSGTHSVC LNGPSGADFD LYVQRWNGSS 4c 4d 4e 4f 4g 451 VTVAQSTSP GSNETITYRG NAGYYRYVVN AASGSGAYTM G TLP (SEQ ID

NO: 6)

4 4i 4j 4k

The following sequence (SEQ ID NO:7) is the amino acid sequence of the precursor protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035) ( SEQ ID NO:7).

1 NEPAPPGSAS APPRLAEKLD PD LEAMERD.LGLDAEEAAA. TLAFQHDAAE 51 TGEALAEELD EDFAGT VED DVLYVATTDE DAVEEVEGEG ATAVTVEHSL

101 ADLEAWKTVL DAALEGHDDV PT YVDVPTN SVVVAVKAGA QDVAAGLVEG

151 ADVPSDAVTF VETDETPRTM FDVIGGNAYT IGGRSRCSIG FAVNGGFITA

201 GHCGRTGATT ANPTGTFAGS SFPGNDYAFV RTGAGVNLLA QVNNYSGGRV

251 QVAGHTAAPV GSAVCRSGST TGWHCGTITA NSSVTYPEG TVRGLIRTTV 301 CAEPGDSGGS L AGNQAQGV TSGGSGNCRT GGTTFFQPVN PILQAYGLRM

351 ITTDSGSSPA PAPTSCTGYA RTFTGTLAAG RAAAQPNGSY VQVNRSGTHS

401 VCLNGPSGAD FD YVQR NG SSWVTVAQST SPGSNETITY RGNAGYYRYV

451 VNAASGSGAY TMGLTLP (SEQ ID NO: 7)

The following sequence (SEQ ID NO:8).is the amino acid sequence of the mature protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035). The catalytic triad residues H32, D56 and S132 are bolded and underlined. 1 FDVIGGNAYT IGGRSRCSIG FAVNGGFITA GHCGRTGATT ANPTGTFAGS

51 SFPGNDYAFV RTGAGVNLLA QVNNYSGGRV QVAGHTAAPV GSAVCRSGST

101 TGWHCGTITA LNSSVTYPEG TVRGLIRTTV CAEPGDSGGS LLAGNQAQGV

151 TSGGSGNCRT GGTTFFQPVN PILQAYGLRM ITTDSGSSP (SEQ ID NO:

The following sequence (SEQ ID NO:9) is the amino acid sequence ofthe signal peptide of the protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4 (DSM 16035).

1 MTPRTVTRAL AVATAAATLL AGGMAAQA (SEQ ID NO:9)

The following sequence (SEQ ID NO: 10) is the degenerate primer used to identify a 177 bp fragment of the protease of Cellulomonas strain 69B4.

TTGWXCGT_FW: 5' ACNACSGGSTGGCRGTGCGGCAC 3' (SEQ ID NO: 10)

The following sequence (SEQ ID NO:11) is the reverse primer used to identity a 177 bp fragment of the protease derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4.

GDSGGX_RV: 5'-ANGNGCCGCCGGAGTCNCC-3' (SEQIDNO:11)

The following DNA (SEQ ID NO: 13) and amino acid sequence ofthe 177 bp fragment (SEQ ID NO: 12) encoding part of the protease gene derived from Cellulomonas strain 69B4. The sequences of the degenerate primers (SEQ ID NOS: 10 and 11) are underlined and in bold.

D G D C G T I T A L N S S V T Y P E G

1 ACGACGGCTG GGACJGCGGC ACCATCACTG CGCTCAACTC CTCGGTCACC TACCCCGAGG TGCTGCCGAC CCTGACGCCG TGGTAGTGAC GCGAGTTGAG GAGCCAGTGG ATGGGGCTCC

• T V R G L I R T T V C A E P G D S G G S 61 GCACCGTCCG CGGCCTGATC CGCACCACCG TCTGCGCCGA GCCCGGCGAC TCCGGTGGCT CGTGGCAGGC GCCGGACTAG GCGTGGTGGC AGACGCGGCT CGGGCCGCTG AGGCCACCGA

• L L A G N Q A Q G V T S G D S G G S 121 CGCTGCTCGC CGGCAACCAG GCCCAGGGCG TCACGTCCGG CGACTCCGGC GGCTCAT

GCGACGAGCG GCCGTTGGTC CGGGTCCCGC AGTGCAGGCC GCTGAGGCCG CCGAGTA

Analysis of the Sequence of Cellulomonas sp.69B4 Protease

A saturated sinapinic acid (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid)("SA") solution in a 1 :1 v/v acetonitrile ("ACN")/0.1% formic acid solution was prepared. The resulting mixture was vortexed for 60 seconds and then centrifuged for 20 seconds at 14,000 rpm. Then, 5μl of the matrix supernatant was transferred to a 0.5 ml Eppendorf tube and 1 μl of a 10 pmole/μl protease 69B4 sample was added to the SA matrix supernatant and vortexed for 5 seconds. Then, 1 μl of the analyte/matrix solution was transferred onto a sample plate and, after being completely dry, analyzed by a Voyager DE-STR (PerSeptive), matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization - time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrophotometer, with the following settings: Mode of operation: Linear; Extraction mode: Delayed; Polarity: Positive; Accelerating voltage: 25000 V; Extraction delay time: 350 nsec; Acquisition mass range: 4000- 20000 Da; Number of laser shots: 100/spectrum; and Laser intensity: 2351. The resulting spectrum is provided in Figure 4.

A tryptic map was produced using methods known in the art (Christianson et al., Anal. Biochem. 223:119-29 [1994]), modified as described herein. The protease solution, containing 10 - 50 μg protease was diluted 1 :1 with chilled water in a 1.5 ml microtube. 1.0 N HCl was added to a final concentration of 0.1 N HCl, mixed thoroughly and incubated for 10 minutes on ice. Then, 50% trichloro-acetic acid ("TCA") was added to a final concentration of 10% TCA and mixed. The sample was incubated for 10 minutes on ice, centrifuged for two minutes and the supernatant discarded. Then, 1 ml of cold 90% acetone was added to resuspend the pellet. The resulting sample was then centrifuged for one minute, the supernatant quickly decanted and remaining liquid was removed by vacuum aspiration. The dry pellet was dissolved in 12 μl of 8.0 M urea solution (480 mg urea [Roche, catalog # 1685899]) in 0.65 ml of ammonium bicarbonate solution (final concentration of bicarbonate: 0.5 M) and incubated for 3-5 minutes at 37°C. The solution was slowing diluted with 48 μl of a n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside solution ("o-water") (200 mg of n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside [C14H28O6, f.w. 292.4] in 200 ml of water). Then, 2.0 μl of trypsin (2.5 mg/ml in 1 mM HCl) was added and the mixture was incubated for 15 minutes at 37°C. The proteolytic reaction was quenched with 6 μl of 10% trifluoroacetic acid ("TFA"). Insoluble material and bubbles were removed from the sample by centrifugation for one minute. The tryptic digest was separate by RP-HPLC on 2.1 X 150 mm C-18 column (5μl particle size, 300 angstroms pore size). The elution gradient was formed from 0.1% (v/v) TFA in water and 0.08% (v/v) TFA in acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.2 ml-min. The column compartment was heated to 50°C. Peptide elution was monitored at 215 nm and data were collected at 215 nm and 280 nm. The samples were then analyzed on a LCQ Advantage mass spectrometer with a Surveyor HPLC (both from Thermo Finnigan). The LCQ mass spectrophotometer was run with the following settings: Spray voltage: 4.5kV; Capillary temperature: 225° C. Data processing was performed using TurboSEQUEST and Xcalibur (ThermoFinnigan). Sequencing of the tryptic digest portions was also performed in part by Argo BioAnalytica. Analysis of the full sequence of the asp gene revealed that it encodes a prosequence protease of 495 amino acids (SEQ ID NO:6). The first 28 amino acids were predicted to form a signal peptide. The mass of the mature chain of 69B4 protease as produced by Cellulomonas strain 69B4 has a molecular weight of 18764 (determined by MALDI-TOF). The sequence of the N-terminus of the mature chain was also determined by MALDI-TOF analysis and starts with the sequence FDVIGGNAYTIGGR (SEQ ID NO:17). It is believed that the 69B4 protease has a unique precursor structure with NH2- and COOH terminal pro-sequences, as is known to occur with some other enzymes (e.g., T aquaticus aqualysin I; See e.g., Lee et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 1 :69-74 [1994]; Sakamoto et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 59:1438-1443 [1995]; Sakamoto et al., Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 45:94-101 [1996]; Kim et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 231 :535-539 [1997]; and Oledzka et al., Protein Expr. Purific, 29:223-229 [2003]). The predicted molecular weight of mature 69B4 protease as provided in SEQ ID NO:8, was 18776.42, which corresponds well with the molecular weight of the purified enzyme with proteolytic activity isolated from Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 (i.e., 18764). The prediction of the COOH terminal pro-sequence in 69B4 protease was also based on an alignment of the 69B4 protease with T. aquaticus aqualysin I, provided below. In this alignment, the amino acid sequence of the Cellulomonas 69B4 signal sequence and precursor protease are aligned with the signal sequence and precursor protease Aqualysin I of Thermus aquaticus (COOH- terminal pro-sequence of Aqualysin I is underlined and in bold). Aqualysin I (1) MRKTYWLMALFAVLVLGGCQMASRSDPTPTLAEAFWPKEAPVYGLD

69B4 (1) MTPRTVTRALAVATAAATLLAGGMAAQANEPAPPGSASAPPRLAEKLDPD

Consensus (1) MA A LLAG A DP P A A PK A D

51 100

Aqualysin I (47) DPEAIPGRYIVVFKKGKGQSLLQGGITTLQARLAPQGVVVTQAYTGALQG 69B4 (51) LLEAMERDLGLDAEEAAATLAFQHDAAETGEALAEE LDEDFAGTWVE

Consensus (51) EAI L A A Q LA L F G

101 150

Aqualysin I (97) FAAEMAPQALEAFRQSPDVEFIEADKVVRAWATQSPAPWGLDRIDQRDLP 69B4 (98) DDVLYVATTDEDAVEEVEGEGATAVTVEHSLADLEAWKTVLDAALEGHDD Consensus (101) E D E A V A A LD

151 200

Aqualysin I (147 ) LSNSYTYTATGRGVNVYVIDTGIRTTHREFGGRARVGYDALGGNGQDCNG

69B4 ( 148 ) VPTWYVDVPTNΞ — VVVAVKAGAQDVAAGLVEGADVPSDAVT — FVETDE

Consensus (151) L Y T V I G A V DAL D 201 250

Aqualysin I (197) HGTHVAGTIGGVTYGVAKAVNLYAVRVLDCNGSGSTSGVIAGVDWVTRNH

69B4 (194) TPRTMFDVIGGNAYTIGGRS RCSIGFAVNGGFITAGHCGRTG

Consensus (201) M IGG Y IA C A G R

251 300 Aqualysin I (247) RRPAVAN SLGGGVSTALDNAVKNSIAAGVVYAVAAGNDNANACNYSPAR

69B4 (236) ATTANPTGTFAGSSFPGNDYAFVRTGAG VNLLAQVNNYSGGR

Consensus (251) A S AG A D A S AA N AN NYS AR 301 350

Aqualysin I (297) VAEALTVGATTSSDARASFSNYGSCVDLFAPGASIPSAWYTSDTATQTLN

69B4 (278) VQVAGHTAAPVGSAVCRSGSTTGWHCGTIT—ALNSSVTYPEGTVRGLIR

Consensus (301 ) V A AA S S S G A S Y T I 351 400

Aqualysin I (347) GTSMATPHVAGVAALYLEQNPSATPASVASAILNGATTGRLSGIGSGSPN

69B4 (326) TTVCAEPGDSGGSLLAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCRTGGTTFFQPVNPILQAYG

Consensus (351) T A P G A L Q T A A G T A

401 450 Aqualysin I (397) RLLYSLLΞSGSGSTAPCTSCSYYTGS SG PGD NFQPNGTYYYSP-A

69B4 (376) LRMITTDS-GSSPAPAPTSCTGYARTFTGTLAAGRAAAQPNGSYVQVNRS Consensus (401) L S S GS TSCS Y S SG G QPNGSY A 451 500

Aqualysin I (443) GTHRAW RGPAGTDFDLYLWRWDGSRWLTVGSSTGPTSEESLSYSGTAGY 69B4 (425) GTHSVCLNGPSGADFDLYVQRWNGSSWVTVAQSTSPGSNETITYRGNAGY

Consensus (451) GTH L GPAG DFDLYL RW GS WLTVA ST P S ESIΞY G AGY 501 521

Aqualysin I (493) YLWRIYAYSGSGMYEFWLQRP (SEQ ID NO: 644) 69B4 (475) YRYVVNAASGSGAYTMGLTLP (SEQ ID NO: 645) Consensus (501) Y W I A SGSG Y L P (SEQ ID NO :646)

The sequences of three internal peptides of the purified enzyme from Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 having proteolytic activity were determined by MALDI-TOF analysis. AH three peptides were also identified in the translation product of the isolated asp gene, confirming the identification of the correct protease gene (See, SEQ ID NO:1 , above).

Percentage Identity Comparison Between Asp and Streptogrisin The deduced polypeptide product of the asp gene (mature chain) was used in homology analysis with other serine proteases using the BLAST program and settings as described in Example 3. The preliminary analyses showed identities of from about 44 - 48% (See, Table 4-1, below). Together with analysis of the translated sequence, these results provided evidence that the asp gene encodes a protease having less than 50% sequence identity with the mature chains of Streptogrisin-like serine proteases. An alignment of Asp with Streptogrisin A, Streptogrisin B, Streptogrisin C, Streptogrisin D of Streptomyces griseus is provided below. In this alignment, the amino acid sequences of Cellulomonas 69B4 mature protease ("69B4 mature") are aligned with mature proteases amino acid sequences of Streptogrisin C ("Sq - streptogrisinCjnature"), Streptogrisin B ("Sq - streptogrisinBmature"), Streptogrisin A ("Sq - streptogrisinAmature"), Streptogrisin D ("Sq - streptogrisinDmature") and consensus residues.

50

69B4 mature (1) FDVIGGNAYTIGGRSRCSIGFAVN GGFITAGHCGRTGATT Sg-StreptogrisinC mature (1) ADIRGGDAYYMNGSGRCSVGFSVTRGTQNGFATAGHCGRVGTTTNG—VN

Sg-StreptogrisinBmature (1) —ISGGDAIYSST-GRCSLGFNVRSGSTYYFLTAGHCTDGATTWWANSAR

Sg-StreptogrisinAmature (1) —IAGGEAITTGG-SRCSLGFNVSVNGVAHALTAGHCTNISASWS

Sg-StreptogrisinDmature (1) —IAGGDAIWGSG-SRCSLGFNVVKGGEPYFLTAGHCTESVTSWSD-TQG

Consensus (1) IAGGDAIY G SRCSLGFNV G YFLTAGHCT GTTW

51 100 Asp mature (41) ANPTGTFAGSSFPGNDYAFVRTGAGVNLLAQVNNYSGGRVQVAGHTAAPV

Sg-StreptogrisinC mature ( 49) QQAQGTFQGSTFPGRDIAWVATNANWTPRPLVNGYGRGDVTVAGSTASVV

Sg-StreptogrisinBmature ( 48 ) TTVLGTTSGSSFPNNDYGIVRYTNTTIPKDGTVGG QDITSAANATV

Sg-StreptogrisinAmature (43) IGTRTGTSFPNNDYGIIRHSNPAAADGRVYLYNGSYQDITTAGNAFV

Sg-StreptogrisinDmature (47 ) GSEIGANEGSSFPENDYGLVKYTSDTAHPSEVNLYDGSTQAITQAGDATV

Consensus (51) IGT GΞSFP NDYGIVRYTA VN Y G Q IT AG A V 101 150

Asp mature ( 91) GSAVCRSGSTTGWHCGTITALNSSVTYPEG-TVRGLIRTTVCAEPGDSGG

Sg-StreptogrisinC mature ( 99) GASVCRSGSTTGWHCGTIQQLNTSVTYPEG-TISGVTRTSVCAEPGDSGG

Sg-StreptogrisinBmature (94 ) GMAVTRRGSTTGTHSGSVTALNATVNYGGGDVVYGMIRTNVCAEPGDSGG

Sg-StreptogrisinAmature (90) GQAVQRSGSTTGLRSGSVTGLNATVNYGSSGIVYGMIQTNVCAEPGDSGG

Sg-StreptogrisinDmature ( 97 ) GQAVTRSGSTTQVHDGEVTALDATVNYGNGDIVNGLIQTTVCAEPGDSGG

Consensus ( 101) G AV RSGΞTTG H GSVTALNATVNYG G IV GLIRTTVCAEPGDSGG 151 200

Asp mature ( 140 ) SLLAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCRTGGTTFFQPVNPILQAYGLRMITTDSGSSP

Sg-StreptogrisinC mature (148) SYISGΞQAQGVTSGGSGNCSSGGTTYFQPINPLLQAYGLTLVTSGGGTPT

Sg-StreptogrisinBmature ( 144 ) PLYSGTRAIGLTSGGSGNCSSGGTTFFQPVTEALSAYGVSVY

Sg-StreptogrisinAmature ( 140) SLFAGSTALGLTSGGSGNCRTGGTTFYQPVTEALSAYGATVL

Sg-StreptogrisinDmature ( 147 ) ALFAGDTALGLTSGGSGDCSSGGTTFFQPVPEALAAYGAEIG

Consensus (151 ) SLFAGS ALGLTSGGSGNCSSGGTTFFQPV EALSAYGLTVI

201 250

Asp mature (190)

Sg-StreptogrisinC mature ( 198 ) DPPTTPPTDSPGGTWAVGTAYAAGATVTYGGATYRCLQAHTAQPGWTPAD

Sg-StreptogrisinBmature ( 186)

Sg-StreptogrisinAmature ( 182 )

Sg-StreptogrisinDmature ( 189)

Consensus (201)

251

Asp mature ( 190 ) (SEQ ID NO:8)

Sg-StreptogrisinC mature (248 ) VPALWQRV (SEQ ID NO: 639)

Sg-StreptogrisinBmature ( 186) (SEQ ID NO: 640)

Sg-StreptogrisinAmature (182) (SEQ ID NO: 641)

Sg-StreptogrisinDmature ( 189 ) (SEQ ID NO: 642)

Consensus (251 ) (SEQ ID NO: 643)

Table 4-1. Percentage Identity: Comparison between Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 Protease

Figure imgf000122_0001
Additional protease sequences were also investigated. In these analyses, proteases homologous in protein sequence to the mature domain of ASP were searched for using BLAST. Those identified were then aligned using the multiple sequence alignment program clustalW. The numbers on the top of the alignment below refer to the amino-acid sequence of the mature ASP protease. The numbers at the side of the alignment are sequence identifiers, as described at the bottom of the alignment.

Sequence 1 10 20 30 40

ASP FDVIGGNAYTIGGRSRCSIGFAVN GGFITAGHCGRTGATTANPTG TF

2 TPLIAGGEAITTGGSRCSLGFNV-SVNGVAHALTAGHCTNISAS S IGTR

3 - -lAGGEAIYAAGGGRCS GFNVRSSSGATYALTAGHCTEIAST YTNSGQTSL- -LGTR NKLIQGGDAI ASSWRCSLGFNWTSSGAEYFLTAGHCTDGAGAWRASSGGT IGQT NKLIQGGDAIYASS RCSLGFNVRTSSGAEYFLTAGHCTDGAGAWRASSGGTV IGQT T LIQGGDAIYASS RCSLGFNVRSSSGVDYFLTAGHCTDGAGTWYSNSARTTA- -IGST TKLISGGDAIYSSTGRCSLGFNVRSGS-TYYFLTAGHCTDGATT WANSARTTV--LGTT ---V GGGAIYGGGSRCSAAFNV-T GGARYFVTAGHCTNISAN SASSGGSV VGVR QREVAGGDAIYGGGSRCSAAFNV-TKNGVRYFLTAGHCTN SSTWSSTSGGTS IGVR KPFIAGGDAITGNGGRCSLGFWTKG-GEPHFLTAGHCTEGISTWSDSSG- -QV- -IGEN KPFVAGGDAITGGGGRCS GFNVTKG-GEPYFITAGHCTESISTWSDSSG- -NV- -IGEN TPLIAGGDAIWGSGSRCSLGFNWKG-GEPYFLTAGHCTESVTSWSDTQGG-SE- -IGAN KTFASGGDAIFGGGARCSLGFNVTAGDGSAAFLTRGHCGGGATMWSDAQGGQPI--ATVD KTFASGGDAIFGGGARCSLGFNVTAGDGSPAFLTAGHCGVAADQWSDAQGGQPI- -ATVD TTRLNGAΞPILSTAGRCSAGFNVTDG-TSDFILTAGHCGPTGSVWFGDRPGDGQ- -VGRT ATVQGGDVYYINRSSRCSIGFAVT TGFVSAGHCGGSGASATTSSGEAL GTF ADIRGGDAYY NGSGRCSVGFSVTRG-TQNGFATAGHCGRVGTTTNGVNQQAQ GTF YDLRGGEAYYINNSSRCSIGFPITKG-TQQGFATAGHCGRAGSSTTGANRVAQ GTF YDLVGGDAYYIGN-GRCSIGFSVRQG-STPGFVTAGHCGSVGNATTGFNRVSQ GTF YDLVGGDAYY GG-GRCSVGFSVTQG-STPGFATAGHCGTVGTSTTGYNQAAQ GTF EDLVGGDAYYIDDQARCSIGFSVTKD-DQEGFATAGHCGDPGATTTGYNEADQ GTF LAAIIGGNPYYFGNYRCSIGFSVRQG-SQTGFATAGHCGSTGTRVSSPSG TV ANIVGGIEYSINNAS CSVGFSVTRG-ATKGFVTAGHCGTVNATARIGGAW GTF AAGTVGGDPYYTGNVRCSIGFSVH GGFVTAGHCGRAGAGVSG DRSYI GTF VIVPVRDY GGDA SGCTLAFPVYGG FLTAGHCAVEGKGHILKTEMTGGQ-IGTV DPPLRSGIAIYGTNVRCSSAF AYSG-SSYY MTAGHCAEDSSYWEVPTYSYGYQGVGHV

50 60 70 80 90 100 AGSSFPGN-DYAFVRTGAGVNL AQVNNYSGGR-VQVAGHTAAPVGSAVCRSGSTTGWHC TGTSFPNNDYGIIRHSNPAAA- -DGRVYLYNGSYQDITTAGNAFVGQAVQRSGSTTGLRS AGTSFPGNDYG IRHSNASAA- -DGRVY YNGSYRDITGAGNAYVGQTVQRSGSTTGLHS AGSSFPGNDYGIVQYTGS VSRPGTANGVDITRAATPSVGTTVIRDGSTTGTHS AGSSFPGNDYGIVQYTGS VSRPGTANGVDITRAATPSVGTTVIRDGSTTGTHS AGSSFPGNDYGIVRYTGS VSRPGTANGVDITRAATPSVGTTVIRDGSTTGTHS SGSSFPNNDYGIVRYTNTT IP DGTVGGQDITSAANATVGMAVTRRGSTTGTHS EGTSFPTNDYGIVRYTDGSSP- -AGTVD YNGSTQDISSAANAWGQAIKKSGSTTKVTS EGTSFPTNDYGIVRYTTTTNV--DGRVN YNGGYQDIASAADAWGQAIKKSGSTTIVTS AASSFPGDDYG V YTADVAH- -PSQVNLYDGSSQSISGAAEAAVGMQVTRSGSTTQVHS AASSFPDNDYGLVKYTADVDH- -PSEVNLYNGSSQAISGAAEATVGMQVTRSGSTTQVHD EGSSFPENDYGLVKYTSDTAH- - SEVNLYDGSTQAITQAGDATVGQAVTRSGSTTQVHD QAVFPPEGDFGLVRYDGPSTE- -APSEVDLGDQTLPISGAAEASVGQEVFR GSTTGLAD QAVFPGEGDFALVRYDDPATE--APSEVDLGDQTLPISGAAEAAVGQΞVFRMGSTTGLAD VAGSFPGDDFSLVEYANGKAGDGADWAVGDGKGVRITGAGEPAVGQRVFRSGSTSGLRD SGSVFPGSADMAYVRTVSGTVLRGYINGYGQGS -FPVSGSSEAAVGASICRSGSTTQVHC QGSTFPGR-DIA VATNAN TPRPLVNGYGRGD-VTVAGSTASWGASVCRSGSTTG HC QGSIFPGR-DMA VATNSS TATPYVLGAGGQN-VQVTGSTASPVGASVCRSGSTTG HC RGS FPGR-D A VAVNSN TPTSLVRNSGSG- -VRVTGSTQATVGSSICRSGSTTG RC EESSFPGD-DMA VSVNSD NTTPTVNEGE VTVSGSTΞAAVGASICRSGSTTGWHC QASTFPGK-DMAWVGVNSD TATPDVKAEGGE -IQLAGSVEALVGASVCRSGSTTG HC AGSYFPGR-DMG VRITSADTVTPLVNRYNGGT-VTVTGSQEAATGSSVCRSGATTG RC AARVFPGN-DRA VSLTSAQTLLPRVANGSSF--VTVRGSTEAAVGAAVCRSGRTTGYQC QGSSFPDN-DYAWVSVGSG TVPWLGWGTVSDQLVRGSNVAPVGASICRSGSTTHWHC EASQFGDGIDAAWAKNYGDWNGRGRVTH NGGGGVDI GSNEAAVGAHMCKSGRTTKWTC ADYTFGYYGDSAIVRVDDPGF WQPRG VYPSTRITNWDYDYVGQYVCKQGSTTGYTC 110 120 130 140 150 GTITALNSSVTYPEGTV-RGLIRTTVCAEPGDSGGSLLAGN-QAQGVTSGGS GSVTGLNATVNYGSSGIVYGMIQTNVCAEPGDSGGSLF-AGSTALGLTSGGS GRVTGLNATVNYGGGDIVSGLIQTNVCAEPGDSGGALF-AGSTALGLTSGGS GRVTALNATVNYGGGDWGGLIQTTVCAEPGDSGGSLYGSNGTAYGLTSGGS GRVTALNATVNYGGGDWGGLIQTTVCAEPGDSGGSLYGSNGTAYGLTSGGS GRVTALNATVNYGGGDIVSGLIQTTVCAEPGDSGGP YGSNGTAYGLTSGGS GSVTALNATVNYGGGDWYGMIRTNVCAEPGDSGGPLY-SGTRAIGLTSGGS GTVTAVNVTVNYGDGP-VYNMGRTTACSAGGDSGGAHF-AGSVALGIHSGSS GTVSAVNVTVNYSDGP-VYGMVRTTACSAGGDSGGAHF-AGSVALGIHSGSS GTVTGLDATVNYGNGDI GLIQTDVCAEPGDSGGSLFSGDK-AVGLTSGGS GTVTGLDATVNYGNGDIVNGLIQTDVCAEPGDSGGSLFSGDQ-AIGLTSGGS GEVTALDATVNYGNGDIVNGLIQTTVCAEPGDSGGALFAGDT-ALGLTSGGS GQVLGLDVTVNYPEG-TVTGLIQTDVCAEPGDSGGSLFTRDGLAIRLTSGGT GQVLGLDATVNYPEG-MVTGLIQTDVCAEPGDSGGSLFTRDGLAIGLTSGGS VDGLIQTDVCAEPGDSGGALFDGDA-AIGLTSGGS GRVTALDATVNYPEG-TVTGLIETDVCAEPGDSGGPMFSEGV-ALGVTSGGS GTIGAKGATVNYPQGAV-SGLTRTSVCAEPGDSGGSFYSGS-QAQGVTSGGS GTIQQLNTSVTYPEGTI-SGVTRTSVCAEPGDSGGSYISGS-QAQGVTSGGS GTVTQLNTSVTYQEGTI-SPVTRTTVCAEPGDSGGSFISGS-QAQGVTSGGS GTIQQHNTSVTYPQGTI-TGVTRTSACAQPGDSGGSFISGT-QAQGVTSGGS GTIQQHNTSVTYPEGTI-TGVTRTSVCAΞPGDSGGSYISGS-QAQGVTSGGS GTIQQHDTSVTYPEGTV-DGLTETTVCAEPGDSGGPFVSGV-QAQGTTSGGS GTIQSKNQTVRYAEGTV-TGLTRTTACAEGGDSGGP LTGS-QAQGVTSGGT GTITAKNVTANYAEGAV-RGLTQGNACMGRGDSGGS ITSAGQAQGVMSGGNVQSNGNNC GTVLAHNETVNYSDGSWHQLTKTSVCAEGGDSGGSFISGD-QAQGVTSGG GYLLRKDVSVNYGNGHI-VTLNETSACALGGDSGGAYVWND-QAQGITSGSN GQITETNATVSYPGRTL-TG TWSTACDAPGDSGSGVYDGSTAHGILSGGPN 160 170 180 189 GNCRTGGTTFFQPVNPILQAYGLRMITTDSGSSP (SEQ ID NO: 18) GNCRTGGTTFYQPVTEALSAYGATVL (SEQ ID NO: 19) GNCRTGGTT (SEQ ID NO:20) GNCSSGGTTFFQPVTEALSAYGVSVY (SEQ ID NO: 21) GNCSSGGTTFFQPVTEALSAYGVSVY (SEQ ID NO: 22) GNCSSGGTTFFQPVTEALSAYGVSVY (SEQ ID NO: 23) GNCSSGGTTFFQPVTEALSAYGVSVY (SEQ ID NO: 24) GCSGTAGSAIHQPVTKALSAYGVTVYL (SEQ ID NO: 25) GCTGTNGSAIHQPVREALSAYGVNVY (SEQ ID NO: 26) GDCTSGGTTFFQPVTEALSATGTQIG (SEQ ID NO: 27) GDCTSGGETFFQPVTEALSATGTQIG (SEQ ID NO: 28) GDCSSGGTTFFQPVPEALAAYGAEIG (SEQ ID NO: 29) RDCTSGGETFFQPVTTALAAVGGTLGGEDGGDG- (SEQ ID NO: 30) GDCTVGGETFFQPVTTALAAVGATLGGEDGGAGA (SEQ ID NO: 31) GDCSQGGETFFQPVTEALKAYGAQIGGGQGEPPE (SEQ ID NO: 32) GDCAKGGTTFFQPLPEAMASLGVRLIVPGREGAA (SEQ ID NO: 33) GDCSRGGTTYFQPVNRILQTYGLTLVTA (SEQ ID NO: 34) GNCSSGGTTYFQPINPLLQAYGLTLVTSGG--GT (SEQ ID NO: 35) GDCRTGGETFFQPINALLQNYGLTLKTTGGDDGG (SEQ ID NO: 36) GNCSIGGTTFHQPVNPILSQYGLTLVRS (SEQ ID NO: 37) GNCTSGGTTYHQPINPLLSAYGLDLVTG (SEQ ID NO: 38) GDCTNGGTTFYQPVNPLLSDFGLTLKTTSA (SEQ ID NO: 39) GDCRSGGITFFQPINPLLSYFGLQLVTG (SEQ ID NO: 40) GIPASQRSSLFERLQPILSQYGLSLVTG (SEQ ID NO: 41) 25 GNCSSGGETWFQPVNEILNRYGLTLHTA (SEQ ID NO: 42)

26 -MDTNNCRSFYQPVNTVLNKWKLSLVTSTDVTTS (SEQ ID NO: 43) 27 SGCGMIHEPISRALADRGVTLLAG (SEQ ID NO: 44) In the above listing, the numbers correspond as follows:

1 ASP Protease

2 Streptogrisin A (Streptomyces griseus)

3 Glutamyl endopeptidase (Streptomyces fradiae) 4 Streptogrisin B (Streptomyces lividans)

5 SAM-P20 (Streptomyces coelicolor)

6 SAM-P20 (Streptomyces albogriseolus)

7 Streptogrisin B (Streptomyces griseus)

8 Glutamyl endopeptidase II (Streptomyces griseus) 9 Glutamyl endopeptidase II (Streptomyces fradiae)

10 Streptogrisin D (Streptomyces albogriseolus)

11 Streptogrisin D (Streptomyces coelicolor)

12 Streptogrisin D (Streptomyces griseus)

13 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (SalO protein) (Streptomyces lividans) 14 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (SALO protein) (Streptomyces coelicolor)

15 Streptogrisin D (Streptomyces platensis)

16 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (3SC5B7.10 protein)(Sfrepromyces coelicolor)

17 CHY1 protease (Metarhizium anisopliae)

18 Streptogrisin C (Streptomyces griseus) 19 Streptogrisin C (SCD40A.16c protein) (Streptomyces coelicolor)

20 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (I) (Streptomyces sp.)

21 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (II) (Streptomyces sp.)

22 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (SCF43A.19 proteinXSfrepfomyces coelicolor)

23 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (Thermobifida fusca; basonym Thermomonospora fusca)

24 Alpha-lytic endopeptidase (Lysobacter enzymogenes)

25 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (SC10G8.13C protein) (Streptomyces coelicolor)

26 Yeast-lytic endopeptidase (Rarobacter faecitabidus) 27 Subfamily S1 E unassigned peptidase (SC10A5.18 protein) (Streptomyces coelicolor) EXAMPLE 5 Screening for Novel Homologues of 69B4 Protease by PCR In this Example, methods used to screen for novel homologues of 69B4 protease are described. Bacterial strains of the suborder Micrococcineae, and in particular from the family Cellulomonadaceae and Promicromonosporaceae were ordered from the German culture collection, DSMZ (Braunschweig) and received as freeze dried cultures. Additional strains were received from the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms, BCCM™/LMG (University of Ghent). The freeze-dried ampoules were opened according to DSMZ instructions and the material rehydrated with sterile physiological saline (1.5 ml) for 1h. Well-mixed, rehydrated cell suspensions (300 μL) were transferred to sterile Eppendorf tubes for subsequent PCR.

PCR Methods i) Pretreatment of the Samples

The rehydrated microbial cell suspensions were placed in boiling water bath for 10 min. The suspensions were then centrifuged at 16000 rpm for 5 min. (Sigma 1-15 centrifuge) to remove cell debris and remaining cells, the clear supernatant fraction serving as template for the PCR reaction.

(ii) PCR Test Conditions

The DNA from these types of bacteria (Actinobacteria) is characteristically highly GC rich (typically >55 mol%), so addition of DMSO is a necessity. The chosen concentration based on earlier work with the Cellulomonas sp. strain 69B4 was 4% v/v DMSO.

(iii) PCR Primers (chosen from the following pairs)

Prot-int_FW1 5'-TGCGCCGAGCCCGGCGACTC-3' (SEQ ID NO:45) Prot-int_RV1 5'-GAGTCGCCGGGCTCGGCGCA-3' (SEQ ID NO:46)

Prot-int_FW2 5'-TTCCCCGGCAACGACTACGCGTGGGT-3' (SEQ ID NO:47)

Prot-int_RV2 5'-ACCCACGCGTAGTCGTTGCCGGGGAA-3' (SEQ ID NO:48) Cellu-FW1 5'-GCCGCTGCTCGATCGGGTTC-3' (SEQ ID NO:49)

Cellu-RV1 5'-GCAGTTGCCGGAGCCGCCGGACGT-3' (SEQ ID NO:50) (iv) PCR Mixture (all materials supplied by Invitrogen)

Template DNA 4μl

10x PCR buffer 5μl

50mM MgSO4 2μl

10mM dNTP's 1 μl

Primers (10μM soln.) 1 μl each

Platinum Taq hifi polymerase 0.5μl DMSO 2μl

MilliQ water 33.5μl

(v) PCR Protocol

1) 94°C 5 min

2) 94°C 30 sec

3) 55°C 30 sec

4) 68°C 3 min

5) Repeat steps 2-4 repeat for 29 cycles 6) 68°C 10 min

7) 15°C 1 min

The amplified PCR products were examined by agarose gel electrophoresis. Distinct bands for each organism were excised from the gel, purified using the Qiagen gel extraction kit, and sequenced by BaseClear, using the same primer combinations.

(vi) Sequence Analysis

Nucleotide sequence data were analyzed and the DNA sequences were translated into amino acid sequences to review the homology to 69B4-mature protein. Sequence alignments were performed using AlignX, a component of Vector NTI suite 9.0.0. The results are compiled in Table 5-1. The numbering is that used in SEQ ID NO:8.

Figure imgf000127_0001
Figure imgf000128_0001

These results show that PCR primers based on polynucleotide sequences of the 69B4 protease gene (mature chain), SEQ ID NO:4 are successful in detecting homologous genes in bacterial strains of the suborder Micrococcineae, and in particular from the family Cellulomonadaceae and Promicromonosporaceae.

Figure 2 provides a phylogeny tree of ASP protease. The phylogeny of this protease was examined by a variety of approaches from mature sequences of similar members of the chymotrypsin superfamily of proteins and ASP homologues for which significant mature sequence has been deduced. Using protein distance methods known in the art (See e.g., Kimura, The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK [1983]) similar trees were obtained either including or excluding gaps. The phylogenetic tree of Figure 2 was constructed from aligned sequences (positions 16 -181 of SEQ ID NO:8) using TREECONW v.1.3b (Van de Peer and De Wachter, Comput. Appl. Biosci., 10:569 - 570 [1994]) and with tree topology inferred by the Neighbor-Joining algorithm (Saitou and Nei, Mol. Biol. Evol., 4:406 - 425 [1987]). As indicated by this tree, the data indicate that the ASP series of homologous proteases ("cellulomonadins") forms a separate subfamily of proteins. In Figure 2, the numbers provided in brackets correspond to the sequences provided herein.

The following is an alignment between the Cellulomonas 69B4 ASP protease and homologous proteases of related genera described herein.

1 50

69B (ASP) complete (1) MTPRTVTRALAVATAAATLLAGGMAAQANEPAPPGSASAPPRLAEKLDPD

Cellulomonas gelida (1) '

Cellulomonas flavigena (1)

Cellulomonas biazotea (1)

Cellulomonas fimi (1) =

Cellulomonas iranensis (1)

Cellulomonas cellasea (1)

C. xylanilytica (1) Oerskovia turbata (1 MARSFWRTLATACAATALVAGPAALTANAATPTPDTPTVSPQTSSKVSPE

Oerskovia jenensis (1

Cm. cellulans (1

Pm. citrea (1

Pm. sukumoe (1

69B4 (ASP) mature (1

Consensus (1

51 100

69B (ASP) complete (51 LLEAMERDLGLDAEEAAATLAFQHDAAETGEALAEELDEDF-AGTWVEDD

Cellulomonas gelida (1

Cellulomonas flavigena (1

Cellulomonas biazotea (1

Cellulomonas fimi (1

Cellulomonas iranensis (1

Cellulomonas cellasea (1

C. xylanilytica (1

Oerskovia turbata (51 VLRALQRDLGLSAKDATKRLAFQSDAASTEDALADSLDAYAGAWVDPARN

Oerskovia jenensis (1

Cm. cellulans (1 PRAAGRAARSSGSRASAS

Pm. citrea (1

Pm. sukumoe (1

69B4 (ASP) mature (1

Consensus (51

101 150

69B (ASP) complete (100 VLYVATTDEDAVEEVEGEGATAVTVEHSLADLEAWKTVLDAALEGHDDVP

Cellulomonas gelida (1

Cellulomonas flavigena (1

Cellulomonas biazotea (1 KQTASEFVIRLTIGELNLAAANSPLPIGHAWSTAL

Cellulomonas f mi (1

Cellulomonas iranensis (1

Cellulomonas cellasea (2 GRVRQLPLRGHDVLPARERDPAGLRSASRPGLTRΞRRARLDAAGPSARVA

C. xylanilytica (1

Oerskovia turbata (101 TLYVGVADRAEAKEVRSAGATPVVVDHTLAELDTWKAALDGELNDPAGVP

Oerskovia jenensis (1

Cm. cellulans (19 TSPGPTSVTASASSCGRATGRRQRWTFEADGTVRAGGKCMDVAWAPRPTA

Pm. citrea (1

Pm. sukumoe (1

69B4 (ASP) mature (1

Consensus (101

151 200

69B4 (ASP) complete (150 TWYVDVPTNSVVVAV AGAQDVAAGLVEGADVPSDAVTFVETDETPRTMF

Cellulomonas gelida (1

Cellulomonas flavigena (1

Cellulomonas biazotea (36 GWYVDVTTNT VVNATALAVAQATEIVAAATVPADAVRVVETTEAPRTFI

Cellulomonas fimi (1 V

Cellulomonas iranensis (1

Cellulomonas cellasea (52 AWYVDVPTNKLVVEΞVG—DTAAAADAVAAAGLPADAVTLATTEAPRTFV

C. xylanilytica (1

Oerskovia turbata (151 SWFVDVTTNQVVVNVHDGGRALAELAAASAGVPADAITYVTTTEAPRPLV

O.jenenensis revi (1

Cm. cellulans (69 RRSSSRTARQRGPEVRAQRRGRPRVGAGEQSASTPPGAHRGTRGAVRAHG

Pm. citrea (1

Pm. sukumoe (1

69B4 (ASP) mature (1

Consensus (151

201 250

69B4 (ASP) complete (200 DVIGGNAYTIGGRSR- -CSIGFAVNGGFITAGHCGRTGA- -TTA

Cellulomonas gelida (1

Cellulomonas flavigena (2 DVIGGNAYYIGSRSR- -CΞIGFAVEGGFVTAGHCGRAGA STS

Cellulomonas biazotea (86 DVIGGNRYRINNTSR- -CSVGFAVSGGFVTAGHCGTTGA TTT

C. fimi. revi (2 DVIGGDAYYIGGRSR- -CSIGFAVTGGFVTAGHCGRTGA ATT

C. iranensis revi (1

Cellulomonas cellasea (100 DVIGGNAYYINASSR- -CSVGFAVEGGFVTAGHCGRAGA STS

C. xylanilytica (1 R_ -CSIGFAVTGGFVTAGHCGRSGA TTT

Oerskovia turbata (201 DVVGGNAYTMGSGGR- -CSVGFAVNGGFITAGHCGSVGT RTS

Oerskovia jenensis (1 R_ -CSVGFAVNGGFVTAGHCGTVGT RTS

Cm. cellulans (119 DVRGGDRYITRDPGASSGSACSIGYAVQGGFVTAGHCGRGGTRRVLTASW

Pm. citrea (1

Pm. sukumoe (1

69B4 (ASP) mature (2 DVIGGNAYTIGGRSR- -CSIGFAVNGGFITAGHCGRTGA- -TTA

Consensus (201 DVIGG Y I R CSIGFAV GGFVTAGHCGR GA TS

251 300 69B4 (ASP) complete (240) NPTGTFAGSSFPGNDYAFVRTGAGVNLLAQVNNYSGGRVQVAGHTAAPVG

Cellulomonas gelida (1)

Cellulomonas flavigena (42) SPSGTFRGSSFPGNDYAWVQVASGNTPRGLVNNHSGGTVRVTGSQQAAVG

Cellulomonas biazotea (126) KPSGTFAGSSFPGNDYAWVRVASGNTPVGAVNNYSGGTVAVAGSTQATVG

Cellulomonas fimi (42) SPSGTFAGSSFPGNDYAWVRVASGNTPVGAVNNYSGGTVAVAGSTQAAVG

Cellulomonas iranensis (1) FPGNDYAWVQVGSGDTPRGLVNNYAGGTVRVTGSQQAAVG

Cellulomonas cellasea (140) SPSGTFRGSSFPGNDYAWVQVASGNTPRGLVNNHSGGTVRVTGSQQAAVG

C. xylanilytica (27) SPSGTFAGSSFPGNDYAWVRAASGNTPVGAVNRYDGSRVTVAGSTDAAVG

Oerskovia turbata (241) GPGGTFRGSNFPGNDYAWVQVDAGNTPVGAVNNYSGGRVAVAGSTAAPVG

Oerskovia jenensis (27) GPGGTFRGSSFPGNDYAWVQVDAGNTPVGAVNNYSGGRVAVAGSTAAPVG

Cm. cellulans (169) ARMGTVQAASFPGHDYAWVRVDAGFSPVPRVNNYAGGTVDVAGSAEAPVG

Pm. citrea (1) FPGNDYAWVNTGTDDTLVGAVNNYSGGTVNVAGSTRAAVG

Pm. sukumoe (1) FPGNDYAWVNVGSDDTPIGAVNNYSGGTVNVAGSTQAAVG

69B4 (ASP) mature (42) NPTGTFAGSSFPGNDYAFVRTGAGVNLLAQVNNYSGGRVQVAGHTAAPVG

Consensus (251) P GTF GSSFPGNDYAWVQVASGNTPVGAVNNYSGGTV VAGST AAVG

301 350

69B4 (ASP) complete (290 SAVCRSGSTTGWHCGTITALNSSVTYPEGTVRGLIRTTVCAEPGDSGGSL Cellulomonas gelida (1

Cellulomonas flavigena (92 SYVCRSGSTTGWRCGYVRAYNTTVRYAEGSVSGLIRTSVCAEPGDSGGSL

Cellulomonas biazotea (176 ASVCRSGSTTGWRCGTIQAFNSTVNYAQGSVSGLIRTNVCAEPGDSGGSL

Cellulomonas fimi (92 ATVCRSGSTTGWRCGTIQAFNATVNYAEGSVSGLIRTNVCAEPGDSGGSL

Cellulomonas iranensis (41 AYVCRSGSTTGWRCGTVQAYNASVRYAEGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGD Cellulomonas cellasea (190 SYVCRSGSTTGWRCGYVRAYNTTVRYAEGSVSGLIRTSVCAEPGDSGGSL

C. xylanilytica (77 AAVCRSGSTTAWGCGTIQSRGASVTYAQGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGDSGGSL

Oerskovia turbata (291 ASVCRSGSTTGWHCGTIGAYNTSVTYPQGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGDSGGSL

Oerskovia jenensis (77 SSVCRSGSTTGWRCGTIAAYNSSVTYPQGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGDSGGSL

Cm. cellulans (219 ASVCRSGATTGWRCGVIEQKNITVNYGNGDVPGLVRGSACAEGGDSGGSV Pm. citrea (41 ATVCRSGSTTGWHCGTIQALNASVTYAEGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGD

Pm. sukumoe (41 STVCRSGSTTGWHCGTIQAFNASVTYAEGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGD

69B4 (ASP) mature (92 SAVCRSGSTTGWHCGTITALNΞSVTYPEGTVRGLIRTTVCAEPGDSGGSL

Consensus (301 ASVCRSGSTTGWRCGTI AYNASV YAEGTVSGLIRTNVCAEPGDSGGSL

351 400

69B4 (ASP) complete (340 LAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCRTGGTTFFQPVNPILQAYGLRMITT-DSGSSPA

Cellulomonas gelida (1 LAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCSSGGTTYFQPVNEALRVYGLTLVTS-DGGGTE-

Cellulomonas flavigena (142 VAGTQAQGVTSGGSGNCRYGGTTYFQPVNEILQDQPGPSTTR-AL

Cellulomonas biazotea (226 IAGNQAQGLTSGGSGNCTTGGTTYFQPVNEALSAYGLTLVTSSGGGGGGG Cellulomonas fimi (142 VAG

Cellulomonas iranensis (86

Cellulomonas cellasea (240 VAGTQAQGVTSGGSGNCRYGGTTYFQPVNEILQAYGLRLVLG-HARGGPS

C. xylanilytica (127 IAGTQARGVTSGGSGNC

Oerskovia turbata (341 LAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCSSGGTTYFQPVNEALGGYGLTLVTSDGGGPSRR Oerskovia jenensis (127 LAGNQAQGLTSGGSGNCSSGGTTYFQPVNEALSAYGLTLVTSGGRGNC—

Cm. cellulans (269 ISGNQAQGVTSGRINDCSNGGKFLYQPDRRPVARDHGRRVGQRARRARGQ

Pm. citrea (86

Pm. sukumoe (86

69B4 (ASP) mature (142 LAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCRTGGTTFFQPVNPILQAYGLRMITTDSGSΞP- Consensus (351 LAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNC GGTTYFQPVN L YGL LV

69B4 (ASP) complete (389 -PAPTSCTGYARTFTGTLAAGRAAAQPNGSYVQVNRSGTHSVCLNGPSGA

Cellulomonas gelida (49 -PPPTGCQGYARTYQGSVSAGTSVAQPNGSYVTTG-GGTHRVCLSGPAGT

Cellulomonas flavigena (186 Cellulomonas biazotea (276 TTCTGYARTYTGSLASRQSAVQPSGSYVTVGSSGTIRVCLDGPSGT

Cellulomonas fimi (145

Cellulomonas iranensis (86

Cellulomonas cellasea (289 -PARRAPAPPARA

C. xylanilytica (144 Oerskovia turbata (391 RPGARA RGPTRAASRPGRRSRSERFVRHDRGRATGCA-

Oerskovia jenensis (175

Cm. cellulans (319 VHRRPRVRLQ

Pm. citrea (86

Pm. sukumoe (86 69B4 (ASP) mature (190

Consensus (401

451 500

69B4 (ASP) complete (438 DFDLYVQRWNGSSWVTVAQSTSPGSNETITYRGNAGYYRYVVNAASGSGA Cellulomonas gelida (97 DLDLYLQKWNGYSWASVAQSTSPGATEAVTYTGTAGYYRYVVHAYAGSGA

Cellulomonas flavigena (186

Cellulomonas biazotea (322 DFDLYLQKWNGSAW

Cellulomonas fimi (145

Cellulomonas iranensis (86 Cellulomonas cellasea (301 C. xylanilytica (144)

Oerskovia turbata (429)

Oerskovia jenensis (175)

Cm. cellulans (329)

Pm. citrea (86)

Pm. sukumoe (86)

69B4 (ASP) mature (190)

Consensus (451)

501

69B4 (ASP) complete (488) YTMGLTLP (SEQ ID NO: 6)

Cellulomonas gelida (147) YTLGATTP (SEQ ID NO: 60)

Cellulomonas flavigena ( 186) ( SEQ ID NO: 54)

Cellulomonas biazotea (336) (SEQ ID NO: 56)

Cellulomonas fimi ( 145 ) (SEQ ID NO: 58 )

Cellulomonas iranensis (86) (SEQ ID NO: 62)

Cellulomonas cellasea (301 ) (SEQ ID NO : 64 )

C . xylanilytica ( 144 ) (SEQ ID NO: 66)

Oerskovia turbata ( 429) (SEQ ID NO : 68 )

Oerskovia jenensis ( 175) (SEQ ID NO: 70 )

Cm. cellulans (329) (SEQ ID NO: 72 )

Pm. citrea (86) (SEQ ID NO : 74 )

Pm. sukumoe ( 86) (SEQ ID NO: 76)

69B4 (ASP) mature (190) (SEQ ID NO -.8 )

Consensus (501) (SEQ ID NO: 647 )

EXAMPLE 6

Detection of Novel Homologues of 69B4 Protease by Immunoblotting

In this Example, immunoblotting experiments used to detect homologues of 69B4 are described. The following organisms were used in these experiments :

1. Cellulomonas biazotea DSM 20112

2. Cellulomonas flavigena DSM 20109

3. Cellulomonas fimi DSM 20113

4. Cellulomonas cellasea DSM 20118 5. Cellulomonas uda DSM 20107

6. Cellulomonas gelida DSM 20111

7. Cellulomonas xylanilytica LMG 21723

8. Cellulomonas iranensis DSM 14785

9. Oerskovia jenensis DSM 46000 10. Oerskovia turbata DSM 20577

11. Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 20424

12. Xylanibacterium ulmi LMG21721

13. Isoptericola variabilis DSM 10177

14. Xylanimicrobium pachnodae DSM 12657 15. Promicromonospora citrea DSM 43110

16. Promicromonospora sukumoe DSM 44121

17. Agromyces ramosus DSM 43045

The strains were first grown on Heart Infusion/skim milk agar plates (72 h, 30°C) to confirm strain purity, protease reaction by clearing of the skim milk and to serve as inoculum. Bacterial strains were cultivated on Brain Heart Infusion broth supplemented with casein (0.8% w/v) in 100/500 Erlenmeyer flasks with baffles at 230 rpm, 30°C for 5 days. Microbial growth was checked by microscopy. Supematants were separated from cells by centrifugation for 30 min at 4766 x g. Further solids were removed by centrifugation at 9500 rpm. Supematants were concentrated using Vivaspin 20 ml concentrator (Vivascience), cutoff 10 kDa, by centrifugation at 4000 x g. Concentrates were stored in aliquots of 0.5 mL at -20°C.

Primary antibody The primary antibody (EP034323) for the immunoblotting reaction, prepared by

Eurogentec (Liege Science Park, Seraing, Belgium) was raised against 2 peptides consisting of amino acids 151-164 and 178-189 in the 69B4 mature protease (SEQ ID NO:8), namely:

TSGGSGNCRTGGTT (epitope 1; SEQ ID NO:51) and LRMITTDSGSSP (epitope 2; SEQ ID NO:52) as shown underlined below in the amino acid sequence of 69B4 mature protease:

1 FDVIGGNAYT IGGRSRCSIG FAVNGGFITA GHCGRTGATT ANPTGTFAGS 51 SFPGNDYAFV RTGAGVNLLA QVNNYSGGRV QVAGHTAAPV GSAVCRSGST

Figure imgf000132_0001

Electrophoresis and Immunoblotting Sample preparation

1. Concentrated culture supernatant (50 μL)

2. PMSF (1 μL; 20 mg/ml)

3. 1M HCI (25 μL)

4. Nu PAGE LDS sample buffer (25 μL) (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) Mixed and heated at 90°C for 10 min.

Electrophoresis

SDS-PAGE was performed in duplicate using NuPAGE 10% Bis-Tris gels (Invitrogen) with MES-SDS running buffer at 100 v for 5 min. and 200 v constant. Where possible,25 μL sample were loaded in each slot. One gel of each pair was stained with Commassie Blue and the other gel was used for immunoblotting using the Boehringer Mannheim chromogenic Western blotting protocol (Roche). Immunoblotting

The transfer buffer used was Transfer buffer: Tris (0.25M) - glycine (1.92M) - methanol (20% v/v). The PVDF membrane was pre-wetted by successive moistening in methanol, deionized water, and finally transfer buffer.

The PAGE gel was briefly washed in deionized water and transferred to blotting pads soaked in transfer buffer, covered with pre-wetted PVDF membrane and pre-soaked blotting pads. Blotting was performed in transfer buffer at 400 mA constant for 2.5-3 h. The membrane was briefly washed (2x) in Tris buffered saline (TBS) (0.5M Tris, 0.15M NaCl, pH7.5). Non-specific antibody binding was prevented by incubating the membrane in 1% v/v mouse/rabbit Blocking Reagent (Roche) in maleic acid solution (100 mM maleic acid, 150 mM NaCl, pH7.5) overnight at 4°C.

The primary antibody used in these reactions was EP034323 diluted 1 :1000. The reaction was performed with the Ab diluted in 1% Blocking Solution with a 30 min. action time. The membrane was washed 4x 10 min. in TBST (TSB + 0.1 % v/v TWEEN®-20).

The secondary antibody consisted of anti-mouse/anti-rabbit IgG (Roche) 73 μL in 20 ml in 1% Blocking Solution with a reaction time of 30 min. The membrane was washed 4x 15 min. in TBST and the substrate reaction (alkaline phosphatase) performed with BM Chromogenic Western Blotting Reagent (Roche) until staining occurred. The results of the cross-reactivity with primary polyclonal antibody are shown in

Table 6-1.

Figure imgf000133_0001
Figure imgf000134_0001

Based on these results, it is clear that the antibody used in these experiments is highly specific at detecting homologues with a very high percentage of amino acid sequence identity to 69B4 protease. Furthermore, these results indicate that the C-terminal portion of the 69B4 mature protease chain is fairly variable especially in the region of the 2-peptide epitopes. In these experiments, it was determined that in cases where there were more than 2 amino acid differences in this region a negative Western blotting reaction resulted.

EXAMPLE 7

Inverse PCR and Genome Walking

In this Example, experiments conducted to elucidate polynucleotide sequences of ASP are described. The microorganisms utilized in these experiments were :

1. Cellulomonas biazotea DSM 20112

2. Cellulomonas flavigena DSM 20109

3. Cellulomonas fimi DSM 20113

4. Cellulomonas cellasea DSM 20118

5. Cellulomonas gelida DSM 20111

6. Cellulomonas iranensis (DSM 14785)

7. Oerskovia jenensis DSM 46000

8. Oerskovia turbata DSM 20577

9. Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 20424

10. Promicromonospora citrea DSM 43110 11. Promicromonospora sukumoe DSM 44121

These bacterial strains were cultivated on brain heart infusion broth or tryptone soya broth in 100/500 Erienmeyer flasks with baffles at 230 rpm, 30°C for 2 days. Cells were separated from the culture broth by centrifugation for 30 min at 4766 x g.

Chromosomal DNA was obtained by standard phenol/chloroform extraction method known in the art from cells digested by lysozyme/EDTA (See e.g., Sambrook et al., supra). Chromosomal DNA was digested with the restriction enzymes selected from the following list: Apal, BamHI, SssHII, Kpn\, Naή, Nco\, Nhe\, Pvu\, Sal\ or SstU.

The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these organisms are provided below. In these listings, the mature protease is indicated in bold and the signal sequence is underlined.

C. flavigena (DSM 20109)

1 GTCGACGTCA TCGGGGGCAA CGCGTACTAC ATCGGGTCGC GCTCGCGGTG CAGCTGCAGT AGCCCCCGTT GCGCATGATG TAGCCCAGCG CGAGCGCCAC 51 CTCGATCGGG TTCGCGGTCG AGGGCGGGTT CGTCACCGCG GGGCACTGCG GAGCTAGCCC AAGCGCCAGC TCCCGCCCAA GCAGTGGCGC CCCGTGACGC

101 GGCGCGCGGG CGCGAGCACG TCGTCACCGT CGGGGACCTT CCGCGGCTCG CCGCGCGCCC GCGCTCGTGC AGCAGTGGCA GCCCCTGGAA GGCGCCGAGC

151 TCGTTCCCCG GCAACGACTA CGCGTGGGTC CAGGTCGCCT CGGGCAACAC AGCAAGGGGC CGTTGCTGAT GCGCACCCAG GTCCAGCGGA GCCCGTTGTG

201 GCCGCGCGGG CTGGTGAACA ACCACTCGGG CGGCACGGTG CGCGTCACCG CGGCGCGCCC GACCACTTGT TGGTGAGCCC GCCGTGCCAC GCGCAGTGGC

251 GCTCGCAGCA GGCCGCGGTC GGCTCGTACG TGTGCCGATC GGGCAGCACG CGAGCGTCGT CCGGCGCCAG •CCGAGCATGC ACACGGCTAG CCCGTCGTGC 301 ACGGGATGGC GGTGCGGCTA CGTCCGGGCG TACAACACGA CCGTGCGGTA TGCCCTACCG CCACGCCGAT GCAGGCCCGC ATGTTGTGCT GGCACGCCAT

351 CGCGGAGGGC TCGGTCTCGG GCCTCATCCG CACGAGCGTG TGCGCCGAGC GCGCCTCCCG AGCCAGAGCC CGGAGTAGGC GTGCTCGCAC ACGCGGCTCG

401 CGGGCGACTC CGGCGGCTCG CTGGTCGCCG GCACGCAGGC CCAGGGCGTC GCCCGCTGAG GCCGCCGAGC GACCAGCGGC CGTGCGTCCG GGTCCCGCAG

451 ACGTCGGGCG GGTCCGGCAA CTGCCGCTAC GGGGGCACGA CGTACTTCCA TGCAGCCCGC CCAGGCCGTT GACGGCGATG CCCCCGTGCT GCATGAAGGT 50 1 GCCCGTGAAC GAGATCCTGC AGGACCAGCC CGGGCCGTCG ACCACGCGTG CGGGCACTTG CTCTAGGACG TCCTGGTCGG GCCCGGCAGC TGGTGCGCAC

55 1 CCCTA

GGGAT (SEQ ID NO : 53 )

Cellulomonas flavigena (DSM 20109)

1 VDVIGGNAYY IGSRSRCSIG FAVEGGFVTA GHCGRAGAST SSPSGTPRGS 51 SFPGNDYA V QVASGNTPRG LVNNHSGGTV RVTGSQQAAV GSYVCRSGST

10 1 TGWRCGYVRA YNTTVRYAEG SVSGLIRTSV CAEPGDSGGS LVAGTQAQGV

151 TSGGSGNCRY GGTTYFQPVN EILQDQPGPS TTRAL ( SEQ ID NO : 54 )

Cellulomonas biazotea (DSM 20112)

1 TAAAACAGAC GGCCAGTGAA TTTGTAATAC GACTCACTAT AGGCGAATTG ATTTTGTCTG CCGGTCACTT AAACATTATG CTGAGTGATA TCCGCTTAAC 51 AATTTAGCGG CCGCGAATTC GCCCTTACCT ATAGGGCACG CGTGGTCGAC

TTAAATCGCC GGCGCTTAAG CGGGAATGGA TATCCCGTGC GCACCAGCTG

101 GGCCCTGGGC TGGTACGTGG ACGTCACTAC CAACACGGTC GTCGTCAACG CCGGGACCCG ACCATGCAGC TGCAGTGATG GTTGTGCCAG CAGCAGTTGC

151 CCACCGCCCT CGCCGTGGCC CAGGCGACCG AGATCGTCGC CGCCGCAACG GGTGGCGGGA GCGGCACCGG GTCCGCTGGC TCTAGCAGCG GCGGCGTTGC

201 GTGCCCGCCG ACGCCGTCCG GGTCGTCGAG ACCACCGAGG CGCCCCGCAC CAGGGGCGGC TGCGGCAGGC CCAGCAGCTC TGGTGGCTCC GCGGGGCGTG

251 GTTCATCGAC GTCATCGGCG GCAACCGTTA CCGGATCAAC AACACCTCGC CAAGTAGCTG CAGTAGCCGC CGTTGGCAAT GGCCTAGTTG TTGTGGAGCG 301 GCTGCTCGGT CGGCTTCGCC GTCAGCGGCG GCTTCGTCAC CGCCGGGCAC

CGACGAGCCA GCCGAAGCGG CAGTCGCCGC CGAAGCAGTG GCGGCCCGTG

351 TGCGGCACGA CCGGCGCGAC CACGACGAAA CCGTCCGGCA CGTTCGCCGG ACGCCGTGCT GGCCGCGCTG GTGCTGCTTT GGCAGGCCGT GCAAGCGGCC 01 CTCGTCGTTC CCCGGCAACG ACTACGCGTG GGTGCGCGTC GCGTCCGGCA GAGCAGCAAG GGGCCGTTGC TGATGCGCAC CCACGCGCAG CGCAGGCCGT

451 ACACCCCGGT CGGCGCCGTG AACAACTACA GCGGCGGCAC CGTGGCCGTC TGTGGGGCCA GCCGCGGCAC TTGTTGATGT CGCCGCCGTG GCACCGGCAG

501 GCCGGCTCGA CGCAGGCGAC CGTCGGTGCG TCCGTCTGCC GCTCCGGCTC CGGCCGAGCT GCGTCCGCTG GCAGCCACGC AGGCAGACGG CGAGGCCGAG 551 CACCACGGGG TGGCGCTGCG GGACGATCCA GGCGTTCAAC TCCACCGTCA

GTGGTGCCCC ACCGCGACGC CCTGCTAGGT CCGCAAGTTG AGGTGGCAGT 601 ACTACGCGCA GGGCAGCGTC TCCGGCCTCA TCCGCACGAA CGTGTGCGCC TGATGCGCGT CCCGTCGCAG AGGCCGGAGT AGGCGTGCTT GCACACGCGG

651 GAGCCCGGCG ACTCCGGCGG CTCGCTCATC GCCGGCAACC AGGCCCAGGG CTCGGGCCGC TGAGGCCGCC GAGCGAGTAG CGGCCGTTGG TCCGGGTCCC

701 CCTGACGTCC GGCGGGTCGG GCAACTGCAC CACCGGCGGG ACGACGTACT GGACTGCAGG CCGCCCAGCC CGTTGACGTG GTGGCCGCCC TGCTGCATGA 751 TCCAGCCCGT CAACGAGGCG CTCTCCGCCT ACGGCCTGAC GCTCGTCACG

AGGTCGGGCA GTTGCTCCGC GAGAGGCGGA TGCCGGACTG CGAGCAGTGC

801 TCGTCCGGCG GCGGCGGTGG CGGCGGCACG ACCTGCACCG GGTACGCGCG AGCAGGCCGC CGCCGCCACC GCCGCCGTGC TGGACGTGGC CCATGCGCGC

851 - GACCTACACC GGCTCGCTCG CCTCGCGGCA GTCCGCCGTC CAGCCGTCCG CTGGATGTGG CCGAGCGAGC GGAGCGCCGT CAGGCGGCAG GTCGGCAGGC

901 GCAGCTATGT GACCGTCGGG TCCAGCGGCA CCATCCGCGT CTGCCTCGAC CGTCGATACA CTGGCAGCCC AGGTCGCCGT GGTAGGCGCA GACGGAGCTG

951 GGCCCGAGCG GGACGGACTT CGACCTGTAC CTGCAGAAGT GGAACGGGTC CCGGGCTCGC CCTGCCTGAA GCTGGACATG GACGTCTTCA CCTTGGGCAG 1001 CGCGTGGGC ( SEQ I D NO : 55 )

GCGCACCCG

Cellulomonas biazotea (DSM 20112) 1 KQTASEFVIR LTIGELNLAA ANSPLPIGHA WSTALGWYVD VTTNTVVVNA

51 TALAVAQATE IVAAATVPAD AVRVVETTEA PRTFIDVIGG NRYRINNTSR

101 CSVGFAVSGG FVTAGHCGTT GATTTKPSGT FAGSSFPGND YAWVRVASGN

151 TPVGAVNNYS GGTVAVAGST QATVGASVCR SGSTTGWRCG TIQAFNSTVN

201 YAQGSVSGLI RTNVCAEPGD SGGSLIAGNQ AQGLTSGGSG NCTTGGTTYF 251 QPVNEALSAY GLTLVTSSGG GGGGGTTCTG YARTYTGSLA SRQSAVQPSG

301 SYVTVGSSGT IRVCLDGPSG TDFDLYLQKW NGSA ( SEQ ID NO : 56 )

Cellulomonas fimi (DSM 20113)

1 GTGGACGTGA TCGGCGGCGA CGCCTACTAC ATCGGCGGCC GCAGCCGCTG CACCTGCACT AGCCGCCGCT GCGGATGATG TAGCCGCCGG CGTCGGCGAC 51 TTCGATCGGG TTCGCCGTCA CCGGGGGCTT CGTGACCGCC GGGCACTGCG

AAGCTAGCCC AAGCGGCAGT GGCCCCCGAA GCACTGGCGG CCCGTGACGC

101 GCCGCACCGG CGCGGCCACG ACGAGCCCGT CGGGCACGTT CGCCGGCTCG CGGCGTGGCC GCGCCGGTGC TGCTCGGGCA GCCCGTGCAA GCGGCCGAGC

151 AGCTTCCCGG GCAACGACTA CGCGTGGGTG CGGGTCGCGT CGGGCAACAC TCGAAGGGCC CGTTGCTGAT GCGCACCCAC GCCCAGCGCA GCCCGTTGTG 201 GCCCGTCGGC GCGGTGAACA ACTACAGCGG CGGCACGGTC GCCGTCGCCG CGGGCAGCCG CGCCACTTGT TGATGTCGCC GCCGTGCCAG CGGCAGCGGC

5 251 GCTCGACCCA GGCCGCCGTC GGTGCGACCG TGTGCCGCTC GGGCTCCACC

CGAGCTGGGT CCGGCGGCAG CCACGCTGGC ACACGGCGAG CCCGAGGTGG

301 ACCGGCTGGC GGTGCGGCAC CATCCAGGCG TTCAACGCGA CCGTCAACTA TGGCCGACCG CCACGCCGTG GTAGGTCCGC AAGTTGCGCT GGCAGTTGAT0

351 CGCCGAGGGC AGCGTCTCCG GCCTCATCCG CACGAACGTG TGCGCCGAGC GCGGCTCCCG TCGCAGAGGC CGGAGTAGGC GTGCTTGCAC ACGCGGCTCG

401 CCGGCGACTC GGGCGGCTCG CTCGTCGCCG GCAACCAGGC GCAGGGCATG5 GGCCGCTGAG CCCGCCGAGC GAGCAGCGGC CGTTGGTCCG CGTCCCGTAC

451 ACGTCCGGCG GCTCCGACAA CTGC ( SEQ I D NO : 57 ) TGCAGGCCGC CGAGGCTGTT GACG o

Cellulomonas fimi (DSM 20113)

1 VDVIGGDAYY IGGRSRCSIG FAVTGGFVTA GHCGRTGAAT TSPSGTFAGS

51 SFPGNDYAWV RVASGNTPVG AVNNYSGGTV AVAGSTQAAV GATVCRSGST5 101 TGWRCGTIQA FNATVNYAEG SVSGLIRTNV CAEPGDSGGS LVAG ( SEQ ID

NO : 58 )

Cellulomonas gelida ( DSM 20111) 0 1 CTCGCGGGCA ACCAGGCGCA GGGCGTGACG TCGGGCGGGT CGGGCAACTG GAGCGCCCGT TGGTCCGCGT CCCGCACTGC AGCCCGCCCA GCCCGTTGAC

51 CTCGTCGGGC GGGACGACGT ACTTCCAGCC CGTCAACGAG GCCCTCCGGG

GAGCAGCCCG CCCTGCTGCA TGAAGGTCGG GCAGTTGCTC CGGGAGGCCC5

101 TGTACGGGCT CACGCTCGTG ACCTCTGACG GTGGGGGCAC CGAGCCGCCG

ACATGCCCGA GTGCGAGCAC TGGAGACTGC CACCCCCGTG GCTCGGCGGC

151 CCGACCGGGT GCCAGGGCTA TGCGCGGACC TACCAGGGCA GCGTCTCGGC0 GGCTGGCCCA CGGTCCCGAT ACGCGCCTGG ATGGTCCCGT CGCAGAGCCG

201 CGGGACGTCG GTCGCGCAGC CGAACGGTTC GTACGTCACG ACCGGGGGCG GCCCTGCAGC CAGCGCGTCG GCTTGCCAAG CATGCAGTGC TGGCCCCCGC5 251 GGACGCACCG GGTGTGCCTG AGCGGACCGG CGGGCACGGA CCTGGACCTG CCTGCGTGGC CCACACGGAC TCGCCTGGCC GCCCGTGCCT GGACCTGGAC

301 TACCTGCAGA AGTGGAACGG GTACTCGTGG GCCAGCGTCG CGCAGTCGAC ATGGACGTCT TCACCTTGCC CATGAGCACC CGGTCGCAGC GCGTCAGCTG0

351 GTCGCCTGGT GCCACGGAGG CGGTCACGTA CACCGGGACC GCCGGCTACT CAGCGGACCA CGGTGCCTCC GCCAGTGCAT GTGGCCCTGG CGGCCGATGA 401 ACCGCTACGT GGTCCACGCG TACGCGGGTT CGGGGGCGTA CACCCTGGGG TGGCGATGCA CCAGGTGCGC ATGCGCCCAA GCCCCCGCAT GTGGGACCCC

451 GCGACGACCC CG (SEQ ID NO: 59) CGCTGCTGGG GC

Cellulomonas gelida (DSM 20111 )

1 LAGNQAQGVT SGGSGNCSSG GTTYFQPVNE ALRVYGLTLV TSDGGGTEPP 51 PTGCQGYART YQGSVSAGTS VAQPNGSYVT TGGGTHRVCL SGPAGTDLDL

101 YLQKWNGYSW ASVAQSTSPG ATEAVTYTGT AGYYRYVVHA YAGSGAYTLG

151 ATTP (SEQ ID NO: 60)

Cellulomonas Iranensis (DSM 14785)

1 TTCCCCGGCA ACGACTACGC GTGGGTCCAG GTCGGGTCGG GCGACACCCC AAGGGGCCGT TGCTGATGCG CACCCAGGTC CAGCCCAGCC CGCTGTGGGG 51 CCGCGGCCTG GTCAACAACT ACGCGGGCGG CACCGTGCGG GTCACCGGGT GGCGCCGGAC CAGTTGTTGA TGCGCCCGCC GTGGCACGCC CAGTGGCCCA

101 CGCAGCAGGC CGCGGTCGGC GCGTACGTCT GCCGGTCGGG CAGCACGACG GCGΓCGTCCG GCGCCAGCCG CGCATGCAGA CGGCCAGCCC GTCGTGCTGC

151 GGCTGGCGCT GCGGCACCGT GCAGGCCTAC AACGCGTCGG TCCGCTACGC CCGACCGCGA CGCCGTGGCA CGTCCGGATG TTGCGCAGCC AGGCGATGCG

201 CGAGGGCACC GTCTCGGGCC TCATCCGCAC CAACGTCTGC GCCGAGCCCG GCTCCCGTGG CAGAGCCCGG AGTAGGCGTG GTTGCAGACG CGGCTCGGGC

251 GCGACTC (SEQ ID NO: 61) CGCTGAG

Cellulomonas iranensis (DSM 14785)

1 FPGNDYAWVQ VGSGDTPRGL VNNYAGGTVR VTGSQQAAVG AYVCRSGSTT 51 GWRCGTVQAY NASVRYAEGT VSGLIRTNVC AEPGD (SEQ ID NO: 62)

Cellulomonas cellasea (DSM 20118) 1 GTCGGGCGGG TCCGGCAACT GCCGCTACGG GGGCACGACG TACTTCCAGC CAGCCCGCCC AGGCCGTTGA CGGCGATGCC CCCGTGCTGC ATGAAGGTCG

51 CCGTGAACGA GATCCTGCAG GCCTACGGTC TGCGTCTCGT CCTGGGCTGA GGCACTTGCT GTAGGAGGTC CGGATGCCAG ACGCAGAGCA GGACCCGACT

101 CACGCTCGCG GCGGGCCCGG CTCGACGCGG CCGGCCCGTC GGCCCGGGTC GTGCGAGCGC CGCCCGGGCC GAGCTGCGCC GGCCGGGCAG CCGGGCCCAG

151 GCCGCCTGGT ACGTCGACGT GCCGACCAAC AAGCTCGTCG TCGAGTCGGT CGGCGGACCA TGCAGCTGCA CGGCTGGTTG TTCGAGCAGC AGCTCAGCCA

201 CGGCGACACC GCGGCGGCCG CCGACGCCGT CGCCGCCGCG GGCCTGCCTG GCCGCTGTGG CGCCGCCGGC GGCTGCGGCA GCGGCGGCGC CCGGACGGAC

251 CCGACGCCGT GACGCTCGCG ACCACCGAGG CGCCACGGAC GTTCGTCGAC GGCTGCGGCA CTGCGAGCGC TGGTGGCTCC GCGGTGCCTG CAAGCAGCTG

301 GTCATCGGCG GCAACGCGTA CTACATCAAC GCGAGCAGCC GCTGCTCGGT CAGTAGCCGC CGTTGCGCAT GATGTAGTTG CGCTCGTCGG CGACGAGCCA 351 CGGCTTCGCG GTCGAGGGCG GGTTCGTCAC CGCGGGCCAC TGCGGGCGCG

GCCGAAGCGC CAGCTCCCGC CCAAGCAGTG GCGCCCGGTG ACGCCCGCGC

401 CGGGCGCGAG CACGTCGTCA CCGTCGGGGA CCTTCCGCGG CTCGTCGTTC GCCCGCGCTC GTGCAGCAGT GGCAGCCCCT GGAAGGCGCC GAGCAGCAAG

451 CCCGGCAACG ACTACGCGTG GGTCCAGGTC GCCTCGGGCA ACACGCCGCG GGGCCGTTGC TGATGCGCAC CCAGGTCCAG CGGAGCCCGT TGTGCGGCGC

501 CGGGCTGGTG AACAACCACT CGGGCGGCAC GGTGCGCGTC ACCGGCTGGC GCCCGACCAC TTGTTGGTGA GCCCGCCGTG CCACGCGCAG TGGCCGAGCG

551 AGCAGGCCGC GGTCGGCTCG TACGTGTGCC GATCGGGCAG CACGACGGGA TCGTCCGGCG CCAGCCGAGC ATGCACACGG CTAGCCCGTC GTGCTGCCCT 601 TGGCGGTGCG GCTACGTCCG GGCGTACAAC ACGACCGTGC GGTACGCGGA

ACCGCCACGC CGATGCAGGC CCGCATGTTG TGCTGGCACG CCATGCGCCT

651 GGGCTCGGTC TCGGGCCTCA TCCGCACGAG CGTGTGCGCC GAGCCGGGCG CCCGAGCCAG AGCCCGGAGT AGGCGTGCTC GCACACGCGG CTCGGCCCGC

701 ACTCCGGCGG CTCGCTGGTC GCCGGCACGC AGGCCCAGGG CGTCACGTCG TGAGGCCGCC GAGCGACCAG CGGCCGTGCG TCCGGGTCCC GCAGTGCAGC

751 GGCGGGTCCG GCAACTGCCG CTACGGGGGC ACGACGTACT TCCAGCCCGT CCGCCCAGGC CGTTGACGGC GATGCCCCCG TGCTGCATGA AGGTCGGGCA

801 GAACGAGATC CTGCAGGCCT ACGGTCTGCG TCTCGTCCTG GGCTGACACG CTTGCTCTAG GACGTCCGGA TGCCAGACGC AGAGCAGGAC CCGACTGTGC 851 CTCGCGGCGG GCCCTCCCCT GCCCGTCGCG CGCCGGCCCC ACCAGCCCGG

GAGCGCCGCC CGGGAGGGGA CGGGCAGCGC GCGGCCGGGG TGGTCGGGCC

901 GCCG ( SEQ I D NO : 63 ) CGGC

Cellulomonas cellasea (DSM 20118) 1 VGRVRQLPLR GHDVLPARER DPAGLRSASR PGLTRSRRAR LDAAGPSARV

51 AAWYVDVPTN KLVVESVGDT AAAADAVAAA GLPADAVTLA TTEAPRTFVD

101 VIGGNAYYIN ASSRCSVGFA VEGGFVTAGH CGRAGASTSS PSGTFRGSSF

151 PGNDYAWVQV ASGNTPRGLV NNHSGGTVRV TGSQQAAVGS YVCRSGSTTG

201 WRCGYVRAYN TTVRYAEGSV SGLIRTSVCA EPGDSGGSLV AGTQAQGVTS

251 GGSGNCRYGG TTYFQPVNEI LQAYGLRLVL G*HARGGPSP ARRAPAPPAR

301 A ( SEQ ID N0 : 64 )

Cellulomonas xylanilytica (LMG 21723)

1 CGCTGCTCGA TCGGGTTCGC CGTGACGGGC GGCTTCGTGA CCGCCGGCCA CTGCGGACGG TCCGGCGCGA CGACGACGTC GCCGAGCGGC ACGTTCGCCG

GCGACGAGCT AGCCCAAGCG GCACTGCCCG CCGAAGCACT GGCGGCCGGT GACGCCTGCC AGGCCGCGCT GCTGCTGCAG CGGCTCGCCG TGCAAGCGGC

101 GGTCCAGCTT TCCCGGCAAC GACTACGCCT GGGTCCGCGC GGCCTCGGGC AACACGCCGG TCGGTGCGGT GAACCGCTAC GACGGCAGCC GGGTGACCGT

CCAGGTCGAA AGGGCCGTTG CTGATGCGGA CCCAGGCGCG CCGGAGCCCG TTGTGCGGCC AGCCACGCCA CTTGGCGATG CTGCCGTCGG CCCACTGGCA 201 GGCCGGGTCC ACCGACGCGG CCGTCGGTGC CGCGGTCTGC CGGTCGGGGT

CGACGACCGC GTGGGGCTGC GGCACGATCC AGTCCCGCGG CGCGAGCGTC

CCGGCCCAGG TGGCTGCGCC GGCAGCCACG GCGCCAGACG GCCAGCCCCA GCTGCTGGCG CACCCCGACG CCGTGCTAGG TCAGGGCGCC GCGCTCGCAG

301 ACGTACGCCC AGGGCACCGT CAGCGGGCTC ATCCGCACCA ACGTGTGCGC CGAGCCGGGT GACrCCGGGG GGTCGCTGAT CGCGGGCACC CAGGCGCGGG

TGCATGCGGG TCCCGTGGCA GTCGCCCGAG TAGGCGTGGT TGCACACGCG GCTCGGCCCA CTGA.GGCCCC CCAGCGACTA GCGCCCGTGG GTCCGCGCCC

401 GCGTGACGTC CGGCGGCTCC GGCAACTGC ( SEQ I D NO : 65 ) CGCACTGCAG GCCGCCGAGG CCGTTGACG

Cellulomonas xylanilytica (LMG 21723)

1 RCSIGFAVTG GFVTAGHCGR SGATTTSPSG TFAGSSFPGN DYAWVRAASG

51 NTPVGAVNRY DGS VTVAGS TDAAVGAAVC RSGSTTAWGC GTIQSRGASV

101 TYAQGTVSGL IRTNTVCAEPG DSGGSLIAGT QARGVTSGGS GNC ( SEQ I D NO : 66 )

Oerskovia turbata (DSM 20577)

1 ATGGCACGAT CATTCT€GAG GACGCTCGCC ACGGCGTGCG CCGCGACGGC TACCGTGCTA GTAAGACCTC CTGCGAGCGG TGCCGCACGC GGCGCTGCCG ACTGGTTGCC GGCCCCGCAG CGCTCACCGC GAACGCCGCG ACGCCCACCC TGACCAACGG CCGGGGCGTC GCGAGTGGCG GTTGCGGCGC TGCGGGTGGG CCGACACCCC GACCGTTTCA CCCCAGACCT CCTCGAAGGT CTCGCCCGAG GGCTGTGGGG CTGGCAAAGT GGGGTCTGGA GGAGCTTCCA GAGCGGGCTC GTGCTCCGCG CCCTCCAGCG GGACCTGGGG CTGAGCGCCA AGGACGCGAC CACGAGGCGC GGGAGGTCGC CCTGGACCCC GACTCGCGGT TCCTGCGCTG GAAGCGTCTG GCGTTCCAGT CCGACGCGGC GAGCACCGAG GACGCTCTCG CTTCGCAGAC CGCAAGGTCA GGCTGCGCCG CTCGTGGCTC CTGCGAGAGC CCGACAGCCT GGACGCCTAC GCGGGCGCCT GGGTCGACCC TGCGAGGAAC GGCTGTCGGA CCTGCGGATG CGCCCGCGGA CCCAGCTGGG ACGCTCCTTG ACCCTGTACG TCGGCGTCGC GGACAGGGCC GAGGCCAAGG AGGTCCGTTC TGGGACATGC AGCCGCAGCG GCTGTCCCGG CTCCGGTTCC TCCAGGCAAG GGCCGGAGCG ACCCCCGTGG TCGTCGACCA CACGCTCGCC GAGCTCGACA CCGGCCTCGC TGGGGGCACC AGCAGCTGGT GTGCGAGCGG CTCGAGCTGT CGTGGAAGGC GGCGCTCGAC GGTGAGCTCA ACGACCCCGC GGGCGTCCCG GCACCTTCCG CCGCGAGCTG CCACTCGAGT TGCTGGGGCG CCCGCAGGGC AGCTGGTTCG TCGACGTCAC GACCAACCAG GTCGTCGTCA ACGTGCACGA TCGACCAAGC AGCTGCAGTG CTGGTTGGTC CAGCAGCAGT TGCACGTGCT CGGCGGACGC GCCCTCGCGG AGCTGGCTGC CGCGAGCGCG GGCGTGCCCG GCCGCCTGCG CGGGAGCGCC TCGACCGACG GCGCTCGCGC CCGCACGGGC CCGACGCCAT CACCTACGTG ACGACGACCG AGGCTCCTCG TCCCCTCGTC GGCTGCGGTA GTGGATGCAC TGCTGCTGGC TCCGAGGAGC AGGGGAGCAG GACGTGGTGG GCGGCAACGC GTACACCATG GGTTCGGGCG GGCGCTGCTC CTGCACCACC CGCCGTTGCG CATGTGGTAC CCAAGCCCGC CCGCGACGAG GGTCGGCTTC GCGGTGAACG GGGGCTTCAT CACGGCCGGG CACTGCGGCT CCAGCCGAAG CGCCACTTGC CCCCGAAGTA GTGCCGGCCC GTGACGCCGA CGGTCGGCAC CCGCACCTCG GGGCCGGGCG GCACGTTCCG GGGGTCGAAC GCCAGCCGTG GGCGTGGAGC CCCGGCCCGC CGTGGAAGGC CCCCAGCTTG TTCCCCGGCA ACGACTACGC CTGGGTGCAG GTCGACGCGG GTAACACCCC AAGGGGCCGT TGCTGATGCG GACCCACGTC CAGCTGCGCC CATTGTGGGG GGTCGGCGCG GTCAACAACT ACAGCGGTGG GCGCGTCGCG GTCGCAGGGT CCAGCCGCGC CAGTTGTTGA TGTCGCCACC CGCGCAGCGC CAGCGTCCCA CGACGGCCGC GCCCGTGGGG GCCTCGGTCT GCCGGTCCGG TTCCACGACG GCTGCCGGCG CGGGCACCCC CGGAGCCAGA CGGCCAGGCC AAGGTGCTGC GGCTGGCACT GCGGCACCAT CGGCGCGTAC AACACCTCGG TGACGTACCC CCGACCGTGA CGCCGTGGTA GCCGCGCATG TTGTGGAGCC ACTGCATGGG 951 GCAGGGCACC GTCTCGGGGC TCATCCGCAC GAACGTGTGC GCCGAGCCCG CGTCCCGTGG CAGAGCCCCG AGTAGGCGTG CTTGCACACG CGGCTCGGGC

1001 GCGACTCGGG CGGCTCGCTC CTCGCGGGCA ACCAGGCGCA GGGCGTGACC CGCTGAGCCC GCCGAGCGAG GAGCGCCCGT TGGTCCGCGT CCCGCACTGG

1051 TCGGGCGGGT CGGGCAACTG CTCGTCGGGC GGGACGACGT ACTTCCAGCC AGCCCGCCCA GCCCGTTGAC GAGCAGCCCG CCCTGCTGCA TGAAGGTCGG

1101 CGTCAACGAG GCCCTCGGGG GGTACGGGCT CACGCTCGTG ACCTCTGACG GCAGTTGCTC CGGGAGCCCC CCATGCCCGA GTGCGAGCAC TGGAGACTGC

1151 GTGGGGGCCC GAGCCGCCGC CGACCGGGTG CCAGGGCTAT GCGCGGACCT CACCCCCGGG CTCGGCGGCG GCTGGCCCAC GGTCCCGATA CGCGCCTGGA

1201 ACCAGGGCAG CGTCTCGGCC GGGACGTCGG TCGCGCAGCG AACGGTTCGT TGGTCCCGTC GCAGAGCCGG CCCTGCAGCC AGCGCGTCGC TTGCCAAGCA 1251 ACGTCACGAC CGGGGGCGGG CGACCGGGTG TGCC ( SEQ I D NO : 67 )

TGCAGTGCTG GCCCCCGCCC GCTGGCCCAC ACGG

Oerskovia turbata (DSM 20577) 1 ARSFWRTLA TACAATALVA GPAALTANAA TPTPDTPTVS PQTSSKVS PE

51 VLRALQRDLG LSAKDATKR AFQSDAASTE DALADSLDAY AGAWVDPARN

101 TLYVGVADRA EAKEVRSAGA TPVVVDHTLA ELDTWKAALD GELNDPAGVP

151 SWFVDVTTNQ WVNVHDGGR ALAELAAASA GVPADAITYV TTTEAPRPLV

201 DWGGNAYTM GSGGRCSVGF AVNGGFITAG HCGSVGTRTS GPGGTFRGSN 251 FPGNDYAWVQ VDAGNTPVGA VNNYSGGRVA VAGSTAAPVG ASVCRSGSTT

301 GWHCGTIGAY NTSVTYPQGT VSGLIRTNVC AEPGDSGGSL LAGNQAQGVT

351 SGGSGNCSSG GTTYFQPVNE ALGGYGLTLV TSDGGGPSRR RPGARAMRGP

401 TRAASRPGRR SRSERFVRHD RGRATGCA ( SEQ I D NO : 68 )

Oerskovia jenensis (DSM 46000)

1 GCCGCTGCTC GGTCGGCTTC GCGGTGAACG GCGGCTTCGT CACCGCAGGC

CGGCGACGAG CCAGCCGAAG CGCCACTTGC CGCCGAAGCA GTGGCGTCCG

51 CACTGCGGGA CGGTGGGCAC CCGCACCTCG GGGCCGGGCG GCACGTTCCG

GTGACGCCCT GCCACCCGTG GGCGTGGAGC CCCGGCCCGC CGTGCAAGGC

101 CGGGTCGAGC TTCCCCGGCA ACGACTACGC CTGGGTGCAG GTCGACGCGG GCCCAGCTCG AAGGGGCCGT TGCTGATGCG GACCCACGTC CAGCTGCGCC

151 GGAACACCCC GGTCGGGGCC GTCAACAACT ACAGCGGTGG ACGCGTCGCG CCTTGTGGGG CCAGCCCCGG CAGTTGTTGA TGTCGCCACC TGCGCAGCGC 201 GTCGCGGGCT CGACGGCCGC ACCCGTGGGT TCCTCGGTCT GCCGGTCCGG CAGCGCCCGA GCTGCCGGCG TGGGCACCCA AGGAGCCAGA CGGCCAGGCC 251 TTCCACGACG GGCTGGCGCT GCGGCACGAT CGCGGCCTAC AACAGCTCGG AAGGTGCTGC CCGACCGCGA CGCCGTGCTA GCGCCGGATG TTGTCGAGCC

301 TGACGTACCC GCAGGGGACC GTCTCCGGGC TCATCCGCAC CAACGTGTGC 5 ACTGCATGGG CGTCCCCTGG CAGAGGCCCG AGTAGGCGTG GTTGCACACG

351 GCCGAGCCGG GCGACTCGGG CGGCTCGCTC CTCGCGGGCA ACCAGGCACA CGGCTCGGCC CGCTGAGCCC GCCGAGCGAG GAGCGCCCGT TGGTCCGTGT 0 401 GGGCCTGACG TCGGGCGGGT CGGGCAACTG CTCGTCGGGC GGCACGACGT

CCCGGACTGC AGCCCGCCCA GCCCGTTGAC GAGCAGCCCG CCGTGCTGCA

451 ACTTCCAGCC CGTCAACGAG GCGCTCTCGG CCTACGGCCT CACGCTCGTG TGAAGGTCGG GCAGTTGCTC CGCGAGAGCC GGATGCCGGA GTGCGAGCAC5

501 ACCTCCGGCG GCAGGGGCAA CTGC (SEQ ID NO: 69) TGGAGGCCGC CGTCCCCGTT GACG o Oerskovia jenensis (DSM 46000)

1 RCSVGFAVNG GFVTAGHCGT VGTRTSGPGG TFRGSSFPGN DYAWVQVDAG

51 NTPVGAVNNY SGGRVAVAGS TAAPVGSSVC RSGSTTGWRC GTIAAYNSSV

101 TYPQGTVSGL IRTNVCAEPG DSGGSLLAGN QAQGLTSGGS GNCSSGGTTY

151 FQPVNEALSA YGLTLVTSGG RGNC ( SEQ I D NO : 70 ) 5

Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (DSM 20424) o 1 CCACGGGCGG CGGGTCGGGC AGCGCGCTCG TCGGGCTCGC GGGCAAGTGC

GGTGCCCGCC GCCCAGCCCG TCGCGCGAGC AGCCCGAGCG CCCGTTCACG

51 ATCGACGTCC CCGGGTCCGA CTTCAGTGAC GGCAAGCGCC TCCAGCTGTG

TAGCTGCAGG GGCCCAGGCT GAAGTCACTG CCGTTCGCGG AGGTCGACAC5

101 GACGTGCAAC GGGTCGCAGG CAGCGCTGGA CGTTCGAAGC CGACGGCACC

CTGCACGTTG CCCAGCGTCC GTCGCGACCT GCAAGCTTCG GCTGCCGTGG

151 GTACGCGCGG GCGGCAAGTG CATGGACGTC GCGTGGGCGC CGCGGCCGACo CATGCGCGCC CGCCGTTCAC GTACCTGCAG CGCACCCGCG GCGCCGGCTG

201 GGCACGGCGC TCCAGCTCGC GAACTGCACG GCAACGCGGC CCAGAAGTTC CCGTGCCGCG AGGTCGAGCG CTTGACGTGC CGTTGCGCCG GGTCTTCAAG 5 251 GTGCTCAACG GCGCGGGCGA CCTCGTGTCG GTGCTGGCGA ACAAAGTGCG

CACGAGTTGC CGCGCCCGCT GGAGCACAGC CACGACCGCT TGTTTCACGC

301 TCGACGCCGC CGGGTGCGCA CCGAGGTACT CGCGGCGCCG TACGAGCTCA AGCTGCGGCG GCCCACGCGT GGCTCCATGA GCGCCGCGGC ATGCTCGAGT 0

351 CGGCGACGTG CGCGGCGGCG ACCGCTACAT CACACGGGAC CCGGGCGCGT GCCGCTGCAC GCGCCGCCGC TGGCGATGTA GTGTGCCCTG GGCCCGCGCA 401 CGTCGGGCTC GGCCTGCTCG ATCGGGTACG CCGTCCAGGG CGGCTTCGTC

GCAGCCCGAG CCGGACGAGC TAGCCCATGC GGCAGGTCCC GCCGAAGCAG

451 ACGGCGGGGC ACTGCGGACG CGGCGGGACA AGGAGAGTGC TCACCGCGAG TGCCGCCCCG TGACGCCTGC GCCGCCCTGT TCCTCTCACG AGTGGCGCTC

501 CTGGGCGCGC ATGGGGACGG TCCAGGCGGC GTCGTTCCCC GGCCACGACT

GACCCGCGCG TACCCCTGCC AGGTCCGCCG CAGCAAGGGG CCGGTGCTGA 551 ACGCGTGGGT GCGCGTCGAC GCCGGGTTCT CCCCCGTCCC GCGGGTGAAC TGCGCACCCA CGCGCAGCTG CGGCCCAAGA GGGGGCAGGG CGCCCACTTG

601 AACTACGCCG GCGGCACCGT CGACGTCGCC GGCTCGGCCG AGGCGCCCGT

TTGATGCGGC CGCCGTGGCA GCTGCAGCGG CCGAGCCGGC TCCGCGGGCA

651 GGGTGCGTCG GTGTGCCGCT CGGGCGCCAC GACCGGCTGG CGCTGCGGCG

CCCACGCAGC CACACGGCGA GCCCGCGGTG CTGGCCGACC GCGACGCCGC

701 TCATCGAGCA GAAGAACATC ACCGTCAACT ACGGCAACGG CGACGTTCCC AGTAGCTCGT CTTCTTGTAG TGGCAGTTGA TGCCGTTGCC GCTGCAAGGG

751 GGCCTCGTGC GCGGCAGCGC GTGCGCGGAG GGCGGCGACT CGGGCGGGTC

CCGGAGCACG CGCCGTCGCG CACGCGCCTC CCGCCGCTGA GCCCGCCCAG 801 GGTGATCTCC GGCAACCAGG CGCAGGGCGT CACGTCGGGC AGGATCAACG

CCACTAGAGG CCGTTGGTCC GCGTCCGGCA GTGCAGCCCG TCCTAGTTGC

851 ACTGCTCGAA CGGCGGCAAG TTCCTCTACC AGCCCGATCG ACGGCCTGTC

TGACGAGCTT GCCGCCGTTC AAGGAGATGG TCGGGCTAGC TGCCGGACAG

901 GCTCGTGACC ACGGGCGGCG GGTCGGGCAG CGCGCTCGTC GGGCTCGCGG

CGAGCACTGG TGCCCGCCGC CCAGCCCGTC GCGCGAGCAG CCCGAGCGCC

951 GCAAGTGCAT CGACGTCCCC GGGTCCGACT TCAG (SEQ ID NO: 71) CGTTCACGTA GCTGCAGGGG CCCAGGCTGA AGTC

Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (DSM 20424) 1 PRAAGRAARS SGSRASASTS PGPTSVTASA SSCGRATGRR QRWTFEADGT

51 VRAGGKCMDV AWAPRPTARR SSSRTARQRG PEVRAQRRGR PRVGAGEQSA

101 STPPGAHRGT RGAVRAHGDV RGGDRYITRD PGASSGSACS IGYAVQGGFV

151 TAGHCGRGGT RRVLTASWAR MGTVQAASFP GHDYAWVRVD AGFSPVPRVN

201 NYAGGTVDVA GSAEAPVGAS VCRSGATTGW RCGVIEQKNI TVNYGNGDVP 251 GLVRGSACAE GGDSGGSVIS GNQAQGVTSG RINDCSNGGK FLYQPDRRPV

301 ARDHGRRVGQ RARRARGQVH RRPRVRLQ ( SEQ ID NO : 72 )

Promicromonospora citrea (DSM 43110)

1 TTCCCCGGCA ACGACTACGC GTGGGTGAAC ACGGGCACGG ACGACACCCT AAGGGGCCGT TGCTGATGCG CACCCACTTG TGCCCGTGCC TGCTGTGGGA 51 CGTCGGCGCC GTGAACAACT ACAGCGGCGG CACGGTCAAC GTCGCGGGCT GCAGCCGCGG CACTTGTTGA TGTCGCCGCC GTGCCAGTTG CAGCGCCCGA

101 CGACCCGTGC CGCCGTCGGC GCGACGGTCT GCCGCTCGGG CTCCACGACC GCTGGGCACG GCGGCAGCCG CGCTGCCAGA CGGCGAGCCC GAGGTGCTGG

151 GGCTGGCACT GCGGCACCAT CCAGGCGCTG AACGCGTCGG TCACCTACGC CCGACCGTGA CGCCGTGGTA GGTCCGCGAC TTGCGCAGCC AGTGGATGCG

201 CGAGGGCACC GTGAGCGGCC TCATCCGCAC CAACGTGTGC GCCGAGCCCG GCTCCCGTGG CACTCGCCGG AGTAGGCGTG GTTGCACACG CGGGTCGGGC

251 GCGACTC ( SEQ I D NO : 73 ) CGCTGAG

Promicromonospora citrea (DSM 43110) 1 FPGNDYAWVN TGTDDTLVGA VNNYSGGTVN VAGSTRAAVG ATVCRSGSTT

51 GWHCGTIQAL NASVTYAEGT VSGLIRTNVC AEPGD ( SEQ I D NO : 74 )

Promicromonospora sukumoe (DSM 44121)

1 TTCCCCGGCA ACGACTACGC GTGGGTGAAC GTCGGCTCCG ACGACACCCC AAGGGGCCGT TGCTGATGCG CACCCACTTG CAGCCGAGGC TGCTGTGGGG

51 GATCGGTGCG GTCAACAACT ACAGCGGCGG CACCGTGAAC GTCGCGGGCT CTAGCCACGC CAGTTGTTGA TGTCGCCGCC GTGGCACTTG CAGCGCCCGA

101 CGACCCAGGC CGCCGTCGGC TCCACCGTCT GCCGCTCGGG TTCCACGACC GCTGGGTCCG GCGGCAGCCG AGGTGGCAGA CGGCGAGGCC AAGGTGCTGG 151 GGCTGGCACT GCGGCACCAT CCAGGCCTTC AACGCGTCGG TCACCTACGC

CCGACCGTGA CGCCGTGGTA GGTCCGGAAG TTGCGCAGCC AGTGGATGCG

201 CGAGGGCACC GTGTCCGGCC TGATCCGCAC CAACGTGTGC GCCGAGCCCG GCTCCCGTGG CACAGGCCGG AGTAGGCGTG GTTGCAGACG CGGCTCGGGC

251 GCGACTC ( SEQ I D NO : 75 ) CGCTGAG

Promicromonospora sukumoe (DSM 44121)

1 FPGNDYAWVN VGSDDTPIGA VNNYSGGTVN VAGSTQAAVG STVCRSGSTT 51 GWHCGTIQAF NASVTYAEGT VSGLIRTNVC AEPGD (SEQ ID NO: 76)

Xylanibacterium ulmi (LMG 21721) 1 GCCGCTGCTC GATCGGGTTC GCCGTGACGG GCGGCTTCGT GACCGCCGGC CGGCGACGAG CTAGCCCAAG CGGCACTGCC CGCCGAAGCA CTGGCGGCCG

51 CACTGCGGAC GGTCCGGCGC GACGACGACG TCCGCGAGCG GCACGTTCGC GTGACGCCTG CCAGGCCGCG CTGCTGCTGC AGGCGCTCGC CGTGCAAGCG

101 CGGGTCCAGC TTTCCCGGCA ACGACTACGC CTGGGTCCGC GCGGCCTCGG GCCCAGGTCG AAAGGGCCGT TGCTGATGCG GACCCAGGCG CGCCGGAGCC 151 GAACACGCCG GTCGGTGCGG TGAACCGCTA CGACGGCAGC CGGGTGACCG

CTTGTGCGGC CAGCCACGCC ACTTGGCGAT GCTGCCGTCG GCCCACTGGC

201 TGGCCGGGTC CACCGACGCG GCCGTCGGTG CCGCGGTCTG CCGGTCGGGG ACCGGCCCAG GTGGCTGCGC CGGCAGCCAC GGCGCCAGAC GGCCAGCCCC

251 - TCGACGACCG CGTGGCGCTG CGGCACGATC CAGTCCCGCG GCGCGACGGT AGCTGCTGGC GCACCGCGAC GCCGTGCTAG GTCAGGGCGC CGCGCTGCCA

301 CACGTACGCC CAGGGCACCG TCAGCGGGCT CATCCGCACC AACGTGTGCG GTGCATGCGG GTCCCGTGGC AGTCGCCCGA GTAGGCGTGG TTGCACACGC

351 CCGAGCCGGG TGACTCCGGG GGGTCGCTGA TCGCGGGCAC CCAGGCGCAG GGCTCGGCCC ACTGAGGCCC CCCAGCGACT AGCGCCCGTG GGTCCGCGTG 401 GGCGTGACGT CCGGCGGCTC CGGCAACTGC ( SEQ ID NO : 77 )

CCGCACTGCA GGCCGCCGAG GCCGTTGACG

Xylanibacterium ulmi: (LMG 21721 ) 1 RCSIGFAVTG GFVTAGHCGR SGATTTSASG TFAGSSFPGN DYAWVRAASG

51 NTPVGAVNRY DGSRVTVAGS TDAAVGAAVC RSGSTTAWRC GTIQSRGATV 101 TYAQGTVSGL IRTNVCAEPG DSGGSLIAGT QAQGVTSGGS G (SEQ ID NO : 78 )

Inverse PCR

Inverse PCR was used to determine the full-length serine protease genes from chromosomal DNA of bacterial strains of the suborder Micrococcineae shown by PCR or immunoblotting to be novel homologues of the new Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 protease described herein.

Digested DNA was purified using the PCR purification kit (Qiagen, Catalogue # 28106), and self-ligated with T4 DNA ligase (Invitrogen) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Ligation mixtures were purified with the PCR purification kit (Qiagen) and a PCR was performed with primers selected from the following list; RV-1 Rest 5' - ACCCACGCGTAGTCGTTGCC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:79)

RV-1 Cellul 5' - ACCCACGCGTAGTCGTKGCCGGGG - 3' (SEQ ID NO:80)

RV-2 biaz-fimi 5' - TCGTCGTGGTCGCGCCGG - 3' (SEQ ID NO:81 )

RV-2 cella-flavi 5' - CGACGTGCTCGCGCCCG - 3' (SEQ ID NO: 82)

5 RV-2 cellul 5' - CGCGCCCAGCTCGCGGTG - 3' (SEQ ID NO:83)

RV-2 turb 5' - CGGCCCCGAGGTGCGGGTGCCG - 3' (SEQ ID NO:84)

Fw-1 biaz-fimi 5' - CAGCGTCTCCGGCCTCATCCGC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:85)

Fw-1 cella-flavi 5' - CTCGGTCTCGGGCCTCATCCGC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:86)

Fw-1 cellul 5' - CGACGTTCCCGGCCTCGTGCGC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:87) ιo Fw-1 turb 5' - CACCGTCTCGGGGCTCATCCGC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:88)

Fw-2 rest 5' - AGCARCGTGTGCGCCGAGCC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:89)

Fw-2 cellul 5' - GGCAGCGCGTGCGCGGAGGG - 3' (SEQ ID NO:90)

Fw-1 gelida 5' - GCCGCTGCTCGATCGGGTTC - 3' (SEQ ID NO:91)

Rv-1 gelida 5' - GCAGTTGCCGGAGCCGCCGGACGT - 3'. (SEQ ID NO:92)

15

The amplified PCR products were examined by agarose gel electrophoresis (0.8% agarose in TBE buffer (Invitrogen)). Distinct bands in the range 1.3 — 2.2 kbp for each organism were excised from the gel, purified using the Qiagen gel extraction kit and the sequence analyzed by BaseClear. Sequence analysis revealed that these DNA fragments 2o covered some additional parts of protease gene homologues to the Cellulomonas 69B4 protease gene.

Genome Walking Using Rapid Amplification of Genomic Ends (RAGE)

A genome walking methodology (RAGE) known in the art was used to determine the 25 full-length serine protease genes from chromosomal DNA of bacterial strains of the suborder Micrococcineae shown by PCR or immunoblotting to be novel homologues of the new Cellulomonas sp. 69B4 protease. RAGE was performed using the Universal GenomeWalker™ Kit (BD Biosciences Clontech), some with modifications to the manufacturer's protocol (BD Biosciences user manual PT3042-1 , Version # PR03300). 30 Modifications to the manufacturer's protocol included addition of DMSO (3 μL) to the reaction mixture in 50 μL total volume due to the high GC content of the template DNA and use of Advantage™ - GC Genomic Polymerase Mix (BD Biosciences Clontech) for the PCR reactions which were performed as follows;

S5 PCR 1 PCR 2

99°C - • 0.05 sec

94°C - 0.25 sec/72°C - 3.00 min 7 cycles 4 cycles

94°C - - 0.25 sec/67°C - 4.00 min 39 cycles 24 cycles

67°C - - 7.00 min

40 15°C - 1.00 min

PCR was performed with primers (Invitrogen, Paisley, UK) selected from the following list (listed in 5' to 3' orientation);

RV-1 Rest ACCCACGCGTAGTCGTTGCC (SEQ ID NO:79) RV-1 Cellul ACCCACGCGTAGTCGTKGCCGGGG (SEQ ID NO:80) RV-2 biaz-fimi TCGTCGTGGTCGCGCCGG (SEQ ID NO:81 ) RV-2 cella-flavi CGACGTGCTCGCGCCCG (SEQ ID NO:82) RV-2 cellul CGCGCCCAGCTCGCGGTG (SEQ ID NO:83) RV-2 turb CGGCCCCGAGGTGCGGGTGCCG (SEQ ID NO:84) Fw-1 biaz-fimi CAGCGTCTCCGGCCTCATCCGC (SEQ ID NO:85) Fw-1 cella-flavi CTCGGTCTCGGGCCTCATCCGC (SEQ ID NO:86) Fw-1 cellul CGACGTTCCCGGCCTCGTGCGC (SEQ ID NO:87) Fw-1 turb CACCGTCTCGGGGCTCATCCGC (SEQ ID NO:88)

Fw-2 rest AGCARCGTGTGCGCCGAGCC (SEQ ID NO:89)

Fw-2 cellul GGCAGCGCGTGCGCGGAGGG (SEQ ID NO:90) Fw-1 gelida GCCGCTGCTCGATCGGGTTC (SEQ ID NO:91 ) Rv-1 gelida GCAGTTGCCGGAGCCGCCGGACGT (SEQ ID NO:92) Flavi FW1 TGCGCCGAGCCCGGCGACTCCGGC (SEQ ID NO:93) Flavi FW2 GGCACGACGTACTTCCAGCCCGTGAAC (SEQ ID NO:94) Flavi RV1 GACCCACGCGTAGTCGTTGCCGGGGAACGACGA (SEQ ID NO:95) Flavi RV2 GAAGGTCCCCGACGGTGACGACGTGCTCGCGCC (SEQ ID NO:96) Turb FW1 CAGGCGCAGGGCGTGACCTCGGGCGGGTCG (SEQ ID NO:97) Turb FW2 GGCGGGACGACGTACTTCCAGCCCGTCAA (SEQ ID NO:98) Cellu RV1 CACCCACGCGTAGTCGTGGCCGGGGAACGA (SEQ ID NO:99) Cellu RV2 GAAGCCGCCCTGGACGGCGTACCCGATCGAGCA (SEQ ID NO:100) Cellu FW1 TGCGCGGAGGGCGGCGACTCGGGCGGGTCG (SEQ ID NO: 101 ) Cellu FW2 TTCCTCTACCAGCCCGTCAACCCGATCCTA (SEQ ID NO:102) Cella RV2 CGCCGCGGGGACGAACCCGCCCTCGACCGCGAA (SEQ ID NO: 103) Cella RV1 CGCGTAGTCGTTGCCGGGGAACGACGAGCC (SEQ ID NO: 104) Cella FW1 GGCCTCATCCGCACGAGCGTGTGCGCCGAG (SEQ ID NO: 105) Cella FW2 ACGTCGGGCGGGTCCGGCAACTGCCGCTACGGGGGC (SEQ ID NO: 106) Gelida RV1 GAGCCCGTACACCCGGAGGGCCTCGTTGACGGGCTGGAA (SEQ ID NO:107) Gelida RV2 CGTCACGCCCTGCGCCTGGTTGCCCGCGAG (SEQ ID NO:108) Gelida FW1 TCCAGCCCGTCAACGAGGCCCTCCGGGTGTACGGGCTC (SEQ ID NO:109) Gelida FW2 ACGTCGGTCGCGCAGCCGAACGGTTCGTACGTC (SEQ ID NO:110) Biazot RV1 CGTGGTCGCGCCGGTCGTGCCGCAGTGCCC (SEQ ID NO:111 ) Biazot RV2 GACGACGACCGTGTTGGTAGTGACGTCGACGTACCA (SEQ ID NO:112) Biazot FW1 TCCACCACGGGGTGGCGCTGCGGGACGATC (SEQ ID NO:113) Biazot FW2 GTGTGCGCCGAGCCCGGCGACTCCGGCGGC (SEQ ID NO:114)

Turb RV C-mature

GCTCGGGCCCCCACCGTCAGAGGTCACGAGCGTGAG (SEQ ID

NO:115)

Turb FW signal

ATGGCACGATCATTCTGGAGGACGCTCGCCACGGCG (SEQ ID NO:116)

Cellu internal FW

TGCTCGATCGGGTACGCCGTCCAGGGCGGCTTC (SEQ ID NO:117)

Cellu internal RV

TAGGATCGGGTTGACGGGCTGGTAGAGGAA (SEQ ID NO:118)

Biazot Int Fw TGGTACGTCGACGTCACTACCAACACGGTCGTCGTC (SEQ ID NO: 119) Biazot Int Rv 5' - GCCGCCGGAGTCGCCGGGCTCGGCGCACAC (SEQ ID MO: 120) flavi Nterm 5' - GTSGACGTSATCGGSGGSAACGCSTACTAC (SEQ ID NO:121 ) flavi Cterm 5' - SGCSGTSGCSGGNGANGA (SEQ ID NO:122) fimi Nterm 5' - GTSGAYGTSATCGGCGGCGAYGCSTAC (SEQ ID NO: 123) fimi Cterm 5' - SGASGCGTANCCCTGNCC (SEQ ID NO: 124)

The PCR products were subcloned in the pCR4-TOPO TA cloning vector (Invitrogen) and transformed to E.coli Top10 one-shot electrocompetent cells (Invitrogen). The transformants were incubated (37°C, 260 rpm, 16 hours) in 2xTY medium with 1O0 μg/ml ampicillin. The isolated plasmid DNA (isolated using the Qiagen Qiaprep pDNA isolation kit) was sequenced by BaseClear.

Sequence Analysis

Full length polynucleotide sequences were assembled from PCR fragment sequences using the ContigExpress and AlignX programs in Vector NTI suite v. 9.0.0 (Invitrogen) using the original polynucleotide sequence obtained in Example 4 as template and the ASP mature protease and ASP full-length sequence for alignment. The results for the polynucleotide sequences are displayed in Table 7-1 and the translated amino acid sequences are displayed in Table 7-2. For each of the natural bacterial strains the polynucleotide sequences and translated amino acid sequences for each of the homologous proteases are provided above.

Table 7-1 provides comparison information between ASP protease and various other sequences obtained from other bacterial strains. Amino acid sequence information for Asp- mature-protease homologues is available from 13 species: 1. , Cellulomonas biazotea DSM 20112

2. Cellulomonas flavigena DSM 20109

3. Cellulomonas fimi DSM 20113

4. Cellulomonas cellasea DSM 20118

5. Cellulomonas gelida DSM 20111 6. Cellulomonas iranensis DSM 147 '84

7. Cellulomonas xylanilytica LMG 21723

8. Oerskovia jenensis DSM 46000

9. Oerskovia turbata DSM 20577 9. Oerskovia turbata DSM 20577 10. Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 20424

11. Promicromonospora citrea DSM 43110 12. Promicromonospora sukumoe DSM 44121

13. Xylanibacterium ulmi LMG 21721

Notably, the sequence from Cellulomonas gelida at 48 amino acids is too short for useful consensus alignment. Sequence alignment against Asp-mature for the remaining 12 species are provided herein. To date, complete mature sequence has been determined for Oerskovia turbata, Cellulomonas cellasea, Cellulomonas biazotea and Cellulosimicrobium cellulans. However, there are some problems and sequence fidelity is not guaranteed for the sequence information known to the public, Cellulomonas cellasea protease is clearly homologous to Asp (61.4% identity). However, the sequencing of 10 independent PCR fragments of the C-terminal region all gives a stop codon at position 184, suggesting that there is no C-terminal prosequence. In addition, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is a close relative of Cellulomonas and clearly has an Asp homologous protease. However, the sequence identity is low, only 47.7%. It contains an insertion of 4 amino acids at position 43- 44 and it is uncertain where the N-terminus of the protein begins. Nonetheless, the data provided here clearly show that there are enzymes homologous to the ASP protease described herein. Thus, it is intended that the present invention encompass the ASP protease isolated from Cellulomonas strain 69B4, as well as other homologous proteases.

In this Table, the nucleotide numbering is based on full-length gene of 69B4 protease (SEQ ID NO:2), where nt 1 - 84 encode the signal peptide, nt 85 - 594 encode the N-terminal prosequence, nt 595 - 1161 encode the mature 69B4 protease, and nt 1162 - 1485 encode the C-terminal prosequence.

Figure imgf000151_0001
Figure imgf000152_0001

The following Table (Table 7-2) provides information regarding the translated amino acid sequence data in natural isolate strains compared with full-length ASP.

Figure imgf000152_0002
Figure imgf000153_0001

These results clearly show that bacterial strains of the suborder Micrococcineae, including the families Cellulomonadaceae and Promicromonosporaceae possess genes that are homologous with the 69B4 protease. Over the region of the mature 69B protease, the gene sequence identities range from about 60%-80%. The amino acid sequences of these homologous sequences exhibit about 45%-80% identity with the mature 69B4 protease protein. In contrast to the majority of streptogrisin proteases derived from members of the suborder Streptomycineae, these 69B4 (Asp) protease homologues from the suborder Micrococcineae possess six cysteine residues, which form three disulfide bridges in the mature 69B4 protease protein.

Indeed, in spite of the incomplete sequences provided herein and questions regarding fidelity, the present invention provides essential elements of the Asp group of proteases and comparisons with streptogrisins. Asp is uniquely Asp is characterized, along with Streptogrisin C, as having 3 disulfide bridges. In the following sequence, the Asp amino acids are printed in bold and the fully conserved residues are underlined. The active site residues are marked with # and double underlined. The cysteine residues are marked with * and underlined. The disulfide bonds are located between C17 and C38, C95 and C105, and C131 and C158.

8 17 20 25 30 32

X D V [I, V] G_G [N, D] [X9] CIS [I, V] G [F, Y1 AV X G G F [I, V] T A G H

33 35 40 45 50 55 60 C1G [X2] G [X2] T V [X4] G T F X G S S F P G N D Y A [F, W] V [X4]

65 72 75 80

[G, D] [X2] [L, P] [X3] V N [N, R] [Y, H] [S, D] G [G, S] [R, T] \λX V [A, T] G

85 90 95 100 105 - 164 - supematant were mixed with 1 volume 1M HCl, 1 volume 4xLDS sample buffer (Invitrogen, Cat.No. NP0007), and 1% PMSF (20 mg/ml) and subsequently heated for 10 minutes at 70°C. Then, 25 μL of each sample was loaded onto the gel, together with 10 μL of SeeBlue plus 2 pre-stained protein standards (Invitrogen, Cat.No. LC5925). The results clearly demonstrated that all asp cloning strategies described in this Example yield sufficient amounts of active Asp produced by B. subtilis.

In addition, samples of the same fermentation broths were assayed as follows: 10μl of the diluted supernatant was taken and added to 190 μl AAPF substrate solution (cone 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris/0.005% TWEEN®, pH 8.6). The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored (25°C), as it provides a measure of the ASP concentration produced. These results indicated that all of the constructs resulted in the production of measurable ASP protease.

The impact of the synthetic asp gene was investigated in Bacillus subtilis comparing the expression levels of the pHPLT-ASP-c-1-2 construct with the synthetic and native asp gene in a B. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degilHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK) strain. The native gene was amplified from plasmid containing the native asp gene, using platinum pfx polymerase (Invitrogen) with the following primers:

AK04-12.1 : ?el thru RBS TTATGCGAGGCTAGCAAAAGGAGAGGGTAAAGAGTGAGAAGCAAAAAACG (SEQ ID NO:165)

AK04-11 : RBS thru 5 aa aprE for ASP native C1 fusion in pHPLT taaagagtgagaagcaaaaaacgcacagtcacgcgggccctg (SEQ ID NO: 166)

AK04-13: Hpal 3' of native ASP mature gtcctctgttaacttacgggctgctgcccgagtcc (SEQ ID NO: 167)

The following conditions were used for these PCRs: 94°C for 2 min.; followed by 25 cycles of 94°C for 45 sec, 60°C for 30 sec, and 68°C for 2 min. for 30 sec; followed by 68°C for 5 min. The resulting PCR product was run on an E-gel (Invitrogen), excised, and purified with a gel extraction kit (Qiagen). Ligase reaction of this fragment containing the native ASP with the pHPLT vector was completed by using ligated (T4 DNA Ligase, NEB) and transformed directly into B. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degUHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA- comK). Transformation to B. subtilis was performed as described in WO 02/14490 A2, herein incorporated by reference. - 165 -

The Asp protein was produced by growth in shake flasks at 37°C in medium containing the following ingredients; 0.03 g/L MgSO4, 0.22 g/L K2HPO4, 21.3 g/L NA2HP04*7H2O, 6.1 g/L NaH2PO4*H2O, 3.6 g/L Urea, 7 g/L soymeal, 70 g/L Maltrin M150, and 42 g/L glucose, with a final pH7.5. In these experiments, the production level of the host carrying the synthetic gene cassette was found to be 3-fold higher than the host carrying the native gene cassette.

In additional experiments, expression of ASP was investigated in Bacillus subtilis using the sacB promoter and aprE signal peptide. The gene was amplified from plasmid containing the synthetic asp gene using TGO polymerase (Roche) and the primers:

CF 520 (+) Fuse ASP (pro) to aprE ss GCAACATGTCTGCGCAGGCTAACGAACCGGCTCCTCCAGGA (SEQ ID NO:168)

CF 525 (-) End of Asp gene Hindlll GACATGACATAAGCTTAAGGGGAACTTCCAGAGTC (SEQ ID NO:169)

The sacB promoter (Bacillus subtilis), the start of the messenger RNA (+1 ) from aprE, and the aprE signal peptide were amplified from the plasmid pJHsacBJ2 using TGO polymerase (Roche) and the primers:

CF 161 (+)EcoRI at start of sacB promoter GAGCCGAATTCATATACCTGCCGTT (SEQ ID NO:170)

CF 521 (-) Reverse complement of CF 520 TCCTGGAGGAGCCGGTTCGTTAGCCTGCGCAGACATGTTGC (SEQ ID NO: 171 )

The following PCR conditions were used to amplify both pieces: 94°C for 2 min. ; followed by 30 cycles of 94° C for 30 se , 50°C for 1 min., and 66°C for 1 min. ; followed by 72°C for 7 min. The resulting PCR products were run on an E-gel (Invitrogen), excised, and purified with a gel extraction kit (Qiagen).

In addition, a PCR overlap extension fusion (Ho, Gene, 15:51-59 [1989]) was used to fuse the above gene fragment to the sacB promoter-aprE signal peptide fragment with PFX polymerase (Invitrogen) using the following primers:

CF 161 (+)EcoRI at start of sacB promoter

GAGCCGAATTCATATACCTGCCGTT (SEQ ID NO: 170) 166

CF 525 (-) End of Asp gene Hind\\\ GACATGACATAAGCTTAAGGGGAACTTCCAGAGTC (SEQ ID NO:169) The following conditions were used for these PCRs:

94°C for 2 min.; followed by 25 cycles of 94°C for 45 sec, 60"C for 30 sec, and 68°C for 2 min. 30 sec; followed 68°C for 5 min. The resulting PCR fusion products were run on an E- gel (Invitrogen), excised, and purified with a gel extraction kit (Qiagen). The purified fusions were cut (EcoRI/H/ndlll) and ligated (T4 DNA Ligase, NEB) into an EcoRI/H/ndlll pJH101 (Ferrari et al., J. Bacteriol., 152:809-814 [1983]) vector containing a strong transcriptional terminator. The ligation mixture was transformed into competent E. coli cells (Top 10 chemically, competent cells, Invitrogen) and plasmid preps were done to retrieve the plasmid (Qiagen spin-prep).

The plasmid, pJHsacB-ASP (1-96 sacB promoter; 97-395 aprE +" through end of aprE ss; and 396-1472 pro+mature asp; See, sequence provided below) was transformed to B. subtilis . Transformation to β. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degUHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK) strain was performed as described in WO 02/14490 A2, herein incorporated by reference. The chromosomal DNA was extracted from an overnight culture of the strain (grown in LB media) then transformed to strain BG 3594 and named "CF 202." This strain produced a clear halo on the indicator plate (LA + 1.6% skim milk).

pJHsacB-ASP Sequence:

CATCACATATACCTGCCGTTCACTATTATTTAGTGAAATGAGATATTATGATATTTTCTG AATTGTGATTAAAAAGGCAACTTTATGCCCATGCAACAGAAACTATAAAAAATACAGAGA ATGAAAAGAAACAGATAGATTTTTTAGTTCTTTAGGCCCGTAGTCTGCAAATCCTTTTAT GATTTTCTATCAAACAAAAGAGGAAAATAGACCAGTTGCAATCCAAACGAGAGTCTAAT AGAATGAGGTCacaGAATAGTCTTTTAAGTAAGTCTACTCTGAATTTTTTTAAAAGGAGA GGGTAAAGAgtgAGAAGCAAAAAATTGTGGATCAGCTTGTTGTTTGCGTTAACGTTAATC TTTACGATGGCGTTCAGCAACATGTCTGCGCAGGCTaacgaaccggctcctccaggatctgcatcag cccctccacgattagctgaaaaacttgaccctgacttacttgaagcaatggaacgcgatctggggttagatgcagaggaagca gctgcaacgttagcttttcagcatgacgcagctgaaacgggagaggctcttgctgaggaactcgacgaagatttcgcgggcac gtgggttgaagatgatgtgctgtatgttgcaaccactgatgaagatgctgttgaagaagtcgaaggcgaaggagcaactgctgt gactgttgagcattctcttgctgatttagaggcgtggaagacggttttggatgctgcgctggagggtcatgatgatgtgcctacgtg gtacgtcgacgtgcctacgaattcggtagtcgttgctgtaaaggcaggagcgcaggatgtagctgcaggacttgtggaaggcg ctgatgtgccatcagatgcggtcacttttgtagaaacggacgaaacgcctagaacgatgttcgacgtaattggaggcaacgcat atactattggcggccggtctagatgttctatcggattcgcagtaaacggtggcttcattactgccggtcactgcggaagaacagg agccactactgccaatccgactggcacatttgcaggtagctcgtttccgggaaatgattatgcattcgtccgaacaggggcagg agtaaatttgcttgcccaagtcaataactactcgggcggcagagtccaagtagcaggacatacggccgcaccagttggatctg ctgtatgccgctcaggtagcactacaggttggcattgcggaactatcacggcgctgaattcgtctgtcacgtatccagagggaac agtccgaggacttatccgcacgacggtttgtgccgaaccaggtgatagcggaggtagccttttagcgggaaatcaagcccaag gtgtcacgtcaggtggttctggaaattgtcggacggggggaacaacattctttcaaccagtcaacccgattttgcaggcttacggc - 167 - ctgagaatgattacgactgactctggaagttcccctTAAGCTTAAAAAACCGGCCTTGGCCCCGCCGGTT TTTTATTATTTTTCTTCCTCCGCATGTTCAATCCGCTCCATAATCGACGGATGGCTCCCT CTGAAAATTTTAACGAGAAACGGCGGGTTGACCCGGCTCAGTCCCGTAACGGCCAAGT CCTGAAACGTCTCAATCGCCGCTTCCCGGTTTCCGGTCAGCTCAATGCCGTAACGGTC GGCGGCGTTTTCCTGATACCGGGAGACGGCATTCGTAATCGGATCCCGGACGCATCG TGGCCGGCATCACCGGCGCCACAGGTGCGGTTGCTGGCGCCTATATCGCCGACATCA CCGATGGGGAAGATCGGGCTCGCCACTTCGGGCTCATGAGCGCTTGTTTCGGCGTGG GTATGGTGGCAGGCCCCGTGGCCGGGGGACTGTTGGGCGCCATCTCCTTGCATGCAC CATTCCTTGCGGCGGCGGTGCTCAACGGCCTCAACCTACTACTGGGCTGCTTCCTAAT GCAGGAGTCGCATAAGGGAGAGCGTCGACCGATGCCCTTGAGAGCCTTCAACCCAGT CAGCTCCTTCCGGTGGGCGCGGGGCATGACTATCGTCGCCGCACTTATGACTGTCTTC TTTATCATGCAACTCGTAGGACAGGTGCCGGCAGCGCTCTGGGTCATTTTCGGCGAGG ACCGCTTTCGCTGGAGCGCGACGATGATCGGCCTGTCGCTTGCGGTATTCGGAATCTT GCACGCCCTCGCTCAAGCCTTCGTCACTGGTCCCGCCACCAAACGTTTCGGCGAGAA GCAGGCCATTATCGCCGGCATGGCGGCCGACGCGCTGGGCTACGTCTTGCTGGCGTT CGCGACGCGAGGCTGGATGGCCTTCCCCATTATGATTCTTCTCGCTTCCGGCGGCATC GGGATGCCCGCGTTGCAGGCCATGCTGTCCAGGCAGGTAGATGACGACCATCAGGGA CAGCTTCAAGGATCGCTCGCGGCTCTTACCAGCCTAACTTCGATCACTGGACCGCTGA TCGTCACGGCGATTTATGCCGCCTCGGCGAGCACATGGAACGGGTTGGCATGGATTG AGGCGCCGCCCTATACCTTATTTATGTTACAGTAATATTGACTTTTAAAAAAGGATTGAT TCTAATGAAGAAAGCAGACAAGTAAGCCTCCTAAATTCACTTTAGATAAAAATTTAGGAG GCATATCAAATGAACTTTAATAAAATTGATTTAGACAATTGGAAGAGAAAAGAGATATTT AATCATTATTTGAACCAACAAACGACTTTTAGTATAACCACAGAAATTGATATTAGTGTTT TATACCGAAACATAAAACAAGAAGGATATAAATTTTACCCTGCATTTATTTTCTTAGTGA CAAGGGTGATAAACTCAAATACAGCTTTTAGAACTGGTTACAATAGCGACGGAGAGTTA GGTTATTGGGATAAGTTAGAGCCACTTTATACAATTTTTGATGGTGTATCTAAAACATTC TCTGGTATTTGGACTCCTGTAAAGAATGACTTCAAAGAGTTTTATGATTTATACCTTTCT GATGTAGAGAAATATAATGGTTCGGGGAAATTGTTTCCCAAAACACCTATACCTGAAAA TGCTTTTTCTCTTTCTATTATTCCATGGACTTCATTTACTGGGTTTAACTTAAATATCAAT AATAATAGTAATTACCTTCTACCCATTATTACAGCAGGAAAATTCATTAATAAAGGTAATT CAATATATTTACCGCTATCTTTACAGGTACATCATTCTGTTTGTGATGGTTATCATGCAG GATTGTTTATGAACTCTATTCAGGAATTGTCAGATAGGCCTAATGACTGGCTTTTATAAT ATGAGATAATGCCGACTGTACTTTTTACAGTCGGTTTTCTAATGTCACTAACCTGCCCC GTTAGTTGAAGAAGGTTTTTATATTACAGCTCCAGATCCTGCCTCGCGCGTTTCGGTGA TGACGGTGAAAACCTCTGACACATGCAGCTCCCGGAGACGGTCACAGCTTGTCTGTAA GCGGATGCCGGGAGCAGACAAGCCCGTCAGGGCGCGTCAGCGGGTGTTGGCGGGTG TCGGGGCGCAGCCATGACCCAGTCACGTAGCGATAGCGGAGTGTATACTGGCTTAAC TATGCGGCATCAGAGCAGATTGTACTGAGAGTGCACCATATGCGGTGTGAAATACCGC ACAGATGCGTAAGGAGAAAATACCGCATCAGGCGCTCTTCCGCTTCCTCGCTCACTGA CTCGCTGCGCTCGGTCGTTCGGCTGCGGCGAGCGGTATCAGCTCACTCAAAGGCGGT AATACGGTTATCCACAGAATCAGGGGATAACGCAGGAAAGAACATGTGAGCAAAAGGC CAGCAAAAGGCCAGGAACCGTAAAAAGGCCGCGTTGCTGGCGTTTTTCCATAGGCTCC GCCCCCCTGACGAGCATCACAAAAATCGACGCTCAAGTCAGAGGTGGCGAAACCCGA CAGGACTATAAAGATACCAGGCGTTTCCCCCTGGAAGCTCCCTCGTGCGCTCTCCTGT TCCGACCCTGCCGCTTACCGGATACCTGTCCGCCTTTCTCCCTTCGGGAAGCGTGGCG CTTTCTCATAGCTCACGCTGTAGGTATCTCAGTTCGGTGTAGGTCGTTCGCTCCAAGCT GGGCTGTGTGCACGAACCCCCCGTTCAGCCCGACCGCTGCGCCTTATCCGGTAACTA TCGTCTTGAGTCCAACCCGGTAAGACACGACTTATCGCCACTGGCAGCAGCCACTGGT AACAGGATTAGCAGAGCGAGGTATGTAGGCGGTGCTACAGAGTTCTTGAAGTGGTGG CCTAACTACGGCTACACTAGAAGGACAGTATTTGGTATCTGCGCTCTGCTGAAGCCAG TTACCTTCGGAAAAAGAGTTGGTAGCTCTTGATCCGGCAAACAAACCACCGCTGGTAG - 168 -

CGGTGGTTTTTTTGTTTGCAAGCAGCAGATTACGCGCAGAAAAAAAGGATCTCAAGAAG ATCCTTTGATCTTTTCTACGGGGTCTGACGCTCAGTGGAACGAAAACTCACGTTAAGGG ATTTTGGTCATGAGATTATCAAAAAGGATCTTCACCTAGATCCTTTTAAATTAAAAATGA AGTTTTAAATCAATCTAAAGTATATATGAGTAAACTTGGTCTGACAGTTACCAATGCTTA

5 ATCAGTGAGGCACCTATCTCAGCGATCTGTCTATTTCGTTCATCCATAGTTGCCTGACT CCCCGTCGTGTAGATAACTACGATACGGGAGGGCTTACCATCTGGCCCCAGTGCTGCA ATGATACCGCGAGACCCACGCTCACCGGCTCCAGATTTATCAGCAATAAACCAGCCAG CCGGAAGGGCCGAGCGCAGAAGTGGTCCTGCAACTTTATCCGCCTCCATCCAGTCTAT TAATTGTTGCCGGGAAGCTAGAGTAAGTAGTTCGCCAGTTAATAGTTTGCGCAACGTTGo TTGCCATTGCTGCAGGCATCGTGGTGTCACGCTCGTCGTTTGGTATGGCTTCATTCAG CTCCGGTTCCCAACGATCAAGGCGAGTTACATGATCCCCCATGTTGTGCAAAAAAGCG GTTAGCTCCTTCGGTCCTCCGATCGTTGTCAGAAGTAAGTTGGCCGCAGTGTTATCAC TCATGGTTATGGCAGCACTGCATAATTCTCTTACTGTCATGCCATCCGTAAGATGCTTT TCTGTGACTGGTGAGTACTCAACCAAGTCATTCTGAGAATAGTGTATGCGGCGACCGA5 GTTGCTCTTGCCCGGCGTCAACACGGGATAATACCGCGCCACATAGCAGAACTTTAAA -AGTGCTCATCATTGGAAAACGTTCTTCGGGGCGAAAACTCTCAAGGATCTTACCGCTG TTGAGATCCAGTTCGATGTAACCCACTCGTGCACCCAACTGATCTTCAGCATCTTTTAC TTTCACCAGCGTTTCTGGGTGAGCAAAAACAGGAAGGCAAAATGCCGCAAAAAAGGGA ATAAGGGCGACACGGAAATGTTGAATACTCATACTCTTCCTTTTTCAATATTATTGAAGC0 ATTTATCAGGGTTATTGTCTCATGAGCGGATACATATTTGAATGTATTTAGAAAAATAAA CAAATAGGGGTTCCGCGCACATTTCCCCGAAAAGTGCCACCTGACGTCTAAGAAACCA TTATTATCATGACATTAACCTATAAAAATAGGCGTATCACGAGGCCCTTTCGTCTTCAA (SEQ ID NO:172) 5

Expression of the asp gene was investigated in a nine-protease delete Bacillus subtilis host. The plasmid pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 (See, Table 10-2, and Figure 9), was transformed into B. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, Aepr, AispA, Abpr, Avpr, AwprA,Ampr-ybfJ, AnprB) and

Figure imgf000158_0001
oppA, AspollE3501, amyE:(xylRPxylAcomK-ermC). Transformation0 was performed as known in the art (See e.g., WO 02/14490, incorporated herein by reference). The Asp protein was produced by growth in shake flasks at 37°C in MBD medium, a MOPS based defined medium. MBD medium was made essentially as known in the art (See, Neidhardt et al., J. Bacteriol., 119: 736-747 [1974]), except NH4CI2, FeSO4, and CaCI2 were left out of the base medium, 3 mM K2HPO4 was used, and the base5 medium was supplemented with 60 mM urea, 75 g/L glucose, and 1 % soytone. Also, the micronutrients were made up as a 100 X stock containing in one liter, 400 mg FeSO4 .7H2O, 100 mg MnSO4 .H2O, 100 mg ZnSO4.7H2O, 50 mg CuCI2.2H20, 100 mg CoCI2.6H2O, 100 mg NaMoO4.2H20, 100 mg Na2B4O7.10H2O, 10 ml of 1M CaCI2 , and 10 ml of 0.5 M sodium citrate. The expression levels obtained in these experiments wereo found to be fairly high.

In additional embodiments, "consensus" promoters such as those developed through site-saturation mutagenesis to create promoters that more perfectly conform to the - 169 - established consensus sequences for the "-10" and "-35" regions of the vegetative "sigma A- type" promoters for B. subtilis (See, Voskuil et al., Mol. Microbiol., 17:271-279 [1995]) find use in the present invention. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular consensus promoter, as it is contemplated that other promoters that function in Bacillus cells will find use in the present invention.

EXAMPLE 11 Protease Production in Bacillus clausii

In this Example, experiments conducted to produce protease 69B4 (also referred to as "Asp" herein) in B. clausii are described. In order to express the Asp protein in Bacillus clausii, it was necessary to use a prombter that "works in this alkaliphilic microorganism due to its unique regulation systems. The production profile of the alkaline serine protease of B. clausii PB92 (MAXACAL® protease) has shown that it has to have a strong promoter (referred to as "MXL-prom." herein; SEQ ID NOS:173, 174, and 175, See, Figure 18) with a delicate regulation. Besides the promoter region, also signal sequences (leader sequences) are known to be very important for secreting proteins in β. clausii. Therefore, 3 constructs were designed with the MAXACAL® protease promoter region and separate fusions of the MAXACAL® protease leader sequence and the Asp leader sequence in front of the N- terminal Pro and the mature Asp protein with 3, 6 and 27 amino acids of the MAXACAL® protease leader fused to 25, 25 and 0 amino acids of the Asp leader, respectively.

To make these constructs, amplification of DNA fragments needed to be done in order to enable the fusion. Therefore, PCRs were performed on both MAXACAL® protease and Asp template DNA with Phusion high fidelity polymerase (Finnzymes) according to the manufacturer's instructions. PCR reactions were executed with the following primers (bold indicates the

MAXACAL® protease part of the primer) synthesized at MWG-Biotech AG:

1 B. clau-3F: agggaaccgaatgaagaaacgaactgtcacaagagctctg (SEQ ID NO: 176) 2 B. clau-3R: cagagctcttgtgacagttcgtttcttcattcggttccct (SEQ ID NO:177) 3 B. clau-6F: aatgaagaaaccgttggggcgaactgtcacaagagctctg (SEQ ID NO: 178) 4 B. clau-6R: cagagctcttgtgacagttcgccccaacggtttcttcatt (SEQ ID NO:179) 5 B. clau-27F: agttcatcgatcgcatcggctaacgaaccggctcctccagga (SEQ ID NO: 180) 6 B. clau-27R: tcctggaggagccggttcgttagccgatgcgatcgatgaact (SEQ ID NO: 181) 7 B. clau-vector 5': tcaggqqqatcctagattctqttaacttaacgtt. (SEQ ID NO:182) - 170 -

This primer contains the Hpal-site (GTTAAC) from the promoter region and a βa/τ?HI-site (GGATCC) for cloning reasons (both underlined). pHPLT- /πdlll-R: gtgctgttttatcctttaccttgtct.ee (SEQ ID NO:183). The sequence of this primer lays just upstream of the H/nclll-site of pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 (See, TablelO-

2).

Figure imgf000160_0001

In Table 11-1, "pMAX4" refers to the template described in WO 88/06623, herein incorporated by reference. PCR fragments 3F3R, 6F6R, 27F27R were digested with both βamHI and Hind\\\. The digested PCR fragments were ligated with T4 ligase (Invitrogen) into βa HI + H/flα ll-opened plasmid pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 (See, Figure 18). The ligation product was transformed to competent B. subtilis cells ((AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degUHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK; See e.g., WO 02/14490, incorporated herein by reference) and selected on neomycin (20 mg/l). Heart Infusion-agar plates containing neomycin were used to identify neomycin resistant colonies. DNA of the B. subtilis transformants was isolated using Qiagen's plasmid isolation kit according to manufacture's instructions, and were tested on the appearance of the fused MAXACAL® protease-Asp fragment by their pattern after digestion with both Nco\ + Hpa\ together in one tube. The restriction enzymes used in this Example (i.e., βamHI, Hindl , Nco\ and Hpal) were all purchased from NEB, and used following the instructions of the supplier. DNA of B. subtilis transformants that showed 2 bands with restriction enzymes (Λ/col + Hpal) was used to transform protease negative B. clausii strain PBT142 protoplast cells (these were derived from PB92).

The protoplast transformation of B. clausii strain PBT142 was performed according - 171 - to the protocol mentioned for the protoplast transformation of B. alkalophilus (renamed β. clausii) strain PB92 in patent WO88/06623, herein incorporated by reference A modification to this protocol was the use of an alternative recipe for the regeneration plates, in that instead of 1.5% agar, 8.0 g/l Gelrite gellam gum (Kelco) was used. In addition, instead of 1000 mg/l neomycin, 20 mg/l neomycin was used as described by Van der Laan et al., (Van der Laan et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 57:901-909 [1991]).

DNA from all 3 constructs isolated from B. subtilis (see above) was transformed into β. clausii PBT142 protoplasts using the same protocol as above. Transformants in B. clausii PBT142 were selected by replica-plating on Heart Infusion agar plates containing 20 mg/l neomycin. The β. clausii strains with the different construct were produced as indicated in Table 11-2.

Figure imgf000161_0001

These 3 strains were fermented in shake flasks containing 100 ml Synthetic

Maxatase Medium (SMM) (See, U.S. Pat. No. 5,324,653, herein incorporated by reference). However, instead of 0.97 g/l CaCI2.6H20, 0.5 g/l CaCI2 was used. Also, instead of 0.5 ml/l antifoam 5693, 0.25 ml/l Basildon was used. The 100 ml SSM shake flasks were inoculated with 0.2 ml of a pre-culture of the 3 B. clausii strains containing the leader constructs in 10 ml TSB (Trypton Soya Broth) with 20 mg/l neomycin. The protease production values were measured via the AAPF-assay (as described above) after growth in the shake flasks for 3 days. The results indicated that these constructs were able to express protease with proteolytic activity.

In an additional experiment, integration of the leader construct with the entire MAXACAL® protease leader length (27 amino acids) was investigated. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular mechanism.

Stable integration of heterologous DNA in the B. alcalophilus (now, β. clausii) chromosome is described in several publications (See e.g., WO 88/06623, and Van der - 172 -

Laan et al., supra). The procedure described in patent WO 88/06623 for integration of 1 or 2 copies of the MAXACAL® protease gene in the chromosome of β. alcalophilus (now, B. clausii) was used to integrate at least 1 copy of the asp gene in the chromosome of B. clausii PBT142. However, a derivative of pE194-neo: pENM#3 (See, Figure 19) was used instead of the integration vector pE194-neo (to make pMAX4 containing the MAXACAL® protease gene). In the integration vector pENM#3, the Asp leader PCR product 27F27R was cloned in the unique blunt end site Hpal in between the 5' and the 3' flanking regions of the MAXACAL® protease gene. Therefore, 27F27R was made blunt-ended as follows: it was first digested with Hpal (5'end), purified with the Qiagen PCR purification kit, and then digested with HindlW (3'end). This treated PCR fragment 27F27R was purified again after Hind\\\ digestion (using the same Qiagen kit) and filled in with dNTP's using T4 polymerase (Invitrogen) and purified again with Qiagen kit. The Hpal-opened pENM#3 and the blunt- ended PCR product 27F27R were ligated with T4 ligase (Invitrogen). The ligation product was transformed directly to B. clausii PBT142 protoplasts and selected after replica-plating on HI agar plates with 20 mg/l neomycin. Two transformants with the correct orientation of the asp gene in the integration vector were identified and taken into the integration procedure as described in patent WO 88/06623. Selections were done at 2 mg/l and 20 mg/l neomycin for integration in the MAXACAL® protease locus and at an illegitimate locus, respectively. These results indicated that β. clausii is also suitable as an expression host for the Asp protease.

EXAMPLE 12 Protease Production in B. licheniformis

In this Example, experiments conducted to produce protease 69B4 in B. licheniformis are described. During these experiments, various expression constructs were created to produce protease 69B4 protease (also referred to as "ASP protease") in Bacillus licheniformis. Constructs were cloned into expression plasmid pHPLT (replicating in Bacillus) and/or into integration vector plCatH. Plasmid pHPLT (See, Figure 17; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,562,612 [herein incorporated by reference) is a pUB110 derivative, has a neomycin resistance marker for selection, and contains the B. licheniformis α-amylase (LAT) promoter (PLAT), a sequence encoding the LAT signal peptide (preLAT), followed by Pst\ and Hpal restriction sites for cloning and the LAT transcription terminator. The plCatH vector - 173 -

(See, Figure 20) contains a temperature sensitive origin of replication (ori pE194, for replication in Bacillus), ori pBR322 (for amplification in E. coli), a neomycin resistance gene for selection, and the native β. licheniformis chloramphenicol resistance gene (cat) with repeats for selection, chromosomal integration and cassette amplification. Construct ASPd was created as a Pst\-Hpa\ fragment by fusion PCR with High

Fidelity Platinum Taq Polymerase (Invitrogen) according to the manufacturer's instructions, and with the following primers:

pHPLT-βg/ll_FW AGTTAAGCAATCAGATCTTCTTCAGGTTA (SEQ ID NO:184)

fusionC1_FW CATTGAAAGGGGAGGAGAATCATGAGAAGCAAGAAGCGAACTGTCAC (SEQ ID NO:185)

fusiond _RV GTGACAGTTCGCTTCTTGCTTCTCATGATTCTCCTCCCCTTTCAATG (SEQ ID NO:186)

pHPLT-Hπdlll_RV CTTTACCTTGTCTCCAAGCTTAAAATAAAAAAACGG (SEQ ID NO:187)

These primers were obtained from MWG Biotech. PCR reactions were typically performed on a thermocycler for 30 cycles with High Fidelity Platinum Taq polymerase (Invitrogen) according to the manufacturer's instructions, with annealing temperature of 55°C. PCR-i was performed with the primers pHPLT-Bglll_FW and fusionC1_RV on pHPLT as template DNA. PCR-II was performed with primers fusionC1_FW and pHPLTHindlll_RV on plasmid pHPLT-ASP-C1-2. The fragments from PCR-I and PCR-II were assembled in a fusion PCR with the primers pHPLT-Bglll_FW and pHPLT-Hindlll_RV. This final PCR fragment was purified using the Qiagen PCR purification kit, digested with βg/ll and H/ndlll, and ligated with T4 DNA ligase according to the manufacturers' instructions into βg/ll and H/ndlll digested pHPLT. The ligation mixture was transformed into B. subtilis strain OS14 as known in the art (See, U.S. Pat. Appl. No. US20020182734 and WO 02/14490, both of which are incorporated herein by reference). Correct transformants produced a halo on a skimmed milk plate and one of them was selected to isolate plasmid pHPLT-ASPc This plasmid was introduced into B. licheniformis host BML780 (BRA7 derivative, cat-, amyL-, spo-, aprL-, endoGluC-) by protoplast transformation as known in the art (See, Pragai et al., Microbiol., 140:305-310 [1994]). Neomycin resistant transformants formed halos on skim - 174 - plates, whereas the parent strain without pHPLT-ASPd did not. This result shows that B. licheniformis is capable of expressing and secreting ASP protease when expression is driven by the LAT promoter and when it is fused to a hybrid signal peptide (MRSKKRTVTRALAVATAAATLLAGGMAAQA; SEQ ID NO: 135). Construct ASPc3 was created as a Pst\-Hpa\ fragment by fusion PCR (necessary to remove the internal Psfl site in the synthetic asp gene) as described above with the following primers:

ASPdelPsfl_FW GCGCAGGATGTAGCAGCTGGACTTGTGG (SEQ ID NO:188)

ASPdelPsfl_RV CCACAAGTCCAGCTGCTACATCCTGCGC (SEQ ID NO:189)

AspPsfl_FW GCCTCATTCTGCAGCTTCAGCAAACGAACCGGCTCCTCCAGG

(SEQ ID NO:190)

AspHpal_RV CGTCCTCTGTTAACTCAGTCGTCACTTCCAGAGTCAGTCGTAATC

(SEQ ID NO:191)

After purification, the PCR product was digested with Psfl-Hpal and ligated into Pstl and Hpal digested pHPLT and then transformed into B. subtilis strain OS14. Plasmid pHPLT-ASPc3 was isolated from a neomycin resistant that formed a relatively (compared to other transformants) large halo on a skim milk plate. Plasmid DNA was isolated using the Qiagen plasmid purification kit and sequenced by BaseClear.

Sequencing confirmed that the ASPc3 construct encodes mature ASP that has two aspartic acid residues at the extreme C-terminal end (S188D, P189D). These mutations were deliberately introduced by PCR to make the C-terminus of ASP less susceptible against proteolytic degradation (See, WO 02055717). It also appeared that two mutations were introduced into the coding region of the N-terminal pro region by the PCR methods. These mutations caused two amino acid changes in the N-terminal pro-region: L42I and Q141 P. Since this particular clone with these two pro(N) mutations gives a somewhat larger halo than other clones without these mutations, it was contemplated that expression and/or secretion of ASP protease in Bacillus is positively affected by these N-terminal pro mutations. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to these specific mutations, as it is also contemplated that further mutations will find use in the present invention.

Next, pHPLT-ASPc3 was transformed into BML780 as described above. In contrast to the parental strain without the plasmid, BML780(pHLPT-ASPc3) produced a halo on a - 175 - skim milk plate indicating that also this ASPc3 construct leads to ASP expression in B. licheniformis. To make an integrated, amplified strain containing the ASPc3 expression cassette, the C3 construct was amplified from pHPLT-ASPc3 with the following primers:

EBS2Xt?ol_FW ATCCTACTCGAGGCTTTTCTTTTGGAAGAAAATATAGGG (SEQ ID NO:192)

EBS2X70l_RV TGGAATCTCGAGGTTTTATCCTTTACCTTGTCTCC (SEQ ID

NO:193)

The PCR product was digested with XΛol, ligated into Xr?ol-digested plCatH (See, Figure 20) and transformed into B. subtilis OS14 as described above. The plasmid from an ASP expressing clone Gudged by halo formation on skim milk plates) was isolated and designated plCatH-ASPc3. DNA sequencing by BaseClear confirmed that no further mutations were introduced in the ASPc3 cassette in plCatH-ASPC3. The plasmid was then transformed into BML780 at the permissive temperature (37 °C) and one neomycin resistant (neoR) and chloramphenicol resistant (capR) transformant were selected and designated BML780(plCatH-ASPc3). The plasmid in BML780(plCatH-ASPc3) was integrated into the cat region on the B. licheniformis genome by growing the strain at a non-permissive temperature (50 °C) in medium with chloramphenicol. One capR resistant clone was selected and designated BML780-plCatH-ASPc3. BML780-plCatH-ASPc3 was grown again at the permissive temperature for several generations without antibiotics to loop-out vector sequences and then one neomycin sensitive (neoS), capR clone was selected. In this clone, vector sequences of plCatH on the chromosome were excised (including the neomycin resistance gene) and only the ASPc3-cat cassette was left. Note that the cat gene is a native β. licheniformis gene and that the asp gene is the only heterologous piece of DNA introduced into the host. Next, the ASPc3-cat cassette on the chromosome was amplified by growing the strain in/on media with increasing concentrations of chloramphenicol. After various rounds of amplification, one clone (resistant against 75 μg/ml chloramphenicol) was selected and designated "BML780-ASPc3." This clone produced a clear halo on a skim milk plate, whereas the parental strain BML780 did not, indicating that ASP protease is produced and secreted by the BML780-ASPc3 strain. Construct ASPc4 is similar to ASPc3, but ASP protease expressed from ASPc4 does not have two aspartic acid residues at the C-terminal end of the mature chain. ASPc4 was created by amplification of the asp gene in pHPLT-ASPc3 with the following Hypur primers from MWG Biotech (Germany): 176

XhoPlatPREIat_FW acccccctcgaggcttttcttttggaagaaaatatagggaaaatggtacttgttaaaaattcggaatatttatacaatatcatatgtttc acattgaaaggggaggagaatcatgaaacaacaaaaacggctttac (SEQ ID NO: 194)

ASPendTERMXhol_RV gtcgacctcgaggttttatcctttaccttgtctccaagcttaaaataaaaaaacggatttccttcaggaaatccgtcctctgttaactc aaggggaacttccagagtcagtcgtaatc (SEQ ID NO: 195)

The ASPc4 PCR product was purified and digested with Xho\, ligated into Xho\- digested plCatH, and transformed into B. subtilis OS14 as described above for ASPc3. Plasmid was isolated from a neoR, capR clone and designated plCatH-ASPc4. plCatH- ASPc4 was transformed into BML780, integrated in the genome, vector sequences were excised, and the cat-ASPc4 cassette was amplified as described above for the ASPc3 construct. Strains with the ASPc4 cassette did not produce smaller halos on skim milk plates than strains with the AspC3 cassette, suggesting that the polarity of the C-terminus of ASP mature is not a significant factor for ASP production, secretion and/or stability in Bacillus. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular method.

To explore whether the native ASP signal peptide can drive export in Bacillus, ASPcδ was constructed. PCR was performed on the synthetic asp gene of DNA2.0 with primers ASPendTERMXhol_RV (above) and XhoPlatPREasp_FW.

XhoPlatPREasp_FW

:acccccctcgaggcttttcttttggaagaaaatatagggaaaatggtacttgttaaaaattcggaatatttatacaatatcatatgttt cacattgaaaggggaggagaatcatgacaccacgaactgtcacaag (SEQ ID NO: 196)

The ASPcδ PCR product was purified and digested with XΛol, ligated into Xho\ digested plCatH, and transformed into B. subtilis OS14 as described above for ASPc3. Plasmid was isolated from a neoR, capR clone and designated "pICatH-ASPcδ." DNA sequencing confirmed that no unwanted mutations were introduced into the asp gene by the PCR. pICatH-ASPcδ was transformed into BML780, integrated in the genome, vector sequences were excised, and the cat-ASPc5 cassette was amplified as described above for - 177 - the ASPc3 construct. It was observed that B. licheniformis strains with the ASPcδ construct also form halos on skim milk plates, confirming that the native signal peptide of ASP functions as a secretion signal in Bacillus species.

Finally, construct ASPc6 was created. It has the B. licheniformis subtilisin (aprL) promoter, RBS and signal peptide sequence fused in-frame to the DNA sequence encoding mature ASP from the optimized DNA2.0 gene. It was created by a fusion PCR with primer ASPendTERMXhol_RV and the following primers:

AprLupXhol_FW attagtctcgaggatcgaccggaccgcaacctcc (SEQ ID NO:197) AprLAsp_FW cgatggcattcagcgattccgcttctgctaacgaaccggctcctccaggatctgc (SEQ ID NO:198)

AprLAsp_RV gcagatcctggaggagccggttcgttagcagaagcggaatcgctgaatgccatcg (SEQ

ID NO: 199)

PCR-I was performed with the primers AprLupXhol_FW and AprLAsp_RV on chromosomal DNA of BRA7 as template DNA. PCR-II was performed with primers AprLAsp_FW and ASPendTERMXhol_RV on the synthetic asp gene of DNA2.0. The fragments from PCR-I and PCR-II were assembled in a fusion PCR with the primers ASPendTERMXhol_RV and AprLupXhol_FW. This final PCR fragment was purified using Qiagen's PCR purification kit (according to the manufacturer's instructions), digested with Xho\, ligated into plCatH, and transformed into B. subtilis OS14, as described above for ASPc3. Plasmid was isolated from a neoR, capR clone and designated "plCatH-ASPc6." DNA sequencing confirmed that no unwanted mutations were introduced into the asp gene or aprL region by the PCRs. pICatH-ASPcδ was transformed into BML780, integrated in the genome, vector sequences were excised, and the cat-ASPc6 cassette was amplified as described above for the ASPc3 construct, β. licheniformis strains with the ASPc6 construct also formed halos on skim milk plates, indicating that the aprL promoter in combination with the AprL signal peptide drives expression/secretion of ASP protease in B. licheniformis.

EXAMPLE 13

Protease Production in T. reesei

In this Example, experiments conducted to produce protease 69B4 in T. reesei are described. In these experiments, three different fungal constructs (fungal expression vectors comprising cbhl fusions) were developed. One contained the ASP 5' pro region, - 178 - mature gene, and 3' pro region; the second contained the ASP δ' pro region and the mature gene; and the third contained only the ASP mature gene.

The following primer pairs were used to PCR (in the presence of 10% DMSO), the different fragments from the chromosomal DNA K25.10, carrying the ASP gene and introduced Spel-Ascl sites to clone the fragments into the vector pTREX4 (See, Figure 21 ) digested with Spel and Asc\ restriction enzymes.

1. CBHI fusion with the ASP 5'pro region, mature gene, and 3'pro region:

AspproF forward primer (Spel-Kexin site-ATG-pro sequence): δ'-ACTAGTAAGCGGATGAACGAGCCCGCACCACCCGGGAGCGCGAGC (SEQ ID NO:200)

AspproR reverse primer (Ascl site; C-term pro region from the TAA stop codon to the end of the gene):

5'- GGCGCGCC TTA GGGGAGGGTGAGCCCCATGGTGTAGGCACCG (SEQ ID NO:201)

The ASP 5'pro region and mature gene:

AspproF forward primer (Spel-Kexin site-ATG-pro sequence): 5'-ACTAGTAAGCGGATGAACGAGCCCGCACCACCCGGGAGCGCGAGC (SEQ ID NO:202)

AspmatR reverse primer (Ascl site: TAA stop to the end of the mature sequence) 5'- GGCGCGCC TTA CGGGCTGCTGCCCGAGTCCGTGGTGATCA-3' (SEQ ID NO:203)

3. The ASP mature gene only:

AspmatF forward primer Spel-Kexin site-ATG-mature: 5'-ACTAGT AAGCGG ATG TTCGACGTGATCGGCGGCAACGCCTACACCAT

(SEQ ID NO:204)

AspmatR Reverse Primer (Ascl site: TAA stop to end of mature sequence) δ'- GGCGCGCC TTA CGGGCTGCTGCCCGAGTCCGTGGTGATCA-3' (SEQ ID

NO.205)

After construction, the different plasmids were transformed into a Trichoderma reesei - 179 - strain with disruptions in the cbhl, cbh2, egH, and egl2 genes, using biolistic transformation methods known in the art. Stable transformants were screened, based on morphology. Ten stable transformants for each construct were screened in shake flasks. The initial inoculum media used contained 30g/L α-lactose, 6.δg/L (NH4)2SO4, 2g/L KH2PO4, 0.3g/L MgSO4*7H2O, 0.2g/L CACI2, 1 ml/L 1000X T reesei Trace Salts, 2 mL/L 10% TWEEN®-80, 22.δ g/L Proflo, and 0.72g/L CaCO3, in which the transformants were grown for approximately 48 hr. After this incubation period, 10% of the culture was transferred into flasks containing minimal medium known in the art (See, Foreman et al., J. Biol. Chem., 278:31988-31997 [2003]), with 16g/L of lactose to induce expression. The flasks were placed in a 28°C shaker. Four-day samples were run on NuPAGE 4-12% gels, and stained with Coomassie Blue. After five-days the protease activity was measured by adding 10μl of the supernatant to190 μl AAPF substrate solution (cone 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris/0.006% TWEEN, pH 8.6). The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p- nitroaniline was monitored (2δ°C) The activity data showed that there was a δx higher production over the control strain

(i.e., the parent strain), indicating that T reesei is suitable for the expression of ASP protease.

EXAMPLE 14 Protease Production in A. niger

In this Example, experiments conducted to produce protease 69B4 in Aspergillus niger var. awamori (PCT WO90/00192) are described. In these experiments, four different fungal constructs (fungal expression vectors comprising glaA fusions) were developed. One contained the ASP pre-region, δ' pro-region, mature gene, and the 3' pro-region: the second contained the ASP pre-region, δ' pro-region, and the mature gene; the third contained the ASP 6' pro-region, mature gene, and the 3' pro-region; the fourth contained the ASP δ' pro- region, and the mature gene. Selected from the following primer pairs, primers were used to PCR (in the presence of 10% DMSO) the different fragments from the chromosomal DNA 69B4 carrying the asp gene and introduced the Nhe 1-βs sites to clone the fragments into the vector pSLGAMpR2 (See, Figure 22) digested with Λ/frel and βs restriction enzymes. Primers Anforward 01 and Anforward 02 contained attB1 Gateway cloning sequences (Invitrogen) at the δ' end of the primer. Primers Anreversed 01 and Anreversed - 180 -

02 contained attB2 Gateway cloning sequences (Invitrogen) at the δ' end of the primer. These primers were used to PCR (in the presence of 10% DMSO) the different fragments from the chromosomal DNA 69B4 carrying the ASP genes.

The different constructs were transferred to a A. niger Gateway compatible destination vector pRAXdes2 (See, Figure 23; See also, U.S. Pat. Appln. Ser. No.

10/804,786, and PCT Appln. No. US04/08520, both of which are incorporated herein by reference).

Anforward 01 (without the attB1 sequence) 5'- ATGACACCACGAACTGTCACAAGAGCTCTG-3' (SEQ ID NO:206)

Anforward 02 (without the attB1 sequence) δ'- AACGAACCGGCTCCTCCAGGATCTGCATCA-3' (SEQ ID NO:207) Anreversed 01 (without the attB2 sequence) δ'- AGGGGAACTTCCAGAGTCAGTCGTAATCATTCTCAGGCC-3' (SEQ ID NO:208)

Anreversed 02 (without the attB1 sequence) δ'- GGGGAGGGTGAGTCCCATTGTGTAAGCTCCTGA-3' (SEQ ID NO:209)

pSLGAM-NT_FW δ'-

ACCGCGACTGCTAGCAACGTCATCTCCAAGCGCGGCGGTGGCAACGAACCGGCTCCT CCAGGATCt-3' (SEQ ID NO:210) pSLGAM-MAT_FW δ'-

ACCGCGACTGCTAGCAACGTCATCTCCAAGCGCGGCGGTGGCAACGAACCGGCTCCT CCAGGATCT-3'(SEQ ID NO:211 )

pSLGAM-MAT_RV δ'-CCGCCAGGTGTCGGTCACCTAAGGGGAACTTCCAGAGTCAGTCGTAATCATTCT-3' (SEQ ID NO:212)

PCR conditions were as follows: 5 μL of 10X PCR reaction buffer (Invitrogen); 20 mM MgS04; 0.2 mM each of dATP, dTTP, dGTP, dCTP (final concentration), 1 μL of 10 ng/μL genomic DNA, 1 μL of High Fidelity Taq polymerase (Invitrogen) at 1 unit per μL, 0.2μM of each primer (final concentration), 5μl DMSO and water to 50 μL. The PCR - 181 - protocol was: 94°C for 5 min.; followed by 30 cycles of 94°C for 30 sec, 55°C for 30 sec, and 68°C for 3 min; followed by 68°C for 10 min., and 15°C for 1 min.

After construction, the different plasmids and a helper plasmid (HM 396 pAPDI) were transformed into Aspergillus niger var awamori (Delta Ap4 strain), using protoplast transformation methods known in the art. Stable transformants were screened, based on morphology. Ten stable transformants for each construct were screened in shake flasks.

After this period, a piece of agar containing the strain was transferred into flasks containing

RoboSoy medium or the formula 12 g/l Tryptone, 8 g/l Soytone, 15 g/l Ammonium sulfate,

12.1 g/l NaH2P04.H20, 2.19 g/l Na2HP04, 5 ml 20% MgS04.7H20, 10 ml 10% Tween 80, 500 ml 30% Maltose and 50 ml 1 M phosphate buffer pH 5.8 and 2 g/l uridine to induce expression. The flasks were placed in a 28°C shaker. Four-day samples were run on

NuPAGE 10% Bis Tris protein gels, and stained with Coomassie Blue. Five-day samples were assayed for protease activity using the AAPF method.

The amount of ASP expressed was found to be low, such that it could not be detected in the Coomassie stained gel. Colonies on plates however showed a clear halo formation on skim milk plate agar plates that were significantly larger than the control strain.

Thus, although the expression was low, these results clearly indicate that A. niger is suitable for the expression of ASP protease.

EXAMPLE 15 Generation of Asp Site-Saturated Mutagenesis (SSM) Libraries

In this Example, experiments conducted to develop site-saturation mutagenesis libraries of asp are described. Site saturated Asp libraries each contained 96 B. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degUHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK) clones harboring the pHPLT-ASP-d-2 expression vector. This vector, containing the Asp expression cassette composed of the synthetic DNA sequence (See, Example 10) encoding the Asp hybrid Signal peptide and the Asp N-terminal pro and mature protein were found to enable expression of the protein indicated below (the signal peptide and precursor protease) and secretion of the mature Asp protease.

DNA Sequence encoding synthetic Asp hybrid signal peptide:

ATGAGAAGCAAGAAGCGAACTGTCACAAGAGCTCTGGCTGTGGCAACAGCAGCTGCTA CACTCTTGGCTGGGGGTATGGCAGCACAAGCT (SEQ ID NO:213) 182

The signal peptide and precursor protease are provided in the following sequence (SEQ ID NO:214) (in this sequence, bold indicates the mature protease, underlining indicates the N-terminal prosequence, and the standard font indicates the signal peptide):

MRSKKRTVTRALAVATAAATLLAGGMAAQANEPAPPGSASAPPRLAEKLDPDLLEAMERDL GLDAEEAAATLAFQHDAAETGEALAEELDEDFAGTWVEDDVLYVATTDEDAVEEVEGEGA TAVTVEHSLADLEAWKTVLDAALEGHDDVPTWYVDVPTNSVWAVKAGAQDVAAGLVEGA DVPSDAVTFVETDETPRTMFDVIGGNAYTIGGRSRCSIGFAVNGGFITAGHCGRTGATTAN PTGTFAGSSFPGNDYAFVRTGAGVNLLAQVNNYSGGRVQVAGHTAAPVGSAVCRSGSTT G HCGTITALNSSVTYPEGTVRGLIRTTVCAEPGDSGGSLLAGNQAQGVTSGGSGNCRT GGTTFFQPVNPILQAYGLRMITTDSGSSP (SEQ ID NO:214)

Construction of the189 asp site saturated mutagenesis libraries was completed by using the pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 expression vector as template and primers listed in Table 15-1. The mutagenesis primers used in these experiments all contain the triple DNA sequence code NNS (N = A, C, T or G and S = C or G) at the position that corresponds with the codon of the Asp mature sequence to be mutated and guaranteed random incorporation of nucleotides at that position. Construction of each SSM library started with two PCR amplifications using pHPLT-Bglll-FW primer and a specific Reverse mutagenesis primer, and pHPLT-Bglll-RV primer and a specific Forward mutagenesis primer (equal positions for the mutagenesis primers). Platinum Taq DNA polymerase High Fidelity (Cat.No. 11304- 029; Invitrogen) was used for PCR amplification (0.2 μM primers, 20 up to 30 cycles) according to protocol provided by Invitrogen. Briefly, 1 μL amplified DNA fragment of both specific PCR mixes, both targeted the same codon, was added to 48 μL of fresh PCR reaction solution together with primers pHPLT-Bglll-FW and pHPLT-Bglll-RV. This fusion PCR amplification (22 cycles) resulted in a linear pHPLT-ASP-d-2 DNA fragment with a specific Asp mature codon randomly mutated and a unique βg/ll restriction site on both ends. Purification of this DNA fragment (Qiagen PCR purification kit, Cat.No. 28106), digesting it with βg/ll, performing an additional purification step and a ligation reaction

(Invitrogen T4 DNA Ligase (Cat.No. 15224-026) generated circular and multimeric DNA that was subsequently transformed into B. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, deg(JHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK). For each library, after overηight incubation at 37°C, 96 single colonies were picked from Heart Infusion agar plates with 20 mg/L neomycin and grown for 153

[H, S] [T, Q] X A X V G [S, A] X V C* R S G [S, A] J T [G, A] W [H, R] C* G

112 115 120 125

[T, Y] [I, V] [X3] [N, G] X [S, T] V X Y [P, A] [E, Q] G [T, S, D] V [R, S] G L

130 131 135 1 37 140

[I, V] R [T, G] [T, N, S] [V, A] C* A E [P, G] G D S G G S [L, V] [L, V, I] [A. S]

145 150 155 158

G [N, T] Q A [Q, R] G [V, L] T_S G [G, R] [S, I] [G, N] [N, D] CT [X2] G

162 167 169 189

G [X4] Q P [X21] (SEQ ID NO:125)

Table 7-3 (below) indicates the positions where ASP and Streptogrisin C differ:

Figure imgf000173_0001

EXAMPLE 8 Mass Spectrometric Sequencing of ASP Homologues

In this Example, experiments conducted to confirm the DNA-derived sequence as well as verify/establish the N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of the mature ASP 154 homologues are described. The microorganisms utilized in these experiments were the following

1. Cellulomonas biazotea DSM 20112

2. Cellulomonas flavigena DSM 20109

3. Cellulomonas fimi DSM 20113

4. Cellulomonas cellasea DSM 20118 •7. Oerskovia jenensis DSM 46000

8. Oerskovia turbata DSM 20677

9. Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 20424 0

The micropurified ASP homologues were subjected to mass spectrometri- based protein sequencing procedures which consisted of these major steps: micropurification, gel electrophoresis, in-gel proteolytic digestion, capillary liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS), database searching of the mass 5 spectrometric data, and de novo sequencing. Details of these steps are described what follows. As described previously in Example 6, concentrated culture sample (about 200 ml) was added to δOOml 1 M CaCI2 and centrifuged at 14,000 rpm (model 641 δC Eppendorf) for δ min. The supernatant was cooled on ice and acidified with 200 ml 1 N HCl. After 5 min, 200 ml 50% trichloroacetic acid were added and the sample was centrifuged for 4 min ato 14,000 rpm (model 541 δC Eppendorf). The supernatant was discarded and the pellet was washed first with water and then with 90% acetone. The pellet, after being dried in the speed vac, was dissolved in 2X Protein Preparation (Tris-Glycine Sample Buffer; Novex) buffer and diluted 1 + 1 with water before being applied to the SDS-PAGE gel. SDS-PAGE was run with NuPAGE MES SDS Running Buffer. SDS-PAGE gel (1 mm NuPAGE 10%5 Bis-Tris; Novex) was developed and stained using standard protocols known in the art. Following SDS-PAGE, bands corresponding to ASP homologues were excised and processed for mass spectrometric peptide sequencing using standard protocols in the art.

Peptide mapping and sequencing was performed using capillary liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS). This0 analysis systems consisted of capillary HPLC system (model CapLC; Waters) and mass spectrometer (model Qtof Ultima API; Waters). Peptides were loaded on a pre-column (PepMap100 C18, δum, 100A, 300um ID x 1mm; Dionex) and chromatographed on capillary columns (Biobasic C18 7δum x 10cm; New Objectives) using a gradient from 0 to 100% solvent B in 45min at a flow rate of 200nL/min (generated using a static split from a pump5 flow rate of 5uL/min). Solvent A consisted of 0.1% formic acid in water; and solvent B was 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile. The mass spectrometer was operated with the following parameters: spray voltage of 3.1 kV, desolavation zone at 1δ0C, mass spectra acquired 155 from 400 to 1900 m/z, resolution of 6000 in v-mode. Tandem MS spectra were acquired in data dependent mode with two most intense peaks selected and fragmented with mass dependent collision energy (as specified by vendor) and collision gas (argon) at 2.5x10-δ torr.

The identities of the peptides were determined using a database search program (Mascot, Matrix Science) using a database containing ASP homologue DNA-obtained sequences. Database searches were performed with the following parameters: no enzyme selected, peptide error of 2.δDa, MS/MS ions error of 0.1 Da, and variable modification of carboxyaminomethyl cysteine). For unmatched MS/MS spectra, manual de novo sequence assignments were performed. For example, Figure 4 shows the sequence of N-terminal most tryptic peptide from C. flavigena determined from this tandem mass spectrum. In Table 8-1 , the percentage of the sequence verified on the protein level for various homologues are reported along with N-terminal and C-terminal peptide sequences.

Figure imgf000175_0001
- 156

EXAMPLE 9 Protease Production in Streptomyces lividans

This Example describes experiments conducted to develop methods for production of protease by S. lividans. Thus, a plasmid comprising a polypeptide encoding a polypeptide having proteolytic activity was constructed and used such vector to transform Streptomyces lividans host cells The methods used for this transformation are more fully described in US Patent No. 6,287,839 and WO 02/50246, both of which are herein expressly incorporated by reference.

One plasmid developed during these experiments was designated as "pSEG69B4T." The construction of this plasmid made use of one pSEGCT plasmid vector (See, WO 02/50245). A glucose isomerase ("Gl") promoter operably linked to the structural gene encoding the 69B4 protease was used to drive the expression of the protease. A fusion between the Gl-promoter and the 69B4 signal-sequence, N-terminal prosequence and mature sequence was constructed by fusion-PCR techniques as a X al-βamHI fragment. The fragment was ligated into plasmid pSEGCT digested with Xbal and βamHI, resulting in plasmid pSEG69B4T (See, Figure 6). Although the present Specification provides specific expression vectors, it is contemplated that additional vectors utilizing different promoters and/or signal sequences combined with various prosequences of the 69B4 protease will find use in the present invention.

An additional plasmid developed during the experiments was designated as "pSEA469B4CT" (See, Figure 7). As with the pSEG69B4T plasmid, one pSEGCT plasmid vector was used to construct this plasmid. To create the pSEA469B4CT, the Aspergillus niger (regulatory sequence) ("A4") promoter was operably linked to the structural gene encoding the 69B4 protease, and used to drive the expression of the protease. A fusion between the A4-promoter and the Cel A (from Streptomyces coelicolor) signal-sequence, the asp-N-terminal prosequence and the asp mature sequence was constructed by fusion- PCR techniques, as a Xbal-βamHI fragment. The fragment was ligated into plasmid pSEA4GCT digested with Xbal and βamHI, resulting in plasmid pSEA469B4CT (See, - 157 -

Figure 7). The sequence of the A4 (A. niger) promoter region is:

1 TCGAA CTTCAT GTTCGA GTTCTT GTTCAC GTAGAA GCCGGA GATGTG AGAGGT

AGCTT GAAGTA CAAGCT CAAGAA CAAGTG CATCTT CGGCCT CTACAC TCTCCA 61 GATCTG GAACTG CTCACC CTCGTT GGTGGT GACCTG GAGGTA AAGCAA GTGACC CTTCTG

CTAGAC CTTGAC GAGTGG GAGCAA CCACCA CTGGAC CTCCAT TTCGTT CACTGG GAAGAC

121 GCGGAG GTGGTA AGGAAC GGGGTT CCACGG GGAGAG AGAGAT GGCCTT GACGGT CTTGGG

CGCCTC CACCAT TCCTTG CCCCAA GGTGCC CCTCTC TCTCTA CCGGAA CTGCCA GAACCC

181 AAGGGG AGCTTC NGCGCG GGGGAG GATGGT CTTGAG AGAGGG GGAGCT AGTAAT GTCGTA TTCCCC TCGAAG NCGCGC CCCCTC CTACCA GAACTC TCTCCC CCTCGA TCATTA CAGCAT

241 CTTGGA CAGGGA GTGCTC CTTCTC CGACGC ATCAGC CACCTC AGCGGA GATGGC ATCGTG

GAACCT GTCCCT CA.CGAG GAAGAG GCTGCG TAGTCG GTGGAG TCGCCT CTACCG TAGCAC

301 CAGAGA CAGACC

GTCTCT GTCTGG ( SEQ ID NO : 130 )

In these experiments, the host Streptomyces lividans TK23 was transformed with either of the vectors described above using protoplast methods known in the art (See e.g., Hopwood, et al.,. Genetic Manipulation of Streptomyces. A Laboratory Manual. The John Innes Foundation, Norwich, United Kingdom [1985]).

The transformed culture was expanded to provide two fermentation cultures. At various time points, samples of the fermentation broths were removed for analysis. For the purposes of this experiment, a skimmed milk procedure was used to confirm successful cloning. In these methods, 30 μl of the shake flask supernatant was spotted in punched out holes in skim milk agar plates and incubated at 37°C. The incubated plates were visually reviewed after overnight incubation for the presence of halos. For purposes of this experiment, the same samples were also assayed for protease activity and for molecular weight (SDS-PAGE). At the end of the fermentation run, full length protease was observed by SDS-PAGE.

A sample of the fermentation broth was assayed as follows: 10μl of the diluted supernatant was taken and added to 190 μl AAPF substrate solution (cone 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris/0.005% TWEEN, pH 8.6). The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored (25°C). The assay results of the fermentation broth of 3 clones (X, Y, W) obtained using the pSEG69B4T and two clones using the pSEA469B4T indicated that Asp was expressed by both constructs, able XXI. Results for Two Clones (pSEA469B4T). Indeed, the results obtained in these experiments showed that the polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having proteolytic activity was expressed in Streptomyces lividans, using both of these expression vectors. Although two vectors are described in this Example, it is contemplated that additional expression vectors using different promoters and/or signal sequences combined with different combinations of 69B4 protease: + / - N terminal and C terminal prosequence in the pSEA4CT backbone (vector), - 158 - as well as other constructs will find use in the present invention.

EXAMPLE 10 Protease Production in B. subtilis

In this Example, experiments conducted to produce protease 69B4 (also referred to herein as "ASP," "Asp," and "ASP protease," and "Asp protease") in B. subtilis are described. In this Example, the transformation of plasmid pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 (See, Table 10-1 ; and Figure 9), into B. subtilis is described. Transformation was performed as known in the art (See e.g., WO 02/14490, incorporated herein by reference. To optimize ASP expression in β. subtilis a synthetic DNA sequence was produced by DNA2.0, and utilized in these expression experiments. The DNA sequence (synthetic ASP DNA sequence) provided below, with codon usage adapted for Bacillus species, encodes the wild type ASP precursor protein:

ATGACACCACGAACTGTCACAAGAGCTCTGGCTGTGGCAACAGCAGCTGCTACACTCTTGGCTGGGGGTAT GGCAGCACAAGCTAACGAACCGGCTCCTCCAGGATCTGCATCAGCCCCTCCACGATTAGCTGAAAAACTTGA CCCTGACTTACTTGAAGCAATGGAACGCGATCTGGGGTTAGATGCAGAGGAAGCAGCTGCAACGTTAGCTTT TCAGCATGACGCAGCTGAAACGGGAGAGGCTCTTGCTGAGGAACTCGACGAAGATTTCGCGGGCACGTGGG TTGAAGATGATGTGCTGTATGTTGCAACCACTGATGAAGATGCTGTTGAAGAAGTCGAAGGCGAAGGAGCAA CTGCTGTGACTGTTGAGCATTCTCTTGCTGATTTAGAGGCGTGGAAGACGGTTTTGGATGCTGCGCTGGAGG GTCATGATGATGTGCCTACGTGGTACGTCGACGTGCCTACGAATTCGGTAGTCGTTGCTGTAAAGGCAGGAG CGCAGGATGTAGCTGCAGGACTTGTGGAAGGCGCTGATGTGCCATCAGATGCGGTCACTTTTGTAGAAACG GACGAAACGCCTAGAACGATGTTCGACGTAATTGGAGGCAACGCATATACTATTGGCGGCCGGTCTAGATG TTCTATCGGATTCGCAGTAAACGGTGGCTTCATTACTGCCGGTCACTGCGGAAGAACAGGAGCCACTACTG CCAATCCGACTGGCACATTTGCAGGTAGCTCGTTTCCGGGAAATGATTATGCATTCGTCCGAACAGGGGCA GGAGTAAATTTGCTTGCCCAAGTCAATAACTACTCGGGCGGCAGAGTCCAAGTAGCAGGACATACGGCCG CACCAGTTGGATCTGCTGTATGCCGCTCAGGTAGCACTACAGGTTGGCATTGCGGAACTATCACGGCGCT GAATTCGTCTGTCACGTATCCAGAGGGAACAGTCCGAGGACTTATCCGCACGACGGTTTGTGCCGAACCA GGTGATAGCGGAGGTAGCCTTTTAGCGGGAAATCAAGCCCAAGGTGTCACGTCAGGTGGTTCTGGAAATT GTCGGACGGGGGGAACAACATTCTTTCAACCAGTCAACCCGATTTTGCAGGCTTACGGCCTGAGAATGATT ACGACTGACTCTGGAAGTTCCCCTGCTCCAGCACCTACATCATGTACAGGCTACGCAAGAACGTTCACAGG AACCCTCGCAGCAGGAAGAGCAGCAGCTCAACCGAACGGTAGCTATGTTCAGGTCAACCGGAGCGGTACAC ATTCCGTCTGTCTCAATGGACCTAGCGGTGCGGACTTTGATTTGTATGTGCAGCGATGGAATGGCAGTAGCT GGGTAACCGTCGCTCAATCGACATCGCCGGGAAGCAATGAAACCATTACGTACCGCGGAAATGCTGGATATT ATCGCTACGTGGTTAACGCTGCGTCAGGATCAGGAGCTTACACAATGGGACTCACCCTCCCCTGA (SEQ ID NO:131 )

In the above sequence, bold indicates the DNA that encodes the mature protease, standard font indicates the leader sequence, and the underline indicates the N-terminal and - 159 -

C-terminal prosequences.

Expression of the Synthetic ASP Gene

Asp expression cassettes were constructed in the pXX-Kpnl (See, Figure 15) or p2JM103-DNNDPI (See, Figure 16) vectors and subsequently cloned into the pHPLT vector (See, Figure 17) for expression of ASP in B. subtilis. pXX-Kpnl is a pUC based vector with the aprE promoter (β. subtilis) driving expression, a cat gene, and a duplicate aprE promoter for amplification of the copy number in B. subtilis. The bla gene allows selective growth in E. coli. The pnl, introduced in the ribosomal binding site, downstream of the aprE promoter region, together with the HindW site enables cloning of Asp expression cassettes in pXX- Kpnl. The vector p2JM103-DMNDPI contains the aprE promoter (B. subtilis) to drive expression of the BCE103 cellulase core (endo-cellulase from an obligatory alkaliphilic Bacillus; See, Shaw et al., J. Mol. Biol., 320:303-309 [2002]), in frame with an acid labile linker(DDNDPI [SEQ ID NO:132]; See, Segalas et al., FEBS Lett., 371 :171-175 [1995]). The ASP expression cassette (SamHI and HindlW) was fused to BCE103-DDNDPI fusion protein. When secreted, ASP is cleaved of the cellulase core to turn into the mature protease pHPLT (See, Figure 17; and Solingen et al., Extremophiles 5:333-341 [2001]) contains the thermostable amylase LAT promoter (PLAT) of Bacillus licheniformis, followed by Xbal and Hpal restriction sites for cloning ASP expression constructs. The following sequence is that of the BCE103 cellulase core with DNNDPI acid labile linker. In this sequence, the bold indicates the acid-labile linker, while the standard font indicates the BCE103 core.

V R S K K W I S L L F A L T L I F T M

GTGAGA AGCAAA AΆTTG TGGATC AGCTTG TTGTTT GCGTTA ACGTTA ATCTTT ACGATG

CACTCT TCGTTT TTTAAC ACCTAG TCGAAC AACAAA CGCAAT TGCAAT TAGAAA TGCTAC

A F S N M S A Q A D D Y S V V E E H G Q

61 GCGTTC AGCAAC ATGAGC GCGCAG GCTGAT GATTAT TCAGTT GTAGAG GAACAT GGGCAA

CGCAAG TCGTTG TACTCG CGCGTC CGACTA CTAATA AGTCAA CATCTC CTTGTA CCCGTT S I S N G E L V N E R G E Q V Q L K G

121 CTAAGT ATTAGT AACGGT GAATTA GTCAAT GAACGA GGCGAA CAAGTT CAGTTA AAAGGG

GATTCA TAATCA TTGCCA CTTAAT CAGTTA CTTGCT CCGCTT GTTCAA GTCAAT TTTCCC

M S S H G L Q W Y G Q F V N Y E S M K W

181 ATGAGT TCCCAT GGTTTG CAATGG TACGGT CAATTT GTAAAC TATGAA AGCATG AAATGG

TACTCA AGGGTA CCAAΆC GTTACC ATGCCA GTTAAA CATTTG ATACTT TCGTAC TTTACC

L R D D W G I T V F R A A M Y T S S G G

241 CTAAGA GATGAT TGGGGA ATAACT GTATTC CGAGCA GCAATG TATACC TCTTCA GGAGGA

GATTCT CTACTA ACCCCT TATTGA CATAAG GCTCGT CGTTAC ATATGG AGAAGT CCTCCT

Y I D D P S V K E K V K E T V E A A I D

301 TATATT GACGAT CCATCA GTAAAG GAAAAA GTAAAA GAGACT GTTGAG GCTGCG ATAGAC

ATATAA CTGCTA GGTAGT CATTTC CTTTTT CATTTT CTCTGA CAACTC CGACGC TATCTG G I Y V I I D W H I L S D N D P N I Y

361 CTTGGC ATATAT GTGATC ATTGAT TGGCAT ATCCTT TCAGAC AATGAC CCGAAT ATATAT 160

GAACCG TATATA CACTAG TAACTA ACCGTA TAGGAA AGTCTG TTACTG GGCTTA TATATA

K E E A K D F F D E M S E Y G D Y P N

421 AAAGAA GAAGCG AAGGAT TTCTTT GATGAA ATGTCA GAGTTG TATGGA GACTAT CCGAAT

TTTCTT CTTCGC TTCCTA AAGAAA CTACTT TACAGT CTCAAC ATACGT GTGATA GGCTTA

V I Y E I A N E P N G S D V T W D N Q I

481 GTGATA TACGAA ATTGCA AATGAA CCGAAT GGTAGT GATGTT ACGTGG GACAAT CAAATA

CACTAT ATGCTT TAACGT TTACTT GGCTTA CCATCA CTACAA TGCACC CTGTTA GTTTAT

K P Y A E E V I P V I R D N D P N N I V

541 AAACCG TATGCA GAAGAA GTGATT CCGGTT ATTCGT GACAAT GACCCT AATAAC ATTGTT

TTTGGC ATACGT CTTCTT CACTAA GGCCAA TAAGCA CTGTTA CTGGGA TTATTG TAACAA

I V G T G T W S Q D V H H A A D N Q A

601 ATTGTA GGTACA GGTACA TGGAGT CAGGAT GTCCAT CATGCA GCCGAT AATCAG CTTGCA

TAACAT CCATGT CCATGT ACCTCA GTCCTA CAGGTA GTACGT CGGCTA TTAGTC GAACGT

D P N V M Y A F H F Y A G T H G Q N L R

661 GATCCT AACGTC ATGTAT GCATTT CATTTT TATGCA GGAACA CATGGA CAAAAT TTACGA

CTAGGA TTGCAG TACATA CGTAAA GTAAAA ATACGT CCTTGT GTACCT GTTTTA AATGCT

D Q V D Y A L D Q G A A I F V S E W G T

721 GACCAA GTAGAT TATGCA TTAGAT CAAGGA GCAGCG ATATTT GTTAGT GAATGG GGGACA

CTGGTT CATCTA ATACGT AATCTA GTTCCT CGTCGC TATAAA CAATCA CTTACC CCCTGT

S A A T G D G G V F L D E A Q V W I D F

781 AGTGCA GCTACA GGTGAT GGTGGT GTGTTT TTAGAT GAAGCA CAAGTG TGGATT GACTTT

TCACGT CGATGT CCACTA CCACCA CACAAA AATCTA CTTCGT GTTCAC ACCTAA CTGAAA

M D E R N L S A N W S L T H K D E S S

841 ATGGAT GAAAGA AATTTA AGCTGG GCCAAC TGGTCT CTAACG CATAAG GATGAG TCATCT

TACCTA CTTTCT TTAAAT TCGACC CGGTTG ACCAGA GATTGC GTATTC CTACTC AGTAGA

A A L M P G A N P T G G W T E A E L S P

901 GCAGCG TTAATG CCAGGT GCAAAT CCAACT GGTGGT TGGACA GAGGCT GAACTA TCTCCA

CGTCGC AATTAC GGTCCA CGTTTA GGTTGA CCACCA ACCTGT CTCCGA CTTGAT AGAGGT

S G T F V R E K I R E S A S D N N D P I 961 TCTGGT ACATTT GTGAGG GAAAAA ATAAGA GAATCA GCATCT GACAAC AATGAT CCCATA

AGACCA TGTAAA CACTCC CTTTTT TATTCT CTTAGT CGTAGA CTGTTG TTACTA GGGTAT

(DNA; SEQ ID NO:133) and (Amino Acid; SEQ ID NO:134)

The Asp expression cassettes were cloned in the pXX-Kpnl vector containing DNA encoding the wild type Asp signal peptide, or a hybrid signal peptide constructed of 5 subtilisin AprE N-terminal signal peptide amino acids fused to the 25 Asp C-terminal signal peptide amino acids (MRSKKRTVTRALAVATAAATLLAGGMAAQA (SEQ ID NO:135), or a hybrid signal peptide constructed of 11 subtilisin AprE N-terminal signal peptide amino acids fused to the 19 asp C-terminal signal peptide amino acids (MRSKKLWISLLLAVATAAATLLAGGMAAQA (SEQ ID NO:136). These expression cassettes were also constructed with the asp C-terminal prosequence encoding DNA in frame. Another expression cassette, for cloning in the p2JM103-DNNDPI vector, encodes the ASP N-terminal pro- and mature sequence.

The Asp expression cassettes cloned in the pXX-Kpnl or p2JM103-DNNDPI vector were transformed into E.co// (Electromax DH10B, Invitrogen, Cat.No. 12033-016). The primers and cloning strategy used are provided in Table 10-1. Subsequently, the expression cassettes were cloned from these vectors and introduced in the pHPLT expression vector for transformation into a β. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degUHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK) strain. The primers and cloning strategy for ASP expression cassettes cloning in pHPLT are provided in Table 10-2. Transformation to B. - 161 - subtilis was performed as described in WO 02/14490, incorporated herein by reference. Figures 12-21 provide plasmid maps for various plasmids described herein.

Table 10-1. ASP in pXX-Kpnl and p2JM103-DNNDPI

Figure imgf000181_0001
-162-
Figure imgf000182_0001
Figure imgf000182_0002
163

Figure imgf000183_0001

Primers were obtained from MWG and Invitrogen. Invitrogen Platinum Taq DNA polymerase High Fidelity (Cat.No. 1 1304-029) was used for PCR amplification (0.2 μM primers, 2δ up to 30 cycles) according to the Invitrogen's protocol. Ligase reactions of ASP expression cassettes and host vectors were completed by using Invitrogen T4 DNA Ligase (Cat. No. 1δ224-02δ), utilizing Invitrogen's protocol as recommended for general cloning of cohesive ends).

Selective growth of B. subtilis (AaprE, AnprE, oppA, AspollE, degUHy32, AamyE::(xylR,pxylA-comK) transformants harboring the p2JM103-ASP vector or one of the pHPLT-ASP vectors was performed in shake flasks containing 2δ ml Synthetic Maxatase Medium (SMM), with 0.97 g/l CaCI2.6H2O instead of O.δ g/l CaCI2 (See, U.S. Pat. No. 6,324,663, herein incorporated by reference) with either 2δ mg/L chloramphenicol or 20 mg/L neomycin. This growth resulted in the production of secreted ASP protease with proteolytic activity. However. Gel analysis was performed using NuPage Novex 10% Bis- Tris gels (Invitrogen, Cat.No. NP0301 BOX). To prepare samples for analysis, 2 volumes of 4 days at 37°C in MOPS media with 20 mg/ml neomycin and 1.26 g/L yeast extract (See, WO 03/062380, incorporated herein by reference, for the exact medium formulation used herein) for sequence analysis (BaseClear) and protease expression for screening purposes. The library numbers ranged from 1 up to 189, with each number representing the codon of the mature asp sequence that is randomly mutated. After selection, each library included a maximum of 20 Asp protease variants.

Table 15-1. Primers Used to Generate Synthetic ASP SSM Libraries pHPLT-Bglll-FW GCAATCAGATCTTCCTTCAGGTTATGACC (SEQ ID N215) pHPLT-Bglll-RV GCATCGAAGATCTGATTGCTTAACTGCTTC (SEQ ID NO:216)

Forward

Mutagenesis

Primer DNA sequence, 5" to 3'

GAAACGCCTAGAACGATGNNSGACGTAATTGGAGGCAAC aspl F (SEQ ID NO:217)

ACGCCTAGAACGATGTTCNNSGTAATTGGAGGCAACGCA asp2F (SEQ ID NO:218)

CCTAGAACGATGTTCGACNNSATTGGAGGCAACGCATAT asp3F (SEQ ID NO:219)

AGAACGATGTTCGACGTANNSGGAGGCAACGCATATACT asp4F (SEQ ID NO:220)

ACGATGTTCGACGTAATTNNSGGCAACGCATATACTATT asp5F (SEQ ID NO:221)

ATGTTCGACGTAATTGGANNSAACGCATATACTATTGGC asp6F (SEQ ID NO:222)

TTCGACGTAATTGGAGGCNNSGCATATACTATTGGCGGC asp7F (SEQ ID NO:223)

GACGTAATTGGAGGCAACNNSTATACTATTGGCGGCCGG aspδF (SEQ ID NO:224)

GTAATTGGAGGCAACGCANNSACTATTGGCGGCCGGTCT asp9F (SEQ ID NO225)

ATTGGAGGCAACGCATATNNSATTGGCGGCCGGTCTAGA asp10F (SEQ ID NO:226)

GGAGGCAACGCATATACTNNSGGCGGCCGGTCTAGATGT asp11 F (SEQ ID NO:227)

GGCAACGCATATACTATTNNSGGCCGGTCTAGATGTTCT asp12F (SEQ ID NO:228) AACGCATATACTATTGGCNNSCGGTCTAGATGTTCTATC asp13F (SEQ ID NO:229)

GCATATACTATTGGCGGCNNSTCTAGATGTTCTATCGGA asp14F (SEQ ID NO:230)

TATACTATTGGCGGCCGGNNSAGATGTTCTATCGGATTC asplδF (SEQ ID NO:231 )

ACTATTGGCGGCCGGTCTNNSTGTTCTATCGGATTCGCA asp16F (SEQ ID NO:232)

ATTGGCGGCCGGTCTAGANNSTCTATCGGATTCGCAGTA asp17F (SEQ ID NO:233)

GGCGGCCGGTCTAGATGTNNSATCGGATTCGCAGTAAAC asp18F (SEQ ID NO:234)

GGCCGGTCTAGATGTTCTNNSGGATTCGCAGTAAACGGT asp19F (SEQ ID NO:23δ)

CGGTCTAGATGTTCTATCNNSTTCGCAGTAAACGGTGGC asp20F (SEQ ID NO:236)

TCTAGATGTTCTATCGGANNSGCAGTAAACGGTGGCTTC asp21 F (SEQ ID NO:237)

AGATGTTCTATCGGATTCNNSGTAAACGGTGGCTTCATT asp22F (SEQ ID NO:238)

TGTTCTATCGGATTCGCANNSAACGGTGGCTTCATTACT asp23F (SEQ ID NO:239)

TCTATCGGATTCGCAGTANNSGGTGGCTTCATTACTGCC asp24F (SEQ ID NO:240)

ATCGGATTCGCAGTAAACNNSGGCTTCATTACTGCCGGT asp26F (SEQ ID NO:241 )

GGATTCGCAGTAAACGGTNNSTTCATTACTGCCGGTCAC asp26F (SEQ ID NO:242)

TTCGCAGTAAACGGTGGCNNSATTACTGCCGGTCACTGC asp27F (SEQ ID NO:243)

GCAGTAAACGGTGGCTTCNNSACTGCCGGTCACTGCGGA asp28F (SEQ ID NO:244)

GTAAACGGTGGCTTCATTNNSGCCGGTCACTGCGGAAGA asp29F (SEQ ID NO:24δ)

AACGGTGGCTTCATTACTNNSGGTCACTGCGGAAGAACA asp30F (SEQ ID NO:246)

GGTGGCTTCATTACTGCCNNSCACTGCGGAAGAACAGGA asp31 F (SEQ ID NO:247)

GGCTTCATTACTGCCGGTNNSTGCGGAAGAACAGGAGCC asp32F (SEQ ID NO:248)

TTCATTACTGCCGGTCACNNSGGAAGAACAGGAGCCACT asp33F (SEQ ID NO:249)

ATTACTGCCGGTCACTGCNNSAGAACAGGAGCCACTACT asp34F (SEQ ID NO:250)

ACTGCCGGTCACTGCGGANNSACAGGAGCCACTACTGCC asp36F (SEQ ID NO:251)

GCCGGTCACTGCGGAAGANNSGGAGCCACTACTGCCAAT asp36F (SEQ ID NO:252)

GGTCACTGCGGAAGAACANNSGCCACTACTGCCAATCCG asp37F (SEQ ID NO:253) CACTGCGGAAGAACAGGANNSACTACTGCCAATCCGACT asp38F (SEQ ID NO:254)

TGCGGAAGAACAGGAGCCNNSACTGCCAATCCGACTGGC asp39F (SEQ ID NO:255)

GGAAGAACAGGAGCCACTNNSGCCAATCCGACTGGCACA asp40F (SEQ ID NO:256)

AGAACAGGAGCCACTACTNNSAATCCGACTGGCACATTT asp41F (SEQ ID NO:257)

ACAGGAGCCACTACTGCCNNSCCGACTGGCACATTTGCA asp42F (SEQ ID NO:258)

GGAGCCACTACTGCCAATNNSACTGGCACATTTGCAGGT asp43F (SEQ ID NO:259)

GCCACTACTGCCAATCCGNNSGGCACATTTGCAGGTAGC asp44F (SEQ ID NO:260)

ACTACTGCCAATCCGACTNNSACATTTGCAGGTAGCTCG asp45F (SEQ ID NO:261)

ACTGCCAATCCGACTGGCNNSTTTGCAGGTAGCTCGTTT asp46F (SEQ ID NO:262)

GCCAATCCGACTGGCACANNSGCAGGTAGCTCGTTTCCG asp47F (SEQ ID NO:263)

AATCCGACTGGCACATTTNNSGGTAGCTCGTTTCCGGGA asp48F (SEQ ID NO:264)

CCGACTGGCACATTTGCANNSAGCTCGTTTCCGGGAAAT asp49F (SEQ ID NO:265)

ACTGGCACATTTGCAGGTNNSTCGTTTCCGGGAAATGAT aspδOF (SEQ ID NO:266)

GGCACATTTGCAGGTAGCNNSTTTCCGGGAAATGATTAT asp51F (SEQ ID NO:267)

ACATTTGCAGGTAGCTCGNNSCCGGGAAATGATTATGCA asp52F (SEQ ID NO:268)

TTTGCAGGTAGCTCGTTTNNSGGAAATGATTATGCATTC aspδ3F (SEQ ID NO:269)

GCAGGTAGCTCGTTTCCGNNSAATGATTATGCATTCGTC aspδ4F (SEQ ID NO:270)

GGTAGCTCGTTTCCGGGANNSGATTATGCATTCGTCCGA aspδδF (SEQ ID NO:271)

AGCTCGTTTCCGGGAAATNNSTATGCATTCGTCCGAACA aspδ6F (SEQ ID NO:272)

TCGTTTCCGGGAAATGATNNSGCATTCGTCCGAACAGGG aspδ7F (SEQ ID NO:273)

TTTCCGGGAAATGATTATNNSTTCGTCCGAACAGGGGCA aspδδF (SEQ ID NO:274)

CCGGGAAATGATTATGCANNSGTCCGAACAGGGGCAGGA asp59F (SEQ ID NO:275)

GGAAATGATTATGCATTCNNSCGAACAGGGGCAGGAGTA aspδOF (SEQ ID NO:276)

AATGATTATGCATTCGTCNNSACAGGGGCAGGAGTAAAT asp61F (SEQ ID NO:277)

GATTATGCATTCGTCCGANNSGGGGCAGGAGTAAATTTG asp62F (SEQ ID NO:278) TATGCATTCGTCCGAACANNSGCAGGAGTAAATTTGCTT asp63F (SEQ ID NO:279)

GCATTCGTCCGAACAGGGNNSGGAGTAAATTTGCTTGCC asp64F (SEQ ID NO:280)

TTCGTCCGAACAGGGGCANNSGTAAATTTGCTTGCCCAA asp65F (SEQ ID NO:281)

GTCCGAACAGGGGCAGGANNSAATTTGCTTGCCCAAGTC asp66F (SEQ ID NO:282)

CGAACAGGGGCAGGAGTANNSTTGCTTGCCCAAGTCAAT asp67F (SEQ ID NO:283)

ACAGGGGCAGGAGTAAATNNSCTTGCCCAAGTCAATAAC asp68F (SEQ ID NO:284)

GGGGCAGGAGTAAATTTGNNSGCCCAAGTCAATAACTAC asp69F (SEQ ID NO:28δ)

GCAGGAGTAAATTTGCTTNNSCAAGTCAATAACTACTCG asp70F (SEQ ID NO:286)

GGAGTAAATTTGCTTGCCNNSGTCAATAACTACTCGGGC asp71F (SEQ ID NO:287)

GTAAATTTGCTTGCCCAANNSAATAACTACTCGGGCGGC asp72F (SEQ ID NO:288)

AATTTGCTTGCCCAAGTCNNSAACTACTCGGGCGGCAGA asp73F (SEQ ID NO:289)

TTGCTTGCCCAAGTCAATNNSTACTCGGGCGGCAGAGTC asp74F (SEQ ID NO:290)

CTTGCCCAAGTCAATAACNNSTCGGGCGGCAGAGTCCAA asp7δF (SEQ ID NO:291)

GCCCAAGTCAATAACTACNNSGGCGGCAGAGTCCAAGTA asp76F (SEQ ID NO292)

CAAGTCAATAACTACTCGNNSGGCAGAGTCCAAGTAGCA asp77F (SEQ ID NO:293)

GTCAATAACTACTCGGGCNNSAGAGTCCAAGTAGCAGGA asp78F (SEQ ID NO:294)

AATAACTACTCGGGCGGCNNSGTCCAAGTAGCAGGACAT asp79F (SEQ ID N0295)

AACTACTCGGGCGGCAGANNSCAAGTAGCAGGACATACG aspδOF (SEQ ID NO:296)

TACTCGGGCGGCAGAGTCNNSGTAGCAGGACATACGGCC asp81F (SEQ ID NO:297)

TCGGGCGGCAGAGTCCAANNSGCAGGACATACGGCCGCA aspδ2F (SEQ ID NO:298)

GGCGGCAGAGTCCAAGTANNSGGACATACGGCCGCACCA asp83F (SEQ ID NO:299)

GGCAGAGTCCAAGTAGCANNSCATACGGCCGCACCAGTT asp84F (SEQ ID NO:300)

AGAGTCCAAGTAGCAGGANNSACGGCCGCACCAGTTGGA aspδδF (SEQ ID NO:301)

GTCCAAGTAGCAGGACATNNSGCCGCACCAGTTGGATCT asp86F (SEQ ID NO:302)

CAAGTAGCAGGACATACGNNSGCACCAGTTGGATCTGCT aspδ7F (SEQ ID NO:303) GTAGCAGGACATACGGCCNNSCCAGTTGGATCTGCTGTA aspδδF (SEQ ID NO:304)

GCAGGACATACGGCCGCANNSGTTGGATCTGCTGTATGC asp89F (SEQ ID NO:305)

GGACATACGGCCGCACCANNSGGATCTGCTGTATGCCGC asp90F (SEQ ID NO:306)

CATACGGCCGCACCAGTTNNSTCTGCTGTATGCCGCTCA asp91 F (SEQ ID NO:307)

ACGGCCGCACCAGTTGGANNSGCTGTATGCCGCTCAGGT asp92F (SEQ ID NO:30δ)

GCCGCACCAGTTGGATCTNNSGTATGCCGCTCAGGTAGC asp93F (SEQ ID NO:309)

GCACCAGTTGGATCTGCTNNSTGCCGCTCAGGTAGCACT asp94F (SEQ ID NO:310)

CCAGTTGGATCTGCTGTANNSCGCTCAGGTAGCACTACA aspθδF (SEQ ID NO:311)

GTTGGATCTGCTGTATGCNNSTCAGGTAGCACTACAGGT asp96F (SEQ ID NO:312)

GGATCTGCTGTATGCCGCNNSGGTAGCACTACAGGTTGG asp97F (SEQ ID NO:313)

TCTGCTGTATGCCGCTCANNSAGCACTACAGGTTGGCAT asp98F (SEQ ID NO:314)

GCTGTATGCCGCTCAGGTNNSACTACAGGTTGGCATTGC asp99F (SEQ ID NO:31δ)

GTATGCCGCTCAGGTAGCNNSACAGGTTGGCATTGCGGA asplOOF (SEQ ID NO:316)

TGCCGCTCAGGTAGCACTNNSGGTTGGCATTGCGGAACT asp101 F (SEQ ID NO:317)

CGCTCAGGTAGCACTACANNSTGGCATTGCGGAACTATC asp102F (SEQ ID NO:318)

TCAGGTAGCACTACAGGTNNSCATTGCGGAACTATCACG asp103F (SEQ ID NO:319)

GGTAGCACTACAGGTTGGNNSTGCGGAACTATCACGGCG asp104F (SEQ ID NO:320)

AGCACTACAGGTTGGCATNNSGGAACTATCACGGCGCTG asp105F (SEQ ID NO:321 )

ACTACAGGTTGGCATTGCNNSACTATCACGGCGCTGAAT asp106F (SEQ ID NO:322)

ACAGGTTGGCATTGCGGANNSATCACGGCGCTGAATTCG asp107F (SEQ ID NO:323)

GGTTGGCATTGCGGAACTNNSACGGCGCTGAATTCGTCT asp108F (SEQ ID NO:324)

TGGCATTGCGGAACTATCNNSGCGCTGAATTCGTCTGTC asp109F (SEQ ID NO:325)

CATTGCGGAACTATCACGNNSCTGAATTCGTCTGTCACG asp110F (SEQ ID NO:326)

TGCGGAACTATCACGGCGNNSAATTCGTCTGTCACGTAT asp111 F (SEQ ID NO:327)

GGAACTATCACGGCGCTGNNSTCGTCTGTCACGTATCCA asp112F (SEQ ID NO:328) ACTATCACGGCGCTGAATNNSTCTGTCACGTATCCAGAG asp113F (SEQ ID NO:329)

ATCACGGCGCTGAATTCGNNSGTCACGTATCCAGAGGGA asp114F (SEQ ID NO:330)

ACGGCGCTGAATTCGTCTNNSACGTATCCAGAGGGAACA asp115F (SEQ ID NO:331 )

GCGCTGAATTCGTCTGTCNNSTATCCAGAGGGAACAGTC asp116F (SEQ ID NO:332)

CTGAATTCGTCTGTCACGNNSCCAGAGGGAACAGTCCGA asp117F (SEQ ID NO:333)

AATTCGTCTGTCACGTATNNSGAGGGAACAGTCCGAGGA asp118F (SEQ ID NO:334)

TCGTCTGTCACGTATCCANNSGGAACAGTCCGAGGACTT asp119F (SEQ ID NO:33δ)

TCTGTCACGTATCCAGAGNNSACAGTCCGAGGACTTATC asp120F (SEQ ID NO:336)

GTCACGTATCCAGAGGGANNSGTCCGAGGACTTATCCGC asp121F (SEQ ID NO:337)

ACGTATCCAGAGGGAACANNSCGAGGACTTATCCGCACG asp122F (SEQ ID NO:338)

TATCCAGAGGGAACAGTCNNSGGACTTATCCGCACGACG asp123F (SEQ ID NO:339)

CCAGAGGGAACAGTCCGANNSCTTATCCGCACGACGGTT asp124F (SEQ ID NO:340)

GAGGGAACAGTCCGAGGANNSATCCGCACGACGGTTTGT asp126F (SEQ ID NO:341 )

GGAACAGTCCGAGGACTTNNSCGCACGACGGTTTGTGCC asp126F (SEQ ID NO:342)

ACAGTCCGAGGACTTATCNNSACGACGGTTTGTGCCGAA asp127F (SEQ ID NO:343)

GTCCGAGGACTTATCCGCNNSACGGTTTGTGCCGAACCA asp128F (SEQ ID NO:344)

CGAGGACTTATCCGCACGNNSGTTTGTGCCGAACCAGGT asp129F (SEQ ID NO:34δ)

GGACTTATCCGCACGACGNNSTGTGCCGAACCAGGTGAT asp130F (SEQ ID NO:346)

CTTATCCGCACGACGGTTNNSGCCGAACCAGGTGATAGC asp131F (SEQ ID NO:347)

ATCCGCACGACGGTTTGTNNSGAACCAGGTGATAGCGGA asp132F (SEQ ID NO:348)

CGCACGACGGTTTGTGCCNNSCCAGGTGATAGCGGAGGT asp133F (SEQ ID NO:349)

ACGACGGTTTGTGCCGAANNSGGTGATAGCGGAGGTAGC asp134F (SEQ ID NO:3δO)

ACGGTTTGTGCCGAACCANNSGATAGCGGAGGΓAGCCTT asp13δF (SEQ ID N0:3δ1 )

GTTTGTGCCGAACCAGGTNNSAGCGGAGGTAGCCTTTTA asp136F (SEQ ID NO:3δ2)

TGTGCCGAACCAGGTGATNNSGGAGGTAGCCTTTTAGCG asp137F (SEQ ID NO:3δ3) GCCGAACCAGGTGATAGCNNSGGTAGCCTTTTAGCGGGA asp138F (SEQ ID NO:354)

GAACCAGGTGATAGCGGANNSAGCCTTTTAGCGGGAAAT asp139F (SEQ ID NO:355)

CCAGGTGATAGCGGAGGTNNSCTTTTAGCGGGAAATCAA asp140F (SEQ ID NO:3δ6)

GGTGATAGCGGAGGTAGCNNSTTAGCGGGAAATCAAGCC asp141 F (SEQ ID NO:3δ7)

GATAGCGGAGGTAGCCTTNNSGCGGGAAATCAAGCCCAA asp142F (SEQ ID NO:358)

AGCGGAGGTAGCCTTTTANNSGGAAATCAAGCCCAAGGT asp143F (SEQ ID NO:359)

GGAGGTAGCCTTTTAGCGNNSAATCAAGCCCAAGGTGTC asp144F (SEQ ID NO:360)

GGTAGCCTTTTAGCGGGANNSCAAGCCCAAGGTGTCACG asp14δF (SEQ ID NO:361)

AGCCTTTTAGCGGGAAATNNSGCCCAAGGTGTCACGTCA asp146F (SEQ ID NO:362)

CTTTTAGCGGGAAATCAANNSCAAGGTGTCACGTCAGGT asp147F (SEQ ID NO:363)

TTAGCGGGAAATCAAGCCNNSGGTGTCACGTCAGGTGGT asp148F (SEQ ID NO:364)

GCGGGAAATCAAGCCCAANNSGTCACGTCAGGTGGTTCT asp149F (SEQ ID NO:36δ)

GGAAATCAAGCCCAAGGTNNSACGTCAGGTGGTTCTGGA asplδOF (SEQ ID NO:366)

AATCAAGCCCAAGGTGTCNNSTCAGGTGGTTCTGGAAAT asp151 F (SEQ ID NO:367)

CAAGCCCAAGGTGTCACGNNSGGTGGTTCTGGAAATTGT asp152F (SEQ ID NO:368)

GCCCAAGGTGTCACGTCANNSGGTTCTGGAAATTGTCGG asp163F (SEQ ID NO:369)

CAAGGTGTCACGTCAGGTNNSTCTGGAAATTGTCGGACG asp164F (SEQ ID NO:370)

GGTGTCACGTCAGGTGGTNNSGGAAATTGTCGGACGGGG asplδδF (SEQ ID NO:371)

GTCACGTCAGGTGGTTCTNNSAATTGTCGGACGGGGGGA asp1δ6F (SEQ ID NO:372)

ACGTCAGGTGGTTCTGGANNSTGTCGGACGGGGGGAACA asp167F (SEQ ID NO:373)

TCAGGTGGTTCTGGAAATNNSCGGACGGGGGGAACAACA asplδδF (SEQ ID NO:374)

GGTGGTTCTGGAAATTGTNNSACGGGGGGAACAACATTC asp169F (SEQ ID NO:37δ)

GGTTCTGGAAATTGTCGGNNSGGGGGAACAACATTCTTT asp160F (SEQ ID NO:376)

TCTGGAAATTGTCGGACGNNSGGAACAACATTCTTTCAA asp161 F (SEQ ID NO:377)

GGAAATTGTCGGACGGGGNNSACAACATTCTTTCAACCA asp162F (SEQ ID NO:378) AATTGTCGGACGGGGGGANNSACATTCTTTCAACCAGTC asp163F (SEQ ID NO:379)

TGTCGGACGGGGGGAACANNSTTCTTTCAACCAGTCAAC asp164F (SEQ ID NO:380)

CGGACGGGGGGAACAACANNSTTTCAACCAGTCAACCCG asp166F (SEQ ID NO:381 )

ACGGGGGGAACAACATTCNNSCAACCAGTCAACCCGATT asp166F (SEQ ID NO:382)

GGGGGAACAACATTCTTTNNSCCAGTCAACCCGATTTTG asp167F (SEQ ID NO:383)

GGAACAACATTCTTTCAANNSGTCAACCCGATTTTGCAG asp168F (SEQ ID NO:384)

ACAACATTCTTTCAACCANNSAACCCGATTTTGCAGGCT asp169F (SEQ ID NO:38δ)

ACATTCTTTCAACCAGTCNNSCCGATTTTGCAGGCTTAC asp170F (SEQ ID NO:386)

TTCTTTCAACCAGTCAACNNSATTTTGCAGGCTTACGGC asp171 F (SEQ ID NO:387)

TTTCAACCAGTCAACCCGNNSTTGCAGGCTTACGGCCTG asp172F (SEQ ID NO:388)

CAACCAGTCAACCCGATTNNSCAGGCTTACGGCCTGAGA asp173F (SEQ ID NO:389)

CCAGTCAACCCGATTTTGNNSGCTTACGGCCTGAGAATG asp174F (SEQ ID NO:390)

GTCAACCCGATTTTGCAGNNSTACGGCCTGAGAATGATT asp176F (SEQ ID NO:391 )

AACCCGATTTTGCAGGCTNNSGGCCTGAGAATGATTACG asp176F (SEQ ID NO:392)

CCGATTTTGCAGGCTTACNNSCTGAGAATGATTACGACT asp177F (SEQ ID NO:393)

ATTTTGCAGGCTTACGGCNNSAGAATGATTACGACTGAC asp178F (SEQ ID NO:394)

TTGCAGGCTTACGGCCTGNNSATGATTACGACTGACTCT asp179F (SEQ ID NO:39δ)

CAGGCTTACGGCCTGAGANNSATTACGACTGACTCTGGA asp180F (SEQ ID NO:396)

GCTTACGGCCTGAGAATGNNSACGACTGACTCTGGAAGT asplδl F (SEQ ID NO:397)

TACGGCCTGAGAATGATTNNSACTGACTCTGGAAGTTCC asp162F (SEQ ID NO:398)

GGCCTGAGAATGATTACGNNSGACTCTGGAAGTTCCCCT asp183F (SEQ ID NO:399)

CTGAGAATGATTACGACTNNSTCTGGAAGTTCCCCTTAA asp184F (SEQ ID NO:400)

AGAATGATTACGACTGACNNSGGAAGTTCCCCTTAACCC asplδδF (SEQ ID NO:401)

ATGATTACGACTGACTCTNNSAGTTCCCCTTAACCCAAC asp1δ6F (SEQ ID NO:402)

ATTACGACTGACTCTGGANNSTCCCCTTAACCCAACAGA asp1δ7F (SEQ ID NO:403) ACGACTGACTCTGGAAGTNNSCCTTAACCCAACAGAGGA asplδδF (SEQ ID NO:404)

ACTGACTCTGGAAGTTCCNNSTAACCCAACAGAGGACGG asp1δ9F (SEQ ID NO:40δ)

Reverse mutagenesis primer DNA sequence, 5"-3'

GTTGCCTCCAATTACGTCSNNCATCGTTCTAGGCGTTTC asplR (SEQ ID NO:406)

TGCGTTGCCTCCAATTACSNNGAACATCGTTCTAGGCGT asp2R (SEQ ID NO:407)

ATATGCGTTGCCTCCAATSNNGTCGAACATCGTTCTAGG asp3R (SEQ ID NO:40δ)

AGTATATGCGTTGCCTCCSNNTACGTCGAACATCGTTCT asp4R (SEQ ID NO:409)

AATAGTATATGCGTTGCCSNNAATTACGTCGAACATCGT aspδR (SEQ ID NO:410)

GCCAATAGTATATGCGTTSNNTCCAATTACGTCGAACAT asp6R (SEQ ID N0:411)

GCCGCCAATAGTATATGCSNNGCCTCCAATTACGTCGAA asp7R (SEQ ID NO:412)

CCGGCCGCCAATAGTATASNNGTTGCCTCCAATTACGTC aspδR (SEQ ID NO:413)

AGACCGGCCGCCAATAGTSNNTGCGTTGCCTCCAATTAC asp9R (SEQ ID NO:414)

TCTAGACCGGCCGCCAATSNNATATGCGTTGCCTCCAAT asplOR (SEQ ID NO:415)

ACATCTAGACCGGCCGCCSNNAGTATATGCGTTGCCTCC asp11R (SEQ ID NO:416)

AGAACATCTAGACCGGCCSNNAATAGTATATGCGTTGCC asp12R (SEQ ID NO:417)

GATAGAACATCTAGACCGSNNGCCAATAGTATATGCGTT asp13R (SEQ ID N0:41δ)

TCCGATAGAACATCTAGASNNGCCGCCAATAGTATATGC asp14R (SEQ ID NO:419)

GAATCCGATAGAACATCTSNNCCGGCCGCCAATAGTATA asp15R (SEQ ID NO:420)

TGCGAATCCGATAGAACASNNAGACCGGCCGCCAATAGT asp16R (SEQ ID NO:421 )

TACTGCGAATCCGATAGASNNTCTAGACCGGCCGCCAAT asp17R (SEQ ID NO:422)

GTTTACTGCGAATCCGATSNNACATCTAGACCGGCCGCC asplδR (SEQ ID NO:423)

ACCGTTTACTGCGAATCCSNNAGAACATCTAGACCGGCC asp19R (SEQ ID NO:424)

GCCACCGTTTACTGCGAASNNGATAGAACATCTAGACCG asp20R (SEQ ID NO:42δ)

GAAGCCACCGTTTACTGCSNNTCCGATAGAACATCTAGA asp21R (SEQ ID NO:426) asp22R AATGAAGCCACCGTTTACSNNGAATCCGATAGAACATCT (SEQ ID NO:427)

AGTAATGAAGCCACCGTTSNNTGCGAATCCGATAGAACA asp23R (SEQ ID NO:42δ)

GGCAGTAATGAAGCCACCSNNTACTGCGAATCCGATAGA asp24R (SEQ ID NO:429)

ACCGGCAGTAATGAAGCCSNNGTTTACTGCGAATCCGAT asp2δR (SEQ ID NO:430)

GTGACCGGCAGTAATGAASNNACCGTTTACTGCGAATCC asp26R (SEQ ID NO:431)

GCAGTGACCGGCAGTAATSNNGCCACCGTTTACTGCGAA asp27R (SEQ ID NO:432)

TCCGCAGTGACCGGCAGTSNNGAAGCCACCGTTTACTGC asp26R (SEQ ID NO:433)

TCTTCCGCAGTGACCGGCSNNAATGAAGCCACCGTTTAC asp29R (SEQ ID NO:434)

TGTTCTTCCGCAGTGACCSNNAGTAATGAAGCCACCGTT asp30R (SEQ ID NO:43δ)

TCCTGTTCTTCCGCAGTGSNNGGCAGTAATGAAGCCACC asp31R (SEQ ID NO:436)

GGCTCCTGTTCTTCCGCASNNACCGGCAGTAATGAAGCC asp32R (SEQ ID NO:437)

AGTGGCTCCTGTTCTTCCSNNGTGACCGGCAGTAATGAA asp33R (SEQ ID NO:43δ)

AGTAGTGGCTCCTGTTCTSNNGCAGTGACCGGCAGTAAT asp34R (SEQ ID NO:439)

GGCAGTAGTGGCTCCTGTSNNTCCGCAGTGACCGGCAGT asp36R (SEQ ID NO:440)

ATTGGCAGTAGTGGCTCCSNNTCTTCCGCAGTGACCGGC asp36R (SEQ ID NO:441)

CGGATTGGCAGTAGTGGCSNNTGTTCTTCCGCAGTGACC asp37R (SEQ ID NO:442)

AGTCGGATTGGCAGTAGTSNNTCCTGTTCTTCCGCAGTG asp3δR (SEQ ID NO:443)

GCCAGTCGGATTGGCAGTSNNGGCTCCTGTTCTTCCGCA asp39R (SEQ ID NO:444)

TGTGCCAGTCGGATTGGCSNNAGTGGCTCCTGTTCTTCC asp40R (SEQ ID NO:445)

AAATGTGCCAGTCGGATTSNNAGTAGTGGCTCCTGTTCT asp41R (SEQ ID NO:446)

TGCAAATGTGCCAGTCGGSNNGGCAGTAGTGGCTCCTGT asp42R (SEQ ID NO:447)

ACCTGCAAATGTGCCAGTSNNATTGGCAGTAGTGGCTCC asp43R (SEQ ID NO:44δ)

GCTACCTGCAAATGTGCCSNNCGGATTGGCAGTAGTGGC asp44R (SEQ ID NO:449)

CGAGCTACCTGCAAATGTSNNAGTCGGATTGGCAGTAGT asp46R (SEQ ID NO:450)

AAACGAGCTACCTGCAAASNNGCCAGTCGGATTGGCAGT asp46R (SEQ ID N0:4δ1 ) asp47R CGGAAACGAGCTACCTGCSNNTGTGCCAGTCGGATTGGC (SEQ ID NO:4δ2)

TCCCGGAAACGAGCTACCSNNAAATGTGCCAGTCGGATT asp4δR (SEQ ID NO:4δ3)

ATTTCCCGGAAACGAGCTSNNTGCAAATGTGCCAGTCGG asp49R (SEQ ID NO:4δ4)

ATCATTTCCCGGAAACGASNNACCTGCAAATGTGCCAGT aspδOR (SEQ ID NO:4δ5)

ATAATCATTTCCCGGAAASNNGCTACCTGCAAATGTGCC aspδlR (SEQ ID NO:456)

TGCATAATCATTTCCCGGSNNCGAGCTACCTGCAAATGT aspδ2R (SEQ ID NO:4δ7)

GAATGCATAATCATTTCCSNNAAACGAGCTACCTGCAAA aspδ3R (SEQ ID N0:4δδ)

GACGAATGCATAATCATTSNNCGGAAACGAGCTACCTGC aspδ4R (SEQ ID N0:4δ9)

TCGGACGAATGCATAATCSNNTCCCGGAAACGAGCTACC asp55R (SEQ ID NO:460)

TGTTCGGACGAATGCATASNNATTTCCCGGAAACGAGCT asp56R (SEQ ID NO:461)

CCCTGTTCGGACGAATGCSNNATCATTTCCCGGAAACGA aspδ7R (SEQ ID NO:462)

TGCCCCTGTTCGGACGAASNNATAATCATTTCCCGGAAA aspδδR (SEQ ID NO:463)

TCCTGCCCCTGTTCGGACSNNTGCATAATCATTTCCCGG aspδ9R (SEQ ID NO:464)

TACTCCTGCCCCTGTTCGSNNGAATGCATAATCATTTCC asp60R (SEQ ID NO:46δ)

ATTTACTCCTGCCCCTGTSNNGACGAATGCATAATCATT asp61R (SEQ ID NO:466)

CAAATTTACTCCTGCCCCSNNTCGGACGAATGCATAATC asp62R (SEQ ID NO:467)

AAGCAAATTTACTCCTGCSNNTGTTCGGACGAATGCATA asp63R (SEQ ID NO:46δ)

GGCAAGCAAATTTACTCCSNNCCCTGTTCGGACGAATGC asp64R (SEQ ID NO:469)

TTGGGCAAGCAAATTTACSNNTGCCCCTGTTCGGACGAA aspδδR (SEQ ID NO:470)

GACTTGGGCAAGCAAATTSNNTCCTGCCCCTGTTCGGAC asp66R (SEQ ID NO:471)

ATTGACTTGGGCAAGCAASNNTACTCCTGCCCCTGTTCG asp67R (SEQ ID NO:472)

GTTATTGACTTGGGCAAGSNNATTTACTCCTGCCCCTGT aspδδR (SEQ ID NO:473)

GTAGTTATTGACTTGGGCSNNCAAATTTACTCCTGCCCC asp69R (SEQ ID NO:474)

CGAGTAGTTATTGACTTGSNNAAGCAAATTTACTCCTGC asp70R (SEQ ID NO:47δ)

GCCCGAGTAGTTATTGACSNNGGCAAGCAAATTTACTCC asp71R (SEQ ID NO:476) asp72R GCCGCCCGAGTAGTTATTSNNTTGGGCAAGCAAATTTAC (SEQ ID N0:477)

TCTGCCGCCCGAGTAGTTSNNGACTTGGGCAAGCAAATT asp73R (SEQ ID NO:478)

GACTCTGCCGCCCGAGTASNNATTGACTTGGGCAAGCAA asp74R (SEQ ID NO:479)

TTGGACTCTGCCGCCCGASNNGTTATTGACTTGGGCAAG asp7δR (SEQ ID NO:4δO)

TACTTGGACTCTGCCGCCSNNGTAGTTATTGACTTGGGC asp76R (SEQ ID NO:4δ1 )

TGCTACTTGGACTCTGCCSNNCGAGTAGTTATTGACTTG asp77R (SEQ ID NO:4δ2)

TCCTGCTACTTGGACTCTSNNGCCCGAGTAGTTATTGAC asp7δR (SEQ ID NO:4δ3)

ATGTCCTGCTACTTGGACSNNGCCGCCCGAGTAGTTATT asp79R (SEQ ID NO:4δ4)

CGTATGTCCTGCTACTTGSNNTCTGCCGCCCGAGTAGTT aspδOR (SEQ ID NO:4δ5)

GGCCGTATGTCCTGCTACSNNGACTCTGCCGCCCGAGTA asp81R (SEQ ID NO:486)

TGCGGCCGTATGTCCTGCSNNTTGGACTCTGCCGCCCGA asp82R (SEQ ID NO:487)

TGGTGCGGCCGTATGTCCSNNTACTTGGACTCTGCCGCC asp83R (SEQ ID NO-.488)

AACTGGTGCGGCCGTATGSNNTGCTACTTGGACTCTGCC asp84R (SEQ ID NO:489)

TCCAACTGGTGCGGCCGTSNNTCCTGCTACTTGGACTCT asp85R (SEQ ID NO:490)

AGATCCAACTGGTGCGGCSNNATGTCCTGCTACTTGGAC asp86R (SEQ ID NO.-491)

AGCAGATCCAACTGGTGCSNNCGTATGTCCTGCTACTTG asp87R (SEQ ID NO:492)

TACAGCAGATCCAACTGGSNNGGCCGTATGTCCTGCTAC aspδδR (SEQ ID NO:493)

GCATACAGCAGATCCAACSNNTGCGGCCGTATGTCCTGC aspδ9R (SEQ ID NO:494)

GCGGCATACAGCAGATCCSNNTGGTGCGGCCGTATGTCC asp90R (SEQ ID NO:495)

TGAGCGGCATACAGCAGASNNAACTGGTGCGGCCGTATG asp91R (SEQ ID NO:496)

ACCTGAGCGGCATACAGCSNNTCCAACTGGTGCGGCCGT asp92R (SEQ ID NO:497)

GCTACCTGAGCGGCATACSNNAGATCCAACTGGTGCGGC asp93R (SEQ ID NO:49δ)

AGTGCTACCTGAGCGGCASNNAGCAGATCCAACTGGTGC asp94R (SEQ ID NO:499)

TGTAGTGCTACCTGAGCGSNNTACAGCAGATCCAACTGG asp95R (SEQ ID NO:500)

ACCTGTAGTGCTACCTGASNNGCATACAGCAGATCCAAC asp96R (SEQ ID NO:δ01) asp97R CCAACCTGTAGTGCTACCSNNGCGGCATACAGCAGATCC (SEQ ID NO:δ02)

ATGCCAACCTGTAGTGCTSNNTGAGCGGCATACAGCAGA aspθδR (SEQ ID NO:δ03)

GCAATGCCAACCTGTAGTSNNACCTGAGCGGCATACAGC asp99R (SEQ ID NO:δ04)

TCCGCAATGCCAACCTGTSNNGCTACCTGAGCGGCATAC asplOOR (SEQ ID NO:δ0δ)

AGTTCCGCAATGCCAACCSNNAGTGCTACCTGAGCGGCA asp101R (SEQ ID NO:δ06)

GATAGTTCCGCAATGCCASNNTGTAGTGCTACCTGAGCG asp102R (SEQ ID NO:δ07)

CGTGATAGTTCCGCAATGSNNACCTGTAGTGCTACCTGA asp103R (SEQ ID NO:δ0δ)

CGCCGTGATAGTTCCGCASNNCCAACCTGTAGTGCTACC asp104R (SEQ ID NO:δ09)

CAGCGCCGTGATAGTTCCSNNATGCCAACCTGTAGTGCT asplOδR (SEQ ID NO:δ10)

ATTCAGCGCCGTGATAGTSNNGCAATGCCAACCTGTAGT asp106R (SEQ ID NO:δ11)

CGAATTCAGCGCCGTGATSNNTCCGCAATGCCAACCTGT asp107R (SEQ ID NO:512)

AGACGAATTCAGCGCCGTSNNAGTTCCGCAATGCCAACC asplOδR (SEQ ID NO:513)

GACAGACGAATTCAGCGCSNNGATAGTTCCGCAATGCCA asp109R (SEQ ID NO:δ14)

CGTGACAGACGAATTCAGSNNCGTGATAGTTCCGCAATG asp110R (SEQ ID NO:515)

ATACGTGACAGACGAATTSNNCGCCGTGATAGTTCCGCA asp111R (SEQ ID NO:δ16)

TGGATACGTGACAGACGASNNCAGCGCCGTGATAGTTCC asp112R (SEQ ID NO:517)

CTCTGGATACGTGACAGASNNATTCAGCGCCGTGATAGT asp113R (SEQ ID NO:51δ)

TCCCTCTGGATACGTGACSNNCGAATTCAGCGCCGTGAT asp114R (SEQ ID NO:519)

TGTTCCCTCTGGATACGTSNNAGACGAATTCAGCGCCGT asp11δR (SEQ ID NO:δ20)

GACTGTTCCCTCTGGATASNNGACAGACGAATTCAGCGC asp116R (SEQ ID NO:δ21 )

TCGGACTGTTCCCTCTGGSNNCGTGACAGACGAATTCAG asp117R (SEQ ID NO:522)

TCCTCGGACTGTTCCCTCSNNATACGTGACAGACGAATT asp11δR (SEQ ID NO:523)

AAGTCCTCGGACTGTTCCSNNTGGATACGTGACAGACGA asp119R (SEQ ID NO:δ24)

GATAAGTCCTCGGACTGTSNNCTCTGGATACGTGACAGA asp120R (SEQ ID NO:525)

GCGGATAAGTCCTCGGACSNNTCCCTCTGGATACGTGAC asp121R (SEQ ID NO:δ26) asp122R CGTGCGGATAAGTCCTCGSNNTGTTCCCTCTGGATACGT (SEQ ID NO:δ27)

CGTCGTGCGGATAAGTCCSNNGACTGTTCCCTCTGGATA asp123R (SEQ ID NO:δ28)

AACCGTCGTGCGGATAAGSNNTCGGACTGTTCCCTCTGG asp124R (SEQ ID NO:δ29)

ACAAACCGTCGTGCGGATSNNTCCTCGGACTGTTCCCTC asp125R (SEQ ID NO:530)

GGCACAAACCGTCGTGCGSNNAAGTCCTCGGACTGTTCC asp126R (SEQ ID NO:631)

TTCGGCACAAACCGTCGTSNNGATAAGTCCTCGGACTGT asp127R (SEQ ID NO:δ32)

TGGTTCGGCACAAACCGTSNNGCGGATAAGTCCTCGGAC asp128R (SEQ ID NO:δ33)

ACCTGGTTCGGCACAAACSNNCGTGCGGATAAGTCCTCG asp129R (SEQ ID NO:δ34)

ATCACCTGGTTCGGCACASNNCGTCGTGCGGATAAGTCC asp130R (SEQ ID N0:δ3δ)

GCTATCACCTGGTTCGGCSNNAACCGTCGTGCGGATAAG asp131 R (SEQ ID NO:δ36)

TCCGCTATCACCTGGTTCSNNACAAACCGTCGTGCGGAT asp132R (SEQ ID NO:δ37)

ACCTCCGCTATCACCTGGSNNGGCACAAACCGTCGTGCG asp133R (SEQ ID N0:δ3δ)

GCTACCTCCGCTATCACCSNNTTCGGCACAAACCGTCGT asp134R (SEQ ID NO:δ39)

AAGGCTACCTCCGCTATCSNNTGGTTCGGCACAAACCGT asp135R (SEQ ID NO:540)

TAAAAGGCTACCTCCGCTSNNACCTGGTTCGGCACAAAC asp136R (SEQ ID NO:541 )

CGCTAAAAGGCTACCTCCSNNATCACCTGGTTCGGCACA asp137R (SEQ ID NO:542)

TCCCGCTAAAAGGCTACCSNNGCTATCACCTGGTTCGGC asp13δR (SEQ ID NO:δ43)

ATTTCCCGCTAAAAGGCTSNNTCCGCTATCACCTGGTTC asp139R (SEQ ID NO:544)

TTGATTTCCCGCTAAAAGSNNACCTCCGCTATCACCTGG asp140R (SEQ ID NO:54δ)

GGCTTGATTTCCCGCTAASNNGCTACCTCCGCTATCACC asp141 R (SEQ ID NO:δ46)

TTGGGCTTGATTTCCCGCSNNAAGGCTACCTCCGCTATC asp142R (SEQ ID NO:δ47)

ACCTTGGGCTTGATTTCCSNNTAAAAGGCTACCTCCGCT asp143R (SEQ ID N0:δ4δ)

GACACCTTGGGCTTGATTSNNCGCTAAAAGGCTACCTCC asp144R (SEQ ID NO:549)

CGTGACACCTTGGGCTTGSNNTCCCGCTAAAAGGCTACC asp145R (SEQ ID NO:550)

TGACGTGACACCTTGGGCSNNATTTCCCGCTAAAAGGCT asp146R (SEQ ID NO:551 ) aspl 47R ACCTGACGTGACACCTTGSNNTTGATTTCCCGCTAAAAG (SEQ ID NO:552)

ACCACCTGACGTGACACCSNNGGCTTGATTTCCCGCTAA asp148R (SEQ ID NO:δ53)

AGAACCACCTGACGTGACSNNTTGGGCTTGATTTCCCGC asp149R (SEQ ID NO.-554)

TCCAGAACCACCTGACGTSNNACCTTGGGCTTGATTTCC asp150R (SEQ ID NO:5δ5)

ATTTCCAGAACCACCTGASNNGACACCTTGGGCTTGATT asp151R (SEQ ID NO:556)

ACAATTTCCAGAACCACCSNNCGTGACACCTTGGGCTTG asp152R (SEQ ID NO:557)

CCGACAATTTCCAGAACCSNNTGACGTGACACCTTGGGC asp163R (SEQ ID NO:558)

CGTCCGACAATTTCCAGASNNACCTGACGTGACACCTTG asp154R (SEQ ID NO:5δ9)

CCCCGTCCGACAATTTCCSNNACCACCTGACGTGACACC asp155R (SEQ ID NO:560)

TCCCCCCGTCCGACAATTSNNAGAACCACCTGACGTGAC asp156R (SEQ ID NO-.561)

TGTTCCCCCCGTCCGACASNNTCCAGAACCACCTGACGT asp157R (SEQ ID NO:562)

TGTTGTTCCCCCCGTCCGSNNATTTCCAGAACCACCTGA asp158R (SEQ ID NO:563)

GAATGTTGTTCCCCCCGTSNNACAATTTCCAGAACCACC asp159R (SEQ ID NO:564)

AAAGAATGTTGTTCCCCCSNNCCGACAATTTCCAGAACC asp160R (SEQ ID NO:δ65)

TTGAAAGAATGTTGTTCCSNNCGTCCGACAATTTCCAGA asp161R (SEQ ID NO:566)

TGGTTGAAAGAATGTTGTSNNCCCCGTCCGACAATTTCC asp162R (SEQ ID NO:567)

GACTGGTTGAAAGAATGTSNNTCCCCCCGTCCGACAATT asp163R (SEQ ID NO:568)

GTTGACTGGTTGAAAGAASNNTGTTCCCCCCGTCCGACA asp164R (SEQ ID NO:569)

CGGGTTGACTGGTTGAAASNNTGTTGTTCCCCCCGTCCG asp165R (SEQ ID NO:570)

AATCGGGTTGACTGGTTGSNNGAATGTTGTTCCCCCCGT asp166R (SEQ ID NO:571 )

CAAAATCGGGTTGACTGGSNNAAAGAATGTTGTTCCCCC asp167R (SEQ ID NO:572)

CTGCAAAATCGGGTTGACSNNTTGAAAGAATGTTGTTCC (SEQ asp16δR ID NO:573)

AGCCTGCAAAATCGGGTTSNNTGGTTGAAAGAATGTTGT (SEQ asp169R ID NO:574)

GTAAGCCTGCAAAATCGGSNNGACTGGTTGAAAGAATGT asp170R (SEQ ID NO:575)

GCCGTAAGCCTGCAAAATSNNGTTGACTGGTTGAAAGAA asp171R (SEQ ID NO:576) asp172R CAGGCCGTAAGCCTGCAASNNCGGGTTGACTGGTTGAAA (SEQ ID NO:δ77)

TCTCAGGCCGTAAGCCTGSNNAATCGGGTTGACTGGTTG asp173R (SEQ ID NO:578)

CATTCTCAGGCCGTAAGCSNNCAAAATCGGGTTGACTGG asp174R (SEQ ID NO:579)

AATCATTCTCAGGCCGTASNNCTGCAAAATCGGGTTGAC asp175R (SEQ ID NO:580)

CGTAATCATTCTCAGGCCSNNAGCCTGCAAAATCGGGTT asp176R (SEQ ID NO:5δ1)

AGTCGTAATCATTCTCAGSNNGTAAGCCTGCAAAATCGG asp177R (SEQ ID NO:5δ2)

GTCAGTCGTAATCATTCTSNNGCCGTAAGCCTGCAAAAT asp178R (SEQ ID NO:583)

AGAGTCAGTCGTAATCATSNNCAGGCCGTAAGCCTGCAA asp179R (SEQ ID NO:584)

TCCAGAGTCAGTCGTAATSNNTCTCAGGCCGTAAGCCTG asp180R (SEQ ID NO:δ8δ)

ACTTCCAGAGTCAGTCGTSNNCATTCTCAGGCCGTAAGC asp181 R (SEQ ID NO:586)

GGAACTTCCAGAGTCAGTSNNAATCATTCTCAGGCCGTA asp182R (SEQ ID NO:587)

AGGGGAACTTCCAGAGTCSNNCGTAATCATTCTCAGGCC asp183R (SEQ ID NO:δ88)

TTAAGGGGAACTTCCAGASNNAGTCGTAATCATTCTCAG asp184R (SEQ ID NO:δ89)

GGGTTAAGGGGAACTTCCSNNGTCAGTCGTAATCATTCT asplδδR (SEQ ID NO:590)

GTTGGGTTAAGGGGAACTSNNAGAGTCAGTCGTAATCAT asp186R (SEQ ID NO:591 )

TCTGTTGGGTTAAGGGGASNNTCCAGAGTCAGTCGTAAT asp187R (SEQ ID IMO:592)

TCCTCTGTTGGGTTAAGGSNNACTTCCAGAGTCAGTCGT asplδδR (SEQ ID IMO:593)

CCGTCCTCTGTTGGGTTASNNGGAACTTCCAGAGTCAGT asp1δ9R (SEQ ID NO:δ94)

EXAMPLE 16 Construction of Arginine and Cysteine Combinatorial Mutants In this Example, the construction of multiple arginine and cysteine mutants of ASP is described. These experiments were conducted in order to determine whether the use of surface arginine and cysteine combinatorial libraries would lead to mutants with increased expression at the protein level.

The QuikChange® multi site-directed mutagenesis (QCMS) kit (Stratagene) was used to construct the two libraries. The 5' phosphorylated primers used to create the two libraries are shown in Table 16-1. It was noted that HPLC, PAGE or any other type of purified primers gave far better results in terms of incorporation of full length primers as well as significant reduction in primer-containing errors. However, in these experiments, purified primers were not used, probably resulting in the production of 12% of clones had undesired mutations.

Figure imgf000200_0001

pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 Plasmid Preparation and In vitro Methylation

To construct the cysteine and arginine libraries using the QCMS kit, the template plasmid pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 was first methylated in vitro since it was derived from a Bacillus strain that does not methylate DNA at GATC sites. This method was used because the more common approach of ensuring methylation in plasmids used in the QCMS protocol involving deriving DNA from dam+ E. coli strains was not an option here, because the plasmid pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 does not grown in E. coli.

Miniprep DNA was prepared from Bacillus cells harboring the pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 plasmid. Specifically, the strain was grown overnight in 5 mL of LB withlOppm of neomycin, after which the cells were spun down. The Qiagen spin miniprep DNA kit was used for preparing the plasmid DNA with an additional step wherein 100uL of 10mg/mL lysozyme was added after the addition of 2δ0uL of P1 buffer from the kit. The sample was incubated at 37°C for 15 min with shaking, after which the remaining steps outlined in the Qiagen miniprep kit manual were carried out. The miniprep DNA was eluted with 30uL of Qiagen buffer EB provided in the kit.

Next, the pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 plasmid DNA was methylated in vitro using a dam methylase kit from NEB (NEB catalog # MO222S). Briefly, 25μL of the miniprep DNA (about 1-2 μg) was incubated with 20μL of the 10x NEB dam methylase buffer, 0.5μL of S- adenosylmethionine (80μM), 4μL of the dam methylase and 150.5μL of sterile distilled water. The reaction was incubated at 37°C for 4 hours, after which the DNA was purified using a Qiagen PCR purification kit. The methylated DNA was eluted with 40μL of buffer EB provided in the kit. To confirm methylation of the DNA, 4μL of the purified, methylated DNA was digested with Mbo\ (NEB; this enzyme cuts unmethylated GATC sites) or Dpn\ (Roche; this enzyme cuts methylated GATC sites) in a 20μL reaction using 2μL of each enzyme. The reactions were incubated at 37°C for 2 hours and they were analyzed on a 1.2% E-gel (Invitrogen). A small molecular weight DNA smear/ladder was observed for the Dpnl digest, whereas the M ol digest showed intact DNA, which indicated that the pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 plasmid was successfully methylated.

Library Construction

The cysteine (cys) and arginine (arg) combinatorial libraries were constructed as outlined in the Stratagene QCMS kit, with the exception of the primer concentration used in the reactions. Specifically, 4μL of the methylated, purified pHPLT-ASP-C1-2 plasmid (about 25 to 50ng) was mixed with 15μL of sterile distilled water, 1.δμL of dNTP, 2.5μL of 10x buffer, 1μL of the enzyme blend and 1.0μL arginine or cysteine mutant primer mix (i.e., for a total of100ng of primers). The primer mix was prepared using 10μL of each of the nine arginine primers (100ng/μL) or each of the six cysteine primers (100ng/μL); adding 50ng of each primer for both the arg and cys libraries as recommended in the Stratagene manual resulted in less than 50% of the clones containing mutations in a previous round of mutagenesis. Thus, the protocol was modified in the present round of mutagenesis to include a total of 100ng of primers in each reaction. The cycling conditions were 95°C for 1 min, followed by 30 cycles of 95°C for 1 min, 55°C for 1 min, and 6δ°C for 9 min, in an MJ Research thermocycler using thin-walled 0.2mL PCR tubes. The reaction product was digested with 1μL of Dpn\ from the QCMS kit by incubating at 37"C overnight. An additional O.δμL of Dpnl was added, and the reaction was incubated for 1 hour.

To transform the library DNA directly into Bacillus cells with out going through E. coli, the library DNA (single-stranded QCMS product) was amplified using the TempliPhi kit (Amersham cat. #25-6400), because Bacillus requires double-stranded multimeric DNA for transformation. For this purpose, 1μL of the arginine or cysteine QCMS reaction was mixed with 5μL of sample buffer from the TempliPhi kit and heated for 3 minutes at 9δ°C to denature the DNA. The reaction was placed on ice to cool for 2 minutes and then spun down briefly. Next, δμL of reaction buffer and 0.2μL of phi29 polymerase from the TempliPhi kit were added, and the reactions were incubated at 30°C in an MJ Research PCR machine for 4 hours. The phi29 enzyme was heat inactivated in the reactions by incubation at 6δ°C for 10 min in the PCR machine.

For transformation of the libraries into Bacillus, O.δμL of the TempliPhi amplification reaction product was mixed with 100μL of co K competent cells followed by vigorous

5 shaking at 37°C for 1 hour. The transformation was serially diluted up to 10 fold, and 60μL of each dilution was plated on LA plates containing 10 ppm neomycin and 1.6% skim milk. Twenty-four clones from each library were picked for sequencing. Briefly, the colonies were resuspended in 20μL of sterile distilled water and 2μL was then used for PCR with ReadyTaq beads (Amersham) in a total volume of 25μL. Primers ASPF1 and ASPR4 were added at a concentration of 0.5μM. Cycling conditions were 94°C for 4 min once, followed by 30 cycles of 94°C for 1min, 55°C for 1 min, and 72°C for 1min, followed by one round at 72°C for 7 min. A 1.δkb fragme'nt was obtained in each case and the product was purified using a Qiagen PCR purification kit. The purified PCR products were sequenced with ASPF4 and ASPR4 primers. A total of 48 clones were sequenced (24 from each library). The mutagenesis worked quite well in that only about 16% of the clones were WT. But 20% of the clones had mixed sequences because the plate was crowded with colonies or the TempliPhi amplification resulted in very concentrated DNA for transformation. Also, as indicated above, about 12% of clones had extra mutations. The remaining clones were all mutant, and of these about 60-80% were unique mutants. The sequencing results for the arginine and cysteine libraries are provided below in Tables 16-2, and 16-3.

Table 16-2. Arginine Library Sequencing and Skim Milk Plate Results

Figure imgf000203_0001

Figure imgf000203_0002
Figure imgf000204_0001

Of the mutants identified in sequencing, the following mutants from the arginine library (See, Table 16-4) were found to be of interest. See the Examples below for additional data regarding the properties of these mutants.

Figure imgf000204_0002

Importantly, the activity results indicated that mutations in the cysteine residues produced ASP proteases with very low or no activity, suggesting that the disulfide bridges play an important role in the stability of the molecule. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to any particular mechanism(s).

EXAMPLE 17 Expression of Homologous O. turbata Protease in S. lividans

In this Example, expression of protease produced by O. turbata that is homologous to the protease 69B4 in S. lividans is described. Thus, this Example describes plasmids comprising polynucleotides encoding a polypeptide having proteolytic activity and used such vectors to transform a Streptomyces lividans host cell. The transformation methods used herein are known in the art (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,237,δ39; and WO 02/50246, herein incorporated by reference). The vector (i.e., plasmid) used in these experiments comprised a polynucleotide encoding a protease of the present invention obtained from Oerskovia turbata DSM 20577. This plasmid was used to transform Streptomyces lividans. The final plasmid vector is referred to herein as "pSEA4CT-O.turbata."

As with previous vectors, the construction of pSEA4CT-O.turbata made use of the pSEGCT plasmid vector (See, above).

An Aspergillus niger ("A4") regulatory sequence operably linked to the structural gene encoding the Oerskovia turbata protease (Otp) was used to drive the expression of the protease. A fusion between the A4-regulatory sequence and the Oerskovia turbata signal- sequence, N-terminal prosequence and mature protease sequence (i.e., without the C- terminal prosequence) was constructed by fusion-PCR techniques known in the art, as an Xoal-βamHI fragment. The polynucleotide primers for the cloning of Oerskovia turbata protease (Otp) in pSEA4CT were based on SEQ ID NO:67. The primer sequences used were:

A4-turb Fw

5'-CAGAGACAGACCCCCGGAGGTAACCATGGCACGATCATTCTGGAGGACGC-3' (SEQ ID NO:613)

A4- turb RV 5'-GCGTCCTCCAGAATGATCGTGCCATGGTTACCTCCGGGGGTCTGTCTCTG-3' (SEQ ID NO:614)

A4- turb Bam Rv δ'-ATCCGCTCGCGGATCCCCATTGTCAGCTCGGGCCCCCACCGTCAGAGGTCACGAG- 3' (SEQ ID NO:61δ)

A4- da1-FW δ'-GCAGCCTGAACTAGTTGCGATCCTCTAGAGATCGAACTTCAT-3' (SEQ ID NO:616)

The fragment was ligated into plasmid pSEA4CT digested with Xba\ and βamHI, resulting in plasmid pSEA4CT-O. turbata. The host Streptomyces lividans TK23 was transformed with plasmid vector pSEA4CT-O.turbata using the protoplast method described in the previous Example (i.e., using the method of Hopwood et al., supra).

The transformed culture was expanded to provide two fermentation cultures in TS* medium. The composition of TS* medium was (g/L) tryptone (Difco) 16, soytone (Difco) 4, casein hydrolysate (Merck) 20, K2HPO 10, glucose 15, Basildon antifoam 0.6, pH 7.0. At various time points, samples of the fermentation broths were removed for analysis. For the purposes of this experiment, a skim milk procedure was used to confirm successful cloning. 30 μL of the shake flask supernatant was pipetted in punched out holes in skim milk agar plates and incubated at 37°C.

The incubated plates were visually reviewed after overnight incubation for the presence of clearing zones (halos) indicating the expression of proteolytic enzyme. For purposes of this experiment, the samples were also assayed for protease activity and for molecular weight (SDS-PAGE). At the end of the fermentation, full length protease was observed by SDS-PAGE.

A sample of the fermentation broth was assayed as follows: 10μL of the diluted supernatant was collected and analyzed using the Dimethylcasein Hydrolysis Assay described in Example 1. The assay results of the fermentation broth of 2 clones clearly show that the polynucleotide from Oerskovia turbata encoding a polypeptide having proteolytic activity was expressed in Streptomyces lividans.

EXAMPLE 18

Expression of Homologous Cellulomonas and Cellulosimicrobium

Proteases in S. lividans

In this Example, expression of proteases produced by Cellulomonas cellasea DSM 2011 δ and Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 204244 that are homologous to the protease 69B4 in S. lividans is described. Thus, this Example describes plasmids comprising polynucleotides encoding a polypeptide having proteolytic activity and used such vectors to transform a Streptomyces lividans host cell. The transformation methods used herein are known in the art (See e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,2δ7,δ39; and WO 02/50246, herein incorporated by reference). The final plasmid vectors are referred to as pSEA4CT-C.cellasea and pSEA4CT- Cm. cellulans. The construction of pSEA4CT-C.cellasea and pSEA4CT-Cm.cellulans made use of the pSEGCT plasmid vector described above.

An Aspergillus niger ("A4") regulatory sequence operably linked to the structural gene encoding the Cellulomonas cellasea mature protease (Ccp) or alternatively, the structural gene encoding the Cellulosimicrobium cellulans mature protease (Cmcp) was used to drive the expression of the protease. A fusion between the A4-regulatory sequence and the 69B4 protease signal-sequence, N-terminal prosequence of the 69B4 protease gene and mature sequence of the native protease gene obtained from genomic DNA of a strain of Micrococcineae (herein, Cellulomonas cellasea or Cellulosimicrobium cellulans) was constructed by fusion-PCR techniques, as a Xoal-βamHI fragment. The polynucleotide primers for the cloning of Cellulomonas cellasea protease (Ccp) in pSEA4CT were based on SEQ ID NO:63, and are as follows:

Asp-npro fw-cell δ'-

AGACCGACGAGACCCCGCGGACCATGGTCGACGTCATCGGCGGCAACGCGTACTAC- 3' (SEQ ID NO:617)

Cell-BH1-rv δ'-

TCAGCCGATCCGCTCGCGGATCCCCATTGTCAGCCCAGGACGAGACGCAGACCGTA-3'

(SEQ ID NO:61δ)

Asp-npro rv-cell δ'-

GTAGTACGCGTTGCCGCCGATGACGTCGACCATGGTCCGCGGGGTCTCGTCGGTCT-

3' (SEQ ID NO:619)

Xba-1 fw A4 δ'-GCAGCCTGAACTAGTTGCGATCCTCTAGAGATCGAACTTCATGTTCGA-3' (SEQ ID

NO:620)

The polynucleotide primers for the cloning of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans protease (Cmcp) in pSEA4CT were based on SEQ ID NO:71 , and are as follows, ASP-npro fw cellu δ'-ACCGACGAGACCCCGCGGACCATGCACGGCGACGTGCGCGGCGGCGACCGCTA-3'

(SEQ ID NO:621 )

ASP-npro rv cellu δ'-TAGCGGTCGCCGCCGCGCACGTCGCCGTGCATGGTCCGCGGGGTCTCGTCGGT-3'

(SEQ ID NO:622)

Cellu-BH1-rv 5'-

TCAGCCGATCCGCTCGCGGATCCCCATTGTCAGCGAGCCCGACGAGCGCGCTGCCCG

AC-3' (SEQ ID NO:623)

Xba-1 fw A4 δ'-GCAGCCTGAACTAGTTGCGATCCTCTAGAGATCGAACTTCATGTTCGA-3' (SEQ ID

NO:620)

The host Streptomyces lividans TK23 was transformed with plasmid vector pSEA4CT using the protoplast method described above (i.e., Hopwood et. al., supra). The transformed culture was expanded to provide two fermentation cultures in TS* medium. The composition of TS* medium was (g/L) tryptone (Difco) 16, soytone (Difco) 4, casein hydrolysate (Merck) 20, K2HP0 10, glucose 16, Basildon antifoam 0.6, pH 7.0. At various time points, samples of the fermentation broths were removed for analysis. For the purposes of this experiment, a skim milk procedure was used to confirm successful cloning.

30 μL of the shake flask supernatant was pipetted in punched out holes in skim milk agar plates and incubated at 37°C.

The incubated plates were visually reviewed after overnight incubation for the presence of clearing zones (halos) indicating the expression of proteolytic enzyme. For purposes of this experiment, the samples were also assayed for protease activity and for molecular weight (SDS-PAGE). At the end of the fermentation full length protease was observed by SDS-PAGE.

A sample of the fermentation broth was assayed as follows: 10μL of the diluted supernatant was taken and added to 190 μL AAPF substrate solution (cone. 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris/0.00δ% Tween δ0, pH δ.6). The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored (2δ°C). As in previous Examples, the results obtained clearly indicated that the polynucleotide from Cellulomonas cellasea or from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans, both encoding polypeptides having proteolytic activity were expressed in Streptomyces lividans.

EXAMPLE 19 Determination of the Crystal Structure of ASP Protease

In this Example, methods used to determine the crystal structure of ASP protease are described. Indeed, high quality single crystals were obtained from purified ASP protease. The crystallization conditions were as follows: 26% PEG 8000, 0.2M ammonium sulphate, and 16% glycerol. -These crystallization conditions are cryo-protective, so transfer to a cryoprotectant was not required. The crystals were frozen in liquid nitrogen, and kept frozen during data collection using an Xstream (Molecular Structure). Data were collected with a R-axis IV (Molecular Structure), equipped with focusing mirrors. X-ray reflection data were obtained to 1.9A resolution. The space group was P212 21, with cell dimensions a=3δ.65A, b=51.82 A and c=76.86A. There was one molecule per asymmetric unit.

The crystal structure was solved using the molecular replacement method. The program used was X-MR (Accelrys Inc.). The starting model for the molecular replacement calculations was Streptogrisin. It is clear from the electron density map obtained from X-MR that the molecular replacement solution is correct. Thus, 98% of the model was built correctly, with some minor errors that were fixed manually. The R-factor for data to 1.9A was 0.23.

The structure was found to largely consist of β-sheets, with 2 very short α-helices, and a longer helix toward the C-terminal end. There are two sets of β-sheets, with a considerable interface between them. The active-site is found in a cleft formed at this interface. The catalytic triad is formed by His 32, Asp 66, and Ser 137. Table 19-1 provides the atomic coordinates identified for ASP.

Table 19-1 Atomic Coordinates for ASP

CRYST1 35. 770 51.730 76, .650 90.00 90.00 90.00 P212121

ATOM 1 N PHE A 1 2.421 18.349 15.176 1.00 16, .78 N

ATOM 2 CA PHE A 1 3.695 18.087 15.905 1.00 18, .18 C AATTOOMM 33 CCBB PPHHEE AA 11 44..887755 1188..555500 1155..004488 11..0000 1166., .7733 C

ATOM 4 C PHE A 1 3.700 18.810 17.249 1.00 16, .36 C

ATOM 5 O PHE A 1 3.443 20.011 17.315 1.00 17. .91 O

ATOM 6 CG PHE A 1 6.214 18.292 15.664 1.00 17. .42 C

ATOM 7 CD2 PHE A 1 6.955 17.180 15.296 1.00 19. .42 C AATTOOMM 88 GCDDI1 PPHHEE AA 11 66..773366 1199..116600 1166..661111 11..0000 1166.. .1133 C

ATOM 9 CE2 PHE A 1 8.200 16.933 15.863 1.00 18. .08 C ATOM 10 CE1 PHE A 1 7,.977 18.,922 17.,180 1.,00 18..34 c

ATOM 11 CZ PHE A 1 8, .710 17, ,807 16. .806 1. .00 19, .32 c

ATOM 12 N ASP A 2 3, .984 18. .076 18, .321 1. .00 13, .94 N

ATOM 13 CA ASP A 2 4. ,015 18. ,670 19. .654 1. ,00 15. .04 c

ATOM 14 CB ASP A 2 3. .527 17. ,677 20. .714 1. .00 15. .13 c

ATOM 15 C ASP A 2 5. .403 19. ,149 20. .063 1. .00 14. .43 c

ATOM 16 O ASP A 2 6, .381 18. ,408 19. ,966 1. .00 11. .44 0

ATOM 17 CG ASP A 2 2, .088 17. .243 20. ,502 1, .00 18. .25 c

ATOM 18 OD2 ASP A 2 1. .721 16. .150 20. ,986 1, .00 19, .05 0

ATOM 19 OD1 ASP A 2 1, .320 17. ,996 19. .874 1, .00 15, .33 0

ATOM 20 N VAL A 3 5, .479 20. ,393 20. .523 1, .00 12. .30 N

ATOM 21 CA VAL A 3 6, .740 20. ,979 20. .959 1. .00 11. .83 C

ATOM 22 CB VAL A 3 6, .812 22. .480 20. ,603 1. .00 11, .52 c

ATOM 23 C VAL A 3 6, .766 20. .795 22, .470 1, .00 13, .77 c

ATOM 24 O VAL A 3 5, .912 21. .321 23. .183 1, .00 11, .14 0

ATOM 25 CGI VAL A 3 7, .987 23. ,133 21. .309 1. .00 15. .13 c

ATOM 26 CG2 VAL A 3 6, .968 22. ,637 19. .101 1. .00 14. .21 c

ATOM 27 CB ILE A 4 7, .561 18. ,267 24. .642 1. .00 14. .73 c

ATOM 28 CG2 ILE A 4 7, .799 17. .929 26, .099 1. .00 14, .20 c

ATOM 29 CGI ILE A 4 6, .103 17. .995 24, .267 1, .00 16, .79 c

ATOM 30 CD1 ILE A 4 5, .774 16. .518 24, .166 1. .00 19, .32 c

ATOM 31 C ILE A 4 9, .334 20. .031 24. .816 1. .00 14, .04 c

ATOM 32 O ILE A 4 10, .289 19. .660 24. .140 1. .00 11. .09 0

ATOM 33 N ILE A 4 7, .745 20. .033 22. .945 1. .00 10. .83 N

ATOM 34 CA ILE A 4 7. .903 19, .750 24, .365 1, .00 13. .46 c

ATOM 35 N GLY A 5 9, .475 20, .681 25, .965 1. .00 11. .82 N

ATOM 36 CA GLY A 5 10, .800 20. .995 26, ,467 1, .00 9. .81 C

ATOM 37 C GLY A 5 11, .700 19. .785 26, .644 1, .00 11. .77 c

ATOM 38 O GLY A 5 11, .256 18. .737 27. .114 1, .00 9. .20 0

ATOM 39 N GLY A 6 12 .966 19, .927 26, .255 1, .00 10, .03 N

ATOM 40 CA GLY A 6 13, .917 18, .836 26, .397 1, .00 8, .54 C

ATOM 41 C GLY A 6 14, .070 17. ,979 25, .156 1, .00 9, .57 C

ATOM 42 O GLY A 6 15, .020 17. .200 25. .042 1, .00 7, .69 0

ATOM 43 N ASN A 7 13, .131 18. .119 24, .224 1, .00 9, .01 N

ATOM 44 CA ASN A 7 13, .168 17. .359 22. ,985 1, .00 10. .51 c

ATOM 45 CB ASN A 7 11, .780 17, .293 22, .349 1, .00 14, .65 c

ATOM 46 CG ASN A 7 10. .897 16. .250 22, .981 1, .00 10, .35 c

ATOM 47 OD1 ASN A 7 9, .715 16. .144 22, .644 1, .00 13, .61 0

ATOM 48 ND2 ASN A 7 11, .456 15. .470 23, .896 1, .00 6, .66 N

ATOM 49 C ASN A 7 14, .130 17. .952 21, .976 1, .00 12, .30 C

ATOM 50 O ASN A 7 14, .424 19, .146 21, .991 1, .00 15, .93 O

ATOM 51 N ALA A 8 14 .608 17, .107 21. .079 1 .00 11, .08 N

ATOM 52 CA ALA A 8 15, .532 17, .564 20, .063 1, .00 14, .32 C

ATOM 53 CB ALA A 8 16, .336 16, .392 19, .541 1, .00 14, .61 C

ATOM 54 C ALA A 8 14, .766 18. .202 18, .914 1, .00 11, .23 c

ATOM 55 O ALA A 8 13, .567 17. .987 18, .747 1, .00 12, .54 0

ATOM 56 N TYR A 9 15 .468 19. .021 18. .145 1. .00 9. .75 N

ATOM 57 CA TYR A 9 14 .899 19, .691 16, .988 1 .00 12, .42 C

ATOM 58 CB TYR A 9 14, .279 21, .059 17, .334 1, .00 12, .79 c

ATOM 59 CG TYR A 9 15, .216 22, .150 17, .790 1, .00 14, .12 c

ATOM 60 CD2 TYR A 9 15, .485 22. .333 19, .139 1, .00 10, .17 c

ATOM 61 CE2 TYR A 9 16, .302 23. .366 19, .572 1, .00 12, .49 c

ATOM 62 CD1 TYR A 9 15 .791 23. .029 16. .877 1 .00 9 .02 c

ATOM 63 CE1 TYR A 9 16 .604 24, .066 17, .294 1, .00 10 .92 c

ATOM 64 CZ TYR A 9 16 .857 24, .230 18, .644 1, .00 13, .93 c

ATOM 65 OH TYR A 9 17, .661 25, .261 19, .070 1, .00 12, .50 0

ATOM 66 C TYR A 9 16, .127 19, .792 16, .101 1, .00 12, .21 c

ATOM 67 O TYR A 9 17 .247 19, .589 16 .583 1 .00 11 .38 0

ATOM 68 N THR A 10 15 .946 20, .055 14 .816 1 .00 11 .44 N

ATOM 69 CA THR A 10 17 .105 20, .144 13, .946 1, .00 13 .35 c

ATOM 70 CB THR A 10 17, .114 18, .998 12, .916 1, .00 14, .07 c

ATOM 71 OG1 THR A 10 15, .952 19, .098 12, .086 1, .00 13, .63 0

ATOM 72 CG2 THR A 10 17, .121 17, .648 13, .620 1, .00 12, .60 c

ATOM 73 C THR A 10 17 .267 21, .452 13 .194 1 .00 14 .66 c

ATOM 74 O THR A 10 16 .299 22, .161 12, .907 1 .00 12 .64 0

ATOM 75 N ILE A 11 18 .520 21, .749 12. .881 1 .00 14 .05 N

ATOM 76 CA ILE A 11 18 .889 22, .954 12, .157 1, .00 18, .00 C

ATOM 77 CB ILE A 11 19, .649 23, .931 13, .068 1, .00 17, .58 C

ATOM 78 CG2 ILE A 11 19, .919 25. .230 12, .323 1, .00 20, .00 c

ATOM 79 CGI ILE A 11 18 .825 24, .212 1 .327 1 .00 21 .47 c

ATOM 80 CD1 ILE A 11 19 .560 25, .031 15, .377 1. .00 23, .61

ATOM 81 C ILE A 11 19 .802 22, .485 11, .030 1 .00 16, .40 c

ATOM 82 O ILE A 11 20, .913 22, .014 11, .278 1, .00 17, .72 0

ATOM 83 N GLY A 12 19, .330 22. ,603 9, .794 1, .00 18, .83 N

ATOM 84 CA GLY A 12 20 .132 22, .155 8 .673 1 .00 17 .69 c

ATOM 85 C GLY A 12 20 .359 20, .659 8, .791 1, .00 18, .86 c

ATOM 86 O GLY A 12 21 .395 20, .141 8, .376 1, .00 19, .71 0 ATOM 87 N GLY A 13 19..391 19..964 9..380 1,.00 17..62 N

ATOM 88 CA GLY A 13 19. .509 18. .525 9. .529 1. ,00 16. .37 C

ATOM 89 C GLY A 13 20. ,352 18, ,060 10. .703 1. .00 17. .10 C

ATOM 90 O GLY A 13 20, .470 16, .861 10. .946 1. ,00 15. .94 O

ATOM 91 N ARG A 14 20, .931 19, .002 11, .438 1. ,00 17, .27 N

ATOM 92 CA ARG A 14 21, .772 18, ,667 12, .585 1. .00 15, .15 C

ATOM 93 CB ARG A 14 23, .017 19, .558 12, .586 1. .00 19, .68 C

ATOM 94 C ARG A 14 21. .030 18. .842 13. .908 1. .00 16. .27 C

ATOM 95 O ARG A 14 20. .423 19. .882 14. .159 1. .00 12, .16 O

ATOM 96 CG ARG A 14 24, .009 19. .273 13, .699 1. .00 25, .94 C

ATOM 97 CD ARG A 14 24, .879 18, .069 13, .393 1. .00 31, .69 C

ATOM 98 NE ARG A 14 25, .964 17, .928 14, .360 1. .00 40, .26 N

ATOM 99 CZ ARG A 14 25, .802 17. .572 15. .630 1. .00 42, .65 C

ATOM 100 NH1 ARG A 14 26, .852 17. .483 16. .435 1. .00 45, .09 N

ATOM 101 NH2 ARG A 14 24, .592 17. .302 16. .091 1. .00 41. .89 N

ATOM 102 N SER A 15 21, .075 17, .821 14, .756 1. .00 14, .36 N

ATOM 103 CA SER A 15 20, .407 17, .892 16, .047 1. .00 18, .05 C

ATOM 104 CB SER A 15 20, .033 16, .488 16, .524 1. .00 19, .52 C

ATOM 105 C SER A 15 21, .402 18, .533 17, .011 1. .00 18, .51 C

ATOM 106 O SER A 15 21, .966 17, .870 17. .882 1. .00 16. .89 O

ATOM 107 OG SER A 15 19, .311 16. .542 17. .742 1. .00 24. .25 O

ATOM 108 N ARG A 16 21 .625 19, .829 16, .842 1. .00 15, .76 N

_&TOM._. _ _L09_ .-CA.. . ARG A 16 22, .560 20, .544 17, .695 1. .00 18, .30 C

ATOM 110 CB ARG A 16 23, .077 21, .795 16, .976 1. .00 22, .82 C

ATOM 111 C ARG A 16 22, .006 20, .952 19, .050 1. .00 17, .05 C

ATOM 112 O ARG A 16 22, .760 21, .064 20, .015 1. .00 11, .60 O

ATOM 113 CG ARG A 16 23, .892 21, .498 15. .729 1. .00 30, .78 c

ATOM 114 CD ARG A 16 24, .503 22. .758 15. .131 1. .00 36, .12 c

ATOM 115 NE ARG A 16 23, .494 23, .756 14. .789 1. .00 41, .88 N

ATOM 116 CZ ARG A 16 23, .737 24, .839 14. .058 1. .00 44, .68 C

ATOM 117 NH2 ARG A 16 24, .954 25, .057 13, .579 1. .00 46, .43 N

ATOM 118 NH1 ARG A 16 22, .762 25, .698 13, .796 1. .00 44, .09 N

ATOM 119 N CYS A 17 20, .695 21. .152 19, .130 1. .00 12, .26 N

ATOM 120 CA CYS A 17 20, .085 21. .562 20. .388 1. .00 11. .02 C

ATOM 121 CB CYS A 17 19, .949 23, .079 20. .394 1, .00 11, .05 c

ATOM 122 C CYS A 17 18, .744 20, .946 20, .756 1, .00 8, .62 c

ATOM 123 O CYS A 17 18, .178 20, .154 20, .008 1. .00 10, .24 0

ATOM 124 SG CYS A 17 21, .542 23, .945 20, .503 1. .00 10, .83 s

ATOM 125 N SER A 18 18, .246 21, .338 21, .926 1. .00 9, .44 N

ATOM 126 CA SER A 18 16, .976 20, .849 22. .441 1. .00 10. .14 C

ATOM 127 CB SER A 18 17. .226 20, .053 23, .726 1, .00 11, .06 c

ATOM 128 OG SER A 18 18, .198 19, .042 23, .516 1, .00 11, .13 O

ATOM 129 C SER A 18 16, .019 22, .004 22, .736 1. .00 10, .28 c

ATOM 130 O SER A 18 16, .439 23, .152 22, .882 1, .00 12, .80 0

ATOM 131 N ILE A 19 14, .731 21, .689 22, .806 1. .00 8, .87 N

ATOM 132 CA ILE A 19 13, .698 22, .676 23. .087 1. .00 9, .04 C

ATOM 133 CB ILE A 19 12, .278 22, .070 22, .951 1, .00 9 .94 C

ATOM 134 CG2 ILE A 19 11, .236 23, .126 23, .287 1, .00 10, .60 C

ATOM 135 CGI ILE A 19 12, .053 21, .514 21, .543 1, .00 12, .49 C

ATOM 136 CD1 ILE A 19 12, .083 22, .554 20, .439 1, .00 10, .46 C

ATOM 137 C ILE A 19 13, .840 23, .154 24, .530 1, ,00 9, .36 c

ATOM 138 O ILE A 19 14, .039 22, .346 25, .442 1. ,00 7, .81 0

ATOM 139 N GLY A 20 13, .748 24, .466 24. ,729 1. .00 6, .59 N

ATOM 140 CA GLY A 20 13 .827 25, .024 26, .067 1, .00 7 .48 C

ATOM 141 C GLY A 20 12, .424 25, .027 26, .649 1, .00 10 .12 c

ATOM 142 O GLY A 20 12, .047 24, .128 27, .400 1, .00 9, .28 o

ATOM 143 N PHE A 21 11, .636 26, .037 26, .293 1, .00 11, .70 N

ATOM 144 CA PHE A 21 10, .262 26, .132 26, .770 1, .00 9, .99 C

ATOM 145 CB PHE A 21 10, .182 27, .019 28, .009 1. .00 12, .23 C

ATOM 146 CG PHE A 21 10 .891 26 .455 29, .197 1, .00 12 .14 C

ATOM 147 GDI PHE A 21 10, .282 25, .493 29, .985 1, .00 10 .45 C

ATOM 148 CD2 PHE A 21 12, .174 26, .873 29, .517 1, .00 11, .10 c

ATOM 149 CE1 PHE A 21 10, .943 24, .953 31, .078 1, .00 9, .63 c

ATOM 150 CE2 PHE A 21 12, .841 26, .339 30, .606 1, .00 10, .44 c

ATOM 151 CZ PHE A 21 12, .225 25, .377 31, .390 1, .00 5, .44 c

ATOM 152 C PHE A 21 9 .378 26, .721 25, .692 1, .00 11 .93 c

ATOM 153 O PHE A 21 9, .838 27, .500 24, .861 1, .00 11 .86 o

ATOM 154 N ALA A 22 8, .105 26, .346 25, .709 1, .00 8, .59 N

ATOM 155 CA ALA A 22 7, .171 26, .861 24, .722 1, .00 10, .98 c

ATOM 156 CB ALA A 22 5. .978 25, .920 24, .580 1, .00 9, .33 c

ATOM 157 C ALA A 22 6, .708 28, .233 25, .200 1, .00 9, .72 c

ATOM 158 O ALA A 22 6, .452 28, .431 26, .390 1, .00 10, .20 o

ATOM 159 N VAL A 23 6, .621 29, .178 24, .270 1, .00 9 .39 N

ATOM 160 CA VAL A 23 6, .186 30, .542 24, .579 1, .00 11, .79 c

ATOM 161 CB VAL A 23 7, .369 31, .545 24, .567 1, .00 8, .77 c

ATOM 162 CGI VAL A 23 8. .373 31, .176 25, .644 1. .00 12, .30 c

ATOM 163 CG2 VAL A 23 8. .034 31. .557 23. .195 1. .00 9, .56 c ATOM 164 C VAL A 23 5.197 30.,943 23.,496 1.00 12.,96 C

ATOM 165 O VAL A 23 5. 047 30. 234 22. ,507 1. 00 15. 51 O

ATOM 166 N ASN A 24 4. ,509 32. ,066 23. .668 1. ,00 15. ,64 N

ATOM 167 CA ASN A 24 3. ,559 32. ,472 22. .642 1. ,00 18. ,48 C

ATOM 168 CB ASN A 24 2. ,848 33. ,772 23. .048 1. ,00 23. ,96 C

ATOM 169 C ASN A 24 4. .304 32. ,661 21. .319 1. 00 18. ,42 C

ATOM 170 O ASN A 24 5. ,277 33. ,410 21. .251 1. ,00 16. ,60 O

ATOM 171 CG ASN A 24 3. ,800 34. ,949 23. .182 1. ,00 23. ,94 C

ATOM 172 OD1 ASN A 24 4. ,697 34. ,951 24. .025 1. ,00 23. ,82 O

ATOM 173 ND2 ASN A 24 3. ,602 35. ,964 22. .345 1. ,00 25. ,51 N

ATOM 174 N GLY A 25 3. ,868 31. ,956 20. .278 1. ,00 19. ,39 N

ATOM 175 CA GLY A 25 4. ,509 32. ,086 18. .978 1. ,00 18. ,25 C

ATOM 176 C GLY A 25 5. ,628 31. ,106 18. .649 1. ,00 18. ,73 c

ATOM 177 O GLY A 25 6. ,103 31. ,065 17. .515 1. ,00 18. ,70 O

ATOM 178 N GLY A 26 6. ,064 30. ,318 19. .624 1. ,00 14. ,44 N

ATOM 179 CA GLY A 26 7. ,123 29. ,362 19, .348 1. ,00 15. ,00 C

ATOM 180 C GLY A 26 7. ,779 28. .822 20. .602 1. ,00 11. ,05 C

ATOM 181 O GLY A 26 7. ,095 28. .457 21, .554 1. ,00 10. ,68 O

ATOM 182 N PHE A 27 9. ,107 28. ,759 20. .599 1. ,00 11. ,66 N

ATOM 183 CA PHE A 27 9. .832 28. ,268 21. .761 1. .00 11. .72 C

ATOM 184 CB PHE A 27 10, .056 26. .748 21, .679 1. .00 10. .14 C

ATOM 185 C PHE A 27 11. .169 28. .960 21. .934 1. .00 10. .62 C

ATOM 186 0 PHE A 27 11. .727 29. .509 20. .985 1. ,00 12. ,74 O

ATOM 187 CG PHE A 27 11, .000 26, .309 20, .580 1, ,00 9. ,74 c

ATOM 188 CD1 PHE A 27 10. .524 26. .006 19. .308 1. .00 12. .75 c

ATOM 189 CD2 PHE A 27 12. .361 26. .158 20. .832 1. .00 11. .98 c

ATOM 190 CE1 PHE A 27 11. .384 25. .555 18. .312 1. .00 8. ,90 c

ATOM 191 CE2 PHE A 27 13. .228 25. .707 19. .837 1. .00 10. ,80 c

ATOM 192 CZ PHE A 27 12, ,740 25, .406 18, ,580 1. .00 9. .83 c

ATOM 193 N ILE A 28 11, .675 28, .948 23. .162 1. .00 12. .44 N

ATOM 194 CA ILE A 28 12. ,956 29. .573 23. ,442 1. .00 10. .82 c

ATOM 195 CB ILE A 28 12. .903 30. .454 24. ,707 1. .00 10. .35 c

ATOM 196 C ILE A 28 13. .992 28. .469 23, .590 1, .00 12. .26 c

ATOM 197 O ILE A 28 13, .667 27, .335 23, .960 1, .00 11. .25 0

ATOM 198 CG2 ILE A 28 12, .081 31, .701 24. .434 1. .00 7. .92 c

ATOM 199 CGI ILE A 28 12, .278 29. .690 25. ,873 1. .00 12. .08 c

ATOM 200 CD1 ILE A 28 12, .175 30. .526 27, .129 1. .00 10. .36 c

ATOM 201 N THR A 29 15, .238 28, .804 23, .283 1. .00 11. .02 N

ATOM 202 CA THR A 29 16, .327 27, .845 23. .364 1, .00 11. .15 C

ATOM 203 CB THR A 29 16, .348 26. .988 22. .052 1. .00 13. .72 C

ATOM 204 OG1 THR A 29 17, .364 25. .981 22. .124 1, .00 11. .80 O

ATOM 205 CG2 .THR A 29 16, .594 27, .875 20, .841 1, .00 9, .32 C

ATOM 206 C THR A 29 17, .630 28, .628 23, .555 1, .00 10, .10 c

ATOM 207 O THR A 29 17, .595 29, .818 23, .888 1, ,00 8. .90 o

ATOM 208 N ALA A 30 18, .771 27, .974 23. .353 1. .00 8. .93 N

ATOM 209 CA ALA A 30 20 .069 28, .630 23, .511 1, .00 8, .72 c

ATOM 210 CB ALA A 30 21, .135 27, .602 23, .862 1, .00 9, .30 c

ATOM 211 C ALA A 30 20, .476 29, .388 22, .252 1, .00 8, .30 c

ATOM 212 O ALA A 30 20, .243 28, .925 21, .133 1, .00 11, .59 0

ATOM 213 N GLY A 31 21, .097 30, .547 22, .448 1, .00 10, .82 N

ATOM 214 CA GLY A 31 21 .527 31, .366 21, .330 1, .00 10, .68 C

ATOM 215 C GLY A 31 22 .626 30, .770 20, .469 1, .00 12, .90 C

ATOM 216 O GLY A 31 22, .656 31, .014 19, .259 1, .00 12, .57 O

ATOM 217 N HIS A 32 23, .529 29, .991 21, .065 1, .00 9, ,76 N

ATOM 218 CA HIS A 32 24 .615 29 .409 20 .285 1, .00 9, .96 C

ATOM 219 CB HIS A 32 25 .747 28, .891 21, .194 1, .00 11, .85 C

ATOM 220 CG HIS A 32 25 .442 27, .602 21, .896 1, .00 9, .52 c

ATOM 221 CD2 HIS A 32 25 .495 26, .319 21, .464 1, .00 11, .42 c

ATOM 222 ND1 HIS A 32 25 .093 27 .545 23 .226 1 .00 12 .01 N

ATOM 223 CE1 HIS A 32 24 .945 26 .281 23, .588 1 .00 12, .23 C

ATOM 224 NE2 HIS A 32 25 .185 25, .518 22, .538 1, .00 12, .81 N

ATOM 225 C HIS A 32 24 .138 28, .301 19, .355 1, .00 8, .20 C

ATOM 226 O HIS A 32 24, .917 27, .768 18, .569 1, .00 10, .19 O

ATOM 227 N CYS A 33 22 .850 27 .977 19 .430 1 .00 8 .42 N

ATOM 228 CA CYS A 33 22 .270 26 .933 18, .589 1, .00 9, .80 C

ATOM 229 CB CYS A 33 20 .894 26, .536 19, .117 1, .00 11, .66 C

ATOM 230 SG CYS A 33 20 .964 25, .864 20, .798 1, .00 13, .22 s

ATOM 231 C CYS A 33 22 .131 27 .410 17 .152 1 .00 14 .10 C

ATOM 232 O CYS A 33 22 .338 26 .649 16, .212 1 .00 14, .43 0

ATOM 233 N GLY A 34 21 .775 28, .676 16, .982 1 .00 14 .60 N

ATOM 234 CA GLY A 34 21, .622 29, .202 15, .643 1, .00 13, .42 C

ATOM 235 C GLY A 34 21 .365 30 .690 15 .632 1 .00 13 .64 C

ATOM 236 O GLY A 34 20 .989 31 .278 16 .652 1 .00 12 .12 O

ATOM 237 N ARG A 35 21 .565 31 .299 14, .467 1 .00 12, .90 N

ATOM 238 CA ARG A 35 21 .360 32 .728 14, .301 1, .00 15, .08 C

ATOM 239 CB ARG A 35 22 .458 33, .322 13, .416 1, .00 14, .13 C

ATOM 240 C ARG A 35 20 .003 33 .020 13, .673 1 .00 11 .11 C ATOM 241 O ARG A 35 19.,367 32..144 13.,084 1.,00 14,.43 O

ATOM 242 CG ARG A 35 22. .408 32. .854 11. ,971 1. ,00 19, .31 c

ATOM 243 CD ARG A 35 23. .430 33. .597 11. .123 1. .00 21, .41 c

ATOM 244 NE ARG A 35 24, .800 33. ,232 11. .469 1. .00 22, .20 N

ATOM 245 CZ ARG A 35 25. .410 32. ,135 11. .032 1. ,00 22. .78 C

ATOM 246 NH1 ARG A 35 26. .658 31. ,875 11, .400 1. ,00 21. .47 N

ATOM 247 NH2 ARG A 35 24. .779 31. .305 10. .215 1. ,00 23. .65 N

ATOM 248 N THR A 36 19. .566 34. .265 13. .803 1. ,00 12. .06 N

ATOM 249 CA THR A 36 18. .291 34. .688 13. .251 1. .00 10. .87 C

ATOM 250 CB THR A 36 18. .123 36. .212 13. .411 1. .00 14. .79 C

ATOM 251 C THR A 36 18, .212 34. .305 11. .774 1. .00 11. .54 C

ATOM 252 O THR A 36 19, .195 34. .414 11. .043 1. .00 10, .69 O

ATOM 253 OG1 THR A 36 18, .002 36. .522 14. .802 1. .00 19, .95 O

ATOM 254 CG2 THR A 36 16, .889 36. .705 12. .679 1. .00 17, .55 C

ATOM 255 N GLY A 37 17, .047 33, .839 11. .339 1. .00 11, .25 N

ATOM 256 CA GLY A 37 16, .896 33. ,446 9. .950 1. ,00 10. .63 C

ATOM 257 C GLY A 37 17, .140 31. ,965 9. .705 1. ,00 16. .44 C

ATOM 258 O GLY A 37 16. .711 31. ,421 8. .688 1. .00 13, .24 O

ATOM 259 N ALA A 38 17. .837 31. ,306 10. .624 1. .00 16. .27 N

ATOM 260 CA ALA A 38 18, .101 29. .877 10. .481 1. .00 17, .14 C

ATOM 261 C ALA A 38 16, .781 29. .118 10. .602 1. .00 15, .01 C

ATOM 262 O ALA A 38 15, .943 29. .447 11. .442 1. .00 14, .04 O

ATOM 263 CB ALA A 38 19, .074 29. .416 11. .559 1. .00 16, .54 C

ATOM 264 N THR A 39 16, .588 28. .107 9, .764 1. .00 15, .44 N

ATOM 265 CA THR A 39 15, .355 27, .329 9, .811 1. .00 16, .44 C

ATOM 266 CB THR A 39 14, .867 26, .956 8, .397 1. .00 16, .50 C

ATOM 267 OG1 THR A 39 15. .848 26. .146 7, .746 1. .00 22, .08 O

ATOM 268 CG2 THR A 39 14, .615 28. .209 7. .578 1. .00 17. .88 c

ATOM 269 C THR A 39 15, .522 26. .052 10. .622 1. .00 14, .04 c

ATOM 270 O THR A 39 16, .603 25. .467 10. .669 1. .00 13, .48 O

ATOM 271 N THR A 40 14, .437 25. .626 11. .256 1. .00 14, .41 N

ATOM 272 CA THR A 40 14, .445 24. .421 12. .072 1. .00 12, .76 C

ATOM 273 CB THR A 40 14, .081 24. .735 13, .536 1. .00 13, .70 C

ATOM 274 OG1 THR A 40 12, .745 25. .260 13, .601 1. .00 11, .68 O

ATOM 275 CG2 THR A 40 15, .043 25. .752 14, .118 1, .00 10, .97 C

ATOM 276 C THR A 40 13, .437 23. .399 11, .566 1, .00 12, .70 C

ATOM 277 O THR A 40 12, .554 23, .717 10, .773 1, .00 15 .30 O

ATOM 278 N ALA A 41 13. .592 22. .164 12, .033 1, .00 12, .69 N

ATOM 279 CA ALA A 41 12. .713 21. .062 11. .667 1. .00 13, .39 C

ATOM 280 C ALA A 41 12, .425 20. .346 12. .986 1. .00 13, .08 c

ATOM 281 O ALA A 41 13, .234 20. .403 13, .912 1. .00 13, .32 O

ATOM 282 CB ALA A 41 13, .403 20. .121 10, .682 1. .00 12, .91 c

ATOM 283 N ASN A 42 11, .280 19. .680 13, .075 1, .00 13, .98 N

ATOM 284 CA ASN A 42 10, .909 18. .966 14, .296 1, .00 15, .22 c

ATOM 285 C ASN A 42 11, .074 19. .886 15, .507 1, .00 15, .41 c

ATOM 286 O ASN A 42 11, .835 19, .580 16, .426 1, .00 14, .69 0

ATOM 287 CB ASN A 42 11, .792 17, .727 14, .507 1, .00 18, .61 c

ATOM 288 CG ASN A 42 11 .862 16, .826 13, .282 1, .00 22 .16 c

ATOM 289 OD1 ASN A 42 10 .893 16, .685 12, .536 1, .00 20 .39 0

ATOM 290 ND2 ASN A 42 13, .017 16, .192 13. .085 1, .00 21, .80 N

ATOM 291 N PRO A 43 10, .319 20. .994 15. .558 1. .00 12, .16 N

ATOM 292 CA PRO A 43 9, .329 21. .449 14, .579 1, .00 13, .99 C

ATOM 293 CB PRO A 43 8, .328 22. .178 15, .454 1, .00 14, .60 C

ATOM 294 C" PRO A 43 9, .863 22. .387 13, .508 1, .00 14, .85 C

ATOM 295 O PRO A 43 10, .949 22. .950 13, .633 1, .00 12, .84 O

ATOM 296 CD PRO A 43 10 .287 21, .862 16, .751 1, .00 11 .35 C

ATOM 297 CG PRO A 43 9, .259 22, .940 16, .356 1, .00 12 .54 C

ATOM 298 N THR A 44 9 .074 22, .556 12, .454 1, .00 12 .78 N

ATOM 299 CA THR A 44 9 .454 23, .436 11, .370 1, .00 13 .48 C

ATOM 300 CB THR A 44 8 .441 23, .349 10, .217 1 .00 15 .07 C

ATOM 301 C THR A 44 9, .387 24. .818 12, .010 1, .00 13, .36 C

ATOM 302 O THR A 44 8, .430 25. .127 12, .721 1, .00 12, .32 O

ATOM 303 OG1 THR A 44 8, .582 22. .082 9, .565 1, .00 17, .67 O

ATOM 304 CG2 THR A 44 8, .660 24. .473 9, .216 1, .00 14, .97 C

ATOM 305 N GLY A 45 10, .412 25. .631 11, .787 1, .00 12, .10 N

ATOM 306 CA GLY A 45 10, .423 26. .958 12, .369 1, .00 13 .77 C

ATOM 307 C GLY A 45 11, .557 27. .824 11, .865 1, .00 12, .84 C

ATOM 308 O GLY A 45 12, .340 27, .412 11, .006 1, .00 14 .31 O

ATOM 309 N THR A 46 11 .648 29, .033 12, .404 1, .00 12 .18 N

ATOM 310 CA THR A 46 12, .686 29, .970 12, .001 1, .00 15 .03 C

ATOM 311 CB THR A 46 12 .141 30, .953 10, .952 1, .00 15 .90 C

ATOM 312 OG1 THR A 46 11, .528 30, .219 9. .884 1, .00 20, .72 O

ATOM 313 CG2 THR A 46 13, .257 31, .821 10, .392 1. .00 18, .41 C

ATOM 314 C THR A 46 13, .167 30, .777 13. .203 1, .00 13, .19 C

ATOM 315 O THR A 46 12, .352 31. .331 13, .944 1, .00 10, .72 O

ATOM 316 N PHE A 47 14, .480 30. .835 13, .407 1, .00 11, .27 N

ATOM 317 CA PHE A 47 15, .009 31. .596 14, .527 1, .00 10, .95 C ATOM 318 CB PHE A 47 16.,541 31.,508 14.,596 1.,00 11.,26 C

ATOM 319 CG PHE A 47 17. ,054 30. ,306 15. ,346 1. ,00 12. ,89 c

ATOM 320 CD2 PHE A 47 17. ,559 30. ,442 16. ,633 1. ,00 8. ,64 c

ATOM 321 CD1 PHE A 47 17. ,036 29. ,046 14. ,767 1. ,00 12. ,80 c

ATOM 322 CE2 PHE A 47 18. 040 29. ,342 17. ,331 1. 00 12. 73 c

ATOM 323 CE1 PHE A 47 17. ,514 27. ,941 15. ,457 1. 00 12. 73 c

ATOM 324 CZ PHE A 47 18. ,017 28. ,088 16. ,740 1. ,00 14. 16 c

ATOM 325 C PHE A 47 14. ,590 33. ,041 14. ,291 1. ,00 12. ,22 c

ATOM 326 O PHE A 47 14. ,737 33. ,563 13. ,182 1. ,00 13. ,19 0

ATOM 327 N ALA A 48 14. ,058 33. ,673 15. ,330 1. ,00 11. ,62 N

ATOM 328 CA ALA A 48 13. ,613 35. ,059 15. ,240 1. ,00 12. ,91 c

ATOM 329 CB ALA A 48 12. .092 35. ,126 15. .261 1. ,00 13. ,93 c

ATOM 330 C ALA A 48 14. .184 35. ,856 16. .400 1. ,00 15. ,66 c

ATOM 331 O ALA A 48 13. .470 36. ,598 17. .072 1, .00 21. ,12 0

ATOM 332 N GLY A 49 15. .482 35. .700 16. .622 1. .00 15. .68 N

ATOM 333 CA GLY A 49 16. .139 36. .407 17. ,701 1. ,00 16. ,25 C

ATOM 334 C GLY A 49 17. .156 35. ,500 18. ,352 1. ,00 15. ,88 C

ATOM 335 O GLY A 49 16. .820 34. ,403 18. ,799 1. ,00 13. ,45 O

ATOM 336 N SER A 50 18. .404 35. ,947 18. .405 1. ,00 13. ,85 N

ATOM 337 CA SER A 50 19. .454 35. ,144 19. .012 1. ,00 13. ,96 C

ATOM 338 CB SER A 50 20. .014 34. ,156 17. .984 1. ,00 17. ,08 C

ATOM 339 OG SER A 50 21. .045 33. .365 18. .541 1. .00 14. ,72 O

ATOM 340 C SER A 50 20. .574 36. .026 19. .543 1. .00 16. .90 C

ATOM 341 O SER A 50 21. .082 36. .894 18. .835 1. .00 16. .85 0

ATOM 342 N SER A 51 20. .941 35. .802 20, .801 1. .00 15. .23 N

ATOM 343 CA SER A 51 22, .003 36. .561 21, .447 1, .00 14. .67 C

ATOM 344 CB SER A 51 21. .440 37. .431 22. .570 1, ,00 15. .96 C

ATOM 345 OG SER A 51 22. .474 38. .172 23. .187 1. .00 18. .34 O

ATOM 346 C SER A 51 23. .062 35. .622 22. .017 1, .00 11. .74 C

ATOM 347 O SER A 51 22. .809 34. .888 22. .969 1. .00 12. .45 O

ATOM 348 N PHE A 52 24. .247 35. .655 21. .419 1. .00 8. .44 N

ATOM 349 CA PHE A 52 25, .367 34, .822 21. .842 1. .00 11. .84 C

ATOM 350 CB PHE A 52 25. .090 33, .344 21, .557 1, .00 9. .85 C

ATOM 351 CG PHE A 52 26, .264 32, .450 21, .837 1, .00 14. .45 C

ATOM 352 CD1 PHE A 52 26, .561 32, .056 23, .133 1, .00 14. .77 C

ATOM 353 CD2 PHE A 52 27, .095 32, .037 20, .808 1, .00 14, .93 C

ATOM 354 CE1 PHE A 52 27, .665 31, .267 23, .400 1, .00 12, .39 C

ATOM 355 CE2 PHE A 52 28, .203 31. ,250 21, .067 1. ,00 13. .03 C

ATOM 356 CZ PHE A 52 28, .489 30. .864 22, .364 1. ,00 15. .39 c

ATOM 357 C PHE A 52 26. .595 35. .245 21, .051 1, ,00 11. .09 c

ATOM 358 O PHE A 52 26. .523 35, .416 19, .830 1, .00 10. .06 0

ATOM 359 N PRO A 53 27. .737 35, .427 21, .732 1, .00 13. .84 N

ATOM 360 CD PRO A 53 29, .034 35, .610 21, .055 1, .00 13, .82 c

ATOM 361 CA PRO A 53 27. .919 35, .257 23, .177 1, .00 11, .97 c

ATOM 362 CB PRO A 53 29, .433 35, .114 23, .319 1, .00 15, .91 c

ATOM 363 CG PRO A 53 29, .953 35, .957 22, .201 1, .00 16, .14 c

ATOM 364 C PRO A 53 27, .345 36, .429 23, .972 1, .00 13, .65 c

ATOM 365 O PRO A 53 26 .411 37, .085 23, .516 1, .00 12, .98 0

ATOM 366 N GLY A 54 27 .909 36 .706 25 .144 1 .00 13, .22 N

ATOM 367 CA GLY A 54 27, .385 37, .778 25, .975 1, .00 13, .41 C

ATOM 368 C GLY A 54 26, .291 37, .112 26, .781 1, .00 13, .11 c

ATOM 369 O GLY A 54 26, .403 36, .931 27, .995 1, .00 12, .76 0

ATOM 370 N ASN A 55 25 .223 36, .740 26, .083 1, .00 13, .05 N

ATOM 371 CA ASN A 55 24 .110 36, .013 26, .681 1 .00 14, .39 C

ATOM 372 CB ASN A 55 22 .761 36 .681 26, .396 1 .00 12, .65 C

ATOM 373 CG ASN A 55 22 .758 38 .153 26 .682 1 .00 11 .23 C

ATOM 374 OD1 ASN A 55 22 .521 38 .967 25 .784 1 .00 16 .09 O

ATOM 375 ND2 ASN A 55 23 .001 38 .516 27 .933 1 .00 11 .47 N

ATOM 376 C ASN A 55 24 .141 3 .721 25 .888 1 .00 15 .51 C

ATOM 377 O ASN A 55 25 .076 34 .485 25 .123 1 .00 11 .36 O

ATOM 378 N ASP A 56 23 .124 33, .890 26, .072 1, .00 14, .13 N

ATOM 379 CA ASP A 56 23 .039 32, .631 25, .346 1, .00 11, .90 C

ATOM 380 CB ASP A 56 23 .881 31 .522 25, .993 1 .00 9, .70 C

ATOM 381 CG ASP A 56 2 .053 30 .320 25, .070 1 .00 9, .97 C

ATOM 382 OD1 ASP A 56 24 .712 29 .330 25 .459 1 .00 12 .57 O

ATOM 383 OD2 ASP A 56 23 .526 30 .365 23 .938 1 .00 8 .45 O

ATOM 384 C ASP A 56 21 .578 32 .216 25 .279 1 .00 9 .86 C

ATOM 385 0 ASP A 56 21 .158 31 .254 25 .920 1 .00 11 .82 O

ATOM 386 N TYR A 57 20 .798 32 .969 24 .509 1 .00 8 .71 N

ATOM 387 CA TYR A 57 19 .379 32 .677 24 .351 1 .00 10 .51 C

ATOM 388 CB TYR A 57 18 .523 33 .480 25 .348 1 .00 12 .30 C

ATOM 389 CG TYR A 57 18 .650 34 .992 25, .271 1 .00 12 .51 C

ATOM 390 CD1 TYR A 57 19 .275 35, .708 26, .291 1, .00 11 .12 C

ATOM 391 CE1 TYR A 57 19 .366 37 .094 26 .244 1 .00 11 .36 C

ATOM 392 CD2 TYR A 57 18 .121 35 .706 24 .197 1 .00 13 .29 C

ATOM 393 CE2 TYR A 57 18 .209 37 .096 24 .144 1 .00 10 .62 C

ATOM 394 CZ TYR A 57 18 .832 37 .783 25 .169 1, .00 13 .60 C ATOM 395 OH TYR A 57 18.921 39.162 25..122 1..00 12..04 O

ATOM 396 C TYR A 57 18.912 32.963 22. .933 1. ,00 10, .26 C

ATOM 397 O TYR A 57 19.573 33.674 22, ,172 1. ,00 10, .59 O

ATOM 398 N ALA A 58 17.767 32.393 22, .578 1. .00 9. .32 N

ATOM 399 CA ALA A 58 17.200 32.583 21, .254 1. .00 7. .41 C

ATOM 400 CB ALA A 58 17.943 31.732 20. .241 1. .00 7, .89 C

ATOM 401 C ALA A 58 15.727 32.207 21. .271 1. .00 10, .96 c

ATOM 402 O ALA A 58 15.260 31.510 22, .175 1. .00 11, .10 O

ATOM 403 N PHE A 59 15.002 32.702 20, .277 1. .00 11. .71 N

ATOM 404 CA PHE A 59 13.578 32.435 20, .136 1. .00 12, .26 c

ATOM 405 CB PHE A 59 12.748 33.707 20, .333 1. .00 10, .18 c

ATOM 406 CG PHE A 59 11.321 33.576 19, .859 1. .00 11, .71 c

ATOM 407 CD2 PHE A 59 10.871 34.297 18, .764 1. ,00 11, .51 c

ATOM 408 CD1 PHE A 59 10.441 32.709 20, .490 1. ,00 10. .35 c

ATOM 409 CE2 PHE A 59 9.566 34.156 18, .307 1, .00 15. .38 c

ATOM 410 CE1 PHE A 59 9.140 32.563 20. .044 1. ,00 14. .84 c

ATOM 411 CZ PHE A 59 8.700 33.286 18. .949 1. ,00 13. .16 c

ATOM 412 C PHE A 59 13.361 31.931 18. .722 1. ,00 11. .77 c

ATOM 413 O PHE A 59 13.887 32.507 17. .771 1. .00 13. .80 0

ATOM 414 N VAL A 60 12.600 30.852 18. .590 1. .00 10. .53 N

ATOM 415 CA VAL A 60 12.310 30.278 17. .285 1. .00 11. .14 c

ATOM 416 CB VAL A 60 12.738 28.796 17. .209 1. .00 15. .19 c

ATOM 417 CGI VAL A 60 12.337 28.212 15. .856 1. .00 10. .78 c

ATOM 418 CG2 VAL A 60 14.248 28.670 17. .421 1. .00 11. .44 c

ATOM 419 C VAL A 60 10.801 30.363 17. .082 1. .00 11. .30 c

ATOM 420 O VAL A 60 10.034 29.905 17. .924 1. .00 8. .90 0

ATOM 421 N ARG A 61 10.372 30.964 15. .979 1. .00 12. .67 N

ATOM 422 CA ARG A 61 8.944 31.083 15. ,716 1. .00 11. .18 c

ATOM 423 CB ARG A 61 8.655 32.314 14. .844 1. .00 12. .63 c

ATOM 424 CG ARG A 61 7.194 32.398 14, .379 1. .00 17. .12 c

ATOM 425 CD ARG A 61 6.967 33.527 13. .376 1. .00 20. .85 c

ATOM 426 NE ARG A 61 5.563 33.614 12. .971 1. .00 24. .18 N

ATOM 427 CZ ARG A 61 4.949 32.744 12. .171 1. .00 24. .05 c

ATOM 428 NH2 ARG A 61 3.665 32.904 11, .884 1. .00 25. ,34 N

ATOM 429 NH1 ARG A 61 5.609 31.708 11. .670 1. .00 25. .91 N

ATOM 430 C ARG A 61 8.424 29.831 15. .011 1. .00 12. .67 c

ATOM 431 O ARG A 61 9.070 29.316 14. .096 1. .00 11. ,46 O

ATOM 432 N THR A 62 7.274 29.333 15, .461 1. .00 13. .58 N

ATOM 433 CA THR A 62 6.666 28.147 14, .865 1, ,00 13, .24 c

ATOM 434 CB THR A 62 6.495 26.995 15, .884 1. ,00 11, .66 c

ATOM 435 OG1 THR A 62 5.729 27.450 17, .007 1. .00 13, .55 0

ATOM 436 CG2 THR A 62 7.853 26.485 16, .349 1. .00 13, .26 c

ATOM 437 C THR A 62 5.289 28.558 14, .335 1. .00 13. .42 c

ATOM 438 O THR A 62 4.727 29.568 14, .770 1. .00 16, .80 0

ATOM 439 N GLY A 63 4.748 27.778 13, .406 1. .00 16, .51 N

ATOM 440 CA GLY A 63 3.455 28.108 12, .834 1, .00 15, .85 c

ATOM 441 C GLY A 63 2.387 27.033 12, .894 1, .00 16, .64 c

ATOM 442 O GLY A 63 2.137 26.432 13, .938 1, .00 12, .21 0

ATOM 443 N ALA A 64 1.753 26.788 11, .753 1, .00 15, .51 N

ATOM 444 CA ALA A 64 0.678 25.810 11, .663 1, .00 15, .84 c

ATOM 445 C ALA A 64 1.090 24.378 11, .977 1, .00 15, .00 c

ATOM 446 O ALA A 64 2.228 23.977 11, .742 1, .00 15, .60 0

ATOM 447 CB ALA A 64 0.052 25.866 10, .279 1, .00 16, .27 c

ATOM 448 N GLY A 65 0.144 23.614 12, .510 1, .00 17, .17 N

ATOM 449 CA GLY A 65 0.390 22.217 12, .828 1, .00 19, .41 c

ATOM 450 C GLY A 65 1.369 21.946 13, .953 1, .00 19, .21 C

ATOM 451 O GLY A 65 1.691 20.790 14, .234 1, .00 22, .10 O

ATOM 452 N VAL A 66 1.842 23.001 14, .603 1, .00 15, .20 N

ATOM 453 CA VAL A 66 2.788 22.844 15, .697 1, .00 15, .99 C

ATOM 454 CB VAL A 66 4.018 23.746 15, .501 1, .00 15, .02 C

ATOM 455 C VAL A 66 2.116 23.195 17, .016 1, .00 18, .46 C

ATOM 456 O VAL A 66 1.769 24.349 17, .257 1, .00 16, .96 0

ATOM 457 CGI VAL A 66 4.961 23.602 16 .688 1, .00 13, .36 c

ATOM 458 CG2 VAL A 66 4.725 23.375 14, .195 1, .00 11, .46 c

ATOM 459 N ASN A 67 1.931 22.193 17, .866 1, .00 15, .34 N

ATOM 460 CA ASN A 67 1.294 22.407 19, .158 1, .00 16, .12 c

ATOM 461 CB ASN A 67 0.474 21.177 19, .539 1, .00 21, .01 C

ATOM 462 C ASN A 67 2.332 22.704 20, .228 1, .00 17, .24 C

ATOM 463 O ASN A 67 3.172 21.862 20 .554 1, .00 17, .97 O

ATOM 464 CG ASN A 67 -0.465 20.748 18, .431 1, .00 29, .21 C

ATOM 465 OD1 ASN A 67 -1.308 21.527 17, .976 1, .00 33, .32 0

ATOM 466 ND2 ASN A 67 -0.323 19.505 17. .982 1, ,00 33, .03 N

ATOM 467 N LEU A 68 2.260 23.915 20. .767 1, ,00 13. .94 N

ATOM 468 CA LEU A 68 3.175 24.378 21. .807 1. ,00 14. .43 C

ATOM 469 CB LEU A 68 3.317 25.896 21. ,707 1, ,00 13. .70 C

ATOM 470 C LEU A 68 2.638 23.985 23. .178 1. .00 15. .01 C

ATOM 471 O LEU A 68 1.670 24.568 23. .664 1, .00 16. .08 O ATOM 472 CG LEU A 68 3.,835 26..395 20.,358 1,.00 8.,95 c

ATOM 473 CD1 LEU A 68 3. ,736 27. .910 20. .284 1. .00 8. ,47 c

ATOM 474 CD2 LEU A 68 5. ,270 25. .931 20. .179 1. .00 12. ,27 c

ATOM 475 N LEU A 69 3. ,284 23. .005 23. .805 1. .00 12. ,99 N

ATOM 476 CA LEU A 69 2. ,861 22. .529 25. .119 1. .00 12. ,18 c

ATOM 477 CB LEU A 69 2. ,888 20. .997 25. .134 1. .00 12. ,27 c

ATOM 478 CG LEU A 69 2. .075 20. .310 24. .029 1, .00 16. ,54 c

ATOM 479 GDI LEU A 69 2. ,251 18. .802 24. .113 1, .00 17. ,85 c

ATOM 480 CD2 LEU A 69 0. ,611 20. .679 24. .170 1, .00 19. ,65 c

ATOM 481 C LEU A 69 3. ,665 23. .050 26. .307 1. .00 14. ,39 c

ATOM 482 O LEU A 69 4. ,879 23. .239 26. .228 1. .00 14. ,53 O

ATOM 483 N ALA A 70 2. ,969 23. .271 27. .416 1. .00 12. ,89 N

ATOM 484 CA ALA A 70 3. ,594 23. .761 28. .635 1, .00 14. ,83 c

ATOM 485 CB ALA A 70 2. ,585 24. .547 29. .457 1. .00 18. ,71 c

ATOM 486 C ALA A 70 4. ,042 22. .519 29. .391 1, .00 12. ,67 c

ATOM 487 O ALA A 70 3. .638 22, .293 30, .523 1, .00 11, .15 0

ATOM 488 N GLN A 71 4. ,876 21, .711 28, .742 1, .00 13, .59 N

ATOM 489 CA GLN A 71 5, .382 20, .483 29, .334 1, .00 14. .04 c

ATOM 490 CB GLN A 71 4, .591 19, .282 28, .809 1, .00 14. .08 c

ATOM 491 CG GLN A 71 3, .114 19, .283 29, .157 1, .00 17. .65 c

ATOM 492 CD GLN A 71 2, .378 18, .099 28, .560 1, .00 19. .50 c

ATOM 493 OE1 GLN A 71 1. .421 17, .592 29, .143 1, .00 24, .87 0

ATOM 494 NE2 GLN A 71 2. .815 17, .658 27, .386 1, .00 17, .48 N

ATOM 495 C GLN A 71 6. .849 20, .255 29, .011 1, .00 16. .23 c

ATOM 496 O GLN A 71 7, .375 20, .786 28, .035 1, .00 15. .48 0

ATOM 497 N VAL A 72 7, .501 19, .451 29, .840 1, .00 13. .56 N

ATOM 498 CA VAL A 72 8, .907 19, .133 29, .648 1, .00 12. .57 c

ATOM 499 CB VAL A 72 9, .792 19, .754 30, .748 1, .00 10, .81 c

ATOM 500 CGI VAL A 72 11, .193 19, .162 30, .677 1, .00 12, .46 c

ATOM 501 CG2 VAL A 72 9, .862 21, .271 30, .563 1, .00 10. .56 c

ATOM 502 C VAL A 72 9, .007 17, .610 29, .695 1, .00 10, .65 c

ATOM 503 O VAL A 72 8, .415 16, .968 30, .565 1, .00 11, .44 0

ATOM 504 N ASN A 73 9, ,736 17, .036 28, .746 1, .00 11. .79 N

ATOM 505 CA ASN A 73 9, ,913 15, .586 28, .673 1, .00 10, .87 C

ATOM 506 CB ASN A 73 10, .633 15, .229 27, .369 1, .00 12, .22 c

ATOM 507 CG ASN A 73 10. .598 13, .743 27, .065 1, .00 12, .04 c

ATOM 508 OD1 ASN A 73 10, .411 12, .916 27, .959 1, .00 11, .92 0

ATOM 509 ND2 ASN A 73 10. .790 13, .397 25, .798 1, .00 10. .15 N

ATOM 510 C ASN A 73 10. .751 15, .098 29, .863 1, .00 11. .93 C

ATOM 511 O ASN A 73 11. .854 15, .597 30, .092 1, .00 11, .67 0

ATOM 512 N ASN A 74 10, ,239 14, .137 30, .631 1, .00 12, .17 N

ATOM 513 CA ASN A 74 11, ,010 13, .640 31, .766 1, .00 9, .29 C

ATOM 514 CB ASN A 74 10, .109 13, .275 32, .958 1, .00 13, .70 C

ATOM 515 CG ASN A 74 9, ,162 12, .126 32, .662 1, .00 16, .27 C

ATOM 516 OD1 ASN A 74 9, .432 11, .274 31, .815 1, .00 14, .62 O

ATOM 517 ND2 ASN A 74 8, .048 12, .088 33, .384 1, .00 18, .77 N

ATOM 518 C ASN A 74 11, ,853 12, .435 31, .359 1, .00 11, .15 C

ATOM 519 O ASN A 74 12, .528 11, .823 32, .189 1, .00 10, .62 O

ATOM 520 N TYR A 75 11, .813 12, .115 30, .069 1, .00 13. .30 N

ATOM 521 CA TYR A 75 12, .556 10, .998 29, .495 1, .00 13. .21 C

ATOM 522 CB TYR A 75 14, .039 11, .363 29, .386 1, .00 10. .04 C

ATOM 523 CG TYR A 75 14, .313 12, .223 28, .170 1, .00 11, .82 C

ATOM 524 CD1 TYR A 75 14, .424 11, .652 26, .907 1, .00 10. .82 C

ATOM 525 CE1 TYR A 75 14, .591 12, .435 25, .775 1, .00 12. .83 C

ATOM 526 CD2 TYR A 75 14, .381 13, .608 28, .271 1, .00 10, .15 C

ATOM 527 CE2 TYR A 75 14, .545 14, .402 27, .142 1, .00 10, .33 C

ATOM 528 CZ TYR A 75 14, ,648 13, .805 25, .898 1, .00 9, .45 C

ATOM 529 OH TYR A 75 14, .793 14, .579 24, .770 1, .00 10, .77 O

ATOM 530 C TYR A 75 12. ,380 9, .652 30, .188 1, .00 16. .68 C

ATOM 531 O TYR A 75 13, ,298 8, .835 30, .228 1, .00 18. .39 O

ATOM 532 N SER A 76 11. .185 9, .433 30, .723 1, .00 18, .33 N

ATOM 533 CA SER A 76 10. .846 8, .193 31. .411 1, .00 20, .49 C

ATOM 534 CB SER A 76 10, .811 8, .390 32, .926 1, .00 21. .53 C

ATOM 535 OG SER A 76 12, .121 8, .424 33. .457 1, .00 25. .72 O

ATOM 536 C SER A 76 9, .470 7, .775 30. .919 1, .00 21. .06 C

ATOM 537 O SER A 76 8. .843 6, .868 31. .473 1. ,00 20. .62 O

ATOM 538 N GLY A 77 9. .013 8, .452 29, .870 1, .00 17. .80 N

ATOM 539 CA GLY A 77 7. .715 8. .156 29, .295 1. ,00 18. .95 C

ATOM 540 C GLY A 77 6. .649 9. .128 29, .752 1. ,00 17. .33 C

ATOM 541 O GLY A 77 5. .464 8. .942 29, .470 1, ,00 16. .27 O

ATOM 542 N GLY A 78 7, .059 10. .173 30, .462 1, .00 15. .79 N

ATOM 543 CA GLY A 78 6, .088 11, ,142 30, .939 1. .00 16, ,07 C

ATOM 544 C GLY A 78 6, .499 12, .585 30, .734 1, .00 17, .80 C

ATOM 545 O GLY A 78 7, .481 12, .876 30, .041 1, .00 15, .22 O

ATOM 546 N ARG A 79 5, .742 13, .492 31, .342 1, .00 17, .07 N

ATOM 547 CA ARG A 79 6, .025 14, .914 31, .226 1, .00 19, .85 C

ATOM 548 CB ARG A 79 5, .199 15, .528 30, .090 1, .00 23, .00 c ATOM 549 CG ARG A 79 5,.711 15,.176 28,.701 1,.00 29,.54 c

ATOM 550 CD ARG A 79 4 .683 14, .404 27 .910 1 .00 35 .50 c

ATOM 551 NE ARG A 79 5 .207 13, .941 26 .626 1, .00 39 .02 N

ATOM 552 CZ ARG A 79 6, .223 13, .094 26 .493 1, .00 41 .51 c

ATOM 553 NH1 ARG A 79 6, .838 12, .611 27 .566 1, .00 38 .71 N

ATOM 554 NH2 ARG A 79 6, .620 12, .716 25 .285 1, .00 43, .02 N

ATOM 555 C ARG A 79 5, .784 15, .695 32, .510 1, .00 18, .62 C

ATOM 556 O ARG A 79 4, .968 15, .313 33, .353 1, .00 16, .21 O

ATOM 557 N VAL A 80 6, .517 16, .793 32, .646 1, .00 15, .48 N

ATOM 558 CA VAL A 80 6, .412 17. .660 33, .810 1. ,00 14, .56 C

ATOM 559 CB VAL A 80 7 .806 18, .040 34 .349 1, .00 14 .30 C

ATOM 560 CGI VAL A 80 7 .666 18, .967 35 .542 1, .00 16 .79 C

ATOM 561 CG2 VAL A 80 8 .580 16, .787 34 .729 1, .00 18 .13 C

ATOM 562 C VAL A 80 5, .690 18, .930 33 .375 1, .00 15 .88 C

ATOM 563 O VAL A 80 6, .106 19, .588 32, .421 1, .00 14, .01 0

ATOM 564 N GLN A 81 4, .602 19, .270 34, .057 1, .00 15, .03 N

ATOM 565 CA GLN A 81 3, .863 20, .472 33, .698 1, .00 18, .02 C

ATOM 566 CB GLN A 81 2, .503 20, .512 34, .403 1, .00 21, .88 C

ATOM 567 CG GLN A 81 1, .422 19. .659 33, .760 1, ,00 29, .23 C

ATOM 568 CD GLN A 81 1, .161 20. .030 32, .311 1, .00 29, .08 C

ATOM 569 OE1 GLN A 81 0 .928 21. .194 31 .984 1, .00 31 .12 O

ATOM 570 NE2 GLN A 81 1 .192 19, .034 31 .434 1, .00 32, .61 N

ATOM 571 C GLN A 81 4, .654 21, .722 34 .067 1, .00 17 .67 C

ATOM 572 O GLN A 81 5, .278 21, .786 35 .128 1, .00 18 .79 O

ATOM 573 N VAL A 82 4, .636 22, .709 33, .179 1, .00 15, .10 N

ATOM 574 CA VAL A 82 5, .345 23, .960 33, .411 1, .00 17, .88 C

ATOM 575 CB VAL A 82 5, .973 24, .494 32, .107 1, .00 16, .36 C

ATOM 576 CGI VAL A 82 6, .710 25. .792 32, .374 1, .00 19, .17 C

ATOM 577 CG2 VAL A 82 6, .927 23. .454 31, .534 1, .00 15, .85 C

ATOM 578 C VAL A 82 4 .309 24, .952 33 .930 1, .00 18 .78 C

ATOM 579 O VAL A 82 3 .512 25, .494 33 .163 1, .00 19 .15 O

ATOM 580 N ALA A 83 4, .321 25, .175 35 .240 1, .00 20, .30 N

ATOM 581 CA ALA A 83 3, .382 26, .091 35, .879 1, .00 20, .84 C

ATOM 582 CB ALA A 83 3, .230 25, .725 37, .348 1, .00 20, .26 C

ATOM 583 C ALA A 83 3, .734 27, .568 35, .751 1, .00 20, .34 C

ATOM 584 O ALA A 83 2, .849 28. .405 35, .594 1, .00 21, .44 O

ATOM 585 N GLY A 84 5, .021 27. .886 35, .826 1. .00 18, .33 N

ATOM 586 CA GLY A 84 5, .445 29. ,267 35, .721 1. .00 15, .96 C

ATOM 587 C GLY A 84 6, .946 29. .381 35 .558 1, .00 18 .35 C

ATOM 588 O GLY A 84 7, .599 28, .433 35 .117 1, .00 16 .24 0

ATOM 589 N HIS A 85 7, .495 30, .534 35 .924 1, .00 16 .53 N

ATOM 590 CA HIS A 85 8, .931 30, .767 35, .798 1, .00 14, .08 C

ATOM 591 CB HIS A 85 9, .219 31, .528 34, .498 1, .00 14, .33 C

ATOM 592 C HIS A 85 9, .534 31. .510 36, .988 1, .00 14, .07 C

ATOM 593 O HIS A 85 10, .349 32. ,413 36, .818 1, .00 15, .60 O

ATOM 594 CG HIS A 85 8. .399 32. .770 34, .323 1. .00 18, .31 C

ATOM 595 ND1 HIS A 85 8, .937 34. .035 34, .404 1. .00 21, .61 N

ATOM 596 CD2 HIS A 85 7. .079 32. .936 34, .064 1, .00 19, .95 C

ATOM 597 NE2 HIS A 85 6, .848 34. .289 33 .994 1, .00 18 .84 N

ATOM 598 CE1 HIS A 85 7, .983 34, .929 34, .202 1, .00 22, .08 C

ATOM 599 N THR A 86 9, .128 31, .124 38, .193 1, .00 14, .33 N

ATOM 600 CA THR A 86 9, .640 31. .758 39, .405 1, .00 13, .94 C

ATOM 601 CB THR A 86 8, .754 31, .449 40, .612 1, .00 15, .26 C

ATOM 602 C THR A 86 11, .044 31. .243 39, .690 1, .00 14, .65 C

ATOM 603 O THR A 86 11. .249 30. .042 39, .855 1. .00 11, .10 O

ATOM 604 OG1 THR A 86 7. .424 31. .904 40, .347 1. .00 16, .89 O

ATOM 605 CG2 THR A 86 9. .289 32. .147 41, .854 1. .00 16, .68 C

ATOM 606 N ALA A 87 12, .005 32, .157 39 .756 1, .00 15, .86 N

ATOM 607 CA ALA A 87 13, .396 31, .801 40, .016 1, .00 17, .16 C

ATOM 608 C ALA A 87 13, .633 31, .152 41, .375 1, .00 19, .39 C

ATOM 609 O ALA A 87 13, .113 31, .608 42, .395 1, .00 18, .84 O

ATOM 610 CB ALA A 87 14. .272 33. .034 39, .877 1. .00 17, .44 C

ATOM 611 N ALA A 88 14. .431 30. .088 41, .373 1. .00 16, .82 N

ATOM 612 CA ALA A 88 14. .766 29. .352 42, .584 1. ,00 14, .95 C

ATOM 613 C ALA A 88 16. .112 29. .832 43, .119 1. .00 15, .66 c

ATOM 614 O ALA A 88 17. .004 30. .204 42, .355 1, .00 15, .62 O

ATOM 615 CB ALA A 88 14. ,827 27. .861 42. ,291 1. .00 10. ,05 c

ATOM 616 N PRO A 89 16, .275 29. .822 44, .447 1, .00 15. .05 N

ATOM 617 CA PRO A 89 17, .510 30, .259 45, .100 1, .00 16, .15 C

ATOM 618 CB PRO A 89 17. .060 30. .498 46, .535 1. .00 16, .59 C

ATOM 619 C PRO A 89 18. .661 29. .260 45, .022 1. .00 17, .33 C

ATOM 620 O PRO A 89 18. .461 28. .076 44, .741 1. .00 14, .79 O

ATOM 621 CD PRO A 89 15. .236 29. .522 45, .448 1, .00 17, ,98 c

ATOM 622 CG PRO A 89 16. .040 29. .425 46, .728 1. .00 15, .94 c

ATOM 623 N VAL A 90 19. .873 29. .751 45. .257 1, .00 18. .24 N

ATOM 624 CA VAL A 90 21. .046 28. ,894 45. .221 1. ,00 17. .32 C

ATOM 625 CB VAL A 90 22. .312 29. .658 45. .672 1. .00 16, .39 C ATOM 626 CGI VAL A 90 23..449 28,.678 45,.932 1..00 19,.70 c

ATOM 627' CG2 VAL A 90 22, .711 30, .665 44 .609 1, .00 18 .18 c

ATOM 628 C VAL A 90 20, .764 27, .770 46 .211 1, .00 17 .15 c

ATOM 629 O VAL A 90 20, .153 28, .005 47 .254 1 .00 17 .16 O

ATOM 630 N GLY A 91 21, .192 26, .556 45 .878 1, .00 13, .56 N

ATOM 631 CA GLY A 91 20, .971 25, .420 46 .755 1, .00 13, .61 C

ATOM 632 C GLY A 91 19, .787 24, .583 46 .314 1, .00 14, .54 C

ATOM 633 O GLY A 91 19, .652 23, .422 46 .695 1, .00 13, .48 O

ATOM 634 N SER A 92 18, .928 25, .175 45 .497 1, .00 12, .12 N

ATOM 635 CA SER A 92 17, .741 24, .486 45 .014 1, .00 13, .41 C

ATOM 636 CB SER A 92 16, .846 25, .457 44 .239 1, .00 10, .87 C

ATOM 637 OG SER A 92 16, .334 26, .463 45 .090 1, .00 12, .36 O

ATOM 638 C SER A 92 18, .040 23, .284 44 .134 1, .00 13, .34 C

ATOM 639 O SER A 92 19, .015 23, .268 43 .383 1, .00 9, .90 O

ATOM 640 N ALA A 93 17, .189 22, .274 44, .252 1, .00 11, .16 N

ATOM 641 CA ALA A 93 17, .324 21, .057 43, .475 1, .00 14, .34 C

ATOM 642 CB ALA A 93 16, .554 19, .925 44, .136 1, .00 14, .73 C

ATOM 643 C ALA A 93 16, .713 21, .389 42, .119 1, .00 14, .46 C

ATOM 644 O ALA A 93 15, .605 21, .920 42, .047 1, .00 13, .83 O

ATOM 645 N VAL A 94 17, .440 21, .092 41, .048 1, .00 14, .27 N

ATOM 646 CA VAL A 94 16, .946 21, .370 39, .707 1, .00 9, .84 C

ATOM 647 CB VAL A 94 17, .617 22, .629 39, .113 1, .00 11, .32 C

ATOM 648 CGI VAL A 94 17, .204 23, .859 39, .904 1, .00 9, .34 C

ATOM 649 CG2 VAL A 94 19, .140 22, .467 39, .126 1, .00 10, .97 C

ATOM 650 C VAL A 94 17, .216 20, .209 38, .763 1, .00 9, .69 C

ATOM 651 O VAL A 94 18, .139 19. .421 38, .976 1, .00 10, .59 O

ATOM 652 N CYS A 95 16. .398 20. .094 37, .727 1, .00 10, .10 N

ATOM 653 CA CYS A 95 16. .573 19. .027 36, .752 1, ,00 9, .94 C

ATOM 654 CB CYS A 95 15. .468 17. .983 36, .845 1, .00 11, .63 C

ATOM 655 SG CYS A 95 15, .412 17, .059 38 .410 1, .00 13, .27 S

ATOM 656 C CYS A 95 16, .566 19, .624 35 .359 1, .00 10, .91 c

ATOM 657 O CYS A 95 15, .808 20, .551 35. .061 1, .00 11, .33 0

ATOM 658 N ARG A 96 17, .424 19, .070 34 .515 1, .00 9, .30 N

ATOM 659 CA ARG A 96 17, .570 19, .496 33, .135 1, .00 7, .08 c

ATOM 660 CB ARG A 96 19, .050 19, .767 32, .827 1, .00 9, .79 c

ATOM 661 CG ARG A 96 19, .326 20, .069 31, .353 1, .00 10, .80 c

ATOM 662 CD ARG A 96 20, .808 19, .966 31, .011 1, .00 10, .58 c

ATOM 663 NE ARG A 96 21, .355 18, .643 31, .312 1, .00 11, .86 N

ATOM 664 CZ ARG A 96 20, .957 17, .506 30, .747 1, .00 10, .78 C

ATOM 665 NH1 ARG A 96 19, .995 17, .500 29, .831 1, .00 10, .18 N

ATOM 666 NH2 ARG A 96 21, .529 16, .365 31, .103 1, .00 12, .39 N

ATOM 667 C ARG A 96 17, .068 18. .397 32, .211 1, .00 9, .14 C

ATOM 668 O ARG A 96 17, ,237 17, .214 32, .499 1, .00 10, .81 O

ATOM 669 N SER A 97 16, .442 18, ,792 31, .104 1, .00 8, .35 N

ATOM 670 CA SER A 97 15. .925 17. .841 30, .134 1, .00 8, .67 C

ATOM 671 CB SER A 97 14, .406 17, .976 29, .984 1. .00 10, .18 C

ATOM 672 OG SER A 97 13, .893 16. ,991 29, .094 1. .00 10, .36 O

ATOM 673 C SER A 97 16, .607 18. ,169 28, .810 1. .00 9, .06 C

ATOM 674 O SER A 97 16, .564 19. .313 28, .353 1. .00 10, .38 O

ATOM 675 N GLY A 98 17. .243 17. .168 28, .209 1, .00 9, .45 N

ATOM 676 CA GLY A 98 17. .939 17. .365 26, .947 1. .00 8. .70 C

ATOM 677 C GLY A 98 17. .853 16. .131 26, .070 1, .00 11, .12 C

ATOM 678 O GLY A 98 17. .689 15. .021 26, .569 1. .00 9, .32 O

ATOM 679 N SER A 99 17. .993 16. .320 24, .762 1. .00 13. ,12 N

ATOM 680 CA SER A 99 17. .884 15. .222 23, .805 1. .00 13. .49 C

ATOM 681 CB SER A 99 17. .628 15. .784 22, .414 1, .00 16. .87 C

ATOM 682 OG SER A 99 18. .805 16. .381 21, .906 1, .00 16. .57 O

ATOM 683 C SER A 99 19. .073 14, .272 23, .709 1, .00 13, .85 C

ATOM 684 O SER A 99 18. .972 13, .230 23, .060 1, .00 10, .18 O

ATOM 685 N THR A 100 20, .195 14, .617 24, .331 1, .00 9, .80 N

ATOM 686 CA THR A 100 21, .365 13, .749 24, .266 1, .00 12, .00 C

ATOM 687 CB THR A 100 22, .645 14, .572 24, .075 1, .00 13, .43 C

ATOM 688 OG1 THR A 100 22. .564 15, .297 22, .844 1, .00 15, .69 O

ATOM 689 CG2 THR A 100 23. .860 13, .667 24, .044 1, .00 13, .71 C

ATOM 690 C THR A 100 21. .547 12, ,845 25, .477 1, .00 13, .37 C

ATOM 691 O THR A 100 21. .888 11. .667 25, .332 1, .00 9, .57 O

ATOM 692 N THR A 101 21. .319 13. .389 26. .668 1. ,00 11, .47 N

ATOM 693 CA THR A 101 21. .468 12. .613 27. .893 1, ,00 10, .42 C

ATOM 694 CB THR A 101 22. .469 13. .277 28. .851 1. .00 12, .08 C

ATOM 695 OG1 THR A 101 22, .031 14. .607 29. .151 1, .00 10, .91 O

ATOM 696 CG2 THR A 101 23, .847 13. .334 28. .216 1. .00 11. .99 C

ATOM 697 C THR A 101 20. ,153 12. .410 28. .633 1, .00 13. .44 C

ATOM 698 O THR A 101 20. ,078 11. .617 29. .566 1, .00 12. ,54 O

ATOM 699 N GLY A 102 19. ,119 13. .128 28. .217 1, .00 10. ,42 N

ATOM 700 CA GLY A 102 17. ,829 12. .979 28. .860 1, .00 9. .53 C

ATOM 701 C GLY A 102 17. ,578 13. ,835 30. .087 1. .00 10. .82 C

ATOM 702 O GLY A 102 17. ,846 15, .041 30. .096 1. .00 8. .61 O ATOM 703 N TRP A 103 17.067 13.190 31.132 ,00 9.62 N

ATOM 704 CA TRP A 103 16.716 13.845 32.383 ,00 11.61 C

ATOM 705 CB TRP A 103 15.370 13.289 32.865 ,00 11.52 C

ATOM 706 CG TRP A 103 14.837 13.868 34.145 ,00 13.15 C

ATOM 707 CD2 TRP A 103 13.964 14.998 34.282 ,00 12.58 C

ATOM 708 CE2 TRP A 103 13.680 15.147 35.655 ,00 15.29 C

ATOM 709 CE3 TRP A 103 13.387 15.896 33.375 ,00 11.72 C

ATOM 710 CD1 TRP A 103 15.050 13.397 35.404 ,00 16.94 C

ATOM 711 NEI TRP A 103 14.357 14.156 36.320 ,00 16.85 N

ATOM 712 CZ2 TRP A 103 12.852 16.155 36.147 ,00 11.23 C

ATOM 713 CZ3 TRP A 103 12.561 16.900 33.865 ,00 12.19 C

ATOM 714 CH2 TRP A 103 12.303 17.019 35.240 ,00 13.20 C

ATOM 715 C TRP A 103 17.790 13.659 33.448 ,00 12.90 C

ATOM 716 O TRP A 103 18.082 12.539 33.872 ,00 9.69 O

ATOM 717 N HIS A 104 18.386 14.768 33.872 ,00 10.38 N

ATOM 718 CA HIS A 104 19.434 14.724 34.890 .00 12.11 C

ATOM 719 CB HIS A 104 20.806 14.734 34.226 .00 12.14 C

ATOM 720 CG HIS A 104 21.106 13.474 33.477 .00 12.45 C

ATOM 721 CD2 HIS A 104 20.822 13.110 32.204 .00 14.29 C

ATOM 722 ND1 HIS A 104 21.684 12.375 34.072 .00 13.64 N

ATOM 723 CE1 HIS A 104 21.740 11.384 33.197 .00 14.53 C

ATOM 724 NE2 HIS A 104 21.222 11.804 32.058 .00 12.11 N

ATOM 725 C HIS A 104 19.283 15.898 35.839 .00 12.75 C

ATOM 726 O HIS A 104 18.959 17.014 35.426 .00 10.16 O

ATOM 727 N CYS A 105 19.545 15.650 37.114 .00 10.52 N

ATOM 728 CA CYS A 105 19.408 16.703 38.102 .00 13.24 C

ATOM 729 CB CYS A 105 18.278 16.318 39.049 .00 13.49 C

ATOM 730 SG CYS A 105 16.817 15.612 38.216 .00 14.12 S

ATOM 731 C CYS A 105 20.657 17.057 38.896 .00 13.65 C

ATOM 732 O CYS A 105 21.720 16.465 38.720 .00 13.71 O

ATOM 733 N GLY A 106 20.511 18.042 39.770 .00 11.96 N

ATOM 734 CA GLY A 106 21.619 18.499 40.583 .00 8.39 C

ATOM 735 C GLY A 106 21.112 19.662 41.404 .00 8.29 C

ATOM 736 O GLY A 106 19.919 19.720 41.723 .00 9.88 O

ATOM 737 N THR A 107 21.997 20.587 41.748 .00 10.00 N

ATOM 738 CA THR A 107 21.593 21.749 42.529 .00 10.90 C

ATOM 739 CB THR A 107 21.979 21.607 44.021 .00 15.03 C

ATOM 740 OG1 THR A 107 23.401 21.490 44.138 .00 19.34 O

ATOM 741 CG2 THR A 107 21.324 20.379 44.630 .00 19.07 C

ATOM 742 C THR A 107 22.230 23.021 42.003 .00 11.41 c

ATOM 743 O THR A 107 23.274 22.986 41.349 .00 10.42 O

ATOM 744 N ILE A 108 21.590 24.150 42.282 .00 9.46 N

ATOM 745 CA ILE A 108 22.116 25.430 41.835 .00 8.75 C

ATOM 746 CB ILE A 108 21.050 26.533 41.895 .00 10.61 C

ATOM 747 CG2 ILE A 108 21.696 27.892 41.613 .00 8.96 C

ATOM 748 CGI ILE A 108 19.926 26.214 40.905 .00 11.64 C

ATOM 749 CD1 ILE A 108 18.797 27.223 40.898 .00 10.98 c

ATOM 750 C ILE A 108 23.240 25.788 42.798 .00 12.89 c

ATOM 751 O ILE A 108 23.030 25.842 44.010 .00 12.63 0

ATOM 752 N THR A 109 24.432 26.026 42.263 .00 12.30 N

ATOM 753 CA THR A 109 25.570 26.372 43.109 .00 12.21 c

ATOM 754 CB THR A 109 26.814 25.557 42.714 .00 16.03 c

ATOM 755 OG1 THR A 109 27.027 25.662 41.304 .00 16.72 0

ATOM 756 CG2 THR A 109 26.623 24.097 43.079 .00 19.29 c

ATOM 757 C THR A 109 25.916 27.855 43.094 .00 14.26 c

ATOM 758 O THR A 109 26.590 28.353 43.994 .00 15.02 0

ATOM 759 N ALA A 110 25.440 28.563 42.078 .00 13.73 N

ATOM 760 CA ALA A 110 25.708 29.985 41.967 .00 14.67 c

ATOM 761 CB ALA A 110 27.186 30.215 41.668 .00 15.41 c

ATOM 762 C ALA A 110 24.853 30.611 40.879 .00 12.70 c

ATOM 763 O ALA A 110 24.367 29.924 39.982 .00 13.13 0

ATOM 764 N LEU A 111 24.664 31.921 40.982 .00 13.52 N

ATOM 765 CA LEU A 111 23.876 32.680 40.019 .00 11.96 C

ATOM 766 CB LEU A 111 22.639 33.286 40.689 .00 15.77 C

ATOM 767 CG LEO A 111 21.638 32.338 41.357 .00 19.65 C

ATOM 768 CD1 LEU A 111 20.593 33.151 42.113 .00 17.73 c

ATOM 769 CD2 LEU A 111 20.970 31.462 40.313 .00 14.60 c

ATOM 770 C LEU A 111 24.775 33.798 39.501 .00 15.77 c

ATOM 771 O LEU A 111 25.753 34.169 40.151 1.00 15.15 0

ATOM 772 N ASN A 112 24.443 34.330 38.332 12.74 N

ATOM 773 CA ASN A 112 25.219 35.409 37.729 17.38 C

ATOM 774 CB ASN A 112 25.168 36.663 38.605 24.14 C

ATOM 775 CG ASN A 112 23.756 37.053 38.980 26.37 c

ATOM 776 OD1 ASN A 112 23.279 36.726 40.067 33.64 0

ATOM 777 ND2 ASN A 112 23.072 37.744 38.076 34.88 N

ATOM 778 C ASN A 112 26.672 35.023 37.495 16.99 C

ATOM 779 O ASN A 112 27.572 35.850 37.643 14.78 O ATOM 780 N SER A 113 26.,896 33..766 37..131 1.,00 16..31 N

ATOM 781 CA SER A 113 28. ,245 33. .280 36. .872 1. ,00 19. .39 C

ATOM 782 CB SER A 113 28, ,315 31. ,757 37, .020 1. .00 18. .03 C

ATOM 783 OG SER A 113 28, ,262 31. .349 38, .374 1. .00 21. .23 O

ATOM 784 C SER A 113 28, ,637 33. .650 35, ,450 1. .00 19. .59 C

ATOM 785 O SER A 113 27. ,780 33. .946 34, ,620 1. ,00 20, .53 0

ATOM 786 N SER A 114 29. ,938 33. .634 35, .180 1. ,00 20, .43 N

ATOM 787 CA SER A 114 30. ,454 33. ,957 33. .857 1. ,00 21, .50 C

ATOM 788 CB SER A 114 31. ,256 35. ,259 33, .878 1. ,00 23. .57 C

ATOM 789 OG SER A 114 30. ,407 36. .384 34, .009 1. .00 27. .72 O

ATOM 790 C SER A 114 31, ,356 32. .824 33, .406 1. .00 21. .25 C

ATOM 791 O SER A 114 32. ,019 32. .181 34, .222 1. ,00 21. .50 O

ATOM 792 N VAL A 115 31. ,364 32. .569 32, .106 1, ,00 19. .94 N

ATOM 793 CA VAL A 115 32, ,188 31. .515 31, .542 1. .00 19. .21 C

ATOM 794 CB VAL A 115 31. .394 30. ,203 31. .350 1. ,00 20. .02 C

ATOM 795 CGI VAL A 115 30, ,768 29. .782 32, .663 1, ,00 23. .26 C

ATOM 796 CG2 VAL A 115 30, ,335 30. .380 30, .276 1. .00 19. .81 C

ATOM 797 C VAL A 115 32, ,675 31. .986 30, .183 1, .00 17. .61 C

ATOM 798 O VAL A 115 32, ,065 32. .857 29, .561 1. .00 16. .06 O

ATOM 799 N THR A 116 33. ,783 31. .419 29, ,729 1, .00 15. .49 N

ATOM 800 CA THR A 116 34. ,330 31. .791 28, .441 1. .00 15. .82 C

ATOM 801 CB THR A 116 35, .750 32. .380 28, .569 1. .00 16, .00 C

ATOM 802 OG1 THR A 116 35, .697 33. .577 29, .355 1. .00 19. .34 O

ATOM 803 CG2 THR A 116 36, .312 32. .721 27, .189 1. .00 13. .81 C

ATOM 804 C THR A 116 34, .364 30. .572 27, .535 1, .00 16. .67 C

ATOM 805 O THR A 116 35, .031 29. .576 27, .828 1. .00 15. .27 0

ATOM 806 N TYR A 117 33. ,604 30. .663 26, .451 1, .00 14. .40 N

ATOM 807 CA TYR A 117 33, .500 29, .609 25, .453 1, .00 18, .79 C

ATOM 808 CB TYR A 117 32, .077 29, .553 24, .886 1. .00 16, .32 C

ATOM 809 CG TYR A 117 30, .993 29. .168 25, .871 1, .00 19, .43 C

ATOM 810 CD1 TYR A 117 29, .875 29, .977 26, .057 1. .00 17, .65 C

ATOM 811 CE1 TYR A 117 28, .844 29. .594 26, .911 1. .00 19. .53 C

ATOM 812 CD2 TYR A 117 31, .053 27. .967 26, .569 1. .00 19. .30 C

ATOM 813 CE2 TYR A 117 30, .029 27, .577 27, .421 1, ,00 23, .56 C

ATOM 814 CZ TYR A 117 28, .926 28, .392 27, .588 1. .00 21, .66 c

ATOM 815 OH TYR A 117 27, .898 27, .991 28, .417 1. ,00 18. .29 0

ATOM 816 C TYR A 117 34, .462 29. .985 24, .330 1, ,00 16, .91 c

ATOM 817 O TYR A 117 34, .968 31. .107 24, .288 1. .00 18. .67 0

ATOM 818 N PRO A 118 34, .727 29, .058 23, .400 1. .00 17. .80 N

ATOM 819 CA PRO A 118 35, .644 29, .417 22, .317 1, .00 18. .47 c

ATOM 820 CB PRO A 118 35 .655 28, .165 21 .434 1, .00 19. .17 c

ATOM 821 C PRO A 118 35 .210 30, .679 21, .567 1, .00 22, .88 c

ATOM 822 O PRO A 118 36, .052 31, .426 21, .064 1, .00 22, .73 o

ATOM 823 CD PRO A 118 34, .280 27. .663 23, .277 1. .00 19, .00 c

ATOM 824 CG PRO A 118 34, .390 27. .442 21, .799 1. .00 22, ,37 c

ATOM 825 N GLU A 119 33, .900 30. .923 21, .509 1. .00 21. .24 N

ATOM 826 CA GLU A 119 33 .375 32, .101 20 .819 1, .00 22. .24 C

ATOM 827 CB GLU A 119 31 .888 31, .930 20, .495 1, .00 23. .42 c

ATOM 828 C GLU A 119 33, .539 33, .356 21, .665 1, .00 24, .28 c

ATOM 829 O GLU A 119 33 .672 34. .464 21, .142 1, .00 24, .95 0

ATOM 830 CG GLU A 119 31, .561 30, .815 19, .522 1, .00 25. ,42 c

ATOM 831 CD GLU A 119 31, .812 29, .443 20, .104 1. .00 29. .77 c

ATOM 832 OE1 GLU A 119 31 .546 29, .252 21 .310 1, .00 28. .43 0

ATOM 833 OE2 GLU A 119 32 .260 28, .552 19 .350 1, .00 28, .50 0

ATOM 834 N GLY A 120 33 .517 33, .181 22, .979 1, .00 21, .77 N

ATOM 835 CA GLY A 120 33 .658 34, .323 23, .857 1, .00 21, .24 c

ATOM 836 C GLY A 120 33, .028 34, .099 25, .215 1, .00 18, .48 c

ATOM 837 O GLY A 120 32, .613 32. .991 25, .549 1, .00 16. ,77 0

ATOM 838 N THR A 121 32, .944 35. ,169 25, .994 1. .00 15. ,75 N

ATOM 839 CA THR A 121 32 .388 35, .098 27 .332 1, .00 15, .58 C

ATOM 840 CB THR A 121 33 .050 36, .151 28 .242 1, .00 20, .73 c

ATOM 841 OG1 THR A 121 34 .472 35, .973 28, .218 1, .00 22, .66 0

ATOM 842 CG2 THR A 121 32 .548 36, .020 29, .675 1, .00 19, .40 c

ATOM 843 C THR A 121 30 .876 35, .292 27, .393 1. .00 13. .13 c

ATOM 844 O THR A 121 30, .307 36. .105 26, .665 1. .00 12, ,67 0

ATOM 845 N VAL A 122 30 .235 34. .523 28 .263 1, .00 10, .86 N

ATOM 846 CA VAL A 122 28 .789 34, .591 28 .460 1, .00 11, .99 c

ATOM 847 CB VAL A 122 28 .095 33, .263 28, .093 1, .00 10, .42 c

ATOM 848 CGI VAL A 122 26 .641 33, .290 28, .534 1. .00 11, .35 c

ATOM 849 CG2 VAL A 122 28 .176 33. .044 26, .587 1. .00 7. .40 c

ATOM 850 C VAL A 122 28, .616 34. .875 29, .951 1, .00 13, .37 c

ATOM 851 O VAL A 122 29 .219 34. .199 30 .786 1, .00 13, .64 0

ATOM 852 N ARG A 123 27 .801 35, .870 30 .288 1, .00 14, .96 N

ATOM 853 CA ARG A 123 27 .581 36, .221 31, .691 1, .00 17, .69 c

ATOM 854 CB ARG A 123 27, .936 37, .693 31, .903 1, ,00 19. .72 c

ATOM 855 CG ARG A 123 29, .309 38. .079 31, .374 1. .00 28. .94 c

ATOM 856 CD ARG A 123 29, .620 39. .545 31, .642 1, .00 34. .45 c ATOM 857 NE ARG A 123 30..913 39..934 31..084 1,,00 34..81 N

ATOM 858 CZ ARG A 123 31, .148 40. .109 29. .787 1, .00 37. ,65 C

ATOM 859 NH1 ARG A 123 30, .175 39. .936 28, .901 1, .00 40, .89 N

ATOM 860 NH2 ARG A 123 32, .362 40. .450 29, .373 1. .00 35. .27 N

ATOM 861 C ARG A 123 26, .160 35, .970 32, .188 1, .00 15. .87 C

ATOM 862 O ARG A 123 25, ,297 35. .538 31. .430 1. .00 14. .52 O

ATOM 863 N GLY A 124 25, .942 36. .231 33, .477 1, .00 14. .67 N

ATOM 864 CA GLY A 124 24 .629 36. .064 34 .084 1, .00 12, .41 C

ATOM 865 C GLY A 124 24. .058 34, .659 34, .085 1, ,00 13. .04 C

ATOM 866 O GLY A 124 22, .841 34. .477 34, .106 1, .00 11. .06 O

ATOM 867 N LEU A 125 24, .937 33. ,666 34, .092 1, .00 10. .63 N

ATOM 868 CA LEU A 125 24, .520 32. .270 34. .063 1. .00 11, .37 C

ATOM 869 CB LEU A 125 25. .556 31, .455 33, .293 1, .00 10, .04 C

ATOM 870 CG LEU A 125 25. .729 31. ,810 31. ,820 1. .00 8. .76 C

ATOM 871 CD1 LEU A 125 26. .853 30, ,973 31, .236 1, .00 12, .07 C

ATOM 872 CD2 LEU A 125 2 .430 31, .559 31, .072 1, .00 10, .99 C

ATOM 873 C LEU A 125 24, .290 31, .595 35. .413 1, .00 11. ,50 C

ATOM 874 O LEU A 125 24, .887 31. .958 36, ,424 1, .00 13. .58 O

ATOM 875 N ILE A 126 23, .412 30, .595 35 .398 1 .00 9. .91 N

ATOM 876 CA ILE A 126 23. .078 29. .829 36. .586 1, .00 10. .95 C

ATOM 877 CB ILE A 126 21, .649 29, .253 36. .502 1, .00 12. .17 C

ATOM 878 CG2 ILE A 126 21, .379 28. ,348 37, .704 1, .00 11. .45 C

ATOM 879 CGI ILE A 126 20, .631 30. .394 36, .417 1, .00 12. .38 C

ATOM 880 GDI ILE A 126 19 .207 29. .931 36, .143 1 .00 11, .96 C

ATOM 881 C ILE A 126 24, .066 28. .668 36, .579 1, .00 11. ,47 c

ATOM 882 O ILE A 126 24, .109 27. .898 35, .620 1, .00 11, ,84 0

ATOM 883 N ARG A 127 24, .874 28. .557 37, .627 1, .00 12, .21 N

ATOM 884 CA ARG A 127 25. .854 27. .478 37. .716 1, .00 14, .56 C

ATOM 885 CB ARG A 127 27, .106 27, .969 38, .444 1, .00 14. .59 C

ATOM 886 CG ARG A 127 28, .195 26, .921 38, .616 1, .00 23. .58 C

ATOM 887 CD ARG A 127 29, .308 27, .473 39. ,493 1. .00 26. .48 C

ATOM 888 NE ARG A 127 30, .349 26, .489 39, .769 1, .00 36. .15 H

ATOM 889 CZ ARG A 127 31, .209 26. .033 38, .865 1, .00 38. .33 C

ATOM 890 NH2 ARG A 127 32, .127 25. .139 39, .211 1, .00 41. .31 N

ATOM 891 NH1 ARG A 127 31, .156 26. .472 37. .616 1. .00 41. .25 N

ATOM 892 C ARG A 127 25, .221 26, .324 38, .485 1, .00 12. .51 C

ATOM 893 O ARG A 127 24, .554 26. .548 39, .495 1, .00 10. .73 O

ATOM 894 N THR A 128 25, .434 25. .098 38, .011 1, .00 11. .75 N

ATOM 895 CA THR A 128 24, .867 23. .924 38, .667 1, .00 11, .43 C

ATOM 896 CB THR A 128 23, .547 23. .501 37. .998 1, .00 12, .42 C

ATOM 897 OG1 THR A 128 23, .835 22. .848 36, .751 1, .00 11, .64 0

ATOM 898 CG2 THR A 128 22, .668 24, .719 37, .728 1, .00 8, ,69 c

ATOM 899 C THR A 128 25, .778 22, .698 38. .622 1, .00 13. .02 c

ATOM 900 O THR A 128 26, .790 22, .680 37, .914 1, .00 12. .78 0

ATOM 901 N THR A 129 25, .391 21. .674 39, .381 1, .00 11. .69 N

ATOM 902 CA THR A 129 26, .132 20. .419 39. .456 1, .00 12. .47 c

ATOM 903 CB THR A 129 26 .099 19, .827 40, .878 1, .00 12, .66 C

ATOM 904 OG1 THR A 129 24. .737 19. .612 41, .277 1. .00 11, ,15 O

ATOM 905 CG2 THR A 129 26, .782 20. .766 41, .859 1, .00 12. .84 C

ATOM 906 C THR A 129 25 .503 19. .399 38, .506 1 .00 15, .23 C

ATOM 907 O THR A 129 25, .820 18. .211 38. .564 1. .00 10. .87 0

ATOM 908 N VAL A 130 24, .601 19. .870 37. .646 1, .00 14. ,09 N

ATOM 909 CA VAL A 130 23, .923 19, .006 36 .680 1 .00 12. .55 C

ATOM 910 CB VAL A 130 22, .662 19. ,694 36. .103 1, .00 13. .46 C

ATOM 911 CGI VAL A 130 21 .913 18, .730 35, .195 1 .00 15. .05 C

ATOM 912 CG2 VAL A 130 21, .755 20. .178 37, .234 1, .00 10. .45 C

ATOM 913 C VAL A 130 24, .872 18. .692 35. .521 1, .00 13. .62 C

ATOM 914 O VAL A 130 25 .655 19, .546 35, .120 1 .00 17. .44 O

ATOM 915 N CYS A 131 24, ,804 17, ,468 34. ,997 1, ,00 10. ,87 N

ATOM 916 CA CYS A 131 25, .658 17, ,047 33, .886 1, .00 12. ,09 C

ATOM 917 CB CYS A 131 25, .939 15, .541 33. .966 1, .00 12, .10 C

ATOM 918 SG CYS A 131 24, .447 14, .512 33. .745 1. ,00 14, ,96 S

ATOM 919 C CYS A 131 24, .957 17, ,343 32. .568 1, .00 12, .93 C

ATOM 920 O CYS A 131 23, .739 17, .506 32. .532 1, .00 11, .56 O

ATOM 921 N ALA A 132 25, .723 17, .403 31, .486 1, .00 13. .76 N

ATOM 922 CA ALA A 132 25, .141 17, .676 30, .181 1, .00 14, .09 C

ATOM 923 CB ALA A 132 24, .724 19. .141 30, .089 1, .00 13. .62 C

ATOM 924 C ALA A 132 26, .086 17. .337 29. .042 1, .00 17. .97 C

ATOM 925 O ALA A 132 27, .294 17. .179 29. .237 1, .00 15. .14 O

ATOM 926 N GLU A 133 25 .508 17, ,215 27. .853 1, .00 13. .21 N

ATOM 927 CA GLU A 133 26, .243 16. ,900 26. .639 1, .00 18. .49 C

ATOM 928 CB GLU A 133 25, .732 15. ,592 26. ,039 1, .00 21. .95 C

ATOM 929 CG GLU A 133 26, .808 14. .614 25, .652 1, .00 27, .91 C

ATOM 930 CD GLU A 133 27. ,336 13, .850 26, .840 1, .00 31. .31 C

ATOM 931 OE1 GLU A 133 27. .870 14. .494 27. ,767 1, .00 28. .79 O

ATOM 932 OE2 GLU A 133 27, .214 12. .606 26. .846 1. ,00 28. .57 O

ATOM 933 C GLU A 133 25, .919 18, .051 25. .693 1, ,00 15. ,23 c ATOM 934 O GLU A 133 24.915 18.738 25.866 . 00 16.37 O

ATOM 935 N PRO A 134 26.761 18.276 24.680 . 00 16.75 N

ATOM 936 CA PRO A 134 26.527 19.366 23.725 , 00 17 . 31 C

ATOM 937 CB PRO A 134 27.558 19.082 22.638 , 00 17 . 01 C

ATOM 938 C PRO A 134 25.093 19.449 23.177 . 00 18 . 87 C

ATOM 939 O PRO A 134 24.468 20.515 23.204 . 00 21 . 16 O

ATOM 940 CD PRO A 134 28.022 17.572 24.385 .00 14 .41 C

ATOM 941 CG PRO A 134 28.708 18.528 23.429 . 00 15. 96 C

ATOM 942 N GLY A 135 24.577 18.329 22.683 . 00 13 .73 N

ATOM 943 CA GLY A 135 23.228 18.315 22.138 00 1111. .5511 C

ATOM 944 C GLY A 135 22.114 18.674 23.112 ,00 1122. .2222 C

ATOM 945 O GLY A 135 20.982 18.933 22.696 ,00 10 .70 O

ATOM 946 N ASP A 136 22.425 18.676 24.405 00 9 .59 N

ATOM 947 CA ASP A 136 21.451 19.019 25.441 00 10 .66 C

ATOM 948 CB ASP A 136 21.957 18.550 26.808 0000 9.43 C

ATOM 949 C ASP A 136 21.239 20.533 25.485 ,0000 9.56 c

ATOM 950 O ASP A 136 20.270 21.018 26.076 ,0000 7.80 0

ATOM 951 CG ASP A 136 21.907 17.044 26.969 00 12.00 c

ATOM 952 OD2 ASP A 136 21.038 16.399 26.348 00 14.65 0

ATOM 953 OD1 ASP A 136 22.732 16.510 27.737 ,00 11.73 0

ATOM 954 N SER A 137 22.159 21.270 24.867 00 11.68 N

ATOM 955 CA SER A 137 22.089 22.728 24.831 00 9.45 C

ATOM 956 CB SER A 137 23.167 23.298 23.902 00 12.71 C

ATOM 957 C SER A 137 20.723 23.231 24.381 00 12.56 C

ATOM 958 O SER A 137 20.110 22.671 23.470 00 9.42 0

ATOM 959 OG SER A 137 24.460 23.160 24.466 00 11.89 0

ATOM 960 N GLY A 138 20.264 24.298 25.027 00 12.50 N

ATOM 961 CA GLY A 138 18.974 24.873 24.698 00 10.84 C

ATOM 962 C GLY A 138 17.863 24.228 25.497 ,00 11.17 C

ATOM 963 O GLY A 138 16.759 24.774 25.583 ,00 10.27 0

ATOM 964 N GLY A 139 18.171 23.075 26.090 1. 0000 9, ,62 N

ATOM 965 CA GLY A 139 17.202 22.326 26.877 1.0000 11, .99 C

ATOM 966 C GLY A 139 16.675 22.997 28.135 1.0000 9, .04 C

ATOM 967 O GLY A 139 17.243 23.968 28.632 1.00 11, .52 O

ATOM 968 N SER A 140 15.588 22.444 28.668 1.00 9, .88 N

ATOM 969 CA SER A 140 14.942 22.990 29.858 1.00 10, ,08 C

ATOM 970 CB SER A 140 13.507 22.456 29.977 1.00 9, .88 C

ATOM 971 OG SER A 140 12.972 22.057 28.729 1.00 1111., .6611 0

ATOM 972 C SER A 140 15.628 22.710 31.187 1.00 99., .5544 C

ATOM 973 O SER A 140 16.253 21.670 31.369 1.00 8, .61 0

ATOM 974 N LEU A 141 15.492 23.660 32.108 1.00 11, ,67 N

ATOM 975 CA LEU A 141 16.057 23.559 33.453 1.00 10, .92 c

ATOM 976 CB LEU A 141 17.184 24.554 33.718 1.00 10, .21 c

ATOM 977 CG LEO A 141 17.665 24.342 35.164 1.0000 9, .58 c

ATOM 978 CD1 LEU A 141 18.252 22.936 35.290 1.0000 7, .62 c

ATOM 979 CD2 LEU A 141 18.682 25.407 35.575 1.0000 8 .11 c

ATOM 980 C LEU A 141 14.867 23.916 34.330 1.00 10, .82 c

ATOM 981 O LEU A 141 14.325 25.021 34.240 1.00 10, .91 0

ATOM 982 N LEU A 142 14.455 22.972 35.161 1.00 7, .99 N

ATOM 983 CA LEU A 142 13.327 23.175 36.046 1.00 11, .41 C

ATOM 984 CB LEU A 142 12.235 22.140 35.741 1.00 12 .37 C

ATOM 985 CG LEU A 142 11.432 22.235 34.449 00 13.83 C

ATOM 986 CD1 LEU A 142 10.710 20.914 34.195 00 16.69 c

ATOM 987 CD2 LEU A 142 10.443 23.391 34.562 00 13.02 c

ATOM 988 C LEU A 142 13.675 23.050 37.518 00 10.11 c

ATOM 989 O LEU A 142 14.631 22.377 37.904 00 13.30 0

ATOM 990 N ALA A 143 12.875 23.731 38.326 00 10.55 N

ATOM 991 CA ALA A 143 12.992 23.746 39.775 00 12.59 C

ATOM 992 CB ALA A 143 13.306 25.141 40.284 1, .00 14 .58 c

ATOM 993 C ALA A 143 11.539 23.388 40.061 1, ,00 13 .64 c

ATOM 994 O ALA A 143 10.677 24.258 40.124 1. .00 15 .86 0

ATOM 995 N GLY A 144 11.260 22.098 40.178 1, .00 14, .54 N

ATOM 996 CA GLY A 144 .890 21.681 40.396 1, ,00 18. .53 C

ATOM 997 C GLY A 144 .156 21.932 39.092 1. .00 18 .05 C

ATOM 998 O GLY A 144 .570 21.445 38.040 1. ,00 18 .26 0

ATOM 999 N ASN A 145 .071 22.695 39.144 1. .00 17, .01 N

ATOM 1000 CA ASN A 145 .316 23.001 37.940 1, .00 17, .28 C

ATOM 1001 CB ASN A 145 .821 22.829 38.199 1, .00 24 .24 C

ATOM 1002 CG ASN A 145 .380 23.471 39.497 1. .00 34 .66 C

ATOM 1003 OD1 ASN A 145 .502 24.685 39.682 1, .00 36, .73 O

ATOM 1004 ND2 ASN A 145 .868 22.655 40.413 . 00 41.73 N

ATOM 1005 C ASN A 145 .589 24.425 37.477 .00 16.30 C

ATOM 1006 O ASN A 145 .844 24.966 36.671 . 00 13 .74 O

ATOM 1007 N GLN A 146 .667 -25.022 37.976 . 00 13.23 N

ATOM 1008 CA GLN A 146 .022 26.388 37.609 . 00 13. 97 C

ATOM 1009 CB GLN A 146 .283 27.205 38.876 . 00 17.49 C

ATOM 1010 CG GLN A 146 .116 27.191 39.850 . 00 17 .44 C ATOM 1011 CD GLN A 146 6,.920 27,.948 39.,324 1..00 19.,58 C

ATOM 1012 OE1 GLN A 146 5, .781 27, .478 39, .412 1, .00 18, .02 0

ATOM 1013 NE2 GLN A 146 7, .166 29. .135 38, .781 1, .00 13, .47 N

ATOM 1014 C GLN A 146 10, .238 26, .469 36, .692 1. .00 13, ,36 C

ATOM 1015 O GLN A 146 11, .332 26, .026 37, .052 1, .00 9, .49 0

ATOM 1016 N ALA A 147 10. .036 27, .037 35, .508 1, .00 10, .85 N

ATOM 1017 CA ALA A 147 11. .107 27, .187 34, .527 1, .00 11, .86 C

ATOM 1018 CB ALA A 147 10. .560 27 .790 33, .231 1, .00 9, .60 C

ATOM 1019 C ALA A 147 12. .212 28, .077 35, ,079 1. .00 12, .02 C

ATOM 1020 O ALA A 147 11, .947 29, .181 35, .559 1, .00 11, .92 O

ATOM 1021 N GLN A 148 13, .450 27 .595 34 .990 1, .00 9, .31 N

ATOM 1022 CA GLN A 148 14, .608 28, .334 35, .478 1, .00 8, .96 C

ATOM 1023 CB GLN A 148 15, .502 27 .426 36, .317 1, .00 9, .82 C

ATOM 1024 CG GLN A 148 14, .814 26, .838 37, .532 1, .00 9 .18 C

ATOM 1025 CD GLN A 148 14, .193 27 .914 38, .392 1, .00 8, .87 C

ATOM 1026 OE1 GLN A 148 12, .974 27, .953 38, .581 1, ,00 13, .35 O

ATOM 1027 NE2 GLN A 148 15, .024 28, .797 38, ,916 1, ,00 6, .09 N

ATOM 1028 C GLN A 148 15. .449 28, .925 34, .353 1, .00 9. .54 C

ATOM 1029 O GLN A 148 15. .874 30, .073 34, .424 1, .00 10, .41 O

ATOM 1030 N GLY A 149 15. .707 28, .130 33, .322 1. .00 9. .02 N

ATOM 1031 CA GLY A 149 16. .522 28, .620 32, .226 1, .00 11. .94 C

ATOM 1032 C GLY A 149 16. .762 27. .559 31. .172 1. .00 10. .03 C

ATOM 1033 O GLY A 149 16. .130 26, .505 31, .198 1, .00 11. .61 O

ATOM 1034 N VAL A 150 17, .670 27, .840 30, .241 1, .00 8, .37 N

ATOM 1035 CA VAL A 150 17, .977 26, .885 29, .185 1, .00 10. .02 C

ATOM 1036 CB VAL A 150 17, .557 27, .428 27, .796 1, .00 8, .22 C

ATOM 1037 CGI VAL A 150 16. .058 27. .733 27, .799 1, .00 9. .61 C

ATOM 1038 CG2 VAL A 150 18, .343 28. .682 27, .452 1, .00 6. ,21 C

ATOM 1039 C VAL A 150 19, .465 26, .542 29, .211 1, .00 11. .57 C

ATOM 1040 O VAL A 150 20. .309 27. .391 29, .504 1. .00 9. ,64 O

ATOM 1041 N THR A 151 19, .773 25, .283 28, .925 1, .00 11. ,95 N

ATOM 1042 CA THR A 151 21, .153 24, .805 28, .923 1, .00 11, .13 C

ATOM 1043 CB THR A 151 21, .195 23, .325 28, .552 1. ,00 9. .19 C

ATOM 1044 OG1 THR A 151 20, .223 22, .622 29, .340 1, .00 6, .16 O

ATOM 1045 CG2 THR A 151 22, .578 22. .748 28. .828 1. .00 8, .56 C

ATOM 1046 C THR A 151 22, .086 25, .577 27, .999 1, .00 11. .68 C

ATOM 1047 O THR A 151 21, .838 25, .677 26. .801 1, .00 8, .62 O

ATOM 1048 N SER A 152 23, .172 26. .107 28, .560 1. ,00 11. .36 N

ATOM 1049 CA SER A 152 24, .133 26, .869 27, .771 1, .00 10. .56 C

ATOM 1050 CB SER A 152 24. ,480 28, .183 28 .479 1, .00 13. .70 C

ATOM 1051 OG SER A 152 25, .434 28, .928 27, .735 1, .00 11. .67 O

ATOM 1052 C SER A 152 25, .407 26, .080 27 .503 1, .00 12, .67 C

ATOM 1053 O SER A 152 25, ,873 26, .005 26, .369 1, .00 11. .22 O

ATOM 1054 N GLY A 153 25, .967 25, .485 28, .547 1, .00 11. .74 N

ATOM 1055 CA GLY A 153 27, .185 24, .719 28 .374 1, .00 13, .59 C

ATOM 1056 C GLY A 153 27, ,807 24, .348 29, .699 1, .00 13. .34 C

ATOM 1057 O GLY A 153 27, .226 24, .590 30 .758 1, .00 11, .10 O

ATOM 1058 N GLY A 154 29, .001 23, ,769 29, .644 1, .00 12, .77 N

ATOM 1059 CA GLY A 154 29, .669 23, .370 30 .862 1, .00 14, .55 C

ATOM 1060 C GLY A 154 30, .763 22, .360 30 .583 1, .00 16, .81 C

ATOM 1061 O GLY A 154 31, .228 22, .235 29, .452 1, .00 15. .66 O

ATOM 1062 N SER A 155 31, .171 21, .631 31 .615 1, .00 16. .15 N

ATOM 1063 CA SER A 155 32. .230 20, .641 31 .472 1 .00 16, .05 C

ATOM 1064 CB SER A 155 33, .475 21, .113 32 .214 1, .00 16, .89 C

ATOM 1065 OG SER A 155 33 .181 21, .338 33 .582 1 .00 23, .41 O

ATOM 1066 C SER A 155 31, .799 19, .291 32, .026 1, .00 16. .84 C

ATOM 1067 O SER A 155 30, .783 19, .187 32 .714 1, .00 14, .62 O

ATOM 1068 N GLY A 156 32, .588 18 .262 31 .731 1 .00 15, .26 N

ATOM 1069 CA GLY A 156 32, .279 16, .928 32 .211 1, .00 13. .85 C

ATOM 1070 C GLY A 156 31, .211 16, .256 31 .376 1 .00 14, .91 C

ATOM 1071 O GLY A 156 30, .935 16, .667 30 .251 1. .00 17, .56 O

ATOM 1072 N ASN A 157 30, .613 15, .213 31 .931 1, .00 14, .60 N

ATOM 1073 CA ASN A 157 29 .566 14, .471 31 .248 1 .00 16, .61 C

ATOM 1074 CB ASN A 157 30, .179 13, .445 30 .289 1, .00 16, .79 C

ATOM 1075 CG ASN A 157 31, .168 12, .525 30 .974 1, .00 16, .85 C

ATOM 1076 OD1 ASN A 157 30, .808 11 .768 31 .876 1 .00 17, .38 O

ATOM 1077 ND2 ASN A 157 32, .429 12, .585 30 .545 1, .00 19, .44 N

ATOM 1078 C ASN A 157 28, .694 13, .773 32 .283 1, .00 16, .81 C

ATOM 1079 O ASN A 157 28, .936 13, .888 33 .487 1, .00 14, .11 O

ATOM 1080 N CYS A 158 27, .679 13, .057 31 .812 1, .00 16, .33 N

ATOM 1081 CA CYS A 158 26 .773 12 .348 32 .704 1 .00 17, .79 C

ATOM 1082 CB CYS A 158 25, ,406 12. ,202 32, .048 1. .00 19. ,95 C

ATOM 1083 SG CYS A 158 24, .578 13. ,802 31, .845 1. .00 17, ,50 S

ATOM 1084 C CYS A 158 27, .257 10. .989 33 .174 1, .00 19. ,67 C

ATOM 1085 O CYS A 158 26, .591 10, .333 33, .971 1, ,00 21. .67 O

ATOM 1086 N ARG A 159 28, .403 10. .554 32, .672 1. ,00 18. .94 N

ATOM 1087 CA ARG A 159 28, ,948 9. ,267 33, .070 1. ,00 19. .35 C ATOM 1088 CB ARG A 159 29..835 8,,700 31,,953 1,.00 19..37 c

ATOM 1089 CG ARG A 159 29, .074 8, ,300 30, ,702 1. .00 24. .85 c

ATOM 1090 CD ARG A 159 30, .003 7. .779 29, .615 1. .00 25, .44 c

ATOM 1091 NE ARG A 159 30. .852 8. .831 29. ,068 1. .00 26, ,55 N

ATOM 1092 CZ ARG A 159 30. .414 9. .821 28, .296 1, .00 28. ,60 c

ATOM 1093 NH1 ARG A 159 29, .130 9. ,901 27, .971 1. ,00 28. .12 N

ATOM 1094 NH2 ARG A 159 31. .264 10, .734 27. ,848 1, .00 25. .81 N

ATOM 1095 C ARG A 159 29. .775 9, .461 34. .345 1, .00 19, .70 C

ATOM 1096 O ARG A 159 29, .653 8. .704 35, .309 1, .00 20, .82 O

ATOM 1097 N THR A 160 30. .608 10, ,494 34. .355 1, .00 16. .93 N

ATOM 1098 CA THR A 160 31, .445 10. .762 35. .517 1. .00 18, .57 C

ATOM 1099 CB THR A 160 32, .937 10. .775 35. .109 1. .00 18, .72 C

ATOM 1100 OG1 THR A 160 33. .136 11. .696 34, .028 1. .00 19, ,41 O

ATOM 1101 CG2 THR A 160 33, .372 9. .387 34, .654 1. .00 23, .02 C

ATOM 1102 C THR A 160 31, .097 12. .055 36, .267 1, .00 17, .76 c

ATOM 1103 O THR A 160 31. .730 12. .391 37, .269 1. .00 14, ,64 O

ATOM 1104 N GLY A 161 30. .079 12. .767 35, .792 1. .00 15, .51 N

ATOM 1105 CA GLY A 161 29. .666 14, .000 36, .444 1, .00 18, .63 C

ATOM 1106 C GLY A 161 30. .199 15, .264 35, .791 1, .00 17, .91 C

ATOM 1107 0 GLY A 161 31, .178 15, .231 35, .047 1, .00 17, .74 O

ATOM 1108 N GLY A 162 29, .556 16, .392 36, .070 1, .00 17, .00 N

ATOM 1109 CA GLY A 162 30, .008 17. .633 35, .475 1. .00 15. .39 C

ATOM 1110 C GLY A 162 29, .373 18. .881 36, .048 1, .00 14, .86 C

ATOM llll O GLY A 162 28, .607 18, .824 37, .013 1, .00 12, .41 O

ATOM 1112 N THR A 163 29. .716 20. .014 35, .445 1, .00 11, .47 N

ATOM 1113 CA THR A 163 29. .203 21, .318 35, .847 1. .00 12, .96 C

ATOM 1114 CB THR A 163 30, .343 22, .255 36, .285 1, .00 15, .39 C

ATOM 1115 OG1 THR A 163 31, .024 21. .685 37, .409 1. .00 15, .28 O

ATOM 1116 CG2 THR A 163 29, .793 23, .622 36, .664 1, .00 11, .49 C

ATOM 1117 C THR A 163 28. .532 21, .921 34, .619 1. ,00 13, ,39 C

ATOM 1118 O THR A 163 29, .168 22, ,081 33, .577 1. .00 15, .12 O

ATOM 1119 N THR A 164 27. .252 22, .253 34, .741 1, .00 10, .11 N

ATOM 1120 CA THR A 164 26. .518 22, ,833 33, .624 1, ,00 10. .81 C

ATOM 1121 CB THR A 164 25. ,362 21, ,914 33, .192 1, .00 8. .40 C

ATOM 1122 OG1 THR A 164 25. .878 20, .612 32, .891 1, .00 6, .91 O

ATOM 1123 CG2 THR A 164 24. .675 22. .471 31. .955 1. .00 6. .07 C

ATOM 1124 C THR A 164 25. .950 24. .203 33, .967 1. .00 10, .82 C

ATOM 1125 O THR A 164 25, .401 24. .402 35, .053 1, .00 9, .66 O

ATOM 1126 N PHE A 165 26. .092 25. ,139 33, .034 1, .00 9, .84 N

ATOM 1127 CA PHE A 165 25, ,600 26. ,502 33, .210 1, .00 10, .47 C

ATOM 1128 CB PHE A 165 26, .669 27, .513 32, .796 1, .00 11, .30 C

ATOM 1129 CG PHE A 165 27. ,940 27, ,419 33. .597 1. .00 14, .89 C

ATOM 1130 CD1 PHE A 165 28, .871 26, .429 33, .335 1, .00 15, .07 c

ATOM 1131 CD2 PHE A 165 28, .188 28, .311 34, .626 1, .00 16, .48 c

ATOM 1132 CE1 PHE A 165 30. .030 26, ,330 34, .085 1. .00 16, .20 c

ATOM 1133 CE2 PHE A 165 29, .341 28, .219 35, .379 1, .00 16, .91 c

ATOM 1134 CZ PHE A 165 30, .264 27, .223 35, .108 1, .00 16, .17 c

ATOM 1135 C PHE A 165 24. .344 26. ,725 32. .373 1, .00 11, .04 c

ATOM 1136 O PHE A 165 24, .224 26. .204 31, .263 1, .00 9, .74 0

ATOM 1137 N PHE A 166 23, .417 27, .517 32, .901 1, .00 7 .30 N

ATOM 1138 CA PHE A 166 22. ,177 27, ,796 32, .195 1, .00 8, .16 C

ATOM 1139 CB PHE A 166 20. .990 27, .127 32, .901 1, .00 7, .36 C

ATOM 1140 CG PHE A 166 21, .148 25, .650 33, .093 1, .00 7 .82 C

ATOM 1141 CD2 PHE A 166 20, .436 24. .758 32, .302 1. .00 10, .08 c

ATOM 1142 CD1 PHE A 166 22, .018 25, .148 34, .050 1, .00 10, .99 c

ATOM 1143 CE2 PHE A 166 20, .591 23, .383 32, .463 1, .00 9 .63 c

ATOM 1144 CE1 PHE A 166 22, .179 23, .777 34, .218 1, .00 7, .63 c

ATOM 1145 CZ PHE A 166 21, .464 22, .894 33, .422 1, .00 9, .75 c

ATOM 1146 C PHE A 166 21, .871 29, .277 32, .077 1, .00 9 .41 c

ATOM 1147 O PHE A 166 22, .183 30. .070 32, .967 1, .00 9, .92 o

ATOM 1148 N GLN A 167 21, .247 29. .634 30, .963 1, .00 9, .95 N

ATOM 1149 CA GLN A 167 20, .866 31. .010 30 .690 1, .00 9 .14 C

ATOM 1150 CB GLN A 167 20, .777 31. .231 29, .176 1, .00 8, .25 c

ATOM 1151 CG GLN A 167 19, .911 32. .403 28, .738 1, .00 11, .98 c

ATOM 1152 CD GLN A 167 20, .487 33, .751 29 .110 1, .00 13 .09 c

ATOM 1153 OE1 GLN A 167 21, .590 34, .111 28, .690 1, .00 12, .87 0

ATOM 1154 NE2 GLN A 167 19, .746 34, .505 29, .905 1, .00 10, .51 N

ATOM 1155 C GLN A 167 19, .492 31, .178 31, .337 1, .00 10 .77 c

ATOM 1156 O GLN A 167 18, .542 30, .483 30, .977 1, .00 7, .43 0

ATOM 1157 N PRO A 168 19, .375 32, .085 32, .318 1, .00 10, .69 N

ATOM 1158 CD PRO A 168 20, .431 32, .933 32, .897 1, .00 11 .76 C

ATOM 1159 CA PRO A 168 18, .092 32, .310 32, .996 1, .00 11, .69 c

ATOM 1160 CB PRO A 168 18, .392 33, .482 33, .924 1, .00 12, .25 c

ATOM 1161 CG PRO A 168 19, .837 33, .296 34, .241 1, .00 14 .30 c

ATOM 1162 C PRO A 168 16, .988 32, ,628 31, .994 1, .00 11, .80 c

ATOM 1163 O PRO A 168 17, .222 33, .317 31, .006 1, .00 9, .94 0

ATOM 1164 N VAL A 169 15, .784 32, .133 32, .261 1, .00 10, .31 N ATOM 1165 CA VAL A 169 14.650 32.358 31.373 1.00 12,.92 C

ATOM 1166 CB VAL A 169 13, .528 31, .331 31 .662 1 .00 17 .07 C

ATOM 1167 CGI VAL A 169 13, .026 31, .491 33. .088 1 .00 15, .81 C

ATOM 1168 CG2 VAL A 169 12. .394 31, .505 30 .678 1 .00 19, .48 C

ATOM 1169 C VAL A 169 14, .028 33, .757 31, .358 1, .00 12, .62 C

ATOM 1170 O VAL A 169 13, .648 34 .253 30 .302 1 .00 11, .62 O

ATOM 1171 N ASN A 170 13, .927 34, .405 32, .510 1 .00 12 .76 N

ATOM 1172 CA ASN A 170 13, .328 35, .736 32 .537 1 .00 15, .21 C

ATOM 1173 CB ASN A 170 13. .268 36, .249 33, .976 1 .00 13, .89 C

ATOM 1174 CG ASN A 170 12, .353 35, .396 34, .841 1, .00 19. .50 C

ATOM 1175 OD1 ASN A 170 11, .367 34, .848 34, .347 1 .00 19 .07 O

ATOM 1176 ND2 ASN A no 12, .667 35, .283 36, .128 1 .00 18, ,85 N

ATOM 1177 C ASN A 170 13. .948 36, .764 31, .591 1 .00 12, .70 C

ATOM 1178 O ASN A 170 13. .235 37, .554 30, .977 1, .00 14, ,77 O

ATOM 1179 N PRO A 171 15. .278 36. .778 31, .458 1, .00 15, ,34 N

ATOM 1180 CD PRO A 171 16, .339 36, .181 32, .282 1 .00 16, .10 C

ATOM 1181 CA PRO A 171 15, .826 37. .772 30, .530 1 .00 16, .08 c

ATOM 1182 CB PRO A 171 17. .336 37, .710 30, .790 1 .00 17, .98 c

ATOM 1183 CG PRO A 171 17. .539 36, .351 31, .399 1, .00 23. ,99 c

ATOM 1184 C PRO A 171 15. .457 37, .465 29, ,077 1, .00 15, .20 c

ATOM 1185 O PRO A 171 15. .464 38. .355 28, .228 1, .00 10. .27 0

ATOM 1186 N ILE A 172 15, .139 36, .203 28, .794 1 .00 11, .01 N

ATOM 1187 CA ILE A 172 14, .769 35, .813 27, .437 1, .00 10, .79 C

ATOM 1188 CB ILE A 172 14, .784 34, .282 27, .247 1, .00 8, .59 C

ATOM 1189 CG2 ILE A 172 14. ,453 33. .943 25. .792 1 .00 10, .32 C

ATOM 1190 CGI ILE A 172 16. .152 33. .712 27, .617 1, .00 7. .68 C

ATOM 1191 CD1 ILE A 172 16. .184 32, .189 27, .604 1 .00 6, .34 c

ATOM 1192 C ILE A 172 13, .355 36, .310 27. .145 1, .00 9. ,04 c

ATOM 1193 O ILE A 172 13, .074 36. .849 26, .070 1, .00 9, .00 0

ATOM 1194 N LEU A 173 12. .461 36. .112 28, .107 1, .00 10, .13 N

ATOM 1195 CA LEU A 173 11. .080 36. .544 27. .951 1, .00 12. .20 C

ATOM 1196 CB LEU A 173 10. .249 36, .103 29. .157 1, .00 9, .16 C

ATOM 1197 CG LEU A 173 10, .233 34, .595 29. .436 1, .00 10, .30 C

ATOM 1198 CD1 LEU A 173 9, .469 34, ,304 30. .717 1, .00 9, .41 c

ATOM 1199 CD2 LEU A 173 9. .598 33, .873 28, .268 1, .00 11, .50 c

ATOM 1200 C LEU A 173 11, .049 38, .061 27, ,824 1, .00 13. .01 c

ATOM 1201 O LEU A 173 10, .295 38, .608 27, .026 1, .00 17, .74 O

ATOM 1202 N GLN A 174 11, .885 38, .733 28. .608 1, .00 16, .26 N

ATOM 1203 CA GLN A 174 11, .962 40. .190 28. .592 1, .00 14, .31 C

ATOM 1204 CB GLN A 174 12. .817 40. .681 29, .769 1, .00 19. .36 C

ATOM 1205 CG GLN A 174 12. .968 42. ,198 29. .866 1. ,00 25. .15 C

ATOM 1206 CD GLN A 174 11, .695 42, .891 30, .315 1, .00 30 .84 C

ATOM 1207 OE1 GLN A 174 10, .628 42, .684 29, .743 1 .00 30, .46 O

ATOM 1208 NE2 GLN A 174 11. .805 43, .723 31, .348 1, .00 34, .53 N

ATOM 1209 C GLN A 174 12. .556 40, .694 27, .282 1, .00 15, .28 C

ATOM 1210 O GLN A 174 12. .104 41, .694 26, .722 1, ,00 10. .15 O

ATOM 1211 N ALA A 175 13, .567 39, .994 26, .786 1, .00 13, .61 N

ATOM 1212 CA ALA A 175 14, .210 40, .393 25, .544 1, .00 16, .01 C

ATOM 1213 CB ALA A 175 15, .372 39, .453 25, .234 1, .00 14, .76 C

ATOM 1214 C ALA A 175 13, ,245 40, .427 24, .363 1, .00 17. .13 C

ATOM 1215 O ALA A 175 13. .221 41. ,387 23, .598 1, .00 14, .51 O

ATOM 1216 N TYR A 176 12, .426 39, .391 24, .229 1 .00 16, .19 N

ATOM 1217 CA TYR A 176 11, .481 39, .329 23 .124 1, .00 17, .75 C

ATOM 1218 CB TYR A 176 11. ,595 37, .947 22, .476 1, .00 15, . 30 C

ATOM 1219 CG TYR A 176 13. .033 37, .599 22, .138 1, ,00 15. .11 C

ATOM 1220 CD1 TYR A 176 13, ,818 38. ,482 21, .415 1. .00 16. .28 C

ATOM 1221 CE1 TYR A 176 15. .134 38. ,186 21. .101 1. .00 13, .92 c

ATOM 1222 CD2 TYR A 176 13, .605 36. .395 22 .548 1, .00 12, .95 c

ATOM 1223 CE2 TYR A 176 14. .925 36, ,086 22 .238 1, .00 12. ,38 c

ATOM 1224 CZ TYR A 176 15. .682 36, ,990 21, .512 1. .00 13, .61 c

ATOM 1225 OH TYR A 176 16. .983 36. ,705 21, .184 1, .00 13, ,98 0

ATOM 1226 C TYR A 176 10. .030 39. ,653 23, .461 1. .00 14. .14 c

ATOM 1227 O TYR A 176 9, .155 39, .546 22 .604 1, .00 16, ,16 0

ATOM 1228 N GLY A 177 9. .780 40, .057 2 .701 1, ,00 14, ,82 N

ATOM 1229 CA GLY A 177 8. .424 40. ,392 25, .105 1. .00 16, ,43 c

ATOM 1230 C GLY A 177 7. .500 39. ,207 24, .933 1. .00 16, ,44 c

ATOM 1231 O GLY A 177 6. .376 39. ,340 24, .439 1, .00 17. .81 0

ATOM 1232 N LEU A 178 7. ,987 38. .046 25 .361 1. ,00 14, ,56 N

ATOM 1233 CA LEU A 178 7, .261 36. .789 25, .258 1, .00 15, .86 c

ATOM 1234 CB LEU A 178 8. .209 35. .686 24, .778 1, .00 15, .44 C

ATOM 1235 CG LEU A 178 8. .886 35. ,807 23, .415 1, .00 19, ,21 C

ATOM 1236 CD1 LEO A 178 10. .030 34. .805 23, .331 1. .00 18. .33 c

ATOM 1237 CD2 LEU A 178 7, .870 35, .553 22, .311 1, .00 21. .44 c

ATOM 1238 C LEU A 178 6. .670 36, .350 26, .586 1. ,00 16, .50 c

ATOM 1239 O LEU A 178 7. .086 36. .808 27. .650 1. .00 16, .26 0

ATOM 1240 N ARG A 179 5, .700 35. .447 26, .504 1. ,00 17. .69 N

ATOM 1241 CA ARG A 179 5. ,040 34. .911 27, ,684 1. ,00 15. .79 c ATOM 1242 CB ARG A 179 3.565 35.312 27.729 1.00 21.75 C

ATOM 1243 CG ARG A 179 3.321 36.700 28.298 1.00 30.60 C

ATOM 1244 CD ARG A 179 1.837 36.960 28.493 1.00 37.51 C

ΛTOM 1245 NE ARG A 179 1.586 38.213 29.199 1.00 47.17 N

ATOM 1246 CZ ARG A 179 2.011 39.405 28.790 1.00 49.75 C

ATOM 1247 NH1 ARG A 179 2.715 39.516 27.672 1.00 52.12 N

A^ΓOM 1248 NH2 ARG A 179 1.731 40.488 29.500 1.00 50.23 N

&t!OM 1249 C ARG A 179 5.153 33.398 27.640 1.00 15.02 C

AΪΌM 1250 O ARG A 179 5.039 32.787 26.574 1.00 14.80 O

ATOM 1251 N MET A 180 5.401 32.800 28.799 1.00 13.59 N

ATOM 1252 CA MET A 180 5.529 31.356 28.909 1.00 16.64 C

ATOM 1253 CB MET A 180 5.991 30.969 30.316 1.00 17.26 C

ATOM 1254 CG MET A 180 7.358 31.449 30.714 1.00 22.61 C

ATOM 1255 SD MET A 180 8.603 30.324 30.120 1.00 24.38 S

ATOM 1256 CE MET A 180 8.143 28.828 30.998 1.00 21.48 C

ATOM 1257 C MET A 180 4.156 30.739 28.706 1.00 16.31 C

ATOM 1258 O MET A 180 3.167 31.255 29.225 1.00 17.83 0

ATOM 1259 N ILE A 181 4.076 29.656 27.942 1.00 14.71 N

ATOM 1260 CA ILE A 181 2.778 29.019 27.740 1.00 13.74 C

ATOM 1261 CB ILE A 181 2.794 28.044 26.559 1.00 16.62 C

ATOM 1262 CG2 ILE A 181 1.570 27.130 26.622 1.00 15.86 c

ATOM 1263 CGI ILE A 181 2.829 28.835 25.247 1.00 17.95 c

ATOM 1264 CD1 ILE A 181 2.732 27.982 24.009 1.00 26.87 c

ATOM 1265 C ILE A 181 2.589 28.256 29.049 1.00 15.69 c

ATOM 1266 O ILE A 181 3.452 27.469 29.438 1.00 13.45 0

ATOM 1267 N THR A 182 1.468 28.483 29.727 1.00 17.74 N

ATOM 1268 CA THR A 182 1.210 27.812 30.998 1.00 23.56 c

ATOM 1269 C THR A 182 0.141 26.728 31.019 1.00 26.44 c

ATOM 1270 O THR A 182 -0.071 26.088 32.052 1.00 29.65 o

ATOM 1271 CB THR A 182 0.841 28.841 32.073 1.00 24.55 c

ATOM 1272 OG1 THR A 182 -0.378 29.497 31.701 1.00 27.19 0

ATOM 1273 CG2 THR A 182 1.940 29.877 32.211 1.00 28.36 c

ATOM 1274 N THR A 183 -0.540 26.517 29.901 1.00 27.09 N

ATOM 1275 CA THR A 183 -1.573 25.494 29.866 1.00 33.19 c

ATOM 1276 C THR A 183 -1.835 25.008 28.447 1.00 33.29 C

ATOM 1277 O THR A 183 -1.707 25.765 27.484 1.00 34.57 O

ATOM 1278 CB THR A 183 -2.888 26.020 30.477 1.00 33.38 c

ATOM 1279 OG1 THR A 183 -3.822 24.942 30.602 1.00 39.37 0

ATOM 1280 CG2 THR A 183 -3.486 27.105 29.600 1.00 36.39 c

ATOM 1281 N ASP A 184 -2.210 23.739 28.330 1.00 33.90 N

ATOM 1282 CA ASP A 184 -2.489 23.133 27.035 1.00 36.90 c

ATOM 1283 C ASP A 184 -3.988 23.017 26.769 1.00 36.93 C

ATOM 1284 O ASP A 184 -4.744 23.965 26.985 1.00 38.19 O

ATOM 1285 CB ASP A 184 -1.841 21.749 26.980 1.00 36.49 C

ATOM 1286 CG ASP A 184 -0.497 21.713 27.682 1.00 39.84 C

ATOM 1287 OD1 ASP A 184 0.341 22.597 27.400 1.00 40.10 O

ATOM 1288 OD2 ASP A 184 -0.279 20.804 28.515 1.00 34.43 O

TER 1289 ASP A 184

ATOM 1290 O *1 1 13.322 21.904 47.897 1.00 25.15 LIGA 0

ATOM 1291 H n 1 12.748 22.438 47.362 1.00 20.00 LIGA H

ATOM 1292 S n 1 14.827 22.185 47.500 1.00 22.18 LIGA S

ATOM 1293 O *1 1 15.755 21.317 48.284 1.00 26.48 LIGA O

ATOM 1294 O n 1 15.030 21.926 46.041 1.00 26.21 LIGA O

ATOM 1295 0 *1 1 15.058 23.692 47.860 1.00 25.81 LIGA O

ATOM 1296 H *1 1 15.899 23.969 47.521 1.00 20.00 LIGA H

TER 1297 *1 1 ,

ATOM 1298 0 *1 1 8.257 10.233 23.934 1.00 51.93 LIGA O

ATOM 1299 H *1 1 8.965 10.771 24.260 1.00 20.00 LIGA H

ATOM 1300 S n 1 7.968 9.064 24.968 1.00 52.38 LIGA S

ATOM 1301 O *1 1 6.699 8.342 24.628 1.00 53.41 LIGA O

ATOM 1302 O *1 1 9.106 8.094 25.015 1.00 51.29 LIGA O

ATOM 1303 O *1 1 7.802 9.828 26.339 1.00 52.66 LIGA O

ATOM 1304 H *1 1 7.532 9.218 27.014 1.00 20.00 LIGA H

TER 1305 *1 1

ATOM 1306 O *1 1 31.870 41.807 26.377 1.00 77.97 LIGA O

ATOM 1307 H *1 1 32.101 42.067 27.259 1.00 20.00 LIGA H

ATOM 1308 S *1 1 33.167 41.279 25.641 1.00 81.24 LIGA S

ATOM 1309 O *1 1 33.774 40.123 26.382 1.00 80.04 LIGA O

VTOM 1310 O *1 1 32.867 40.862 24.230 1.00 80.50 LIGA O

MOM 1311 O *1 1 34.119 42.548 25.670 1.00 79.65 LIGA O iTOM 1312 H *1 1 34.951 42.330 25.269 1.00 20.00 LIGA H

ER 1313 *1 1

TOM 1314 O HOH 1 19.154 20.019 28.345 1.00 14.14 S O

TOM 1315 O HOH W 2 23.228 15.643 36.576 1.00 16.94 S O

COM 1316 o HOH W 3 9.851 19.721 10.708 1.00 13.00 S O

OM 1317 0 HOH W 4 8.807 18.269 21.008 1.00 14.72 S 0

OM 1318 0 HOH 5 4.955 20.914 9.889 1.00 26.47 S 0 225

ATOM 1242 CB ARG A 179 3. .565 35, .312 27, .729 1, .00 21. .75 C

ATOM 1243 CG ARG A 179 3. .321 36, .700 28. .298 1, .00 30. .60 C

ATOM 1244 CD ARG A 179 1. .837 36, .960 28. .493 1, .00 37. .51 C

ATOM 1245 NE ARG A 179 1. 586 38, .213 29, .199 1, .00 47. .17 N

ATOM 1246 CZ ARG A 179 2. . Oil 39, .405 28, .790 1, .00 49. ,75 C

ATOM 1247 NH1 ARG A 179 2. .715 39, .516 27, ,672 1, .00 52. .12 N

ATOM 1248 NH2 ARG A 179 1. .731 40, .488 29, .500 1, .00 50. .23 N

ATOM 1249 C ARG A 179 5. 153 33, .398 27, ,640 1, .00 15. .02 C

ATOM 1250 O ARG A 179 5. .039 32, .787 26, .574 1, .00 14. .80 O

ATOM 1251 N MET A 180 5. 401 32, .800 28. .799 1, .00 13. .59 N

ATOM 1252 CA MET A 180 5. .529 31, .356 28. .909 1, .00 16. .64 C

ATOM 1253 CB MET A 180 5. 991 30, .969 30. ,316 1, .00 17. .26 C

ATOM 1254 CG MET A 180 7. 358 31, .449 30, ,714 1, .00 22. .61 C

ATOM 1255 SD MET A 180 8. 603 30, .324 30, ,120 1, .00 24. .38 Ξ

ATOM 1256 CE MET A 180 8. 143 28, .828 30, ,998 1, .00 21. .48 C

ATOM 1257 C MET A 180 4. .156 30, .739 28, ,706 1, .00 16. .31 C

ATOM 1258 O MET A 180 3. .167 31, .255 29. ,225 1, .00 17. .83 O

ATOM 1259 N ILE A 181 4. .076 29, .656 27. ,942 1, .00 14. .71 N

ATOM 1260 CA ILE A 181 2. 778 29, .019 27. .740 1, .00 13. .74 C

ATOM 1261 CB ILE A 181 2. 794 28, .044 26, .559 1, .00 16. .62 C

ATOM 1262 CG2 ILE A 181 1. 570 27, .130 26, .622 1, .00 15. .86 c

ATOM 1263 CGI ILE A 181 2. .829 28, .835 25. .247 1, .00 17. .95 c

ATOM 1264 CD1 ILE A 181 2. 732 27, .982 24. .009 1, .00 26. .87 c

ATOM 1265 C ILE A 181 2. 589 28, .256 29. ,049 1, .00 15. .69 c

ATOM 1266 O ILE A 181 3. 452 27, .469 29. ,438 1, .00 13. .45 0

ATOM 1267 N THR A 182 1. 468 28, .483 29. .727 1, .00 17. .74 N

ATOM 1268 CA THR A 182 1. 210 27, .812 30. .998 1, .00 23. .56 C

ATOM 1269 C THR A 182 0. 141 26, .728 31. .019 1, .00 26. .44 C

ATOM 1270 O THR A 182 -0. 071 26, .088 32. .052 1, .00 29. .65 O

ATOM 1271 CB THR A 182 0. 841 28, .841 32. .073 1, .00 24. .55 C

ATOM 1272 OG1 THR A 182 -0. 378 29, .497 31. .701 1, .00 27. .19 0

ATOM 1273 CG2 THR A 182 1. 940 29, .877 32. .211 1, .00 28. .36 c

ATOM 1274 N THR A 183 -0. 540 26, .517 29. .901 1. .00 27. .09 N

ATOM 1275 CA THR A 183 -1. 573 25, .494 29. .866 1. ,00 33. .19 C

ATOM 1276 C THR A 183 -1. 835 25, .008 28. .447 1, .00 33. .29 C

ATOM 1277 O THR A 183 -1. 707 25, .765 27. .484 1, .00 34. .57 O

ATOM 1278 CB THR A 183 -2. 888 26, .020 30. .477 1. .00 33. .38 C

ATOM 1279 OG1 THR A 183 -3. 822 24, .942 30. .602 1. .00 39. .37 O

ATOM 1280 CG2 THR A 183 -3. 486 27, .105 29. .600 1. .00 36. .39 C

ATOM 1281 N ASP A 184 -2. 210 23, .739 28. .330 1. .00 33. .90 N

ATOM 1282 CA ASP A 184 -2. 489 23, .133 27. .035 1, .00 36. .90 C

ATOM 1283 C ASP A 184 -3. 988 23, .017 26. .769 1. .00 36. .93 C

ATOM 1284 O ASP A 184 -4. 744 23, .965 26. .985 1, .00 38. .19 O

ATOM 1285 CB ASP A 184 -1. 841 21, .749 26. .980 1. .00 36. .49 C

ATOM 1286 CG ASP A 184 -0. 497 21, .713 27. .682 1. .00 39. .84 C

ATOM 1287 OD1 ASP A 184 0. 341 22, .597 27. .400 1. ,00 40. .10 O

ATOM 1288 OD2 ASP A 184 -0. 279 20, .804 28. .515 1. .00 34. .43 O

TER 1289 ASP A 184

ATOM 1290 O *1 1 13. 322 21, .904 47. .897 1. .00 25. .15 LIGA O

ATOM 1291 H *1 1 12. 748 22, .438 47. .362 1. .00 20. .00 LIGA H

ATOM 1292 S *1 1 14. 827 22, .185 47. .500 1. .00 22. .18 LIGA S

ATOM 1293 O *1 1 15. 755 21, .317 48. .284 1. .00 26. .48 LIGA O

ATOM 1294 0 *1 1 15. 030 21, .926 46. .041 1. ,00 26. .21 LIGA O

ATOM 1295 0 *1 1 15. 058 23, .692 47. .860 1. ,00 25. .81 LIGA O

ATOM 1296 H *1 1 15. 899 23, .969 47. .521 1, ,00 20. .00 LIGA H

TER 1297 *1 1

ATOM 1298 O *1 1 8. 257 10, .233 23. .934 1. .00 51, .93 LIGA O

ATOM 1299 H *1 1 8. 965 10, .771 24. .260 1, ,00 20, .00 LIGA H

ATOM 1300 S *1 1 7. 968 9, .064 24. .968 1. .00 52, .38 LIGA S

ATOM 1301 O *1 1 6. 699 8, .342 24. .628 1, .00 53. .41 LIGA O

ATOM 1302 O *1 1 9. 106 8, .094 25, .015 1. .00 51. .29 LIGA O

ATOM 1303 O *1 1 7. 802 9, .828 26, .339 1, .00 52. .66 LIGA O

ATOM 1304 H *1 1 7. 532 9, .218 27, .014 1. .00 20. .00 LIGA H

TER 1305 *1 1

ATOM 1306 O *1 1 31. 870 41, .807 26, .377 1, .00 77. .97 LIGA O

ATOM 1307 H u 1 32. 101 42, ,067 27. .259 1. .00 20. .00 LIGA H

ATOM 1308 S u 1 33. 167 41. .279 25. .641 1. .00 81. .24 LIGA S

ATOM 1309 O *1 1 33. 774 40. .123 26. .382 1. .00 80. .04 LIGA O

ATOM 1310 O *1 1 32. 867 40. .862 24. .230 1, .00 80. .50 LIGA O

ATOM 1311 O *1 1 34. 119 42. .548 25. .670 1. .00 79. .65 LIGA O

ATOM 1312 H *1 1 34. 951 42, .330 25. .269 1, .00 20. .00 LIGA H

TER 1313 *1 1

ATOM 1314 O HOH W 1 19. 154 20. .019 28, .345 1. .00 14. .14 S O

ATOM 1315 O HOH 2 23. 228 15. .643 36. .576 1, .00 16. .94 S O

ATOM 1316 0 HOH w 3 9. 851 19. .721 10. .708 1. .00 13. .00 S O

ATOM 1317 0 HOH w 4 8. 807 18. .269 21. ,008 1. .00 14. .72 S O

ATOM 1318 0 HOH w 5 4. 955 20, .914 9. ,889 1. .00 26. .47 S O - 226

ATOM 1319 O HOH W 6 17.303 10.248 31.329 1.00 20.21 S 0

ATOM 1320 O HOH W 7 21. .419 36. ,535 33, .815 1. .00 20. .37 S 0

ATOM 1321 O HOH W 8 17. ,558 29. ,940 39, .867 1. .00 20, .33 S 0

ATOM 1322 O HOH 9 6. ,195 26. ,062 12. .062 1. ,00 15. ,73 S O

ATOM 1323 O HOH 10 27. ,195 16, ,076 37. .425 1. ,00 23. ,27 S 0

ATOM 1324 O HOH 11 7, .569 24, .195 27, .699 1. ,00 15. .49 S 0

ATOM 1325 O HOH w 12 9. .918 10, .244 27, .897 1. ,00 14. .73 S 0

ATOM 1326 O HOH w 13 18. ,578 40. .541 22, .823 1, .00 17. .35 S 0

ATOM 1327 O HOH 14 12. ,929 31, .417 36. .841 1. ,00 14. ,91 S 0

ATOM 1328 O HOH w 15 18. ,919 21, ,848 17, .030 1. ,00 16. ,90 S 0

ATOM 1329 O HOH 16 16. ,648 20. .485 10. .072 1. ,00 19. .27 S 0

ATOM 1330 O HOH w 17 22. ,460 33. .500 36. .980 1, ,00 16. .01 S 0

ATOM 1331 O HOH 18 3. .488 17. .715 36. .292 1. ,00 27. .12 S 0

ATOM 1332 O HOH 19 19, .370 14. .862 9. .712 1. .00 13. .10 S 0

ATOM 1333 O HOH w 20 19. .355 40, .188 27. .351 1. .00 20. .79 S 0

ATOM 1334 O HOH w 21 16. .874 12. .423 21. ,691 1, .00 24, .23 S 0

ATOM 1335 O HOH 22 18. ,521 38, .452 20. .251 1. ,00 22, .43 S 0

ATOM 1336 O HOH w 23 10. .797 19, .540 36, .865 1, ,00 27, .07 S 0

ATOM 1337 O HOH w 24 11. ,234 19, .209 19. .064 1. .00 21, .16 S 0

ATOM 1338 O HOH w 25 11. .110 10. .795 24. .566 1. .00 21. .70 S 0

ATOM 1339 O HOH 26 10. ,089 25, .686 42. .195 1. .00 27. .30 S 0

ATOM 1340 O HOH w 27 5. .885 26, .924 28, .544 1. .00 17, .14 S 0

ATOM 1341 O HOH w 28 22, ,189 13, .924 20, .647 1. .00 19, .65 S 0

ATOM 1342 0 HOH w 29 2, .839 15, ,407 25, .779 1, .00 24, .76 S 0

ATOM 1343 0 HOH 30 20, .416 36. .872 30. .702 1. .00 22. .38 s 0

ATOM 1344 0 HOH w 31 14, .010 25, .569 46, .267 1, ,00 20. .18 s 0

ATOM 1345 0 HOH w 32 19. ,103 14. .781 19, .716 1. .00 25. .71 s 0

ATOM 1346 0 HOH 33 14, .999 33, ,688 35. .037 1. .00 17. .93 s 0

ATOM 1347 0 HOH w 35 23, .578 36, .561 29. .922 1, .00 21. .76 s 0

ATOM 1348 0 HOH w 36 20, .341 32, ,322 45, .950 1. .00 21, .47 s 0

ATOM 1349 0 HOH w 37 0, .497 25, ,775 19, ,401 1, ,00 26. .47 s 0

ATOM 1350 0 HOH 38 11. .741 34, ,995 39. ,424 1, ,00 22. .41 s 0

ATOM 1351 0 HOH w 39 22. .467 9, .409 26. .630 1. .00 15. .84 s 0

ATOM 1352 0 HOH 40 22. .662 11, .866 36, .367 1, .00 45. .41 s 0

ATOM 1353 O HOH w 41 3, ,122 26, .816 16. .542 1. .00 23. .85 s 0

ATOM 1354 O HOH 42 6. .805 20, .983 12. .758 1. .00 24. .18 s 0

ATOM 1355 0 HOH w 43 29. ,143 24. ,285 40. .975 1. .00 26. .61 s 0

ATOM 1356 0 HOH w 44 24, .253 18, .985 43, .742 1, .00 21. ,24 s 0

ATOM 1357 0 HOH w 45 16, .923 33, .119 42, .439 1, .00 24. .24 s 0

ATOM 1358 0 HOH 46 -0. ,710 24, ,821 24. .871 1. .00 22. .41 s 0

ATOM 1359 0 HOH 47 28, .123 37, .039 34, .996 1. .00 23. .29 s 0

ATOM 1360 0 HOH 48 22, .509 29, .264 12, .288 1. .00 22, .20 s 0

ATOM 1361 0 HOH 49 18, .268 20, .963 47, .186 1, .00 27, .23 s 0

ATOM 1362 0 HOH 50 25, .603 33 .211 43, .598 1, .00 26, .97 s 0

ATOM 1363 0 HOH w 51 20, .065 33, ,475 8. .796 1. .00 27, .50 s 0

ATOM 1364 O HOH w 52 27, .258 11 .820 29, .311 1, .00 24, .08 s 0

ATOM 1365 0 HOH 53 10. .875 28 .986 41, .865 1, .00 23, .77 s 0

ATOM 1366 0 HOH w 54 5. .763 34, .393 31, .210 1. .00 25, .54 s 0

ATOM 1367 0 HOH w 55 13, .975 14, .195 21, .784 1, .00 27, .82 s 0

ATOM 1368 0 HOH w 56 12, .541 23 .538 8, .045 1, .00 22, .43 s 0

ATOM 1369 0 HOH w 57 24, .567 16 .480 39, .993 1, .00 26, .58 s 0

ATOM 1370 0 HOH 58 24, .532 38 .285 35, .829 1, .00 57, .74 s 0

ATOM 1371 0 HOH 59 25. .710 22, .863 22, .059 1. .00 31. .50 s 0

ATOM 1372 0 HOH w 60 12, ,323 34, .306 43, .203 1, .00 31, .10 s 0

ATOM 1373 0 HOH w 61 4, .395 14, .949 17 .739 1 .00 29, .65 s 0

ATOM 1374 0 HOH w 62 6, .745 20 .043 6, .966 1, .00 84, .14 s 0

ATOM 1375 0 HOH w 63 5, .532 20 .170 37, .794 1, .00 41, ,49 s 0

ATOM 1376 0 HOH w 64 26. .003 16, .001 22, .248 1. ,00 29. .03 s 0

ATOM 1377 0 HOH 65 5, .525 35 .401 19, .570 1, .00 33. .21 s 0

ATOM 1378 0 HOH w 66 31. .845 33 .895 37 .644 1, .00 34. .28 s 0

ATOM 1379 0 HOH w 67 20. ,183 13, .414 38, .159 1. ,00 27. .70 s 0

ATOM 1380 0 HOH w 68 20. .038 18, .219 20. .060 1, ,00 50. .13 s 0

ATOM 1381 0 HOH w 70 0. ,763 17 .179 17, .010 1. .00 37, .46 s 0

ATOM 1382 0 HOH w 71 24, .671 21 .255 26, .579 1, .00 25, .15 s 0

ATOM 1383 0 HOH w 72 8, .061 13 .765 23, .048 1, .00 31. .32 s 0

ATOM 1384 0 HOH w 73 21, ,384 36, .182 15. ,238 1. ,00 25. .91 s 0

ATOM 1385 0 HOH 74 32, .543 19 .236 37, .104 1, .00 32. .62 s 0

ATOM 1386 0 HOH w 75 3. ,201 29 .276 38, .786 1, .00 44. .04 s 0

ATOM 1387 0 HOH w 76 2. ,482 32 .835 31. ,391 1, .00 47, .33 s 0

ATOM 1388 0 HOH w 77 22, ,558 9, .563 30. .212 1, ,00 60, .39 s 0

ATOM 1389 0 HOH w 78 24, .502 25 .394 46. .538 1, .00 35, .15 s 0

ATOM 1390 0 HOH 79 7, .028 39 .862 28. .058 1. ,00 31, .57 s 0

ATOM 1391 0 HOH w 80 33, .571 14 .425 35, .307 1, .00 26. .04 s 0

ATOM 1392 0 HOH 81 2, .732 10, .198 34, ,775 1. .00 30. .67 s 0

ATOM 1393 0 HOH 82 34, .746 11 .362 31, .655 1, .00 34. .37 s 0

ATOM 1394 0 HOH 83 27. .003 10, .835 24, .556 1, .00 34, .40 s 0

ATOM 1395 0 HOH w 84 11. .607 15, .263 18, ,090 1. .00 53. .18 s 0 -227

ATOM 1396 O HOH W 85 18, .961 26, .409 8, .948 1, ,00 30. .64 S 0

ATOM 1397 O HOH w 86 8, .329 30, .456 11, .682 1. .00 24. .79 S 0

ATOM 1398 O HOH 87 28. .267 25. .545 24. .816 1, .00 34. .18 S 0

ATOM 1399 O HOH w 88 27, .826 26. .788 46. .520 1, .00 45. .31 S 0

ATOM 1400 O HOH 89 13, .822 23. .152 43. ,665 1, ,00 23. .81 S 0

ATOM 1401 O HOH 90 15. .013 32. .301 6. .825 1, .00 36. .86 S 0

ATOM 1402 O HOH 91 7. .321 15. .444 19, .576 1, .00 38. .03 S 0

ATOM 1403 O HOH 92 9, .274 4, .160 30, .626 1, .00 34. .25 S 0

ATOM 1404 O HOH w 93 1. .045 23. .765 33, ,021 1, .00 29. .72 S 0

ATOM 1405 O HOH 94 0, .274 28, .435 36, ,491 1, .00 39. ,40 S 0

ATOM 1406 O HOH w 95 26. ,351 23, .628 18. ,493 1. .00 37, .43 S 0

ATOM 1407 O HOH w 96 34, .940 15, .280 30, .014 1, ,00 38, ,02 S 0

ATOM 1408 O HOH w 97 20, .426 30, .014 49, .201 1, .00 33, .87 S 0

ATOM 1409 O HOH 98 13, .509 20, .866 41, .132 1, ,00 41, ,63 S 0

ATOM 1410 O HOH 99 28, .366 18, .133 31, .889 1, ,00 32. .04 S 0

ATOM 1411 O HOH w 100 0, .422 36, .030 31 .986 1, .00 42, .04 S 0

ATOM 1412 0 HOH 103 13, .872 24, .846 4, .468 1, .00 45. ,22 S 0

ATOM 1413 0 HOH w 104 25, .742 19 .925 19, .691 1, .00 41. .00 S 0

ATOM 1414 0 HOH w 105 5, ,894 32, .368 37, .453 1, .00 28. .07 S 0

ATOM 1415 0 HOH w 108 27, .692 30, .529 45, .176 1, .00 36, .94 S 0

ATOM 1416 0 HOH 109« 30, .999 38 .392 25, .165 1 .00 26, .39 Ξ 0

ATOM 1417 0 HOH w 111 13, .400 10, .503 34, .273 1, .00 29. ,92 S 0

ATOM 1418 O HOH w 112 20, .748 36 .914 39, .970 1, .00 40, .16 S 0

ATOM 1419 0 HOH 113 24, .634 31, .190 17, .336 1 .00 36, .87 Ξ 0

ATOM 1420 0 HOH w 114 5, .642 30 .898 42, .120 1, .00 38. .57 S 0

ATOM 1421 0 HOH w 115 8 .972 40 .592 30 .979 1 .00 32. .13 S 0

ATOM 1422 O HOH w 116 2, .047 31, .605 35, .777 1, .00 62. .75 S 0

ATOM 1423 0 HOH w 117 27, .060 7 .939 28, .519 1 .00 31. .51 S 0

ATOM 1424 0 HOH 118 4, .134 24 .143 10 .395 1 .00 19. .77 S 0

ATOM 1425 0 HOH 119 17. .406 32, .729 38, ,273 1. .00 19. .77 S 0

ATOM 1426 0 HOH w 120 21. ,370 42, .268 22, .477 1, ,00 19. .75 S 0

ATOM 1427 0 HOH w 121 23. .854 15. .724 43. ,136 1. .00 19, .76 S 0

ATOM 1428 0 HOH 122 19. .654 34, .836 37. .602 1, .00 19. .76 S 0

ATOM 1429 0 HOH w 123 21. .170 42, .930 27. .470 1, .00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1430 0 HOH w 124 25. .304 8, .005 25. ,551 1. .00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1431 0 HOH 125 20. .739 40, .152 30. .476 1, .00 19. .73 s 0

ATOM 1432 0 HOH w 126 19. ,238 15, .779 6. .587 1, .00 19, .76 s 0

ATOM 1433 0 HOH w 127 7. .151 28, .097 9. .617 1, .00 19, ,75 s 0

ATOM 1434 0 HOH 128 7, .122 17, .869 11, .543 1, ,00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1435 0 HOH 129 9. .467 35, .418 37. ,012 1, .00 19. .76 s 0

ATOM 1436 0 HOH w 130 5. .720 23, .417 6. .558 1, .00 19. .76 s 0

ATOM 1437 0 HOH 131 3. .123 12, .568 32, .283 1, .00 19. .76 s 0

ATOM 1438 0 HOH w 132 12, ,909 18, .142 39. .232 1, .00 19. ,75 s 0

ATOM 1439 0 HOH w 133 18, .190 34, .668 45, .077 1, .00 19. .77 s 0

ATOM 1440 0 HOH w 134 16. ,371 23, .490 8. .743 1, .00 19. .77 s 0

ATOM 1441 O HOH w 135 25. .889 26, .341 15, .721 1, .00 19. ,77 s 0

ATOM 1442 0 HOH 138 18, .831 37 .368 35, .694 1, .00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1443 0 HOH 139 -1. .837 27, .004 34. .243 1, .00 19. .78 s 0

ATOM 1444 0 HOH 140 29, .965 21, .328 39. .814 1, .00 19, .75 s 0

ATOM 1445 0 HOH 141 29. ,084 22, .512 22, .380 1, .00 19, .74 s 0

ATOM 1446 0 HOH 144 26. .825 34, .183 16, .982 1, .00 19, ,75 s 0

ATOM 1447 0 HOH w 146 28, .060 21 .125 26, .874 1, .00 19, .76 s 0

ATOM 1448 0 HOH 147 7, .953 28, .465 43, ,320 1, .00 19. ,76 s 0

ATOM 1449 0 HOH 148 25, .139 13, .555 38, ,510 1, .00 19, .76 s 0

ATOM 1450 0 HOH 154 27, .898 15 .263 40, .931 1, .00 19, .75 s 0

ATOM 1451 0 HOH 157 29, .305 18, .029 39, .665 1, .00 19, ,76 s 0

ATOM 1452 0 HOH w 158 22, .038 30 .753 9, .108 1, .00 19, .76 s 0

ATOM 1453 0 HOH 159 18, .399 11, .163 36, ,207 1 .00 19, .76 Ξ 0

ATOM 1454 0 HOH w 164 26. .335 11, .937 35, ,945 1, ,00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1455 0 HOH w 165 1. .758 29, .855 17, ,357 1, ,00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1456 0 HOH w 166 24, .163 39. .471 32, ,170 1, ,00 19. .76 s 0

ATOM 1457 0 HOH 170 16, .077 17, .918 7, ,749 1. .00 19, .75 s 0

ATOM 1458 0 HOH 172 32, .921 14, .044 27, .295 1, .00 19, .76 s 0

ATOM 1459 0 HOH 177 32, .795 38, ,969 32. ,954 1. .00 19. .77 s 0

ATOM 1460 o HOH w 179 4, .059 6, .708 28. .892 1, .00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1461 0 HOH 180 25. .397 29. .865 14. .090 1. ,00 19, .76 s 0

ATOM 1462 0 HOH 182 11. .078 20. .731 43. .859 1, ,00 19, .77 s 0

ATOM 1463 0 HOH 184 30. .825 30, .779 39, .402 1. .00 19. .77 s 0

ATOM 1464 0 HOH 187 10. .289 21. ,108 7. ,474 1, .00 19. .75 s 0

ATOM 1465 0 HOH 189 27. .314 38, .906 38, ,135 1. .00 19. .76 s 0

ATOM 1466 0 HOH 197 25. .884 26. .959 11, .320 1. ,00 19. .70 s 0

ATOM 1467 0 HOH w 209 9. .364 16, .866 38. ,731 1. .00 19. .73 s 0

ATOM 1468 0 HOH 219 32. .352 16, .134 38. ,786 1, ,00 19. .73 s 0

ATOM 1469 0 HOH 221 15. ,972 35. ,898 37. .609 1. .00 19. ,69 s 0

ATOM 1470 0 HOH w 223 3. ,319 35, .758 13. .483 1, .00 19. .71 s 0

TER 1471 HOH 223

END - 228 -

The surface accessible residues of ASP were determined from the crystallographic coordinates provided above, using the program DS Modeling (Accelrys), using the default settings. The solvent accessible surface (SAS) of ASP was found to be 8044.777 Angstroms. Table 19-2 provides the total SAS, side chain SAS, and percent SAS (the percentage of an amino acid's total surface that is accessible to solvent). Alterations in these surface residues are contemplated to provide desirable changes in hydrophobicity, hydrophiliciy, and total surface charge, and surface charge distribution in the ASP, as well as variant ASPs.

Table 19-2. Solvent Accessible Surface of ASP

Residue Total SAS ang SideChaiπ SAS ang Percent SAS asp 1 :Phe 89.992 66.420 36.954 asp 2: Asp 85.970 68.625 48.199 asp 4:lle 17.921 12.076 9.714 asp 7:Asn 40.541 40.541 21.246 asp 8:Ala 41.497 24.153 35.259 asp 10:Thr 35.846 35.846 21.190 asp 11:lle 29.424 18.114 17.028 asp 12:Gly 81.658 30.191 73.513 asp 13:Gly 75.236 18.114 67.615 asp 4: Arg 124.289 124.289 55.664 asp 15:Ser 29.424 29.424 19.554 asp 16:Arg 105.411 88.447 38.127 asp 22:Ala 11.690 0.000 9.932 asp 24:Asn 71.105 65.067 47.079 asp 25:Gly 53.190 30.191 43.325 asp 32:His 34.693 17.728 19.568 asp 34:Gly 18.114 12.076 20.656 asp 35:Arg 177.087 171.242 69.918 asp 36:T r 87.506 64.886 45.401 asp 37:Gly 58.465 24.153 55.659 asp 38:Ala 18.114 12.076 16.195 asp 39:T r 99.579 87.889 55.002 asp 40:Thr 11.310 0.000 6.469 asp 41. 'Ala 36.229 36.229 38.182 asp 42:Asn 86.537 74.844 43.919 asp 43:Pro 6.038 0.000 4.599 asp 44:Thr 111.082 99.582 59.375 asp 45:Gly 6.038 6.038 5.436 asp 46:Thr 52.427 52.427 28.958 asp 47:Phe 5.655 0.000 2.715 asp 48:Ala 58.848 30.191 52.705 asp 49: Gly 12.076 12.076 12.937 asp 50:Ser 51.274 0.000 37.049 asp 51:Ser 17.348 17.348 11.573 asp 52:Phe 52.040 12.076 25.034 asp 53:Pro 53.193 36.229 40.511 asp 54:Gly 30.191 30.191 27.274 asp 55:Asn 34.499 34.499 18.613 asp 57:Tyr 28.658 28.658 11.861 asp 59:Phe 18.114 18.114 9.808 asp 61:Arg 146.706 141.051 59.429 asp 62:Thr 22.619 5.655 12.939 asp 63:Gly 17.538 6.038 17.646 229 asp 64:Ala 112.229 60.381 90.564 asp 65:Gly 70.535 30.191 60.226 asp 66:Val 16.965 0.000 10.967 asp 67:Asn 69.002 62.964 39.692 asp 68:Leu 34.503 6.038 16.536 asp 69:Leu 42.267 42.267 20.295 asp 71 :Gln 39.774 39.774 18.552 asp 73:Asn 17.345 17.345 8.760 asp 74:Asn 41.301 41.301 25.351

10 asp 75 Tyr 93.544 47.922 37.830 asp 76:Ser 97.666 52.044 76.965 asp 77:Gly 81.275 24.153 73.294 asp 78:Gly 17.921 12.076 18.067 asp 79:Arg 139.911 94.292 56.632

15 asp 80:Val 36.229 30.191 22.621 asp 81 :Gln 82.421 70.921 37.295 asp 83:Ala 41.117 24.153 33.386 asp 84:Gly 12.076 12.076 12.151 asp 85:His 71.298 65.454 36.451

20 asp 86:Thr 111.082 93.544 65.517 asp 87:Ala 64.886 42.267 52.523 asp 88:Ala 12.076 6.038 10.760 asp 89:Pro 90.572 78.496 58.405 asp 90:Val 94.694 66.420 53.062

25 asp 91:Gly 58.082 18.114 49.593 asp 92:Ser 34.886 23.003 27.450 asp 93:Ala 83.381 60.381 70.846 asp 95:Cys 26.565 26.565 15.773 asp 99:Ser 39.584 0.000 29.907

30 asp 100:T r 87.123 47.155 48.121 asp 101 Thr 34.696 6.038 22.060 asp 102:Gly 12.076 12.076 13.771 asp 103:Trp 70.728 47.919 27.630 asp 104:Hrs 47.726 41.687 23.152

35 asp 105:Cys 54.609 31.799 33.796 asp 106:Gly 23.386 12.076 23.531 asp 107:Thr 47.155 47.155 29.873 asp 108:lle 5.655 0.000 2.888 asp 109Thr 64.503 30.191 35.741

40 asp 110:Ala 24.153 24.153 21.668 asp 111:Leu 71.115 48.305 36.142 asp 112:Asn 138.770 104.841 66.301 asp 113:Ser 17.731 11.693 12.794 asp 114:Ser 92.391 52.427 63.967

45 asp 115:Val 30.191 24.153 18.166 asp 116:Thr 128.237 82.618 66.534 asp 11 :Tyr 35.846 24.153 15.603 asp 18:Pro 159.964 102.648 93.188 asp 119:Glu 132.745 87.123 63.766

50 asp 120:Gly 18.114 18.114 20.611 asp 121 Thr 93.924 76.579 48.828 asp 123:Arg 129.748 129.748 59.619 asp 124:Gly 29.231 12.076 26.315 asp 126:lle 6.038 6.038 3.084

55 asp 127:Arg 99.943 99.943 36.957 asp 128:Thr 5.655 0.000 3.450 asp 129:Thr 76.579 59.615 45.219 asp 130:Val 0.000 0.000 0.000 asp 131 :Cys 25.568 19.723 18.583

60 asp 132:Ala 11.693 6.038 9.495 asp 133:Glu 40.734 29.041 20.057 asp 134:Pro 114.531 102.648 68.994 asp 135:Gly 11.883 6.038 11.979 asp 137:Ser 5.655 5.655 3.915

65 asp 143:Ala 17.731 6.038 18.763 asp 144:Gly 59.612 36.229 63.599 asp 145:Asn 81.832 70.142 44.061 asp 146:Gln 52.810 52.810 27.510 asp 147:Ala 5.655 0.000 4.797

70 asp 148:Gln 11.500 5.845 5.335 asp 152:Ser 5.655 0.000 4.092 230 asp 153:Gly 24.153 18.114 25.819 asp 154:Gly 63.927 12.076 64.322 asp 155:Ser 88.656 70.541 69.864 asp 156:Gly 52.807 18.114 50.090 asp 157:Asn 35.263 35.263 20.195 asp 158:Cys 34.312 6.038 21.893 asp 159:Arg 199.716 154.094 79.090 asp 160:Thr 135.044 89.422 85.862 asp 161 :Gly 35.462 24.153 33.699 asp 162:Gly 23.576 6.038 21.225 asp 163:Thr 46.005 46.005 25.438 asp 164:Thr 5.655 5.655 3.127 asp 165:Phe 24.153 24.153 10.669 asp 167:Gln 5.845 5.845 3.042 asp 168:Pro 48.305 48.305 31.227 asp 170:Asn 59.032 53.377 31.882 asp 171 :Pro 59.615 42.267 42.027 asp 173:Leu 17.731 12.076 8.274 asp 174:Gln 145.572 122.569 80.497 asp 175:Ala 52.044 6.038 44.291 asp 176:Tyr 64.886 36.229 29.811 asp 177:Gly 69.775 24.153 70.340 asp 178: Leu 11.693 6.038 5.788 asp 179:Arg 182.932 182.932 72.390 asp 180: Met 34.886 12.076 17.253 asp 181 :lle 36.229 30.191 19.053 asp 182:Thr 99.389 76.579 60.785 asp 183:Thr 104.854 93.544 68.979 asp 184:Asp 122.008 23.386 52.822

The ASP co-ordinates, and those of homologous structures were loaded into MOE (Chemical Computing Group). Co-ordinates for waters and ligands were removed. Using MOE align, the structures were aligned using actual secondary structure, with structural alignment enabled and superpose chains enabled. This resulted in the following structural alignment. The numbers indicated refer to the mature ASP protease amino-acid sequence.

PDB ID

1 10 20 30 40

ASP FDVIGGNAYTIG-GRSRCSIGFAVN GGFITAGHCGRTGATTAN PTGTFA

1HPG - -VLGGGAIYGG-GSR-CSAAFNVTK-GGARYFVTAGHCTN SANWSASS-GGSWGVRE

1SGP --ISGGDAIYSS-TGR-CSLGFNVRS-GSTYYFLTAGHCTDGATT WANSARTTVLGTTS

1TA ANIVGGIEYSIN ASL-CSVGFSVTR-GATKGFVTAGHCGTVNATARIG GAWGTFA

2SFA - -IAGGEAI AAGGGR-CS GFNVRSSSGATYALTAGHCTEIASTWYTNSGQTSLLGTRA SGA - -IAGGEAITT-GGSR-CSLGFNVSVr-NGVAHALTAGHCTWISAS S IGTRT

PDB ID

50 60 70 80 90 100

ASP GSSFPGITOYAFVRTGAG-VI^LAQVNISΓYSGGRVQVAGHTAAPVGSAVCRSGSTTGWHCGT

1HPG GTSFPTITOYGIVRYTDG-SSPAG VDLYNGSTQDISSAANAVVGQAIKKSGSTTKVTSGT

1SGP GSSFPKΓ DYGIVRYT TTIPKDGTVG GQDITSAANATVGMAVTRRGSTTGTHSGS

1TAL ARVFPGNDRAVS TSA-QTLLPRVAG-SSFVTVRGSTEAAVGAAVCRSGRTTGYQCGT

2SFA GTSFPG DYGLIRHSNA-SAADGRVYLYNGSYRDITGAGNAΎVGQTVQRSGSTTGLHSGR

2SGA GTSFPNDYGIIRHSNP-AAADGRVY YNGSYQDITTAGNAFVGQAVQRSGSTTGLRSGS

PDB ID

110 120 130 140 150 160

ASP ITA NSSVTYPE-GTVRGLIRTTVCAEPGDSGGS LA-GNQAQGVTSGGSG NCRT 1HPG VTAV π V YGD-GP Y MVRTTACS GGDSGGAHFA-GSVALGIHSGSSG CSG - 231 -

1SGP VTALNATVNYGGGDVVYGMIRTNVCAEPGDSGGP YS-GTRAIGrjTSGGSG NCSS 1TAL ITA VTANYAE-GAVRGLTQGNACMGRGDSGGS ITSAGQAQGVMSGGNVQSNGNNCGI 2SFA VTGLNATV YGGGDIVSGLIQTNVCAEPGDSGGALFA-GSTALGLTSGGSG NCRT 2SGA VTGLNATVNYGSSGIVYGMIQTNVCAQPGDSGGSLFA-GSTA GLTSGGSG NCRT

PDB ID

170 180

ASP G GTTFFQPVNPILQAYGLRMITTD (SEQ ID NO: 624 )

1HPG TA- -GSAIHQPVTEALSAYGVTVY (SEQ ID NO: 625 )

1SGP G GTTFFQPVTEA VAYGVSVY (SEQ ID NO: 626 )

1TAL PASQRSS FERLQPILSQYGLSLVTG- (SEQ ID NO: 627 )

2SFA G- - -GTTFFQPVTEALSAYGVSIL (SEQ ID NO: 628 )

2SGA G- - -GTTFYQPVTEALSAYGATVL- - - (SEQ ID NO: 629 )

In the above alignment, the codes are as follows:

1HPG = Streptomyces griseus glutamic acid specific protease. 1SGP = Streptomyces griseus proteinase B 1SGT = Streptomyces griseus strain K1 trypsin

1TAL = Lysobacter enzymogenes alpha-lytic protease 2SFA = Streptomyces fradiae serine proteinase 2SGA = Streptomyces griseus protease A

EXAMPLE 20 Enzyme Substrate Modeling and Mapping of the ASP Active-Site In this Example, enzyme-substrate modeling and mapping of the ASP active site methods are described. Preliminary inspection of the active-site revealed a large P1 binding pocket that is large enough to accommodate large hydrophobic groups such as the side- chains of Trp, Tyr, and Phe.

The crystal structure of Streptogrisin A with the turkey third domain of the ovomucoid inhibitor (pdb code 2SGB) was been determined. 2SGB was structurally aligned to ASP, using MOE (Chemical Computing Corp), which places the inhibitor in the active-site of ASP. All of the 2SGB co-ordinates were removed, except for those which define a hexa-peptide bound in the ASP active-site, corresponding to binding at the S4 to S2' binding sites. The Pro-ASP protein self-cleaves the pro domain-mature domain junction, to release the mature protease enzyme. The last four residues of the pro domain are expected to occupy the S1- S4 sites, and the first two residues of the mature protease occupy the S1' and S2' sites. Therefore the hexapeptide in the active-site was in-silico mutated to sequence PRTMFD (SEQ ID NO:630).

From inspection of the structure of the initial substrate bound model, the backbone amide of Gly13δ and Asp136 would be expected to form the oxy-anion hole. However, the -232- amide nitrogen of Gly13δ appears to point in the wrong direction. Comparison with streptogrisin A confirms this. Thus, it is presumed that a conformational change in ASP is required to form the oxy-anion hole. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited by any particular mechanism nor hypothesis. The peptide backbone between residues 134 and 136 was altered to that of a similar orientation to that of structurally equivalent atoms in the streptogrisin A structure. The enzyme substrate model was then energy minimized.

Residues within 6 A of the modeled substrate were determined using the proximity tools within the program QUANTA. These residues were identified as: Arg14, Serlδ, Arg16, Cys17, His32, Cys33, Pheδ2, Aspδ6, Thr100, Vai115, Thr116, Tyr117, Pro118, Glu119, Ala132, Glu133, Pro134, Gly135, Asp136, Ser137, Thr151, Ser152, Gly1δ3, Gly1δ4, Serlδδ, Gly1δ6, Asn1δ7, Thr164, Phe16δ. Of these, His 32, Aspδ6, and Ser137 form the catalytic triad.

The P1 pocket is formed by Cys131, Ala132, Glu133, Pro134, Gly13δ, Thr1δ1, Ser1δ2, Gly1δ3, Gly164, Serlδδ, Gly1δ6, Asn1δ7 and Gly 162, Thr 163, Thr164. The P2 pocket is defined by Pheδ2, Tyr117, Pro118 and Glu119. The P3 pocket has main-chain to main chain hydrogen bonding from Gly 164 to the substrate main-chain. The P1' pocket is defined by Arg 16, and His32. The P2' pocket is defined by Thr100, and Pro134. The atomic coordinates of ASP with the modeled octapeptide substrate are provided in Table 20- 1 below.

Table 20-1. Atomic Coordinates of ASP with the Modeled Octapeptide Sul

ATOM 1 N PHE A 1 2.452 18.495 15.165 O.OO N1 +

ATOM 2 CA PHE A 1 3.712 18.208 15.901 O.OO c

ATOM 3 CB PHE A 1 4.906 18.646 15.055 o.oo c

ATOM 4 C PHE A 1 3.743 18.914 17.254 O.OO c

ATOM 5 O PHE A 1 3.539 20.133 17.340 O.OO O

ATOM 6 CG PHE A 1 6.232 18.405 15.707 O.OO c

ATOM 7 CD2 PHE A 1 6.963 17.268 15.411 O.OO c

ATOM 8 CD1 PHE A 1 6.750 19.312 16.618 0.00 c

ATOM 9 CE2 PHE A 1 8.192 17.035 16.010 o.oo c

ATOM 10 CE1 PHE A 1 7.981 19.086 17.222 O.OO c

ATOM 11 CZ PHE A 1 8.702 17.946 16.917 o.oo c

ATOM 12 N ASP A 2 4.000 18.148 18.311 o.oo N

ATOM 13 CA ASP A 2 4.052 18.708 19.659 o.oo c

ATOM 14 CB ASP A 2 3.584 17.678 20.688 0.00 c

ATOM 15 C ASP A 2 5.422 19.210 20.066 o.oo c

ATOM 16 O ASP A 2 6.415 18.508 19.925 o.oo 0

ATOM 17 CG ASP A 2 2.109 17.354 20.560 o.oo c

ATOM 18 OD2 ASP A 2 1.597 16.558 21.379 0.00 01-

ATOM 19 OD1 ASP A 2 1.459 17.889 19.638 o.oo 0

ATOM 20 N VAL A 3 5.464 20.440 20.562 o.oo N

ATOM 21 CA VAL A 3 6.707 21.057 21.009 o.oo c

ATOM 22 CB VAL A 3 6.736 22.574 20.718 o.oo c

ATOM 23 C VAL A 3 6.737 20.837 22.513 o.oo c

ATOM 24 O VAL A 3 5.806 21.233 23.216 o.oo 0

ATOM 25 CGI VAL A 3 7.921 23.222 21.425 o.oo c

ATOM 26 CG2 VAL A 3 6.840 22.810 19.220 o.oo c -233-

ATOM 27 CB ILE A '4 7.602 18.448 24.730 o.oo c

ATOM 28 CG2 ILE A 4 7.684 18.189 26.227 0.00 c

ATOM 29 CGI ILE A 4 6.196 18.137 24.220 0.00 c

ATOM 30 CD1 ILE A 4 5.768 16.711 24.456 0.00 c

ATOM 31 C ILE A 4 9.379 20.168 24.911 O.OO c

ATOM 32 O ILE A 4 10.346 19.836 24.229 O.OO 0

ATOM 33 N ILE A 4 7.801 20.200 22.997 o.oo N

ATOM 34 CA ILE A 4 7.955 19.916 24.423 O.OO c

ATOM 35 N GLY A 5 9.499 20.743 26.103 o.oo N

ATOM 36 CA GLY A 5 10.807 21.030 26.653 o.oo c

ATOM 37 C GLY A 5 11.655 19.787 26.819 o.oo c

ATOM 38 O GLY A 5 11.171 18.750 27.277 0.00 0

ATOM 39 N GLY A 6 12.927 19.885 26.443 o.oo N

ATOM 40 CA GLY A 6 13.817 18.747 26.572 0.00 c

ATOM 41 C GLY A 6 14.007 17.948 25.294 o.oo c

ATOM 42 0 GLY A 6 14.990 17.217 25.157 0.00 0

ATOM 43 N ASN A 7 13.069 18.082 24.359 o.oo N

ATOM 44 CA ASN A 7 13.155 17.351 23.100 o.oo c

ATOM 45 CB ASN A 7 11.784 17.247 22.450 o.oo c

ATOM 46 CG ASN A 7 10.918 16.210 23.102 0.00 c

ATOM 47 OD1 ASN A 7 9.741 16.Q69 22.760 o.oo 0

ATOM 48 ND2 ASN A 7 11.492 15.464 24.049 0.00 N

ATOM 49 C ASN A 7 14.124 17.933 22.086 o.oo c

ATOM 50 O ASN A 7 14.466 19.114 22.119 0.00 0

ATOM 51 N ALA A 8 14.561 17.077 21.176 o.oo N

ATOM 52 CA ALA A 8 15.486 17.487 20.138 , o.oo c

ATOM 53 CB ALA A 8 16.212 16.271 19.577 o.oo c

ATOM 54 C ALA A 8 14.716 18.174 19.023 o.oo c

ATOM 55 O ALA A 8 13.509 17.988 18.874 o.oo 0

ATOM 56 N TYR A 9 15.423 18.993 18.262 o.oo N

ATOM 57 CA TYR A 9 14.847 19.714 17.143 o.oo c

ATOM 58 CB TYR A 9 14.253 21.064 17.580 o.oo c

ATOM 59 CG TYR A 9 15.221 22.148 17.963 o.oo c

ATOM 60 CD2 TYR A 9 15.517 22.398 19.301 o.oo c

ATOM 61 CE2 TYR A 9 16.341 23.443 19.663 o.oo c

ATOM 62 CD1 TYR A 9 15.785 22.972 16.993 0.00 c

ATOM 63 CE1 TYR A 9 16.609 24.021 17.343 0.00 c

ATOM 64 CZ TYR A 9 16.883 24.255 18.678 o.oo c

ATOM 65 OH TYR A 9 17.688 25.309 19.029 0.00 0

ATOM 66 C TYR A 9 16.072 19.837 16.262 o.oo c

ATOM 67 O TYR A 9 17.188 19.678 16.753 o.oo 0

ATOM 68 N THR A 10 15.886 20.077 14.970 0.00 N

ATOM 69 CA THR A 10 17.034 20.183 14.082 o.oo c

ATOM 70 CB THR A 10 17.031 19.031 13.041 o.oo c

ATOM 71 OG1 THR A 10 15.822 19.082 12.269 o.oo 0

ATOM 72 CG2 THR A 10 17.129 17.676 13.741 o.oo c

ATOM 73 C THR A 10 17.205 21.488 13.329 o.oo c

ATOM 74 O THR A 10 16.249 22.243 13.104 o.oo 0

ATOM 75 N ILE A 11 18.453 21.734 12.938 o.oo N

ATOM 76 CA ILE A 11 18.828 22.930 12.197 o.oo c

ATOM 77 CB ILE A 11 19.609 23.914 13.093 o.oo c

ATOM 78 CG2 ILE A 11 19.855 25.221 12.343 o.oo c

ATOM 79 CGI ILE A 11 18.811 24.187 14.369 o.oo c

ATOM 80 CD1 ILE A 11 19.546 25.036 15.385 o.oo c

ATOM 81 C ILE A 11 19.712 22.442 11.054 o.oo c

ATOM 82 O ILE A 11 20.772 21.856 11.284 o.oo 0

ATOM 83 N GLY A 12 19.274 22.668 9.821 o.oo N

ATOM 84 CA GLY A 12 20.048 22.193 8.689 o.oo c

ATOM 85 C GLY A 12 20.344 20.705 8.845 o.oo c

ATOM 86 O GLY A 12 21.439 20.239 8.523 o.oo 0

ATOM 87 N GLY A 13 19.373 19.957 9.361 o.oo N

ATOM 88 CA GLY A 13 19.564 18.531 9.545 o.oo c

ATOM 89 C GLY A 13 20.373 18.127 10.769 o.oo c

ATOM 90 O GLY A 13 20.438 16.945 11.103 o.oo 0

ATOM 91 N ARG A 14 20.984 19.091 11.449 o.oo N

ATOM 92 CA ARG A 14 21.787 18.782 12.627 o.oo c

ATOM 93 CB ARG A 14 23.036 19.670 12.669 o.oo c

ATOM 94 C ARG A 14 21.018 18.938 13.935 o.oo c

ATOM 95 O ARG A 14 20.441 19.982 14.212 o.oo 0

ATOM 96 CG ARG A 14 24.251 19.072 11.964 o.oo c

ATOM 97 CD ARG A 14 24.065 19.084 10.450 o.oo c

ATOM 98 NE ARG A 14 24.173 17.752 9.858 o.oo N1+

ATOM 99 CZ ARG A 14 25.316 17.100 9.660 o.oo c

ATOM 100 NH1 ARG A 14 26.474 17.655 10.004 o.oo N

ATOM 101 NH2 ARG A 14 25.302 15.886 9.120 o.oo N

ATOM 102 N SER A 15 21.016 17.878 14.733 o.oo N

ATOM 103 CA SER A 15 20.335 17.870 16.017 o.oo c -234-

ATOM 104 CB SER A 15 20.062 16.429 16.454 0.00 c

ATOM 105 C SER A 15 21.312 18.525 16.983 0.00 c

ATOM 106 O SER A 15 21.933 17.849 17.803 0.00 0

ATOM 107 OG SER A 15 19.396 16.382 17.701 0.00 0

ATOM 108 N ARG A 16 21.454 19.841 16.867 0.00 N

ATOM 109 CA ARG A 16 22.362 20.594 17.724 0.00 c

ATOM 110 CB ARG A 16 22.741 21.927 17.073 0.00 c

ATOM 111 C ARG A 16 21.815 20.907 19.104 0.00 c

ATOM 112 O ARG A 16 22.550 20.867 20.088 0.00 0

ATOM 113 CG ARG A 16 23.719 21.851 15.915 0.00 c

ATOM 114 CD ARG A 16 24.200 23.253 15.549 0.00 c

ATOM 115 NE ARG A 16 24.625 23.984 16.745 0.00 N1+

ATOM 116 CZ ARG A 16 25.242 25.166 16.739 0.00 c

ATOM 117 NH2 ARG A 16 25.581 25.735 17.888 0.00 N

ATOM 118 NH1 ARG A 16 25.528 25.781 15.597 0.00 N

ATOM 119 N CYS A 17 20.526 21.215 19.178 0.00 N

ATOM 120 CA CYS A 17 19.928 21.546 20.455 0.00 c

ATOM 121 CB CYS A 17 19.800 23.068 20.553 0.00 c

ATOM 122 C CYS A 17 18.599 20.911 20.803 0.00 c

ATOM 123 O CYS A 17 18.071 20.077 20.071 0.00 0

ATOM 124 SG CYS A 17 21.393 23.932 20.696 0.00 s

ATOM 125 N SER A 18 18.066 21.348 21.942 0.00 N

ATOM 126 CA SER A 18 16.799 20.865 22.455 0.00 c

ATOM 127 CB SER A 18 17.042 20.053 23.723 0.00 c

ATOM 128 OG SER A 18 18.081 19.111 23.521 0.00 0

ATOM 129 C SER A 18 15.871 22.030 22.769 0.00 c

ATOM 130 O SER A 18 16.312 23.175 22.890 0.00 0

ATOM 131 N ILE A 19 14.584 21.728 22.892 0.00 N

ATOM 132 CA ILE A 19 13.582 22.737 23.195 0.00 c

ATOM 133 CB ILE A 19 12.150 22.152 23.125 0.00 c

ATOM 134 CG2 ILE A 19 11.133 23.215 23.532 0.00 c

•ATOM 135 CGI ILE A 19 11.852 21.634 21.715 0.00 c

ATOM 136 CDl ILE A 19 11.832 22.709 20.655 0.00 c

ATOM 137 C ILE A 19 13.794 23.273 24.614 0.00 c

ATOM 138 O ILE A 19 14.070 22.505 25.545 0.00 0

ATOM 139 N GLY A 20 13.670 24.589 24.774 0.00 N

ATOM 140 CA GLY A 20 13.818 25.185 26.088 0.00 c

ATOM 141 C GLY A 20 12.443 25.203 26.722 0.00 c

ATOM 142 O GLY A 20 12.122 24.389 27.585 0.00 0

ATOM 143 N PHE A 21 11.616 26.137 26.274 0.00 N

ATOM 144 CA PHE A 21 10.253 26.258 26.763 0.00 c

ATOM 145 CB PHE A 21 10.196 27.160 27.992 0.00 c

ATOM 146 CG PHE A 21 10.855 26.559 29.195 0.00 c

ATOM 147 CDl PHE A 21 10.269 25.491 29.857 0.00 c

ATOM 148 CD2 PHE A 21 12.086 27.025 29.638 0.00 c

ATOM 149 CEl PHE A 21 10.898 24.898 30.936 0.00 c

ATOM 150 CE2 PHE A 21 12.713 26.435 30.715 0.00 c

ATOM 151 CZ PHE A 21 12.122 25.370 31.366 0.00 c

ATOM 152 c PHE A 21 9.391 26.825 25.664 0.00 c

ATOM 153 0 PHE A 21 9.865 27.597 24.830 0.00 0

ATOM 154 N ALA A 22 8.131 26.413 25.646 0.00 N

ATOM 155 CA ALA A 22 7.194 26.882 24.647 0.00 c

ATOM 156 CB ALA A 22 6.014 25.915 24.533 0.00 c

ATOM 157 C ALA A 22 6.719 28.230 25.138 0.00 c

ATOM 158 O ALA A 22 6.416 28.388 26.320 0.00 0

ATOM 159 N VAL A 23 6.677 29.202 24.239 0.00 N

ATOM 160 CA VAL A 23 6.233 30.546 24.582 0.00 c

ATOM 161 CB VAL A 23 7.402 31.570 24.551 0.00 c

ATOM 162 CGI VAL A 23 8.328 31.338 25.728 0.00 c

ATOM 163 CG2 VAL A 23 8.182 31.442 23.248 0.00 c

ATOM 164 C VAL A 23 5.206 30.945 23.545 0.00 c

ATOM 165 O VAL A 23 5.053 30.267 22.526 0.00 0

ATOM 166 N ASN A 24 4.495 32.036 23.791 0.00 N

ATOM 167 CA ASN A 24 3.492 32.476 22.832 0.00 c

ATOM 168 CB ASN A 24 2.807 33.759 23.328 0.00 c

ATOM 169 C ASN A 24 4.177 32.715 21.484 0.00 c

ATOM 170 O ASN A 24 5.050 33.576 21.365 0.00 0

ATOM 171 CG ASN A 24 3.737 34.963 23.334 0.00 c

ATOM 172 ODl ASN A 24 4.697 35.029 24.107 0.00 0

ATOM 173 ND2 ASN A 24 3.451 35.927 22.462 0.00 N

ATOM 174 N GLY A 25 3.801 31.929 20.477 0.00 N

ATOM 175 CA GLY A 25 4.396 32.084 19.158 0.00 c

ATOM 176 C GLY A 25 5.503 31.104 18.788 0.00 c

ATOM 177 O GLY A 25 5.925 31.054 17.635 0.00 0

ATOM 178 N GLY A 26 5.989 30.327 19.748 0.00 N

ATOM 179 CA GLY A 26 7.043 29.377 19.433 0.00 c

ATOM 180 C GLY A 26 7.702 28.795 20.666 0.00 c 235

ATOM 181 O GLY A 26 028 28.328 21.582 00 0

ATOM 182 N PHE A 27 028 28.813 20.688 00 N

ATOM 183 CA PHE A 27 , 757 28.294 21.832 00 C

ATOM 184 CB PHE A 27 , 973 26.783 21.710 00 c

ATOM 185 C PHE A 27 11.103 28.975 21.954 0.00 c

ATOM 186 O PHE A 27 11.660 29.459 20.963 0.00 0

ATOM 187 CG PHE A 27 10.949 26.376 20.624 00 c

ATOM 188 CDl PHE A 27 10.504 26.078 19.336 00 c

ATOM 189 CD2 PHE A 27 12.306 26.246 20.905 0.00 c

ATOM 190 CE1 PHE A 27 11.391 25.650 18.352 0.00 c

ATOM 191 CE2 PHE A 27 13.202 25.819 19.926 00 c

ATOM 192 CZ PHE A 27 12.742 25.518 18.648 00 c

ATOM 193 N ILE A 28 11.615 29.020 23.180 00 N

ATOM 194 CA ILE A 28 12.904 29.640 23.445 00 c

ATOM 195 CB ILE A 28 12.843 30.524 24.704 00 c

ATOM 196 C ILE A 28 13.953 28.542 23.603 0.00 c

ATOM 197 O ILE A 28 13.640 27.426 24.011 0.00 0

ATOM 198 CG2 ILE A 28 11.915 31.688 24.450 00 c

ATOM 199 CGI ILE A 28 12.350 29.718 25.904 00 c

ATOM 200 CDl ILE A 28 12.270 30.524 27.176 00 c

ATOM 201 N THR A 29 15.195 28.866 23.265 0.00 N

ATOM 202 CA THR A 29 16.293 27.916 23.353 0.00 c

ATOM 203 CB THR A 29 16.329 27.054 22.052 0.00 c

ATOM 204 OG1 THR A 29 17.423 26.126 22.095 0.00 o

ATOM 205 CG2 THR A 29 16.459 27.950 20.831 0.00 c

ATOM 206 C THR A 29 17.601 28.695 23.538 00 c

ATOM 207 O THR A 29 17.565 29.881 23.842 00 0

ATOM 208 N ALA A 30 18.743 28.029 23.362 00 N

ATOM 209 CA ALA A 30 20.059 28.662 23.510 00 c

ATOM 210 CB ALA A 30 21.121 27.601 23.765 00 c

ATOM 211 C ALA A 30 20.447 29.486 22.282 00 c

ATOM 212 O ALA A 30 20.232 29.061 21.141 00 o

ATOM 213 N GLY A 31 21.028 30.659 22.520 00 N

ATOM 214 CA GLY A 31 21.427 31.522 21.423 00 c

ATOM 215 C GLY A 31 22.508 30.942 20.528 00 c

ATOM 216 O GLY A 31 22.527 31.212 19.322 00 0

ATOM 217 N HIS A 32 23.410 30.143 21.099 00 N

ATOM 218 CA HIS A 32 24.490 29.558 20.310 0.00 c

ATOM 219 CB HIS A 32 25.648 29.091 21.215 0.00 c

ATOM 220 CG HIS A 32 25.412 27.772 21.885 00 c

ATOM 221 CD2 HIS A 32 24.715 27.451 23.001 00 c

ATOM 222 ND1 HIS A 32 25.946 26.589 21.419 00 N

ATOM 223 CE1 HIS A 32 25.590 25.601 22.218 0.00 c

ATOM 224 NE2 HIS A 32 24.842 26.098 23.188 0.00 N

ATOM 225 C HIS A 32 24.029 28.401 19.413 00 c

ATOM 226 O HIS A 32 24.805 27.870 18.630 00 0

ATOM 227 N CYS A 33 22.762 28.025 19.525 00 N

ATOM 228 CA CYS A 33 22.210 26.940 18.723 00 c

ATOM 229 CB CYS A 33 20.836 26.522 19.251 0.00 c

ATOM 230 SG CYS A 33 20.853 25.876 20.942 0.00 s

ATOM 231 C CYS A 33 22.062 27.395 17.283 0.00 c

ATOM 232 O CYS A 33 22.149 26.603 16.356 0.00 o

ATOM 233 N GLY A 34 21.822 28.680 17.095 00 N

ATOM 234 CA GLY A 34 21.664 29.181 15.749 00 c

ATOM 235 C GLY A 34 21.360 30.656 15.763 00 c

ATOM 236 O GLY A 34 20.984 31.213 16.794 00 o

ATOM 237 N ARG A 35 21.523 31.288 14.608 00 N

ATOM 238 CA ARG A 35 21.284 32.716 14.478 00 c

ATOM 239 CB ARG A 35 22.417 33.355 13.680 0.00 c

ATOM 240 C ARG A 35 19.951 33.012 13.798 0.00 c

ATOM 241 O ARG A 35 19.348 32.138 13.173 00 o

ATOM 242 CG ARG A 35 22.437 32.937 12.219 00 c

ATOM 243 CD ARG A 35 23.488 33.715 11.458 00 c

ATOM 244 NE ARG A 35 24.832 33.237 11.755 00 N1+

ATOM 245 CZ ARG A 35 25.406 32.207 11.139 00 c

ATOM 246 NHl ARG A 35 26.634 31.832 11.471 0.00 N

ATOM 247 NH2 ARG A 35 24.759 31.559 10.178 0.00 N

ATOM 248 N THR A 36 19.513 34.258 13.918 00 N

ATOM 249 CA THR A 36 18.259 34.714 13.335 00 c

ATOM 250 CB THR A 36 18.124 36.242 13.522 00 c

ATOM 251 C THR A 36 18.161 34.353 11.856 0.00 c

ATOM 252 O THR A 36 19.123 34.512 11.099 0.00 0

ATOM 253 OG1 THR A 36 18.120 36.536 14.923 0.00 0

ATOM 254 CG2 THR A 36 16.844 36.773 12.880 0.00 c

ATOM 255 N GLY A 37 16.999 33.855 11.449 00 N

ATOM 256 CA GLY A 37 16.813 33.479 10.059 00 c

ATOM 257 C GLY A 37 17.046 32.001 9.799 0.00 c 236

ATOM 258 O GLY A 37 16. ,521 31. ,451 8. ,839 , 00 o

ATOM 259 N ALA A 38 17. ,842 31. ,349 10. ,640 , 00 N

ATOM 260 CA ALA A 38 18. ,095 29. ,924 10. .470 0 . 00 C

ATOM 261 C ALA A 38 16. ,745 29. ,222 10. .565 0 . 00 c

ATOM 262 O ALA A 38 15. ,881 29. ,657 11. ,324 00 0

ATOM 263 CB ALA A 38 19. ,026 29. ,426 11. ,566 00 c

ATOM 264 N THR A 39 16. ,553 28, .151 9. ,800 00 N

ATOM 265 CA THR A 39 15. ,281 27. ,432 9. .842 00 c

ATOM 266 CB THR A 39 14. ,779 27, ,066 8. ,425 0 . 00 c

ATOM 267 OG1 THR A 39 15. ,582 26. ,012 7. ,887 00 o

ATOM 268 CG2 THR A 39 14. .857 28. .277 7, ,504 00 c

ATOM 269 C THR A 39 15. .433 26, .157 10. .664 0 . 00 c

ATOM 270 O THR A 39 16. .533 25. .637 10. .821 0 . 00 0

ATOM 271 N THR A 40 14. ,328 25. ,649 11. ,186 0 . 00 N

ATOM 272 CA THR A 40 14. ,382 24. ,437 11. ,990 0 . 00 c

ATOM 273 CB THR A 40 14. .143 24. .753 13. .473 0 .00 c

ATOM 274 OG1 THR A 40 12. .807 25. ,242 13. .636 00 o

ATOM 275 CG2 THR A 40 15. .124 25. ,799 13. ,962 00 c

ATOM 276 C THR A 40 13. ,332 23. ,421 11. ,581 00 c

ATOM 277 O THR A 40 12. ,345 23. ,760 10. .927 00 o

ATOM 278 N ALA A 41 13. .546 22. ,178 11. .994 00 N

ATOM 279 CA ALA A 41 12. .629 21. ,084 11. .698 0. 00 c

ATOM 280 C ALA A 41 12. .368 20. ,368 13. .030 0 . 00 c

ATOM 281 O ALA A 41 13, .211 20. .394 13. ,936 00 0

ATOM 282 CB ALA A 41 13, .247 20. .133 10. ,684 00 c

ATOM 283 N ASN A 42 11. .206 19. .734 13. .149 00 N

ATOM 284 CA ASN A 42 10. .839 19. .022 14. .370 00 c

ATOM 285 C ASN A 42 11. .037 19. .959 15. ,555 00 c

ATOM 286 O ASN A 42 11, ,861 19. .693 16. .424 00 0

ATOM 287 CB ASN A 42 11, .720 17. .780 14. .584 00 c

ATOM 288 CG ASN A 42 11. .686 16. .812 13. .408 00 c

ATOM 289 OD1 ASN A 42 10. .687 16. .713 12. .695 00 o

ATOM 290 ND2 ASN A 42 12, .779 16. .076 13. .217 00 N

ATOM 291 N PRO A 43 10, .258 21. .046 15. .635 00 N

ATOM 292 CA PRO A 43 9, .206 21. .493 14. .718 00 c

ATOM 293 CB PRO A 43 8. .274 22. .244 15. .649 00 c

ATOM 294 C PRO A 43 9, ,697 22, ,416 13. .612 0.00 c

ATOM 295 O PRO A 43 10, ,816 22. .920 13. ,660 0.00 o

ATOM 296 CD PRO A 43 10, .319 21. .934 16. .809 00 c

ATOM 297 CG PRO A 43 9. ,278 23. .008 16. .480 00 c

ATOM 298 N THR A 44 8. .841 22. .652 12. ,621 00 N

ATOM 299 CA THR A 44 9, .208 23. .533 11, ,522 00 c

ATOM 300 CB THR A 44 8, .225 23. ,421 10. ,345 0.00 c

ATOM 301 C THR A 44 9, .142 24. .934 12. ,110 0.00 c

ATOM 302 O THR A 44 8. .162 25. .293 12. ,772 0.00 o

ATOM 303 OG1 THR A 44 8, .437 22, .176 9, ,671 0.00 o

ATOM 304 CG2 THR A 44 8, .423 24, .566 9, ,366 0.00 c

ATOM 305 N GLY A 45 10, .196 25. ,710 11. .893 0.00 N

ATOM 306 CA GLY A 45 10, ,233 27. ,057 12. .425 0.00 c

ATOM 307 C GLY A 45 11. .421 27. .851 11. ,920 0.00 c

ATOM 308 O GLY A 45 12, .226 27, .355 11. .120 0.00 o

ATOM 309 N THR A 46 11, .537 29, .084 12, ,401 0.00 N

ATOM 310 CA THR A 46 12, .615 29. .979 11. .998 0.00 c

ATOM 311 CB THR A 46 12, ,134 30. .919 10. .867 0.00 c

ATOM 312 OG1 THR A 46 11, .720 30. .132 9, .741 0.00 o

ATOM 313 CG2 THR A 46 13, .246 31, .872 10, .438 0.00 c

ATOM 314 C THR A 46 13, .097 30, .831 13, ,171 0.00 c

ATOM 315 O THR A 46 12, ,287 31. .407 13. .909 0.00 0

ATOM 316 N PHE A 47 14, .412 30. .903 13, .358 00 N

ATOM 317 CA PHE A 47 14, .954 31, .702 14, .451 00 c

ATOM 318 CB PHE A 47 16, .478 31, .585 14, .530 0.00 c

ATOM 319 CG PHE A 47 16, .959 30, .410 15, ,339 0.00 c

ATOM 320 CD2 PHE A 47 17, .538 30. ,606 16. ,590 0.00 c

ATOM 321 CDl PHE A 47 16 .843 29. .115 14, .857 0.00 c

ATOM 322 CE2 PHE A 47 17, .996 29, .532 17, .345 00 c

ATOM 323 CE1 PHE A 47 17, .300 28, .030 15, .608 00 c

ATOM 324 CZ PHE A 47 17, .878 28, ,241 16. .855 00 c

ATOM 325 C PHE A 47 14 .567 33, .160 14, .226 0.00 c

ATOM 326 O PHE A 47 14, .665 33, .686 13, • 111 0.00 o

ATOM 327 N ALA A 48 14, .102 33, .795 15, .291 0.00 N

ATOM 328 CA ALA A 48 13, .690 35, ,184 15, ,245 0.00 c

ATOM 329 CB ALA A 48 12 .161 35, .280 15, .133 00 c

ATOM 330 C ALA A 48 14, .174 35, .828 16, .532 00 c

ATOM 331 O ALA A 48 13, .389 36, .116 17, .433 00 o

ATOM 332 N GLY A 49 15, .481 36, .038 16. ,609 00 N

ATOM 333 CA GLY A 49 16, .072 36. .635 17. ,791 00 c

ATOM 334 C GLY A 49 17 .068 35, .674 18. .415 00 c 237

ATOM 335 O GLY A 49 16.698 34.589 18.867 0.00 0

ATOM 336 N SER A 50 18.333 36.073 18.438 0.00 N

ATOM 337 CA SER A 50 19.387 35.248 18.999 0.00 c

ATOM 338 CB SER A 50 19.976 34.360 17.899 0.00 c

ATOM 339 OG SER A 50 21.019 33.552 18.406 0.00 0

ATOM 340 C SER A 50 20.484 36.112 19.633 0.00 c

ATOM 341 O SER A 50 20.999 37.045 19.012 0.00 0

ATOM 342 N SER A 51 20.832 35.794 20.877 0.00 N

ATOM 343 CA SER A 51 21.860 36.529 21.603 0.00 c

ATOM 344 CB SER A 51 21.228 37.337 22.741 0.00 c

ATOM 345 OG SER A 51 22.179 38.189 23.359 0.00 0

ATOM 346 C SER A 51 22.938 35.596 22.162 0.00 c

ATOM 347 O SER A 51 22.700 34.819 23.089 0.00 0

ATOM 348 N PHE A 52 24.127 35.692 21.579 0.00 N

ATOM 349 CA PHE A 52 25.277 34.889 21.970 0.00 c

ATOM 350 CB PHE A 52 25.031 33.414 21.643 0.00 c

ATOM 351 CG PHE A 52 26.204 32.518 21.941 0.00 c

ATOM 352 CDl PHE A 52 26.485 32.124 23.238 0.00 c

ATOM 353 CD2 PHE A 52 27.034 32.081 20.922 0.00 c

ATOM 354 CE1 PHE A 52 27.575 31.312 23.516 0.00 c

ATOM 355 CE2 PHE A 52 28.131 31.266 21.193 0.00 c

ATOM 356 CZ PHE A 52 28.400 30.883 22.492 0.00 c

ATOM 357 C PHE A 52 26.468 35.390 21.167 0.00 c

ATOM 358 O PHE A 52 26.370 35.589 19.960 0.00 0

ATOM 359 N PRO A 53 27.612 35.603 21.827 0.00 N

ATOM 360 CD PRO A 53 28.893 35.756 21.110 0.00 c

ATOM 361 CA PRO A 53 27.831 35.405 23.266 0.00 c

ATOM 362 CB PRO A 53 29.351 35.249 23.361 0.00 c

ATOM 363 CG PRO A 53 29.851 36.088 22.223 0.00 c

ATOM 364 C PRO A 53 27.268 36.543 24.132 0.00 c

ATOM 365 O PRO A 53 26.346 37.235 23.713 0.00 0

ATOM 366 N GLY A 54 27.814 36.744 25.328 0.00 N

ATOM 367 CA GLY A 54 27.288 37.777 26.211 0.00 c

ATOM 368 C GLY A 54 26.143 37.138 26.980 0.00 c

ATOM 369 O GLY A 54 26.210 36.964 28.197 0.00 0

ATOM 370 N ASN A 55 25.079 36.806 26.254 0.00 N

ATOM 371 CA ASN A 55 23.922 36.103 26.810 0.00 c

ATOM 372 CB ASN A 55 22.579 36.740 26.404 0.00 c

ATOM 373 CG ASN A 55 22.516 38.240 26.641 0.00 c

ATOM 374 OD1 ASN A 55 22.161 39.005 25.734 0.00 0

ATOM 375 ND2 ASN A 55 22.833 38.667 27.857 0.00 N

ATOM 376 C ASN A 55 24.011 34.788 26.037 0.00 c

ATOM 377 O ASN A 55 24.998 34.538 25.333 0.00 0

ATOM 378 N ASP A 56 22.980 33.958 26.171 0.00 N

ATOM 379 CA ASP A 56 22.917 32.682 25.473 0.00 c

ATOM 380 CB ASP A 56 23.774 31.595 26.119 0.00 c

ATOM 381 CG ASP A 56 23.987 30.395 25.179 0.00 c

ATOM 382 OD1 ASP A 56 24.631 29.408 25.585 0.00 0

ATOM 383 OD2 ASP A 56 23.504 30.443 24.024 0.00 01

ATOM 384 C ASP A 56 21.470 32.221 25.379 0.00 c

ATOM 385 O ASP A 56 21.078 31.195 25.930 0.00 0

ATOM 386 N TYR A 57 20.672 33.008 24.671 0.00 N

ATOM 387 CA TYR A 57 19.266 32.693 24.485 0.00 c

ATOM 388 CB TYR A 57 18.396 33.484 25.463 0.00 c

ATOM 389 CG TYR A 57 18.527 34.993 25.374 0.00 c

ATOM 390 CDl TYR A 57 19.153 35.711 26.390 0.00 c

ATOM 391 CE1 TYR A 57 19.231 37.092 26.352 0.00 c

ATOM 392 CD2 TYR A 57 17.986 35.706 24.303 0.00 c

ATOM 393 CE2 TYR A 57 18.060 37.093 24.255 0.00 c

ATOM 394 CZ TYR A 57 18.682 37.781 25.289 0.00 c

ATOM 395 OH TYR A 57 18.732 39.165 25.286 0.00 0

ATOM 396 C TYR A 57 18.820 32.998 23.062 0.00 c

ATOM 397 O TYR A 57 19.438 33.800 22.355 0.00 0

ATOM 398 N ALA A 58 17.742 32.344 22.652 0.00 N

ATOM 399 CA ALA A 58 17.187 32.532 21.323 0.00 c

ATOM 400 CB ALA A 58 17.899 31.645 20.312 0.00 c

ATOM 401 C ALA A 58 15.706 32.191 21.360 0.00 c

ATOM 402 O ALA A 58 15.228 31.521 22.284 0.00 0

ATOM 403 N PHE A 59 14.989 32.683 20.359 0.00 N

ATOM 404 CA PHE A 59 13.564 32.453 20.225 0.00 c

ATOM 405 CB PHE A 59 12.762 33.735 20.438 0.00 c

ATOM 406 CG PHE A 59 11.333 33.629 19.970 0.00 c

ATOM 407 CD2 PHE A 59 10.859 34.437 18.947 0.00 c

ATOM 408 CDl PHE A 59 10.475 32.698 20.531 0.00 c

ATOM 409 CE2 PHE A 59 9.553 34.316 18.491 0.00 c

ATOM 410 CE1 PHE A 59 9.175 32.573 20.084 0.00 c

ATOM 411 CZ PHE A 59 8.712 33.382 19.063 0.00 c 238

ATOM 412 C PHE A 59 13. .294 31, .942 18, .816 0 .00 C

ATOM 413 O PHE A 59 13. .693 32. .562 17. .820 0.00 0

ATOM 414 N VAL A 60 12. .616 30. .809 18. .731 00 N

ATOM 415 CA VAL A 60 12. .308 30. .253 17, .434 00 C

ATOM 416 CB VAL A 60 12, .702 28. ,776 17, ,340 0.00 c

ATOM 417 CGI VAL A 60 12, .503 28. ,279 15, .908 0.00 c

ATOM 418 CG2 VAL A 60 14, .147 28. ,593 17, .796 00 c

ATOM 419 C VAL A 60 10, .816 30, .361 17, .236 00 c

ATOM 420 O VAL A 60 10. .043 29, .927 18, .087 00 o

ATOM 421 N ARG A 61 10, .406 30. .960 16, .126 00 N

ATOM 422 CA ARG A 61 8, .987 31. .098 15, .851 00 c

ATOM 423 CB ARG A 61 8. .704 32. ,313 14. ,962 00 c

ATOM 424 CG ARG A 61 7, ,255 32. ,374 14. .480 00 c

ATOM 425 CD ARG A 61 7, .019 33, .543 13. .521 00 c

ATOM 426 NE ARG A 61 5. ,615 33. ,660 13. .118 00 N1+

ATOM 427 CZ ARG A 61 4, .989 32, .815 12, .303 0.00 c

ATOM 428 NH2 ARG A 61 3, ,711 33. .007 12, .004 0.00 N

ATOM 429 NH1 ARG A 61 5, .636 31. .777 11, .787 00 N

ATOM 430 C ARG A 61 8, .509 29. .847 15, .128 00 c

ATOM 431 O ARG A 61 9, .193 29. .338 14, .238 00 0

ATOM 432 N THR A 62 7, .338 29. .357 15, .527 00 N

ATOM 433 CA THR A 62 6, .740 28. ,170 14, .923 0.00 c

ATOM 434 CB THR A 62 6, .514 27. .046 15, .956 0.00 c

ATOM 435 OG1 THR A 62 5, .808 27. ,570 17, .089 0.00 0

ATOM 436 CG2 THR A 62 7. .845 26. ,460 16. .396 0.00 c

ATOM 437 C THR A 62 5, .391 28. .597 14, .352 00 c

ATOM 438 O THR A 62 4 .857 29, .645 14, .724 00 0

ATOM 439 N GLY A 63 4, .837 27, .791 13, .455 00 N

ATOM 440 CA GLY A 63 3, .562 28. .146 12, .859 00 c

ATOM 441 C GLY A 63 2, .522 27. .046 12, .880 00 c

ATOM 442 O GLY A 63 2, .375 26. .326 13, .873 00 o

ATOM 443 N ALA A 64 1, .806 26, .909 11, .767 00 N

ATOM 444 CA ALA A 64 0, .744 25. .916 11, ,643 0.00 c

ATOM 445 C ALA A 64 1, .213 24, .496 11, .895 0.00 c

ATOM 446 O ALA A 64 2, .370 24. .154 11, .651 00 o

ATOM 447 CB ALA A 64 0, .111 26. .009 10, .268 00 c

ATOM 448 N GLY A 65 0, .291 23, .672 12, .381 00 N

ATOM 449 CA GLY A 65 0, .596 22, .281 12, .657 00 c

ATOM 450 C GLY A 65 1, .469 22. .050 13. .877 00 c

ATOM 451 O GLY A 65 1 .797 20, .908 14, .199 00 0

ATOM 452 N VAL A 66 1, .837 23, .119 14, .572 00 N

ATOM 453 CA VAL A 66 2, .699 22. .976 15, .736 00 c

ATOM 454 CB VAL A 66 3, .946 23, .854 15, .595 00 c

ATOM 455 C VAL A 66 2 .031 23, .307 17, .063 00 c

ATOM 456 O VAL A 66 1, .737 24. .467 17, .337 00 o

ATOM 457 CGI VAL A 66 4, .832 23. .683 16. .818 00 c

ATOM 458 CG2 VAL A 66 4 .698 23. .482 14, .324 00 c

ATOM 459 N ASN A 67 1 .806 22, .283 17 .882 0.00 N

ATOM 460 CA ASN A 67 1, .176 22, .454 19, .185 0.00 c

ATOM 461 CB ASN A 67 0 .403 21, .188 19, .564 00 c

ATOM 462 C ASN A 67 2, .240 22, .745 20, .237 00 c

ATOM 463 O ASN A 67 3, .120 21. .920 20, .491 00 o

ATOM 464 CG ASN A 67 -0 .405 20. .634 18, .404 00 c

ATOM 465 OD1 ASN A 67 -1, .160 21. .361 17, .750 00 o

ATOM 466 ND2 ASN A 67 -0, .253 19. .340 18. .140 0.00 N

ATOM 467 N LEU A 68 2, .148 23, .923 20, .845 0.00 N

ATOM 468 CA LED A 68 3 .087 24, .366 21, .876 00 c

ATOM 469 CB LEU A 68 3 .279 25, .883 21, .759 00 c

ATOM 470 C LEU A 68 2, .571 23. .996 23. ,273 00 c

ATOM 471 O LEU A 68 1 .620 24, .597 23, .770 00 o

ATOM 472 CG LED A 68 3 .688 26, .430 20 .380 00 c

ATOM 473 CDl LEU A 68 3, .724 27. .950 20. ,406 00 c

ATOM 474 CD2 LEU A 68 5 .051 25, .888 19, .987 00 c

ATOM 475 N LEU A 69 3, .218 23. .027 23, .917 0.00 N

ATOM 476 CA LEU A 69 2, .803 22. ,584 25, .250 0.00 c

ATOM 477 CB LEU A 69 2 .769 21. .052 25, .286 00 c

ATOM 478 CG LEU A 69 2, .045 20. ,369 24, .116 00 c

ATOM 479 CDl LEU A 69 2 .109 18. .857 24, .274 00 c

ATOM 480 CD2 LEU A 69 0 .604 20, .841 24, .050 00 c

ATOM 481 C LEU A 69 3, .612 23, .078 26, .449 00 c

ATOM 482 O LEU A 69 4 .835 23, .216 26, .394 0.00 0

ATOM 483 N ALA A 70 2, .907 23. .332 27. ,544 0.00 N

ATOM 484 CA ALA A 70 3, .534 23. .796 28. .773 00 c

ATOM 485 CB ALA A 70 2 .507 24. .496 29, .646 00 c

ATOM 486 C ALA A 70 4, ,048 22, .539 29. ,473 00 c

ATOM 487 O ALA A 70 3, .712 22. .273 30. ,618 00 0

ATOM 488 N GLN A 71 4, .862 21, .763 28, .770 0.00 N -239

ATOM 489 CCAA GLN A 71 408 20.536 29.325 0.00 c ATOM 490 CCBB GLN A 71 618 19.333 28.808 0.00 c ATOM 491 CCGG GLN A 71 169 19.299 29.255 0.00 c ATOM 492 CCDD GLN A 71 407 18.116 28.692 00 c ATOM 493 OE1 GLN A 71 460 17.634 29.308 00 0 ATOM 494 NE2 GLN A 71 809 17.646 27.515 00 N ATOM 495 CC GLN A 71 6.869 20.310 28.998 00 c ATOM 496 OO GLN A 71 7.395 20.825 28.009 00 0 ATOM 497 NN VAL A 72 7.520 19.529 29.850 0.00 N ATOM 498 CCAA VAL A 72 8.924 19.199 29.676 0.00 c ATOM 499 CCBB VAL A 72 9.809 19.799 30.777 0.00 c ATOM 500 CGI VAL A 72 11.240 19.342 30.580 00 c ATOM 501 CG2 VAL A 72 9.726 21.309 30.758 00 c ATOM 502 CC VAL A 72 8.997 17.685 29.772 00 c ATOM 503 OO VAL A 72 8.419 17.086 30.680 00 0 ATOM 504 NN ASN A 73 9.699 17.075 28.824 0.00 N ATOM 505 CCAA ASN A 73 9.867 15.629 28.771 0.00 c ATOM 506 CCBB ASN A 73 10.543 15.250 27.452 0.00 c ATOM 507 CCGG ASN A 73 10.513 13.756 27.182 0.00 c ATOM 508 OD1 ASN A 73 10.470 12.947 28.106 00 0 ATOM 509 ND2 ASN A 73 10.551 13.387 25.906 00 N ATOM 510 C ASN 73 10.735 15.146 29.931 0.00 c ATOM 511 O ASN 73 11.843 15.651 30.123 0.00 0 ATOM 512 N ASN 74 10.244 14.175 30.703 00 N ATOM 513 CA ASN 74 11.028 13.663 31.823 00 c ATOM 514 CB ASN 74 10.151 13.368 33.049 00 c ATOM 515 CG ASN 74 9.191 12.217 32.830 00 c ATOM 516 OD1 ASN 74 9.486 11.265 32.108 00 0 ATOM 517 ND2 ASN 74 8.032 12.291 33.477 0.00 N ATOM 518 C ASN 74 11.791 12.408 31.417 0.00 c ATOM 519 O ASN 74 12.332 11.695 32.266 00 0 ATOM 520 N TYR A 75 11.830 12.156 30.112 00 N ATOM 521 CA TYR A 75 12.514 11.005 29.528 00 c ATOM 522 CB TYR A 75 14.008 11.321 29.354 0.00 c ATOM 523 CG TYR A 75 14.268 12.239 28.181 0.00 c ATOM 524 CDl TYR A 75 14.228 11.756 26.873 0.00 c ATOM 525 CE1 TYR A 75 14.371 12.597 25.792 0.00 c ATOM 526 CD2 TYR A 75 14.466 13.599 28.370 00 c ATOM 527 CE2 TYR A 75 14.608 14.451 27.290 00 c ATOM 528 CZ TYR A 75 14.557 13.945 26.005 00 c ATOM 529 OH TYR A 75 14.679 14.796 24.931 00 0 ATOM 530 C TYR A 75 12.326 9.680 30.260 0.00 c ATOM 531 O TYR A 75 13.253 8.875 30.378 0.00 0 ATOM 532 N SER A 76 11.112 9.464 30.747 00 N ATOM 533 CA SER A 76 10.773 8.244 31.458 00 c ATOM 534 CB SER A 76 10.737 8.471 32.968 00 c ATOM 535 OG SER A 76 12.053 8.566 33.475 00 0 ATOM 536 C SER A 76 9.407 7.816 30.963 0.00 c ATOM 537 O SER A 76 8.784 6.905 31.512 0.00 0 ATOM 538 N GLY A 77 8.960 8.483 29.905 0.00 N ATOM 539 CA GLY A 77 .671 8.180 29.320 0.00 c ATOM 540 C GLY 77 .610 9.168 29.755 0.00 c ATOM 541 O GLY 77 .464 9.090 29.311 00 0 ATOM 542 N GLY 78 .992 10.102 30.622 00 N ATOM 543 CA GLY 78 .043 11.087 31.101 00 c ATOM 544 C GLY 78 .492 12.522 30.887 0.00 c ATOM 545 O GLY 78 .545 12.775 30.293 0.00 0 ATOM 546 N ARG 79 .687 13.462 31.375 0.00 N ATOM 547 CA ARG 79 .986 14.879 31.240 0.00 c ATOM 548 CB ARG 79 .099 15.537 30.166 0.00 c ATOM 549 CG ARG A 79 .396 15.117 28.732 0.00 c ATOM 550 CD ARG A 79 .770 13.772 281432 00 c ATOM 551 NE ARG 79 .975 13.348 27.048 00 N1+ ATOM 552 CZ ARG 79 .081 12.764 26.593 00 c ATOM 553 NH1 ARG 79 .095 12.529 27.412 00 N ATOM 554 NH2 ARG 79 .165 12.399 25.319 00 N ATOM 555 C ARG 79 5.797 15.627 32.550 00 c ATOM 556 O ARG 79 5.129 15.149 33.466 00 0 ATOM 557 N VAL 80 6.398 16.809 32.620 00 N ATOM 558 CA VAL 80 6.317 17.656 33.794 00 c ATOM 559 CB VAL 80 7.714 17.891 34.389 00 c ATOM 560 CGI VAL 80 7.630 18.858 35.546 0.00 c ATOM 561 CG2 VAL 80 8.300 16.566 34.853 0.00 c ATOM 562 C VAL 80 5.682 18.989 33.398 00 c ATOM 563 O VAL 80 6.182 19.701 32.517 00 0 ATOM 564 N GLN 81 4.561 19.307 34.036 00 N ATOM 565 CA GLN 81 3.846 20.546 33.760 00 c - 240 -

ATOM 566 CB GLN A 81 2 .518 20 .579 34 .527 0. 00 C

ATOM 567 CG GLN A 81 1 .415 19 .722 33 .930 0 . 00 c

ATOM 568 CD GLN A 81 1 .138 20 .067 32 .473 00 c

ATOM 569 OE1 GLN A 81 1 .086 21 .239 32 .101 00 o

ATOM 570 NE2 GLN A 81 0 .950 19 .044 31 .644 00 N

ATOM 571 C GLN A 81 4 .650 21 .785 34, .126 0 .00 c

ATOM 572 O GLN A 81 5 .333 21 .817 35 .154 0. 00 o

ATOM 573 N VAL A 82 4 .578 22 .798 33 .272 0.00 N

ATOM 574 CA VAL A 82 5 .288 2 .047 33, .510 0 . 00 c

ATOM 575 CB VAL A 82 5 .925 24 .610 32 .219 00 c

ATOM 576 CGI VAL A 82 6 .695 2 .885 32 .535 00 c

ATOM 577 CG2 VAL A 82 6 .841 23 .580 31, .605 00 c

ATOM 578 C VAL A 82 4 .222 25 .022 34 .003 00 c

ATOM 579 O VAL A 82 3, .399 25. .500 33, .221 00 o

ATOM 580 N ALA A 83 4 .242 25 .305 35, .302 00 N

ATOM 581 CA ALA A 83 3 .277 26 .213 35 .919 00 c

ATOM 582 CB ALA A 83 3 .009 25, .768 37, .342 00 c

ATOM 583 C ALA A 83 3 .677 27 .688 35, .909 00 c

ATOM 584 O ALA A 83 2 .820 28 .571 35 .886 00 o

ATOM 585 N GLY A 84 4 .975 27, .960 35, .934 00 N

ATOM 586 CA GLY A 84 5 .413 29 .339 35, .930 00 c

ATOM 587 C GLY A 84 6 .913 29 .458 35, .790 00 c

ATOM 588 O GLY A 84 7 .601 28 .463 35, .536 0 . 00 0

ATOM 589 N HIS A 85 7 .426 30 .673 35 .960 0 . 00 N

ATOM 590 CA HIS A 85 8, .856 30. .903 35, .841 0. 00 c

ATOM 591 CB HIS A 85 9, .154 31 .684 34, .557 0. 00 c

ATOM 592 C HIS A 85 9 .476 31 .610 37 .037 0 .00 c

ATOM 593 O HIS A 85 10, .275 32, .530 36. .866 0. 00 0

ATOM 594 CG HIS A 85 8 .328 32, .920 34, .391 0. 00 c

ATOM 595 ND1 HIS A 85 8 .864 34, .188 34, .455 0 . 00 N

ATOM 596 CD2 HIS A 85 7, .006 33, .083 34, .147 0. 00 c

ATOM 597 NE2 HIS A 85 6. .772 34, .434 34, .067 00 N

ATOM 598 CE1 HIS A 85 7 .909 35, .078 34, .256 00 c

ATOM 599 N THR A 86 9, .115 31, .163 38, .243 00 N

ATOM 600 CA THR A 86 9, .631 31, .738 39. ,491 00 c

ATOM 601 CB THR A 86 8 .743 31, .356 40, .683 00 c

ATOM 602 C THR A 86 11, .055 31, .244 39, .779 00 c

ATOM 603 O THR A 86 11, .289 30, ,047 39. .908 0. 00 0

ATOM 604 OG1 THR A 86 7 .417 31, .837 40. .456 0.00 0

ATOM 605 CG2 THR A 86 9. .283 31, .957 41. .971 00 c

ATOM 606 N ALA A 87 11, .996 32, .175 39. .894 00 N

ATOM 607 CA ALA A 87 13, .391 31, ,830 40. .160 00 c

ATOM 608 C ALA A 87 13, .621 31. .173 41. .519 00 c

ATOM 609 O ALA A 87 13, .145 31, .649 42, .546 00 0

ATOM 610 CB ALA A 87 14, .265 33, .077 40. .032 00 c

ATOM 611 N ALA A 88 14, .360 30, .074 41. .517 0 . 00 N

ATOM 612 CA ALA A 88 14, .653 29, .360 42, .747 0. 00 c

ATOM 613 C ALA A 88 16. .009 29. ,831 43. .263 0. 00 c

ATOM 614 O ALA A 88 16, .904 30. .156 42. .482 0 . 00 O

ATOM 615 CB ALA A 88 14, .662 27, ,855 42, .490 0 . 00 c

ATOM 616 N PRO A 89 16, .173 29, ,877 44. .592 0 . 00 N

ATOM 617 CA PRO A 89 17, .404 30. .310 45. .260 0 . 00 c

ATOM 618 CB PRO A 89 16, .939 30, .560 46. .690 0 .00 c

ATOM 619 C PRO A 89 18, .545 29. ,304 45. .204 0 . 00 c

ATOM 620 O PRO A 89 18, .323 28. .106 45. .007 0 . 00 0

ATOM 621 CD PRO A 89 15, .136 29. .511 45. .576 0.00 c

ATOM 622 CG PRO A 89 15, .917 29, .473 46. .886 0 . 00 c

ATOM 623 N VAL A 90 19, .767 29, .809 45. .361 0 . 00 N

ATOM 624 CA VAL A 90 20, ,960 28. ,973 45. .343 0. 00 c

ATOM 625 CB VAL A 90 22, .197 29. ,747 45. .873 0 .00 c

ATOM 626 CGI VAL A 90 23. .347 28. ,779 46, .162 0 .00 c

ATOM 627 CG2 VAL A 90 22. .623 30. ,803 44. ,858 0. 00 c

ATOM 628 C VAL A 90 20. .680 27. ,810 46. .279 0 . 00 c

ATOM 629 O VAL A 90 19. .988 27. ,976 47. .287 0. 00 o

ATOM 630 N GLY A 91 21. .205 26. ,635 45. ,954 0. 00 N

ATOM 631 CA GLY A 91 20. .976 25. ,482 46. .806 0 .00 c

ATOM 632 C GLY A 91 19. .734 24. ,699 46. .425 , 00 c

ATOM 633 O GLY A 91 19. .576 23. ,550 46. .836 , 00 0

ATOM 634 N SER A 92 18. .853 25. ,314 45. ,642 .00 N

ATOM 635 CA SER A 92 17. .620 24. ,659 45. .210 , 00 c

ATOM 636 CB SER A 92 16. .720 25. ,634 44. ,438 .00 c

ATOM 637 OG SER A 92 16. ,414 26. .792 45. ,196 , 00 0

ATOM 638 C SER A 92 17. .929 23. ,479 44. ,306 0.00 c

ATOM 639 O SER A 92 18. .881 23. ,512 43. ,521 0 .00 o

ATOM 640 N ALA A 93 17. ,117 22. 435 44. ,417 0. 00 N

ATOM 641 CA ALA A 93 17. ,301 21. 247 43. 600 0. 00 c

ATOM 642 CB ALA A 93 16. .576 20. 054 44. 231 0. 00 c 241

ATOM 643 c ALA A 93 16.715 21.559 42.226 0.00 c

ATOM 644 O ALA A 93 15.669 22.202 42.126 0.00 0

ATOM 645 N VAL A 94 17.396 21.125 41.170 0.00 N

ATOM 646 CA VAL A 94 16.916 21.371 39.814 0.00 c

ATOM 647 CB VAL A 94 17.544 22.639 39.212 0.00 c

ATOM 648 CGI VAL A 94 17.072 23.872 39.971 0.00 c

ATOM 649 CG2 VAL A 94 19.050 22.534 39.241 0.00 c

ATOM 650 C VAL A 94 17.204 20.211 38.867 0.00 c

ATOM 651 O VAL A 94 18.143 19.432 39.071 0.00 0

ATOM 652 N CYS A 95 16.378 20.090 37.834 0.00 N

ATOM 653 CA CYS A 95 16.548 19.030 36.851 0.00 c

ATOM 654 CB CYS A 95 15.428 17.983 36.942 0.00 c

ATOM 655 SG CYS A 95 15.344 17.009 38.470 0.00 s

ATOM 656 C CYS A 95 16.552 19.647 35.464 0.00 c

ATOM 657 O CYS A 95 15.820 20.598 35.194 0.00 O

ATOM 658 N ARG A 96 17.391 19.092 34.598 0.00 N

ATOM 659 CA ARG A 96 17.531 19.551 33.228 0.00 c

ATOM 660 CB ARG A 96 19.003 19.840 32.935 0.00 c

ATOM 661 CG ARG A 96 19.300 20.110 31.465 0.00 c

ATOM 662 CD ARG A 96 20.778 19.955 31.151 0.00 c

ATOM 663 NE ARG A 96 21.272 18.625 31.499 0.00 N1+

ATOM 664 CZ ARG A 96 20.875 17.493 30.927 0.00 c

ATOM 665 NH1 ARG A 96 19.967 17.507 29.960 0.00 N

ATOM 666 NH2 ARG A 96 21.377 16.341 31.341 0.00 N

ATOM 667 C ARG A 96 17.027 18.487 32.258 0.00 c

ATOM 668 O ARG A 96 17.160 17.288 32.509 0.00 0

ATOM 669 N SER A 97 16.458 18.924 31.142 0.00 N

ATOM 670 CA SER A 97 15.950 17.983 30.157 0.00 c

ATOM 671 CB SER A 97 14.418 18.054 30.082 0.00 c

ATOM 672 OG SER A 97 13.913 17.133 29.134 0.00 0

ATOM 673 C SER A 97 16.564 18.272 28.797 0.00 c

ATOM 674 O SER A 97 16.429 19.378 28.267 0.00 0

ATOM 675 N GLY A 98 17.246 17.265 28.251 0.00 N

ATOM 676 CA GLY A 98 17.900 17.390 26.960 0.00 c

ATOM 677 C GLY A 98 17.767 16.133 26.115 0.00 c

ATOM 678 O GLY A 98 17.481 15.042 26.624 0.00 0

ATOM 679 N SER A 99 17.997 16.290 24.814 0.00 N

ATOM 680 CA SER A 99 17.865 15.196 23.864 0.00 c

ATOM 681 CB SER A 99 17.547 15.749 22.478 0.00 c

ATOM 682 OG SER A 99 18.663 16.457 21.968 0.00 0

ATOM 683 C SER A 99 19.067 14.279 23.740 0.00 c

ATOM 684 O SER A 99 18.992 13.275 23.039 0.00 O

ATOM 685 N THR A 100 20.174 14.612 24.396 0.00 N

ATOM 686 CA THR A 100 21.358 13.766 24.307 0.00 c

ATOM 687 CB THR A 100 22.641 14.602 24.125 0.00 c

ATOM 688 OG1 THR A 100 22.516 15.417 22.953 0.00 0

ATOM 689 CG2 THR A 100 23.860 13.690 23.967 0.00 c

ATOM 690 C THR A 100 21.531 12.872 25.524 0.00 c

ATOM 691 O THR A 100 21.890 11.697 25.388 0.00 0

ATOM 692 N THR A 101 21.269 13.422 26.707 0.00 N

ATOM 693 CA THR A 101 21.401 12.662 27.950 0.00 c

ATOM 694 CB THR A 101 22.375 13.340 28.936 0.00 c

ATOM 695 OG1 THR A 101 21.791 14.549 29.441 0.00 0

ATOM 696 CG2 THR A 101 23.692 13.642 28.244 0.00 c

ATOM 697 C THR A 101 20.083 12.442 28.677 0.00 c

ATOM 698 O THR A 101 19.990 11.581 29.548 0.00 0

ATOM 699 N GLY A 102 19.068 13.227 28.342 0.00 N

ATOM 700 CA GLY A 102 17.784 13.044 28.985 0.00 c

ATOM 701 C GLY A 102 17.522 13.868 30.231 0.00 c

ATOM 702 O GLY A 102 17.759 15.075 30.245 0.00 0

ATOM 703 N TRP A 103 17.023 13.207 31.274 0.00 N

ATOM 704 CA TRP A 103 16.681 13.847 32.540 0.00 c

ATOM 705 CB TRP A 103 15.339 13.286 33.027 0.00 c

ATOM 706 CG TRP A 103 14.790 13.876 34.311 0.00 c

ATOM 707 CD2 TRP A 103 13.889 14.989 34.434 0.00 c

ATOM 708 CE2 TRP A 103 13.601 15.141 35.807 0.00 c

ATOM 709 CE3 TRP A 103 13.293 15.858 33.517 0.00 c

ATOM 710 CDl TRP A 103 15.010 13.424 35.581 0.00 c

ATOM 711 NEI TRP A 103 14.295 14.179 36.483 0.00 N

ATOM 712 CZ2 TRP A 103 12.749 16.138 36.284 0.00 c

ATOM 713 CZ3 TRP A 103 12.444 16.848 33.991 0.00 c

ATOM 714 CH2 TRP A 103 12.178 16.977 35.363 0.00 c

ATOM 715 C TRP A 103 17.776 13.652 33.593 0.00 c

ATOM 716 O TRP A 103 18.112 12.526 33.955 0.00 0

ATOM 717 N HIS A 104 18.333 14.762 34.074 0.00 N

ATOM 718 CA HIS A 104 19.391 14.731 35.081 0.00 c

ATOM 719 CB HIS A 104 20.755 14.780 34.405 0.00 c -242-

ATOM 720 CG HIS A 104 21.064 13.554 33.619 0.00 c

ATOM 721 CD2 HIS A 104 20.741 13.202 32.352 0.00 c

ATOM 722 ND1 HIS A 104 21.704 12.465 34.167 ,00 N

ATOM 723 CE1 HIS A 104 21.759 11.496 33.273 ,00 c

ATOM 724 NE2 HIS A 104 21.181 11.917 32.162 ,00 N

ATOM 725 C HIS A 104 19.229 15.894 36.038 .00 c

ATOM 726 O HIS A 104 18.859 16.995 35.636 .00 o

ATOM 727 N CYS A 105 19.512 15.647 37.309 ,00 N

ATOM 728 CA CYS A 105 19.373 16.692 38.303 ,00 c

ATOM 729 CB CYS A 105 18.223 16.317 39.234 ,00 c

ATOM 730 SG CYS A 105 16.804 15.602 38.342 0.00 s

ATOM 731 C CYS A 105 20.635 17.014 39.099 0.00 c

ATOM 732 O CYS A 105 21.665 16.361 38.964 0.00 o

ATOM 733 N GLY A 106 20.533 18.046 39.923 0.00 N

ATOM 734 CA GLY A 106 21.642 18.487 40.739 00 c

ATOM 735 C GLY A 106 21.125 19.693 41.490 00 c

ATOM 736 O GLY A 106 19.916 19.805 41.707 00 0

ATOM 737 N THR A 107 22.011 20.598 41.888 ,00 N

ATOM 738 CA THR A 107 21.572 21.784 42.603 00 c

ATOM 739 CB THR A 107 21.865 21.681 44.117 00 c

ATOM 740 OG1 THR A 107 23.250 21.386 44.328 00 0

ATOM 741 CG2 THR A 107 21.021 20.583 44.746 00 c

ATOM 742 C THR A 107 22.215 23.046 42.058 0.00 c

ATOM 743 O THR A 107 23.238 23.001 41.372 0.00 o

ATOM 744 N ILE A 108 21.588 24.178 42.344 0.00 N

ATOM 745 CA ILE A 108 22.103 25.452 41.886 0.00 c

ATOM 746 CB ILE A 108 21.039 26.550 41.982 00 c

ATOM 747 CG2 ILE A 108 21.651 27.904 41.614 00 c

ATOM 748 CGI ILE A 108 19.850 26.200 41.091 00 c

ATOM 749 CDl ILE A 108 18.691 27.166 41.228 0.00 c

ATOM 750 C ILE A 108 23.216 25.803 42.852 0.00 c

ATOM 751 O ILE A 108 23.001 25.774 44.065 ,00 0

ATOM 752 N THR A 109 24.399 26.118 42.331 00 N

ATOM 753 CA THR A 109 25.516 26.472 43.197 00 c

ATOM 754 CB THR A 109 26.787 25.662 42.849 0.00 c

ATOM 755 OG1 THR A 109 27.055 25.748 41.443 0.00 0

ATOM 756 CG2 THR A 109 26.599 24.201 43.244 00 c

ATOM 757 C THR A 109 25.827 27.965 43.128 00 c

ATOM 758 O THR A 109 26.599 28.481 43.928 00 o

ATOM 759 N ALA A 110 25.214 28.664 42.181 00 N

ATOM 760 CA ALA A 110 25.457 30.090 42.053 0.00 c

ATOM 761 CB ALA A 110 26.949 30.348 41.846 0.00 c

ATOM 762 C ALA A 110 24.650 30.767 40.946 0.00 c

ATOM 763 O ALA A 110 24.191 30.132 40.001 0.00 0

ATOM 764 N LEU A 111 24.491 32.078 41.092 00 N

ATOM 765 CA LEU A 111 23.755 32.893 40.145 ,00 c

ATOM 766 CB LEU A 111 22.550 33.530 40.844 ,00 c

ATOM 767 CG LEU A 111 21.547 32.545 41.465 ,00 c

ATOM 768 CDl LEU A 111 20.462 33.315 42.227 00 c

ATOM 769 CD2 LEU A 111 20.925 31.681 40.371 00 c

ATOM 770 C LEU A 111 24.688 33.970 39.593 ,00 c

ATOM 771 O LEU A 111 25.661 34.363 40.243 ,00 0

ATOM 772 N ASN A 112 24.380 34.439 38.390 ,00 N

ATOM 773 CA ASN A 112 25.171 35.468 37.719 00 c

ATOM 774 CB ASN A 112 25.123 36.788 38.490 00 c

ATOM 775 CG ASN A 112 23.725 37.149 38.930 ,00 c

ATOM 776 OD1 ASN A 112 23.244 36.663 39.950 ,00 0

ATOM 777 ND2 ASN A 112 23.057 37.994 38.155 .00 N

ATOM 778 C ASN A 112 26.629 35.074 37.507 00 c

ATOM 779 O ASN A 112 27.526 35.891 37.680 ,00 0

ATOM 780 N SER A 113 26.870 33.820 37.144 ,00 N

ATOM 781 CA SER A 113 28.237 33.383 36.916 ,00 c

ATOM 782 CB SER A 113 28.375 31.875 37.126 ,00 c

ATOM 783 OG SER A 113 28.149 31.522 38.479 00 0

ATOM 784 C SER A 113 28.604 33.726 35.480 ,00 c

ATOM 785 O SER A 113 27.733 34.045 34.663 0.00 0

ATOM 786 N SER A 114 29.899 33.691 35.192 0.00 N

ATOM 787 CA SER A 114 30.403 33.985 33.859 ,00 c

ATOM 788 CB SER A 114 31.288 35.234 33.847 00 c

ATOM 789 OG SER A 114 30.524 36.417 33.962 ,00 0

ATOM 790 C SER A 114 31.237 32.795 33.440 ,00 c

ATOM 791 O SER A 114 31.708 32.027 34.277 ,00 0

ATOM 792 N VAL A 115 31.400 32.631 32.138 00 N

ATOM 793 CA VAL A 115 32.185 31.535 31.611 ,00 c

ATOM 794 CB VAL A 115 31.342 30.241 31.427 ,00 c

ATOM 795 CGI VAL A 115 30.850 29.751 32.772 ,00 c

ATOM 796 CG2 VAL A 115 30.174 30.492 30.485 0.00 c 243

ATOM 797 C VAL A 115 32.678 32.010 30.266 0.00 c

ATOM 798 O VAL A 115 32.121 32.945 29.691 0.00 0

ATOM 799 N THR A 116 33.735 31.387 29.768 0.00 N

ATOM 800 CA THR A 116 34.268 31.779 28.482 0.00 c

ATOM 801 CB THR A 116 35.671 32.359 28.634 0.00 c

ATOM 802 OG1 THR A 116 35.602 33.538 29.446 0.00 0

ATOM 803 CG2 THR A 116 36.247 32.726 27.277 0.00 c

ATOM 804 C THR A 116 34.278 30.589 27.535 0.00 c

ATOM 805 O THR A 116 34.931 29.573 27.787 0.00 0

ATOM 806 N TYR A 117 33.512 30.721 26.459 0.00 N

ATOM 807 CA TYR A 117 33.397 29.691 25.443 0.00 c

ATOM 808 CB TYR A 117 31.972 29.664 24.885 0.00 c

ATOM 809 CG TYR A 117 30.892 29.244 25.874 0.00 c

ATOM 810 CDl TYR A 117 29.803 30.072 26.134 0.00 c

ATOM 811 CE1 TYR A 117 28.780 29.675 26.981 0.00 c

ATOM 812 CD2 TYR A 117 30.930 27.998 26.499 0.00 c

ATOM 813 CE2 TYR A 117 29.908 27.589 27.353 0.00 c

ATOM 814 CZ TYR A 117 28.834 28.432 27.590 0.00 c

ATOM 815 OH TYR A 117 27.814 28.036 28.431 0.00 0

ATOM 816 C TYR A 117 34.368 30.064 24.333 0.00 c

ATOM 817 O TYR A 117 34.922 31.161 24.329 0.00 0

ATOM 818 N PRO A 118 34.609 29.151 23.384 0.00 N

ATOM 819 CA PRO A 118 35.541 29.528 22.318 0.00 c

ATOM 820 CB PRO A 118 35.655 28.249 21.472 0.00 c

ATOM 821 C PRO A 118 35.080 30.751 21.520 0.00 c

ATOM 822 0 PRO A 118 35.875 31.369 20.805 0.00 0

ATOM 823 CD PRO A 118 34.313 27.711 23.347 0.00 c

ATOM 824 CG PRO A 118 34.472 27.405 21.890 0.00 c

ATOM 825 N GLU A 119 33.804 31.109 21.651 0.00 N

ATOM 826 CA GLU A 119 33.266 32.265 20.935 0.00 c

ATOM 827 CB GLU A 119 31.785 32.079 20.612 0.00 c

ATOM 828 C GLU A 119 33.416 33.514 21.789 0.00 c

ATOM 829 O GLU A 119 33.498 34.634 21.275 0.00 0

ATOM 830 CG GLU A 119 31.470 30.985 19.611 0.00 c

ATOM 831 CD GLU A 119 31.686 29.606 20.179 0.00 c

ATOM 832 OE1 GLU A 119 31.593 29.460 21.415 0.00 01-

ATOM 833 OE2 GLU A 119 31.932 28.667 19.393 0.00 0

ATOM 834 N GLY A 120 33.437 33.315 23.102 0.00 N

ATOM 835 CA GLY A 120 33.575 34.438 24.002 0.00 c

ATOM 836 C GLY A 120 32.984 34.167 25.368 0.00 c

ATOM 837 O GLY A 120 32.714 33.020 25.727 0.00 0

ATOM 838 N THR A 121 32.782 35.233 26.133 0.00 N

ATOM 839 CA THR A 121 32.233 35.110 27.471 0.00 c

ATOM 840 CB THR A 121 32.932 36.084 28.435 0.00 c

ATOM 841 OG1 THR A 121 34.319 35.733 28.527 0.00 0

ATOM 842 CG2 THR A 121 32.293 36.026 29.831 0.00 c

ATOM 843 C THR A 121 30.739 35.358 27.526 0.00 c

ATOM 844 O THR A 121 30.198 36.160 26.771 0.00 0

ATOM 845 N VAL A 122 30.075 34.632 28.417 0.00 N

ATOM 846 CA VAL A 122 28.635 34.754 28.607 0.00 c

ATOM 847 CB VAL A 122 27.899 33.451 28.196 0.00 c

ATOM 848 CGI VAL A 122 26.412 33.553 28.519 0.00 c

ATOM 849 CG2 VAL A 122 28.091 33.207 26.695 0.00 c

ATOM 850 C VAL A 122 28.515 35.016 30.103 0.00 c

ATOM 851 O VAL A 122 29.182 34.363 30.902 0.00 0

ATOM 852 N ARG A 123 27.689 35.978 30.493 0.00 N

ATOM 853 CA ARG A 123 27.546 36.282 31.915 0.00 c

ATOM 854 CB ARG A 123 27.917 37.748 32.153 0.00 c

ATOM 855 CG ARG A 123 26.856 38.724 31.655 0.00 c

ATOM 856 CD ARG A 123 25.712 38.852 32.671 0.00 c

ATOM 857 NE ARG A 123 24.459 39.336 32.089 0.00 N1+

ATOM 858 CZ ARG A 123 24.345 40.426 31.336 0.00 c

ATOM 859 NH1 ARG A 123 25.414 41.162 31.054 0.00 N

ATOM 860 NH2 ARG A 123 23.156 40.796 30.877 0.00 N

ATOM 861 C ARG A 123 26.151 36.018 32.468 0.00 c

ATOM 862 O ARG A 123 25.252 35.605 31.739 0.00 0

ATOM 863 N GLY A 124 25.991 36.272 33.767 0.00 N

ATOM 864 CA GLY A 124 24.714 36.080 34.438 0.00 c

ATOM 865 C GLY A 124 24.094 34.712 34.238 0.00 c

ATOM 866 O GLY A 124 22.910 34.603 33.936 0.00 0

ATOM 867 N LEU A 125 24.891 33.666 34.415 0.00 N

ATOM 868 CA LEU A 125 24.412 32.304 34.238 0.00 c

ATOM 869 CB LEU A 125 25.411 31.495 33.406 0.00 c

ATOM 870 CG LEU A 125 25.597 31.779 31.913 0.00 c

ATOM 871 CDl LEU A 125 26.780 30.977 31.383 0.00 c

ATOM 872 CD2 LEU A 125 24.333 31.411 31.152 0.00 c

ATOM 873 C LEU A 125 24.189 31.574 35.554 0.00 c 244 -

ATOM 874 O LEU A 125 24, ,828 31. .869 36. .573 00 o

ATOM 875 N ILE A 126 23, .270 30, .615 35, .516 00 N

ATOM 876 CA ILE A 126 22, .949 29, .813 36, .685 00 c

ATOM 877 CB ILE A 126 21, .506 29, ,276 36, .600 0 .00 c

ATOM 878 CG2 ILE A 126 21, .268 28, .230 37, .672 0 .00 c

ATOM 879 CGI ILE A 126 20, .517 30, .441 36, .754 00 c

ATOM 880 CDl ILE A 126 19, .074 30, .045 36. .578 00 c

ATOM 881 C ILE A 126 23, .947 28. .646 36. .668 00 c

ATOM 882 O ILE A 126 24. ,009 27. .881 35. ,701 00 0

ATOM 883 N ARG A 127 24, .746 28. ,536 37. .723 00 N

ATOM 884 CA ARG A 127 25 .738 27, .473 37, .831 0 .00 c

ATOM 885 CB ARG A 127 26, .989 28, ,007 38, .528 0. 00 c

ATOM 886 CG ARG A 127 28, .129 27, ,015 38, .679 0 . 00 c

ATOM 887 CD ARG A 127 29, .261 27, ,678 39, .441 00 c

ATOM 888 NE ARG A 127 30, .312 26, ,748 39, .830 00 N1+

ATOM 889 CZ ARG A 127 31, .098 26. ,112 38. .971 0 . 00 c

ATOM 890 NH2 ARG A 127 32, .033 25. .279 39. .417 0 . 00 N

ATOM 891 NH1 ARG A 127 30, .949 26. .310 37. .669 0 . 00 N

ATOM 892 C ARG A 127 25, .132 26. .328 38. .633 0 . 00 c

ATOM 893 O ARG A 127 24, ,507 26. .553 39. .676 0 . 00 0

ATOM 894 N THR A 128 25 .325 25, .103 38, .151 00 N

ATOM 895 CA THR A 128 24 .784 23, .929 38, .828 00 c

ATOM 896 CB THR A 128 23 .447 23, .475 38, .189 0 .00 c

ATOM 897 OG1 THR A 128 23, .718 22, .755 36, ,977 0 . 00 o

ATOM 898 CG2 THR A 128 22, .568 24. .674 37, .863 00 c

ATOM 899 C THR A 128 25, .720 22. .729 38. .782 00 c

ATOM 900 O THR A 128 26, .763 22. .759 38. .135 00 o

ATOM 901 N THR A 129 25, .317 21. .667 39. .472 00 N

ATOM 902 CA THR A 129 26, .084 20. .429 39. .533 00 c

ATOM 903 CB THR A 129 26 .055 19, .838 40, ,946 00 c

ATOM 904 OG1 THR A 129 24 .691 19, .639 41, .355 00 o

ATOM 905 CG2 THR A 129 26 .758 20, ,779 41, .924 0. 00 c

ATOM 906 C THR A 129 25, .474 19, ,411 38, ,565 0 . 00 c

ATOM 907 O THR A 129 25, .792 18, ,227 38, .607 00 o

ATOM 908 N VAL A 130 24, .589 19. ,886 37. .696 00 N

ATOM 909 CA VAL A 130 23, .930 19. .027 36. .722 00 c

ATOM 910 CB VAL A 130 22, .663 19. .707 36. .164 0 . 00 c

ATOM 911 CGI VAL A 130 21, .972 18. .790 35. .162 0 . 00 c

ATOM 912 CG2 VAL A 130 21, .715 20. .054 37. ,308 00 c

ATOM 913 C VAL A 130 24 .857 18, .691 35. .561 00 c

ATOM 914 O VAL A 130 25 .623 19, .536 35. .109 00 0

ATOM 915 N CYS A 131 24 .790 17, .449 35. ,086 00 N

ATOM 916 CA CYS A 131 25, .626 17. .016 33, .975 00 c

ATOM 917 CB CYS A 131 25, .889 15. .507 34. .034 00 c

ATOM 918 SG CYS A 131 24, .399 14. .468 33. .874 0 . 00 s

ATOM 919 C CYS A 131 24, .893 17. .340 32. .690 0 . 00 c

ATOM 920 O CYS A 131 23, .670 17. .436 32. .678 00 0

ATOM 921 N ALA A 132 25, .636 17. .514 31. .607 00 N

ATOM 922 CA ALA A 132 25 .020 17, .821 30, .329 00 c

ATOM 923 CB ALA A 132 24 .707 19, .313 30. ,237 0. 00 c

ATOM 924 C ALA A 132 25 .920 17, .404 29. .176 0 . 00 c

ATOM 925 O ALA A 132 27, .113 17, .139 29. .356 00 0

ATOM 926 N GLU A 133 25, .323 17. .353 27. .992 00 N

ATOM 927 CA GLU A 133 26, .017 16. .981 26. .774 00 c

ATOM 928 CB GLU A 133 25, .434 15. .686 26. .219 00 c

ATOM 929 CG GLU A 133 26, .457 14. .695 25. ,730 00 c

ATOM 930 CD GLU A 133 27, .077 13. .909 26. .862 0 . 00 c

ATOM 931 OE1 GLϋ A 133 27 .702 14, .533 27. .741 0 .00 01-

ATOM 932 OE2 GLU A 133 26, .937 12, .667 26. ,871 0. 00 0

ATOM 933 C GLU A 133 25 .750 18, .114 25. .792 0. 00 c

ATOM 934 O GLU A 133 24, .778 18, .851 25. ,946 0 . 00 o

ATOM 935 N PRO A 134 26, .602 18, ,268 24. ,769 00 N

ATOM 936 CA PRO A 134 26, .395 19, ,343 23. .789 00 c

ATOM 937 CB PRO A 134 27, .471 19. .059 22. .742 00 c

ATOM 938 C PRO A 134 24, .975 19, .390 23. .185 00 c

ATOM 939 O PRO A 134 24, .331 20. .446 23. .159 00 0

ATOM 940 CD PRO A 134 27, ,856 17. .539 24. ,501 00 c

ATOM 941 CG PRO A 134 28 .586 18, ,478 23. .572 00 c

ATOM 942 N GLY A 135 24, .490 18, ,250 22. .708 0. 00 N

ATOM 943 CA GLY A 135 23, .167 18. ,218 22, .117 0 . 00 c

ATOM 944 C GLY A 135 22, .074 18, ,675 23, .063 00 c

ATOM 945 O GLY A 135 20, .979 19. .053 22. .631 00 o

ATOM 946 N ASP A 136 22, .369 18. .638 24. .359 00 N

ATOM 947 CA ASP A 136 21, .414 19. .046 25. .387 00 c

ATOM 948 CB ASP A 136 21, ,914 18. .588 26. ,770 0. 00 c

ATOM 949 C ASP A 136 21, ,162 20, ,564 25. ,400 0 . 00 c

ATOM 950 O ASP A 136 20, .124 21, ,024 25. ,886 0 .00 o -245

ATOM 951 CG ASP A 136 21.783 17.075 26.982 0.00 c

ATOM 952 OD2 ASP A 136 20.834 16.471 26.436 0.00 01-

ATOM 953 OD1 ASP A 136 22.618 16.492 27.714 0.00 0

ATOM 954 N SER A 137 22.109 21.332 24.868 0.00 N

ATOM 955 CA SER A 137 21.989 22.791 24.823 0.00 c

ATOM 956 CB SER A 137 23.048 23.390 23.896 0.00 c

ATOM 957 C SER A 137 20.610 23.287 24.388 0.00 c

ATOM 958 O SER A 137 19.993 22.752 23.456 0.00 0

ATOM 959 OG SER A 137 24.352 23.234 24.427 0.00 0

ATOM 960 N GLY A 138 20.148 24.332 25.070 0.00 N

ATOM 961 CA GLY A 138 18.854 24.904 24.782 0.00 c

ATOM 962 C GLY A 138 17.803 24.224 25.629 0.00 c

ATOM 963 O GLY A 138 16.706 24.748 25.809 0.00 0

ATOM 964 N GLY A 139 18.150 23.057 26.160 0.00 N

ATOM 965 CA GLY A 139 17.222 22.297 26.982 0.00 c

ATOM 966 C GLY A 139 16.617 23.021 28.176 0.00 c

ATOM 967 O GLY A 139 17.104 24.070 28.604 0.00 0

ATOM 968 N SER A 140 15.555 22.438 28.729 0.00 N

ATOM 969 CA SER A 140 14.858 23.024 29.870 0.00 c

ATOM 970 CB SER A 140 13.423 22.500 29.948 0.00 c

ATOM 971 OG SER A 140 12.971 22.037 28.691 0.00 0

ATOM 972 C SER A 140 15.532 22.736 31.198 0.00 c

ATOM 973 O SER A 140 16.162 21.691 31.389 0.00 0

ATOM 974 N LEU A 141 15.393 23.683 32.115 0.00 N

ATOM 975 CA LEU A 141 15.967 23.558 33.448 0.00 c

ATOM 976 CB LEU A 141 17.175 24.482 33.639 0.00 c

ATOM 977 CG LEU A 141 17.722 24.420 35.073 0.00 c

ATOM 978 CDl LEU A 141 18.323 23.047 35.334 0.00 c

ATOM 979 CD2 LEU A 141 18.749 25.518 35.297 0.00 c

ATOM 980 C LEU A 141 14.851 23.945 34.405 0.00 c

ATOM 981 O LEU A 141 14.398 25.081 34.422 0.00 0

ATOM 982 N LEU A 142 14.409 22.987 35.199 0.00 N

ATOM 983 CA LEU A 142 13.341 23.220 36.150 0.00 c

ATOM 984 CB LEU A 142 12.230 22.198 35.913 0.00 c

ATOM 985 CG LEU A 142 11.289 22.306 34.719 0.00 c

ATOM 986 CDl LEU A 142 10.674 20.933 34.463 0.00 c

ATOM 987 CD2 LEU A 142 10.219 23.350 34.996 0.00 c

ATOM 988 C LEU A 142 13.702 23.168 37.629 0.00 c

ATOM 989 O LEU A 142 14.745 22.671 38.029 0.00 0

ATOM 990 N ALA A 143 12.788 23.701 38.424 0.00 N

ATOM 991 CA ALA A 143 12.880 23.759 39.875 0.00 c

ATOM 992 CB ALA A 143 13.159 25.178 40.345 0.00 c

ATOM 993 C ALA A 143 11.434 23.368 40.165 0.00 c

ATOM 994 O ALA A 143 10.557 24.221 40.225 0.00 0

ATOM 995 N GLY A 144 11.175 22.072 40.287 0.00 N

ATOM 996 CA GLY A 144 9.810 21.642 40.513 0.00 c

ATOM 997 C GLY A 144 9.058 21.945 39.232 0.00 c

ATOM 998 O GLY A 144 9.457 21.487 38.154 0.00 0

ATOM 999 N ASN A 145 7.984 22.723 39.322 0.00 N

ATOM 1000 CA ASN A 145 7.241 23.066 38.122 0.00 c

ATOM 1001 CB ASN A 145 5.736 22.848 38.321 0.00 c

ATOM 1002 CG ASN A 145 5.144 23.751 39.384 0.00 c

ATOM 1003 OD1 ASN A 145 5.382 24.962 39.396 0.00 0

ATOM 1004 ND2 ASN A 145 4.351 23.166 40.281 0.00 N

ATOM 1005 C ASN A 145 7.503 24.496 37.650 0.00 c

ATOM 1006 O ASN A 145 6.716 25.049 36.886 0.00 0

ATOM 1007 N GLN A 146 8.613 25.086 38.093 0.00 N

ATOM 1008 CA GLN A 146 8.968 26.455 37.702 0.00 c

ATOM 1009 CB GLN A 146 9.234 27.314 38.942 0.00 c

ATOM 1010 CG GLN A 146 8.080 27.367 39.916 0.00 c

ATOM 1011 CD GLN A 146 6.875 28.097 39.363 0.00 c

ATOM 1012 OE1 GLN A 146 5.735 27.705 39.615 0.00 0

ATOM 1013 NE2 GLN A 146 7.117 29.172 38.617 0.00 N

ATOM 1014 C GLN A 146 10.205 26.492 36.798 0.00 c

ATOM 1015 O GLN A 146 11.277 25.999 37.169 0.00 0

ATOM 1016 N ALA A 147 10.055 27.084 35.618 0.00 N

ATOM 1017 CA ALA A 147 11.160 27.188 34.660 0.00 c

ATOM 1018 CB ALA A 147 10.642 27.698 33.309 0.00 c

ATOM 1019 C ALA A 147 12.253 28.124 35.183 0.00 c

ATOM 1020 O ALA A 147 11.958 29.233 35.625 0.00 0

ATOM 1021 N GLN A 148 13.508 27.679 35.124 0.00 N

ATOM 1022 CA GLN A 148 14.637 28.481 35.593 0.00 c

ATOM 1023 CB GLN A 148 15.576 27.627 36.435 0.00 c

ATOM 1024 CG GLN A 148 14.939 27.023 37.667 0.00 c

ATOM 1025 CD GLN A 148 14.283 28.062 38.553 0.00 c

ATOM 1026 OE1 GLN A 148 13.074 28.016 38.797 0.00 0

ATOM 1027 NE2 GLN A 148 15.075 29.005 39.040 0.00 N 246

ATOM 1028 c GLN A 148 15.440 29.128 34.466 0.00 c

ATOM 1029 O GLN A 148 15.723 30.325 34.501 0.00 O

ATOM 1030 N GLY A 149 15.818 28.330 33.472 0.00 N

ATOM 1031 CA GLY A 149 16.578 28.852 32.349 0.00 c

ATOM 1032 C GLY A 149 16.762 27.783 31.290 ' 0.00 c

ATOM 1033 O GLY A 149 16.104 26.742 31.348 0.00 0

ATOM 1034 N VAL A 150 17.628 28.041 30.311 0.00 N

ATOM 1035 CA VAL A 150 17.896 27.061 29.261 0.00 c

ATOM 1036 CB VAL A 150 17.568 27.604 27.848 0.00 c

ATOM 1037 CGI VAL A 150 16.053 27.737 27.694 0.00 c

ATOM 1038 CG2 VAL A 150 18.256 28.936 27.611 0.00 c

ATOM 1039 C VAL A 150 19.351 26.630 29.329 0.00 c

ATOM 1040 O VAL A 150 20.210 27.368 29.809 0.00 0

ATOM 1041 N THR A 151 19.630 25.431 28.844 0.00 N

ATOM 1042 CA THR A 151 20.985 24.914 28.873 0.00 c

ATOM 1043 CB THR A 151 20.980 23.429 28.536 0.00 c

ATOM 1044 OG1 THR A 151 20.057 22.771 29.412 0.00 0

ATOM 1045 CG2 THR A 151 22.361 22.828 28.748 0.00 c

ATOM 1046 C THR A 151 21.954 25.675 27.984 0.00 c

ATOM 1047 O THR A 151 21.756 25.796 26.779 0.00 0

ATOM 1048 N SER A 152 23.007 26.192 28.607 0.00 N

ATOM 1049 CA SER A 152 24.020 26.956 27.898 0.00 c

ATOM 1050 CB SER A 152 24.382 28.193 28.723 0.00 c

ATOM 1051 OG SER A 152 25.262 29.047 28.021 0.00 0

ATOM 1052 C SER A 152 25.264 26.127 27.603 0.00 c

ATOM 1053 O SER A 152 25.673 26.005 26.450 0.00 0

ATOM 1054 N GLY A 153 25.859 25.561 28.648 0.00 N

ATOM 1055 CA GLY A 153 27.047 24.740 28.483 0.00 c

ATOM 1056 C GLY A 153 27.702 24.415 29.817 0.00 c

ATOM 1057 O GLY A 153 27.151 24.724 30.872 0.00 0

ATOM 1058 N GLY A 154 28.876 23.794 29.771 0.00 N

ATOM 1059 CA GLY A 154 29.589 23.443 30.984 0.00 c

ATOM 1060 C GLY A 154 30.688 22.439 30.708 0.00 c

ATOM 1061 O GLY A 154 31.161 22.322 29.579 0.00 0

ATOM 1062 N SER A 155 31.101 21.703 31.736 0.00 N

ATOM 1063 CA SER A 155 32.149 20.701 31.572 0.00 c

ATOM 1064 CB SER A 155 33.416 21.148 32.296 0.00 c

ATOM 1065 OG SER A 155 33.180 21.231 33.688 0.00 0

ATOM 1066 C SER A 155 31.700 19.354 32.128 0.00 c

ATOM 1067 O SER A 155 30.690 19.268 32.836 0.00 0

ATOM 1068 N GLY A 156 32.460 18.307 31.805 0.00 N

ATOM 1069 CA GLY A 156 32.142 16.970 32.283 0.00 c

ATOM 1070 C GLY A 156 31.101 16.231 31.458 0.00 c

ATOM 1071 O GLY A 156 30.856 16.564 30.302 0.00 0

ATOM 1072 N ASN A 157 30.495 15.211 32.051 0.00 N

'ATOM 1073 CA ASN A 157 29.470 14.434 31.369 0.00 c

ATOM 1074 CB ASN A 157 30.115 13.390 30.450 0.00 c

ATOM 1075 CG ASN A 157 31.077 12.472 31.188 0.00 c

ATOM 1076 ODl ASN A 157 30.669 11.681 32.038 0.00 0

ATOM 1077 ND2 ASN A 157 32.365 12.575 30.863 0.00 N

ATOM 1078 C ASN A 157 28.578 13.766 32.410 0.00 c

ATOM 1079 O ASN A 157 28.788 13.932 33.610 0.00 0

ATOM 1080 N CYS A 158 27.580 13.021 31.948 0.00 N

ATOM 1081 CA CYS A 158 26.661 12.337 32.840 0.00 c

ATOM 1082 CB CYS A 158 25.304 12.169 32.155 0.00 c

ATOM 1083 SG CYS A 158 24.426 13.754 31.973 0.00 s

ATOM 1084 C CYS A 158 27.181 11.000 33.350 0.00 c

ATOM 1085 O CYS A 158 26.592 10.393 34.244 0.00 0

ATOM 1086 N ARG A 159 28.288 10.538 32.784 0.00 N

ATOM 1087 CA ARG A 159 28.862 9.271 33.215 0.00 c

ATOM 1088 CB ARG A 159 29.714 8.662 32.099 0.00 c

ATOM 1089 CG ARG A 159 28.922 8.198 30.890 0.00 c

ATOM 1090 CD ARG A 159 29.852 7.660 29.817 0.00 c

ATOM 1091 NE ARG A 159 30.711 8.703 29.260 0.00 N1+

ATOM 1092 CZ ARG A 159 30.273 9.714 28.517 0.00 c

ATOM 1093 NHl ARG A 159 28.980 9.826 28.237 0.00 N

ATOM 1094 NH2 ARG A 159 31.128 10.610 28.049 0.00 N

ATOM 1095 C ARG A 159 29.716 9.462 34.467 0.00 c

ATOM 1096 O ARG A 159 29.634 8.675 35.405 0.00 0

ATOM 1097 N THR A 160 30.533 10.510 34.481 0.00 N

ATOM 1098 CA THR A 160 31.400 10.785 35.628 0.00 c

ATOM 1099 CB THR A 160 32.874 10.925 35.185 0.00 c

ATOM 1100 OG1 THR A 160 32.966 11.897 34.138 0.00 0

ATOM 1101 CG2 THR A 160 33.404 9.605 34.676 0.00 c

ATOM 1102 C THR A 160 31.000 12.048 36.396 0.00 c

ATOM 1103 O THR A 160 31.525 12.320 37.475 0.00 0

ATOM 1104 N GLY A 161 30.068 12.812 35.836 0.00 N -247

ATOM 1105 CA GLY A 161 29.622 14.028 36.490 0.00 c

ATOM 1106 C GLY A 161 30.200 15.295 35.878 0.00 c

ATOM 1107 O GLY A 161 31.194 15.262 35.150 0.00 O

ATOM 1108 N GLY A 162 29.577 16.426 36.180 0.00 N

ATOM 1109 CA GLY A 162 30.061 17.681 35.646 0.00 c

ATOM 1110 C GLY A 162 29.414 18.909 36.250 0.00 c

ATOM llll O GLY A 162 28.785 18.856 37.318 0.00 0

ATOM 1112 N THR A 163 29.592 20.023 35.547 0.00 N

ATOM 1113 CA THR A 163 29.057 21.322 35.934 0.00 c

ATOM 1114 CB THR A 163 30.179 22.248 36.440 0.00 c

ATOM 1115 OG1 THR A 163 30.861 21.621 37.535 0.00 0

ATOM 1116 CG2 THR A 163 29.604 23.576 36.896 0.00 c

ATOM 1117 C THR A 163 28.414 21.948 34.695 0.00 c

ATOM 1118 O THR A 163 29.052 22.077 33.650 0.00 0

ATOM 1119 N THR A 164 27.152 22.342 34.810 0.00 N

ATOM 1120 CA THR A 164 26.452 22.945 33.680 0.00 c

ATOM 1121 CB THR A 164 25.290 22.053 33.208 0.00 c

ATOM 1122 OG1 THR A 164 25.744 20.700 33.075 0.00 0

ATOM 1123 CG2 THR A 164 24.768 22.536 31.869 0.00 c

ATOM 1124 C THR A 164 25.878 24.298 34.060 0.00 c

ATOM 1125 O THR A 164 25.354 24.466 35.167 0.00 0

ATOM 1126 N PHE A 165 25.981 25.256 33.139 0.00 N

ATOM 1127 CA PHE A 165 25.470 26.607 33.369 0.00 c

ATOM 1128 CB PHE A 165 26.521 27.662 33.021 0.00 c

ATOM 1129 CG PHE A 165 27.818 27.507 33.769 0.00 c

ATOM 1130 CDl PHE A 165 28.758 26.554 33.380 0.00 c

ATOM 1131 CD2 PHE A 165 28.107 28.319 34.858 0.00 c

ATOM 1132 CE1 PHE A 165 29.957 26.427 34.071 0.00 c

ATOM 1133 CE2 PHE A 165 29.302 28.187 35.541 0.00 c

ATOM 1134 CZ PHE A 165 30.224 27.242 35.146 0.00 c

ATOM 1135 C PHE A 165 24.242 26.834 32.505 0.00 c

ATOM 1136 O PHE A 165 24.170 26.334 31.386 0.00 0

ATOM 1137 N PHE A 166 23.276 27.586 33.020 0.00 N

ATOM 1138 CA PHE A 166 22.067 27.854 32.262 0.00 c

ATOM 1139 CB PHE A 166 20.860 27.130 32.880 0.00 c

ATOM 1140 CG PHE A 166 21.062 25.643 33.076 0.00 c

ATOM 1141 CD2 PHE A 166 20.371 24.721 32.295 0.00 c

ATOM 1142 CDl PHE A 166 21.936 25.165 34.050 0.00 c

ATOM 1143 CE2 PHE A 166 20.549 23.339 32.484 0.00 c

ATOM 1144 CE1 PHE A 166 22.117 23.788 34.243 0.00 c

ATOM 1145 CZ PHE A 166 21.423 22.879 33.460 0.00 c

ATOM 1146 C PHE A 166 21.765 29.344 32.173 0.00 c

ATOM 1147 O PHE A 166 22.066 30.122 33.086 0.00 0

ATOM 1148 N GLN A 167 21.187 29.736 31.046 0.00 N

ATOM 1149 CA GLN A 167. 20.822 31.122 30.802 0.00 c

ATOM 1150 CB GLN A 167 20.737 31.366 29.291 0.00 c

ATOM 1151 CG GLN A 167 19.786 32.464 28.875 0.00 c

ATOM 1152 CD GLN A 167 20.300 33.840 29.234 0.00 c

ATOM 1153 OE1 GLN A 167 21.329 34.282 28.722 0.00 0

ATOM 1154 NE2 GLN A 167 19.589 34.525 30.126 0.00 N

ATOM 1155 C GLN A 167 19.449 31.262 31.442 0.00 c

ATOM 1156 O GLN A 167 18.500 30.600 31.020 0.00 0

ATOM 1157 N PRO A 168 19.322 32.107 32.481 0.00 N

ATOM 1158 CD PRO A 168 20.334 32.973 33.113 0.00 c

ATOM 1159 CA PRO A 168 18.013 32.270 33.132 0.00 c

ATOM 1160 CB PRO A 168 18.261 33.395 34.138 0.00 c

ATOM 1161 CG PRO A 168 19.716 33.237 34.470 0.00 c

ATOM 1162 C PRO A 168 16.926 32.611 32.108 0.00 c

ATOM 1163 O PRO A 168 17.180 33.288 31.116 0.00 0

ATOM 1164 N VAL A 169 15.711 32.149 32.373 0.00 N

ATOM 1165 CA VAL A 169 14.578 32.379 31.487 0.00 c

ATOM 1166 CB VAL A 169 13.465 31.328 31.802 0.00 c

ATOM 1167 CGI VAL A 169 12.914 31.542 33.204 0.00 c

ATOM 1168 CG2 VAL A 169 12.370 31.401 30.786 0.00 c

ATOM 1169 C VAL A 169 13.962 33.788 31.427 0.00 c

ATOM 1170 O VAL A 169 13.638 34.273 30.358 0.00 O

ATOM 1171 N ASN A 170 13.802 34.455 32.560 0.00 N

ATOM 1172 CA ASN A 170 13.213 35.793 32.554 0.00 c

ATOM 1173 CB ASN A 170 13.128 36.329 33.979 0.00 c

ATOM 1174 CG ASN A 170 12.215 35.486 34.843 0.00 c

ATOM 1175 OD1 ASN A 170 11.177 35.008 34.373 0.00 0

ATOM 1176 ND2 ASN A 170 12.587 35.298 36.107 0.00 N

ATOM 1177 C ASN A 170 13.859 36.822 31.635 0.00 c

ATOM 1178 O ASN A 170 13.166 37.586 30.975 0.00 0

ATOM 1179 N PRO A 171 15.192 36.873 31.590 0.00 N

ATOM 1180 CD PRO A 171 16.217 36.299 32.476 0.00 c

ATOM 1181 CA PRO A 171 15.768 37.872 30.684 0.00. c 248

ATOM 1182 CB PRO A 171 17.258 37.857 31.043 0.00 c

ATOM 1183 CG PRO A 171 17.466 36.517 31.673 0.00 c

ATOM 1184 C PRO A 171 15.484 37.551 29.209 0.00 c

ATOM 1185 O PRO A 171 15.601 38.418 28.338 0.00 0

ATOM 1186 N ILE A 172 15.101 36.307 28.935 0.00 N

ATOM 1187 CA ILE A 172 14.798 35.896 27.570 0.00 c

ATOM 1188 CB ILE A 172 14.811 34.374 27.403 0.00 c

ATOM 1189 CG2 ILE A 172 14.516 34.018 25.947 0.00 c

ATOM 1190 CGI ILE A 172 16.164 33.801 27.813 0.00 c

ATOM 1191 CDl ILE A 172 16.196 32.269 27.764 0.00 c

ATOM 1192 C ILE A 172 13.386 36.369 27.251 0.00 c

ATOM 1193 O ILE A 172 13.113 36.885 26.166 0.00 0

ATOM 1194 N LEU A 173 12.488 36.179 28.210 0.00 N

ATOM 1195 CA LEU A 173 11.102 36.587 28.038 0.00 c

ATOM 1196 CB LEU A 173 10.279 36.158 29.252 0.00 c

ATOM 1197 CG LEU A 173 10.263 34.645 29.486 0.00 c

ATOM 1198 CDl LEU A 173 9.465 34.308 30.759 0.00 c

ATOM 1199 CD2 LEU A 173 9.671 33.965 28.251 0.00 c

ATOM 1200 C LEU A 173 11.031 38.105 27.869 0.00 c

ATOM 1201 O LEU A 173 10.287 38.617 27.037 0.00 0

ATOM 1202 N GLN A 174 11.831 38.807 28.662 0.00 N

ATOM 1203 CA GLN A 174 11.896 40.259 28.641 0.00 c

ATOM 1204 CB GLN A 174 12.665 40.752 29.870 0.00 c

ATOM 1205 CG GLN A 174 12.868 42.259 29.923 0.00 c

ATOM 1206 CD GLN A 174 11.664 43.006 30.461 0.00 c

ATOM 1207 OE1 GLN A 174 10.532 42.811 30.003 0.00 0

ATOM 1208 NE2 GLN A 174 11.904 43.876 31.438 0.00 N

ATOM 1209 C GLN A 174 12.555 40.817 27.381 0.00 c

ATOM 1210 O GLN A 174 12.219 41.909 26.933 0.00 0

ATOM 1211 N ALA A 175 13.493 40.078 26.808 0.00 N

ATOM 1212 CA ALA A 175 14.164 40.552 25.604 0.00 c

ATOM 1213 CB ALA A 175 15.378 39.681 25.306 0.00 c

ATOM 1214 C ALA A 175 13.238 40.580 24.394 0.00 c

ATOM 1215 O ALA A 175 13.276 41.512 23.595 0.00 0

ATOM 1216 N TYR A 176 12.396 39.561 24.276 0.00 N

ATOM 1217 CA TYR A 176 11.462 39.458 23.161 0.00 c

ATOM 1218 CB TYR A 176 11.571 38.063 22.535 0.00 c

ATOM 1219 CG TYR A 176 12.990 37.700 22.173 0.00 c

ATOM 1220 CDl TYR A 176 13.761 38.551 21.381 0.00 c

ATOM 1221 CE1 TYR A 176 15.075 38.249 21.073 0.00 c

ATOM 1222 CD2 TYR A 176 13.574 36.528 22.643 0.00 c

ATOM 1223 CE2 TYR A 176 14.890 36.213 22.335 0.00 c

ATOM 1224 CZ TYR A 176 15.636 37.083 21.553 0.00 c

ATOM 1225 OH TYR A 176 16.959 36.817 21.285 0.00 0

ATOM 1226 C TYR A 176 10.004 39.742 23.500 0.00 c

ATOM 1227 O TYR A 176 9.135 39.574 22.646 0.00 0

ATOM 1228 N GLY A 177 9.736 40.165 24.733 0.00 N

ATOM 1229 CA GLY A 177 8.366 40.457 25.131 0.00 c

ATOM 1230 C GLY A 177 7.469 39.232 25.065 0.00 c

ATOM 1231 O GLY A 177 6.295 39.326 24.711 0.00 0

ATOM 1232 N LEU A 178 8.033 38.080 25.421 0.00 N

ATOM 1233 CA LEU A 178 7.323 36.807 25.390 0.00 c

ATOM 1234 CB LEU A 178 8.275 35.694 24.937 0.00 c

ATOM 1235 CG LEU A 178 8.981 35.724 23.581 0.00 c

ATOM 1236 CDl LEU A 178 10.077 34.688 23.584 0.00 c

ATOM 1237 CD2 LEU A 178 8.006 35.441 22.454 0.00 c

ATOM 1238 C LEU A 178 6.737 36.403 26.741 0.00 c

ATOM 1239 O LEU A 178 7.221 36.821 27.794 0.00 0

ATOM 1240 N ARG A 179 5.698 35.573 26.688 0.00 N

ATOM 1241 CA ARG A 179 5.008 35.060 27.875 0.00 c

ATOM 1242 CB ARG A 179 3.519 35.439 27.872 0.00 c

ATOM 1243 CG ARG A 179 3.193 36.849 28.356 0.00 c

ATOM 1244 CD ARG A 179 1.760 37.239 27.989 0.00 c

ATOM 1245 NE ARG A 179 1.401 38.565 28.490 0.00 N1+

ATOM 1246 CZ ARG A 179 1.070 38.825 29.751 0.00 c

ATOM 1247 NH1 ARG A 179 1.044 37.S44 30.646 0.00 N

ATOM 1248 NH2 ARG A 179 0.773 40.066 30.117 0.00 N

ATOM 1249 C ARG A 179 5.118 33.541 27.794 0.00 c

ATOM 1250 O ARG A 179 5.043 32.978 26.707 0.00 0

ATOM 1251 N MET A 180 5.313 32.882 28.931 0.00 N

ATOM 1252 CA MET A 180 5.422 31.428 28.955 0.00 c

ATOM 1253 CB MET A 180 5.866 30.936 30.329 0.00 c

ATOM 1254 CG MET A 180 7.257 31.311 30.768 0.00 c

ATOM 1255 SD MET A 180 8.400 30.052 30.227 0.00 S

ATOM 1256 CE MET A 180 7.622 28.610 30.892 0.00 c

ATOM 1257 C MET A 180 4.034 30.856 28.712 0.00 c

ATOM 1258 O MET A 180 3.034 31.444 29.118 0.00 0 249

ATOM 1259 N ILE A 181 3.967 29.715 28.042 0.00 N

ATOM 1260 CA ILE A 181 2.690 29.085 27.781 0.00 c

ATOM 1261 CB ILE A 181 2.726 28.266 26.464 0.00 c

ATOM 1262 CG2 ILE A 181 1.534 27.294 26.399 0.00 c

ATOM 1263 CGI ILE A 181 2.711 29.237 25.270 0.00 c

ATOM 1264 CDl ILE A 181 2.740 28.556 23.910 0.00 c

ATOM 1265 C ILE A 181 2.613 28.211 29.023 0.00 c

ATOM 1266 O ILE A 181 3.458 27.357 29.238 0.00 0

ATOM 1267 N THR A 182 1.598 28.457 29.845 0.00 N

ATOM 1268 CA THR A 182 1.398 27.724 31.090 0.00 c

ATOM 1269 C THR A 182 0.212 26.770 31.163 0.00 c

ATOM 1270 O THR A 182 -0.098 26.231 32.241 0.00 0

ATOM 1271 CB THR A 182 1.315 28.733 32.273 0.00 c

ATOM 1272 OG1 THR A 182 0.199 28.407 33.111 0.00 0

ATOM 1273 CG2 THR A 182 1.137 30.133 31.739 0.00 c

ATOM 1274 N THR A 183 -0.448 26.534 30.036 0.00 N

ATOM 1275 CA THR A 183 -1.593 25.623 30.045 0.00 c

ATOM 1276 C THR A 183 -1.754 25.043 28.647 0.00 c

ATOM 1277 O THR A 183 -1.274 25.608 27.675 0.00 0

ATOM 1278 CB THR A 183 -2.909 26.342 30.433 0.00 c

ATOM 1279 OG1 THR A 183 -3.716 25.460 31.228 0.00 0

ATOM 1280 CG2 THR A 183 -3.690 26.738 29.184 0.00 c

ATOM 1281 N ASP A 184 -2.402 23.896 28.532 0.00 N

ATOM 1282 CA ASP A 184 -2.573 23.318 27.213 0.00 c

ATOM 1283 C ASP A 184 -4.035 23.091 26.918 0.00 c

ATOM 1284 O ASP A 184 -4.380 22.208 26.174 0.00 0

ATOM 1285 CB ASP A 184 -1.810 22.005 27.113 0.00 c

ATOM 1286 CG ASP A 184 -0.464 22.056 27.794 0.00 c

ATOM 1287 OD1 ASP A 184 0.296 23.029 27.577 0.00 0

ATOM 1288 OD2 ASP A 184 -0.152 21.080 28.527 0.00 01-

TER 1289 ASP A 184

ATOM 1290 N ALA B 14 37.553 22.457 29.194 0.00 N1+

ATOM 1291 H ALA B 14 36.582 22.364 28.935 0.00 H

ATOM 1292 H ALA B 14 37.991 23.157 28.614 0.00 H

ATOM 1293 H ALA B 14 38.021 21.572 29.065 0.00 H

ATOM' 1294 CA ALA B 14 37.649 22.863 30.616 0.00 c

ATOM 1295 C ALA B 14 36.345 22.665 31.400 0.00 c

ATOM 1296 O ALA B 14 36.364 21.816 32.304 0.00 0

ATOM 1297 CB ALA B 14 38.235 24.270 30.658 0.00 c

ATOM 1298 N ALA B 15 35.261 23.393 31.094 0.00 N

ATOM 1299 CA ALA B 15 35.165 24.394 30.026 0.00 c

ATOM 1300 C ALA B 15 34.368 23.941 28.790 0.00 c

ATOM 1301 O ALA B 15 34.957 23.330 27.892 0.00 0

ATOM 1302 CB ALA B 15 34.779 25.773 30.573 0.00 c

ATOM 1303 N ALA B 16 33.028 24.069 28.763 0.00 N

ATOM 1304 CA ALA B 16 32.304 23.388 27.683 0.00 c

ATOM 1305 C ALA B 16 31.144 24.054 26.918 0.00 c

ATOM 1306 O ALA B 16 30.114 24.490 27.453 0.00 0

ATOM 1307 CB ALA B 16 32.420 21.850 27.713 0.00 c

ATOM 1308 H ALA B 16 32.544 24.608 29.452 0.00 H

ATOM 1309 N HIS B 17 31.370 24.111 25.600 0.00 N

ATOM 1310 CA HIS B 17 30.508 24.676 24.521 0.00 c

ATOM 1311 C HIS B 17 29.820 23.558 23.756 0.00 c

ATOM 1312 O HIS B 17 30.487 22.621 23.291 0.00 0

ATOM 1313 CB HIS B 17 31.473 25.545 23.683 0.00 c

ATOM 1314 CG HIS B 17 30.806 26.351 22.601 0.00 c

ATOM 1315 ND1 HIS B 17 30.728 26.028 21.264 0.00 N

ATOM 1316 CD2 HIS B 17 30.170 27.551 22.772 0.00 c

ATOM 1317 CE1 HIS B 17 30.054 27.014 20.648 0.00 c

ATOM 1318 NE2 HIS B 17 29.694 27.965 21.525 0.00 N

ATOM 1319 H HIS B 17 32.233 23.710 25.292 0.00 H

ATOM 1320 N TYR B 18 28.491 23.661 23.613 0.00 N

ATOM 1321 CA TYR B 18 27.651 22.538 23.244 0.00 c

ATOM 1322 C TYR B 18 26.791 22.741 21.978 0.00 c

ATOM 1323 O TYR B 18 25.936 21.904 21.762 0.00 0

ATOM 1324 CB TYR B 18 26.869 22.044 24.476 0.00 c

ATOM 1325 CG TYR B 18 27.638 21.257 25.527 0.00 c

ATOM 1326 CDl TYR B 18 27.073 20.996 26.793 0.00 c

ATOM 1327 CD2 TYR B 18 28.818 20.596 25.160 0.00 c

ATOM 1328 CE1 TYR B 18 27.702 20.099 27.685 0.00 c

ATOM 1329 CE2 TYR B 18 29.420 19.668 26.020 0.00 c

ATOM 1330 CZ TYR B 18 28.855 19.410 27.276 0.00 c

ATOM 1331 OH TYR B 18 29.519 18.595 28.139 0.00 0

ATOM 1332 H TYR B 18 28.022 24.521 23.872 0.00 H

ATOM 1333 N ASP B 19 27.328 23.446 20.986 0.00 N

ATOM 1334 CA ASP B 19 27.252 23.065 19.573 0.00 c

ATOM 1335 C ASP B 19 25.957 22.335 19.178 0.00 c - 250 -

ATOM 1336 O ASP B 19 24.855 22.851 19.367 0.00 O

ATOM 1337 CB ASP B 19 27.381 24.271 18.655 0.00 C

ATOM 1338 CG ASP B 19 28.399 25.369 18.926 0.00 c

ATOM 1339 OD1 ASP B 19 28.777 25.568 20.105 0.00 0

ATOM 1340 OD2 ASP B 19 28.588 26.117 17.941 0.00 01-

ATOM 1341 H ASP B 19 28.092 24.050 21.252 0.00 H

ATOM 1342 N GLU B 20 26.024 21.140 18.622 0.00 N

ATOM 1343 CA GLU B 20 27.219 20.341 18.451 0.00 c

ATOM 1344 C GLU B 20 27.848 20.634 17.079 0.00 c

ATOM 1345 O GLU B 20 27.311 20.147 16.091 0.00 0

ATOM 1346 CB GLU B 20 26.641 18.934 18.532 0.00 c

ATOM 1347 CG GLϋ B 20 26.790 18.174 19.836 0.00 c

ATOM 1348 CD GLU B 20 26.391 16.720 19.643 0.00 c

ATOM 1349 OE1 GLU B 20 26.614 16.043 20.673 0.00 01-

ATOM 1350 OE2 GLU B 20 26.569 16.221 18.501 0.00 0

ATOM 1351 H GLU B 20 25.129 20.696 18.442 0.00 H

ATOM 1352 N ALA B 21 29.122 21.069 17.024 0.00 N

ATOM 1353 CA ALA B 21 29.859 21.221 15.768 0.00 c

ATOM 1354 C ALA B 21 30.422 19.894 15.208 0.00 c

ATOM 1355 O ALA B 21 31.618 19.821 14.879 0.00 0

ATOM 1356 CB ALA B 21 30.954 22.295 15.900 0.00 c

ATOM 1357 OXT ALA B 21 29.677 18.897 15.088 0.00 01

ATOM 1358 H ALA B 21 29.585 21.298 17.880 0.00 H

TER 1359 ALA B 21

EXAMPLE 21 Oxidative Stability of ASP

This Example describes experiments conducted to determine the oxidative stability of the ASP protease and mutant proteases. The resistance to oxidation of Cellulomonas 69B4 protease was compared to that of: a BPN'-variant protease (BPN'-variant 1 ; Genencor; See, RE 34,606 [incorporated herein by reference], for a description of this enzyme); a GG36 variant protease (GG36-variant 1 ; Genencor; See e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,956,340 and 6,700,676, herein incorporated by reference); and PURAFECT protease (Genencor).

The assay was conducted by incubating a sample of the protease with 0.1 M H202. A 2.0 ml volume of 0.1 M Borate buffer (46.4 gm NaB 07 10 H20), pH 9.45 containing 0.1 M H202 and 100 ppm protease was incubated at 25°C for 20 minutes and assayed for enzyme activity. The enzyme activity was determined as follows: 60 μl of the incubation mixture was combined with 960 μl 0.1 M Tris buffer, pH 8.6 and a sample from 10 μl was taken and added to 990 μl AAPF substrate solution, cone. 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris / 0.006% TWEEN®, pH δ.6. The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored. The results obtained for these proteases are provided in Figure 31. As indicated in this graph, protease 69B4 showed greatly enhanced stability under oxidative conditions relative to the subtilisin proteases. - 251 -

EXAMPLE 22 Chelate Stability of ASP

In this Example, experiments to determine the chelate stability of ASP are described. The resistance to the presence of a chelator of 69B4 protease was assayed by incubating an aliquot of the enzyme with 10 mM EDTA in 50 mM Tris, pH 8.2. The same enzyme preparations as used in Example 21 were used in these experiments.

In specific, a volume of 2.0 ml 50 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.2, containing 10 mM EDTA and 100 ppm protease was incubated at 45°C for 100 minutes and assayed for enzyme activity as follows: 60 μl of the incubation mixture was combined with 960 μl 0.1 M Tris buffer, pH 8.6 and a sample from 10 μl was taken and added to 990 μl AAPF substrate solution, cone. 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris / 0.006% TWEEN®, pH 8.6

The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored. The results obtained for these four proteases are shown in Figure 32. As indicated by these results, protease 69B4 showed greatly enhanced stability in the presence of a chelator than BPN' variant-1 , PURAFECT®, or GG36 variant-1.

EXAMPLE 23 Thermal Stability of ASP

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the thermostability of ASP protease are described. In one set of experiments, 69B4 protease was tested for resistance to thermal inactivation in solution. As in Examples 21 and 22, a BPN' variant (BPN'-variant-1 ), PURAFECT®, and a GG36 variant (GG36-variant-1 ) were also tested and compared with ASP.

The thermal inactivation was performed by incubating a volume of 2.0 ml 60 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.0, containing 100 ppm protease at 4δ°C for 300 minutes and assayed for enzyme activity as follows: 60 μl of the incubation mixture was combined with 960 μl 0.1 M Tris buffer, pH 8.6 and a sample from 10 μl was taken and added to 990 μl AAPF substrate Solution, cone. 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris / 0.006% TWEEN®, pH 8.6. The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored. The results of these four proteases are shown in Figure 33. As shown by these results, protease 69B4 showed enhanced or comparative thermal stability at 45 degrees centigrade than the BPN' variant, PURAFECT®, or the GG36 variant.

In addition to the above experiments, an alternative method for determining the thermostability of ASP was also tested. In these experiments, a temperature gradient - 252 - between 57°- 62 °C was used. The thermal inactivation (using a Thermocycler -MTP plate DNA Engine Tetad; MJ Research) was performed by incubating a volume of 1δ0μl 100 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.6, containing 1 mM CaCI2 and δ ppm protease for 60 minutes and assayed for enzyme activity as follows: 10 μl was taken and added to 190 μl AAPF substrate solution, cone. 1 mg/ml, in 0.1 M Tris / 0.006% TWEEN®, pH 8.6. The rate of increase in absorbance at 410 nm due to release of p-nitroaniline was monitored (at 2δ°C). The results of 4 proteases are shown in Figure 34.

EXAMPLE 24 pH profile of ASP Protease on DMC Substrate

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the pH profile of the ASP protease are described. The Cellulomonas 69B4 protease of the present invention, isolated and purified by methods described herein and three currently used subtilisin proteases (PURAFECT®, BPN'-variant- 1 , GG36-variant-1 ) described in Examples 21-23, were analyzed for their ability to hydrolyze a commercial synthetic substrate, di-methyl casein ("DMC7 Sigma C-9801) in the pH range from 4 to 12.

The DMC method described at the beginning of the Experimental section was used, with modifications, as indicated below. Briefly, a δ mg/ml DMC substrate solution was prepared in the appropriate buffer (δ mg/ml DMC, 0.006% (w/w) TWEEN-80®

(polyoxyethylene sorbitan mono-oleate, Sigma P-1764)). The appropriate DMC buffers were composed as follows: 40 mM MES for pH 4 and δ ; 40 mM HEPES for pH 6 and 7, 40 mM TRIS for pH δ and 9; and 40 mM Carbonate for pH 10, 11 and 12.

For the determination, 160 μl of each pH-substrate solution was transferred into 96 well microtiter plate and were pre-incubated at 37°C for twenty minutes prior to enzyme addition. The respective enzyme solutions (BPN'-variant-1 ; GG36-variant-1 ; PURAFECT®; and 69B4 protease) were prepared, containing about 26 ppm and 20 μl of these enzyme solutions. These enzyme solutions were pipetted into the substrate containing wells in order to achieve a 2.6 ppm final enzyme concentration in each well. The 96 well plate containing enzyme-substrate mixtures was incubated at 37°C and 300 rpm for one hour in an IKS- Multitron incubator/shaker.

A 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonate ("TNBS") color reaction method was used to determine the amount of peptides and amino acids release from DMC substrate. The free amino groups (of the peptides and amino acids) react with 2,4,6-trinitro-benzene sulfonic 253 acid to form a yellow colored complex. The absorbance was measured at 405 nm in a Spectra Max 250 MTP Reader.

The TNBS assay was conducted as follows. A 1 mg/ml solution of TNBS ( 5% 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid/Sigma-P2297) was prepared in reagent buffer A (2.4 g NaOH, 46.4 g Na2B4O7.10H2O dissolved by heating in 1000ml). Then, 60 μl per well were aliquoted into a 96-well plate and 10 μl of the incubation mixture described above were added to each well and mixed for 20 minutes at room temperature. Then, 200 μl of reagent B (70.4 g NaH2PO4-H2O and 1.2 g Na2SO3 in 2000 ml) were added to each well and mixed to stop the reaction. The absorbance at 406 nm was measured in a SpectraMax 260 MTP0 Reader. The absorbance value was corrected for a blank (without enzyme). The data in Table 24-1 show the comparative ability of the 69B4 protease to hydrolyze such substrate versus proteases from a known mutant variants (BPN' variant-1 and GG36 variant-1 ).

Also, as shown in Figure 36, the serine protease of the present invention showed5 comparative or increased hydrolysis of DMC substrate with an optimal DMC-hydrolysis activity over a broad pH range from 7 to 12.

Figure imgf000255_0001

o EXAMPLE 25 pH Stability of ASP Protease

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the pH stability of the ASP protease are described. As in Examples 21-24, two currently used subtilisin proteases (PURAFECT® and BPN'-variant-1 ) were also tested. 5 The respective enzyme solutions (i.e., BPN'-variant-1 , PURAFECT®, and 69B4 - 254 - protease) were prepared containing 90 ppm protease in 0.1 M Citrate buffer, pH 3, 4, 5 and 6. Then, 10 ml tubes containing 1 ml of buffered enzyme solutions were placed in a GFL 1083 water bath set at 2δ°C, 3δ°C and 4δ°C respectively, for 60 minutes. AAPF activity was determined for each enzyme sample at time 0 and 60 minutes as described above. The remaining enzyme activity was calculated and the results are provided in Table 25-1 below, and are shown in Figures 25-28).

As indicated by the data in Table 26-1 , the ASP protease is exceptional stable at pH 3, 4, δ, and 6, at temperatures between 2δ°C and 4δ°C, as compared to the BPN' variant-1 and PURAFECT®.

Figure imgf000256_0001

EXAMPLE 26 Stability and Specificity of ASP

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the stability and specificity differences between ASP, ASP mutants, and FNA are described. These experiments were performed by formulating liquid TIDE® detergent (Procter & Gamble) with calcium formate (an anionic surfactant titrant), borate (a P1 binder/inhibitor), and glycerol (water ordering), either independently of or in combination with each other. The enzyme was tested under these conditions and the residual enzyme activity was determined over time at a fixed temperature.

The experiments are described in greater detail below. Liquid TIDE® detergent without added enzyme stabilizing chemicals was divided into eleven aliquots. Then, glycerol, borax, or calcium formate were added to the detergent aliquots in the proportions shown in Table 26-1. 255

Figure imgf000257_0001

Each aliquot was pre-warmed to 90 , and either FNA, ASP (wild-type) or an ASP R1δ variant was added to approximately one gram per liter protease. After thorough mixing, a portion was removed and assayed for activity with synthetic AAPF-pNA substrate, as described above. After the assay, each aliquot was placed back into a 90°F oven. The assay process was repeated over time, and the decline in activity at TO was plotted as a % TO activity remaining.

Surprisingly, it was found that ASP did not have the same calcium formate or glycerol dependency as FNA. Furthermore, it was determined that borate (alone) had the most dramatic effect on stabilizing ASP. It was also found that the addition of stabilizing chemicals provided significant benefits to the wild-type ASP, as well as the ASP R1δ variant, indicating that the variant site is independent of the borate-activated site.

EXAMPLE 27 LAS Stability of ASP

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the stability of ASP to anionic surfactants are described. LAS (linear alkyl sulfonate), an anionic surfactant, is a component of HDL detergents known to inactivate enzymes. The methods used are described above. It was determined that wild-type ASP incubated in LAS dissolved in Tris HCl pH δ.6 is inactivated (See, Table 27-1 , below). Further study revealed that inactivation is rapid (See, Table 27-2). As LAS is a negatively charged molecule, the hypothesis that electrostatic attraction of LAS with positively charged amino-acid side chains of ASP was the cause of the LAS sensitivity, was developed. To test this hypothesis, arginine residues - 256 -

(wild-type ASP contains no lysine residues), were mutated to other amino-acids.

Incubation of these mutants in 0.05%(w/v) LAS in Tris HCl pHδ.6, for one hour revealed that all arginine replacement mutants were more stable than wild-type ASP. In contrast, non-arginine replacement mutations that were also tested for LAS stability were generally not improved compared to wild-type (See, Table 27-3). Subsequent multiple arginine replacement mutations revealed that the enzyme is substantially more stable than the wild-type enzyme, and more stable that single arginine replacement mutations (See, Table 27-4).

Another anionic surfactant that is used in HDL detergents is AES. Wild-type ASP was found to be unstable in high concentrations of AES (See, Table 27-5). The mutant ASP R18 was found to be more stable than wild-type in AES (See, Table 27-5). Also, the rate of inactivation of activity by 5% AES was found to be higher for the wild-type than the ASP R18 mutant (See, Table 27-6). These results confirm that replacement of arginine residues of ASP improves the stability of ASP in anionic detergents in general. It is not intended that the present invention be limited to any specific anionic detergents or mutations. Indeed, it is contemplated that various anionic detergents (as well as other detergents) will find use in the present invention, as will various ASP mutants.

Table 27-1. Inactivation of ASP by LAS in Tris HCl pH 8.6 %LAS (w/v) % Activity of Control

Control (0 LAS) 100 0.01 87

0.03 77

0.06 59

0.10 47

0.30 31 0.60 20

1.00 12

Table 27-2. Time-course of ASP Inactivation by 0.1% LAS

Time (sees) % Remaining Activity 0 100

60 45

120 26 257

240 20 600 11

Table 27-3. Stability of ASP and Single Mutants (Incubated 0.05% LAS in Tris HCl, pH 8.6, for 60 mins.) 0

Mutant % Remaining Activity of 0 LAS Control

Wild-type 18

R14L 47 5 R16I 49

R16L 56

R16Q 61

R36F 43

R127A 69 0 R127K 31

R127Q 62

R169K 26

T36S 11

G65Q 22 5 Y76G 7

N76L 17

S76V 17 o

Table 27-4. Stability of ASP and Multiple Arginine Replacements (Incubated 0.05% LAS in Tris HCl, pH 8.6. for 60mins) 5

Mutant % Remaining Activity of 0 LAS Control

Wild-type 27.5

ASP R-1 98.6 0 ASP R-2 69.6

ASP R-3 100.2

ASP R-7 103.9

ASP R-10B 96.9

ASP R-1 δ 100.9 5 ASP R23 79.4

In this Table, R-1=R16Q/R35F/R1δ9Q R-2=R1δ9Q o R-3=R16Q/R123L

R-7=R14L/R127Q/R159Q - 258

R-10B=R14L/R179Q

R-18=R123L/R127Q/R179Q.

R-21 =R16Q/R79T/R127Q

R-23=R16Q/R79T

Table 27-5. Inactivation of ASP and ASP Mutant R-18 by AES in Tris HCl pH8.6 %Remaining activity of 0% AES control

% AES(v/w) Wild-type ASP ASP R-18

0 100 100

1 70 94

5 32 67

Table 27-6. Time-course of ASP and Mutant R-18 Inactivation by 5% AES in Tris HCl, pH 8.6 % Remaining Activity of 0% AES Control

Time (Mins) Wild-type ASP ASP R-128

0 100 100

90 99 106

4020 1δ 83

EXAMPLE 28

Determination of ASP Autolysis Sites in the Presence and Absence of LAS Detergent

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the ASP autolysis sits in the presence and absence of LAS are described. ASP autolysis was evaluated in a buffer with and without LAS (dodecylbenzene-sulfonic acid). Autolysis peptide assignments were made based on molecular weight and sequence of each peptide (from MS and MS/MS data, respectively).

ASP (at concentration of 0.3δug/uL) was incubated (at 4°C) in a 100mM Tris pH 8.6 with and without 0.1 %LAS (dodecylbenzene-sulfonic acid). Aliquots were taken at time periods from 0 to 30 min of incubation and autolysis was terminated by an addition of TFA (final concentration 1 %). Aliquots (10μL) were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Peptides were resolved using an HPLC system (model 1 100, Agilent Technologies) using a reversed-phase column (Vydac C4, 0.3mmlD x 1δ0mm), and a gradient from 0 to 100% solvent B (0.1%formic acid - 259 - in acetonitrile) in 60 min at a flow rate of 5μL/min (generated using a static split from a pump flow rate of 250uL/min). Solvent A consisted of 0.1% formic acid in water; and solvent B was 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile.

Mass spectra were acquired using ion trap mass spectrometer (model LCQ Classic, Thermo). The mass spectrometer was tuned for optimum detection of m/z of 786 and operated with spray voltage of 2.δkV, and a heated capillary at 2δO°C. Mass spectra were acquired with injection time of 500 msec and 5 microscans. Tandem MS spectra were acquired in data-dependent mode, with the most intense peak selected and fragmented with a normalized collision energy of 35%. For relative peptide quantitation, peak areas were determined using vendor software. The identity of the autolysis peptides was determined using a database search program (TurboSequest, Thermo) run on a database containing ASP sequence. Database searches were performed with no enzyme selected, threshold of 10000, dta file parameters (peptide m/z error of 1.7, group 11 , minimum ion count 15), and database parameters (peptide error of 2.2, MS/MS ions error of 0.0, both B,Y ions). Without LAS in the sample buffer, ASP cleavages were primarily observed at the termini and in the middle of the molecule (positions Y9, F47, Y69, F165, Q174, Y176; See Table 28-1 , below). Relative quantitative data for observed peptides and intact ASP was plotted over the course of the experiment (See, Figure 25, Panel A). The majority of the ASP remained intact and only 1% was in the form of cleaved peptides (protein:peptide ratio of 99:1 ) These data indicated that the majority of ASP remains intact, folded, and resistant to further autolytic cleavage.

With 0.1% LAS in the sample buffer, ASP cleavages were observed thoughout the protein (positions Y9, T40, F47, Y67, F59, R61, L69, F165, Q174, Y176). The majority of the ASP was in the peptide form after 10min (See, Figure 25, Panel B). After 60 min, the protein: peptide ratio was <1 :99. These data indicate that ASP is totally unfolded in the presence of LAS detergent, thus extensive cleavage throughout the sequence was observed. The observed autolysis cleavage sites under the two conditions are summarized in the following Table. In this Table, the amino acids preceding and following the periods are the amino acids that immediately precede and follow the autolysis peptide. The sequence between the periods indicates the sequence of the autolysis peptides observed.

Table 28-1. ASP Autolysis Peptides Observed With and Without 0.1% LAS

Peptide Sequence Observed

Start -End

Figure imgf000261_0001
Measured in in 260 -

Figure imgf000262_0001

EXAMPLE 29 Use of Reversible Inhibitors to Reduce LAS-Induced Degradation of ASP

In this Example, experiments conducted to assess the use of reversible inhibitors to reduce LAS-induced degradation of ASP are described. Benzamidine (BZA) is a known reversible inhibitor of serine proteases. Using the standard succ-AAPF-pNA assay as described above, BZA was shown to inhibit the activity of approximately 2μg/ml ASP, with complete inhibition occurring at lOOOmM (1 M), as indicated in Table 29-1 , below:

Figure imgf000262_0002

Approximately 200μg/ml ASP was then incubated with 0.1% LAS and with, and without 1 M BZA for up to 4 days. Enzyme activity was measured at different time points by addition of 10μl incubated sample to 990 μl of assay solution. This reduces the BZA concentration to 10mM, which by reference to the table above is not inhibitory. Therefore, - 261 - any loss of activity will be due to enzyme degradation. As indicated in the results below, enzyme incubated with 0.1% LAS and without BZA lost all activity (i.e., it was degraded), while enzyme incubated with 0.1 % LAS and 1 M BZA, retained activity over the 4 day time- course of the study, demonstrating that inhibition of ASP activity prevents degradation by LAS.

Figure imgf000263_0001

EXAMPLE 30 Testing of Mutant ASPs

In addition to the tests described above, tests were conducted on various mutants of ASP. The methods described above in Example 1 were used. In the following Tables, "Variant Code" provides the wild-type amino acid, the position in the amino acid sequence, and the replacement amino acid (i.e., "F001 A" indicates that the phenylalanine at position 1 in the amino acid sequence has been replaced by alanine in this particular variant).

Keratin Hydrolysis

The table (Table 30-1 ) below provides the keratin hydrolysis data obtained for the ASP variants which show activity on this substrate in the keratin assay as described above ("Protease Assay with Keratin in Microtiter Plates"). The values are relative to wild type (WT) and calculated as described in the assay procedure. Values greater than 1 are indicative of better activity than WT ASP.

Table 30-1. Keratin Hydrolysis Results 262

Figure imgf000264_0002
Figure imgf000264_0003
Figure imgf000264_0001
263

Figure imgf000265_0001
Figure imgf000265_0002
Figure imgf000265_0003
264 -

Figure imgf000266_0003
Figure imgf000266_0001
Figure imgf000266_0002

DMC Assay

The following table (Table 30-2) provides the variants with improved specific activity on casein. The activity on casein as substrate for all variants was determined as described above ("Protease Assay with Dimethylcasein (96 wells), With or Without Preheating of the Protease for Activity and Thermostability Assays"). The values in the table provide relative values for each variant compared to the activity of the WT enzyme (i.e., each value is the quotient of (variant activity)/(wild type activity)). Every variant with a value higher than 1 is 265 better than WT.

Table 30-2. DMC Assay Results

Figure imgf000267_0001
Figure imgf000267_0002
Figure imgf000267_0003
-266-

Figure imgf000268_0001
Figure imgf000268_0002
Figure imgf000268_0003
-267

Figure imgf000269_0001
Figure imgf000269_0002
Figure imgf000269_0003
268

Figure imgf000270_0001
Figure imgf000270_0002
Figure imgf000270_0003

Thermostability Assays

The data in the following table (Table 30-3) represent the relative thermostability data of variants of ASP relative to the stability of the WT ASP stability under these conditions. The stability was measured by determining casein activity before and after incubation at elevated temperature (See, "Thermostability Assays" above). The table contains the relative thermostability values compared to WT under these conditions. It is the quotient of (Variant residual activity/WT residual activity). A value greater than one indicates higher thermostability.

Table 30-3. Thermostabilit Assay Resu ts

Figure imgf000270_0004
Figure imgf000270_0005
Figure imgf000270_0006
269-

Figure imgf000271_0001
Figure imgf000271_0002
Figure imgf000271_0003
270

Figure imgf000272_0001
Figure imgf000272_0002
Figure imgf000272_0003
271

Figure imgf000273_0001
Figure imgf000273_0002
Figure imgf000273_0003

BMI Performance Assays

The following table (Table 30-4) provides the data obtained for selected variants in the BMI performance assay (See, "Microswatch Assay for Testing Protease Performance"). The table shows performance indices, which where calculated as described above for the variants, which show improved performance compare to the WT enzyme. Those variants, which have a performance index greater than 1 , have an improved performance.

Table 30-4. BMI Performance Assay Results

Figure imgf000273_0004
Figure imgf000273_0005
Figure imgf000273_0006
-272

Figure imgf000274_0001
Figure imgf000274_0002
Figure imgf000274_0003
-273-

Figure imgf000275_0001
Figure imgf000275_0002
Figure imgf000275_0003
- 274

Figure imgf000276_0003
Figure imgf000276_0001
Figure imgf000276_0002

BMI-Low pH Performance Assays

The table below (Table 30-5) provides the data obtained for the ASP variants which show activity on this substrate in the microswatch assays under low pH conditions (See, Microswatch Assay for Testing Protease Performance). The table provides performance indices, which were calculated as described above for the variants which show improved performance compared to WT. Variants that have a performance index greater than 1 have improved performance.

Table 30-5. BMI-Low pH Performance Assays

Figure imgf000276_0004
Figure imgf000276_0005
Figure imgf000276_0006
-275-

Figure imgf000277_0001
Figure imgf000277_0002
Figure imgf000277_0003
-276-

Figure imgf000278_0001
Figure imgf000278_0002
Figure imgf000278_0003
277

Figure imgf000279_0003
Figure imgf000279_0001
Figure imgf000279_0002

Las Stability

The following table (Table 30-6) shows all variants, which have an improved stability compared to the WT-ASP. All variants were tested and the calculations determined according to the protocol shown above (See, "LAS Stability Assay"). The table provides the residual activity after incubation for the variants. Under these conditions the average of the WT value was found to be 10.59% residual activity. All variants with a higher activity are improved with respect to the WT molecule. 278

Table 30-6. LAS Stability Assay Results

Figure imgf000280_0001
Figure imgf000280_0002
Figure imgf000280_0003
-279

Figure imgf000281_0001
Figure imgf000281_0002
Figure imgf000281_0003
280

Figure imgf000282_0003
Figure imgf000282_0001
Figure imgf000282_0002
- 281 -

EXAMPLE 31 Determination of ASP Cleaning Activity

In this Example, experiments conducted to determine the cleaning activity of ASP under various conditions, as well as the properties of the various wash conditions are described.

There is a wide variety of wash conditions including varying detergent formulations, wash water volume, wash water temperature, and length of wash time. Thus, detergent components such as proteases must be able to tolerate and function under adverse environmental conditions. For example, detergent formulations used in different areas have different concentrations of their relevant components present in the wash water. For example, a European detergent typically has about 3000-8000 ppm of detergent components in the wash water, while a Japanese detergent typically has less than 800 (e.g., 667 ppm) of detergent components in the wash water. In North America, particularly the United States, detergent typically have about 800 to 2000 (e.g., 97δ ppm) of detergent components present in the wash water.

Latin American detergents are generally high suds phosphate builder detergents and the range of detergents used in Latin America can fall in both the medium and high detergent concentrations, as they range from 1600 ppm to 6000 ppm of detergent components in the wash water. Brazilian detergents typically has approximately 1600 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water. However, other high suds phosphate builder detergent geographies, not limited to other Latin American countries, may have high detergent concentration systems up to about 6000 ppm of detergent components present in the wash water. In light of the foregoing, it is evident that concentrations of detergent compositions in typical wash solutions throughout the world varies from less than about δOO ppm of detergent composition ("low detergent concentration geographies"), for example about 667 ppm in Japan, to between about 600 ppm to about 2000 ppm ("medium detergent concentration geographies"), for example about 97δ ppm in U.S. and about 1500 ppm in Brazil, to greater than about 2000 ppm ("high detergent concentration geographies"), for example about 3000 ppm to about δOOO ppm in Europe and about 6000 ppm in high suds phosphate builder geographies.

The concentrations of the typical wash solutions are determined empirically. For example, in the U.S., a typical washing machine holds a volume of about 64.4 L of wash solution. Accordingly, in order to obtain a concentration of about 97δ ppm of detergent - 282 - within the wash solution, about 62.79 g of detergent composition must be added to the 64.4 L of wash solution. This amount is the typical amount measured into the wash water by the consumer using the measuring cup provided with the detergent.

As a further example, different geographies use different wash temperatures. The temperature of the wash water in Japan is typically less than that used in Europe. For example, the temperature of the wash water in North America and Japan can be between 10 and 30°C (e.g., about 20°C), whereas the temperature of wash water in Europe is typically between 30 and 50°C (e.g., about 40°C).

As a further example, different geographies may have different water hardness. Water hardness is typically described as grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+. Hardness is a measure of the amount of calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) in the water. Most water in the United States is hard, but the degree of hardness varies from area to area. Moderately hard (60-120 ppm) to hard (121-181 ppm) water has 60 to 181 parts per million (i.e., parts per million converted to grains per U.S. gallon is ppm # divided by 17.1 equals grains per gallon) of hardness minerals. Table 31-1 provides ranges of water hardness.

Figure imgf000284_0001

European water hardness is typically greater than 10.δ (e.g., 10.6-20.0) grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+ (e.g., about 1δ grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+ ). North American water hardness is typically greater than Japanese water hardness, but less than European water hardness. For example, North American water hardness can be between 3 to10 grains, 3-δ grains or about 6 grains. Japanese water hardness is typically lower than North American water hardness, typically less than 4, for example 3 grains per gallon mixed Ca2+/Mg2+. The present invention provides protease variants that provide improved wash performance in at least one set of wash conditions and typically in multiple wash conditions. As described herein, the protease variants are tested for performance in different - 283 - types of detergent and wash conditions using a microswatch assay (See above, and U.S. Pat. Appln. Ser. No. 09/664,992; and WO 99/34011 , both of which are incorporated by reference herein). Protease variants are tested for other soil substrates also in a similar fashion.

5 In the experiments conducted to determine cleaning activity of ASP, the following methods were used. Incubators (Innova 4330 Model Incubator, New Brunswick) was pre- warmed for 60 minutes to 40°C for "European" conditions and for 20° C for "Japanese" conditions. Blood-Milk-Ink swatches (EMPA 116) were obtained from the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and from CFT Research, and were modified by exposureo to 0.03 % hydrogen peroxide for 30 minutes at 60° C, then dried. Circles of 1/4" diameter were cut from the dried swatches and placed vertically, one per well, in a 96 well microplate.

Protease samples of ASP were diluted in 10 mM NaCl, 0.00δ% TWEEN®-80 to provide the desired concentration of 10 ppm (protein). To provide "North American wash conditions," 1 gram per liter TIDE® laundry detergent (Procter & Gamble) without bleachs was prepared in deionized water, and a concentrated stock of calcium and magnesium was added to result in a final water hardness value of 6 grains per gallon. To provide "European wash conditions," 7.6 gram per liter ARIEL® REGULAR laundry detergent (Procter & Gamble) without bleach was prepared in deionized water, and a concentrated stock of calcium and magnesium was added to result in a final water hardness value of 1δ grains per0 gallon. To provide "Japanese wash conditions," 0.67 gram per liter PURE CLEAN laundry detergent (Procter & Gamble) without bleach was prepared in deionized water, and a concentrated stock of calcium and magnesium was added to result in a final water hardness value of 3 grains per gallon.

In yet another detergent composition to provide "Japanese wash conditions with5 North American detergent formulation," 0.66 gram per liter detergent without bleach was prepared in deionized water, and a concentrated stock of calcium and magnesium was added to result in a final water hardness value of 3 grains per gallon.

The detergent solutions were allowed to mix for 1δ minutes and were then filtered through a 0.2 micron cellulose acetate filter. A 190 ul of the respective detergent solutiono was then added to the appropriate wells of a microplate. Then, 10 ul of the enzyme preparation were added to the filtered detergent in order to obtain a final concentration 0.2δ- 3.0 ppm (micrograms per milliliter) of enzyme, for a total volume of 200 μl. The microplate was then sealed to prevent leakage, placed in a holder on an incubator/shaker set to 20°C and 360/400 RPM and allowed to shake for one hour. 5 The plate was then removed from the incubator/shaker and an aliquot of 100μl of - 284 - solution was removed from each well, and placed on a fresh Costar microtiter plate (Corning). The absorbance at 406 nm wavelength was read for each aliquot on a Microtiter plate reader (SpectraMax 340, Molecular Devices), and reported. The detergent composition and incubation conditions in the microswatch assay are set forth in Table 31-2.

Table 31-2. Deter ent Com osition and Incubation Conditions

Figure imgf000286_0001

The dose response curves depicting absorbance at 40δ nm as a function of concentration (ppm in well), for PURAFECT® (Genencor), OPTIMASE® (Genencor), RELASE™ (Genencor; GG36-variant described above), and ASP are provided in Figures 23-27).

As indicated in Figure 26, under North American conditions, in liquid TIDE® detergent, the ASP protease showed enhanced cleaning performance as compared to PURAFECT®, RELASE™ and OPTIMASE™ proteases under the same conditions. Under Japanese conditions, in powdered detergent (0.66 g/l), ASP showed enhanced or the same cleaning performance as compared to PURAFECT®, RELASE™ and OPTIMASE™ proteases under the same conditions (See, Figure 27). Under European conditions, in ARIEL® REGULAR powder detergent, the ASP protease showed enhanced cleaning performance as compared to PURAFECT®, RELASE™ and OPTIMASE™ proteases under the same conditions (See, Figure 28). In both tests, ASP and OPTIMASE™ provided - 285 - results that were 2 to 10 times the absorbance at 405 nm as compared to PURAFECT® and RELASE™. Under Japanese conditions, in PURE CLEAN powder detergent (See, Figure 29), the ASP protease showed enhanced and comparative cleaning performance as compared to PURAFECT®, RELASE™ and OPTIMASE™ proteases under the same conditions. Under North American conditions, in powder detergent (See, Figure 30), the ASP protease showed enhanced or comparative cleaning performance as compared to PURAFECT®, RELASE™ and OPTIMASE™ proteases under the same conditions.

EXAMPLE 32

Liquid Fabric Cleaning Compositions

This Example provides liquid fabric cleaning compositions that find use in conjunction with the present invention. These compositions are contemplated to find particular utility under Japanese machine wash conditions, as well as for applications involving cleaning of fine and/or delicate fabrics. Table 32-1 provides a suitable composition. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to this specific formulation, as many other formulations find use with the present invention.

Figure imgf000287_0001
286
Figure imgf000288_0001

EXAMPLE 33 Liquid Dishwashing Compositions

This Example provides liquid dishwashing compositions that find use in conjunction with the present invention. These compositions are contemplated to find particular utility under Japanese dish washing conditions. Table 33-1 provide suitable compositions. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to this specific formulation, as many other formulations find use with the present invention.

Figure imgf000288_0002

EXAMPLE 34 Liquid Fabric Cleaning Compositions

The proteases of the present invention find particular use in cleaning compositions. For example, it is contemplated that liquid fabric cleaning composition of particular utility under Japanese machine wash conditions be prepared in accordance with the invention. In 287 - some preferred embodiments, these compositions comprise the following components shown in Table 34-1.

Figure imgf000289_0001

EXAMPLE 35 Granular Fabric Cleaning Compositions

In this Example, various granular fabric cleaning compositions that find use with the present invention are provided. The following Tables provide suitable compositions. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to these specific formulations, as many other formulations find use with the present invention. 288

Figure imgf000290_0001

The following laundry detergent compositions are contemplated to provide particular utility under European machine wash conditions.

Figure imgf000290_0002
289

Figure imgf000291_0001

EXAMPLE 36 Animal Feed Comprising ASP

The present invention also provides animal feed compositions comprising ASP and/or ASP variants. In this Example, one such feed, suitable for poultry is provided. However, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to this specific formulation, - 290 - as the proteases of the present invention find use with numerous other feed formulations. It is further intended that the feeds of the present invention be suitable for administration to any animal, including but not limited to livestock (e.g., cattle, pigs, sheep, etc.), as well as companion animals (e.g., dogs, cats, horses, rodents, etc.). The following Table provides a formulation for a mash, namely a maize-based starter feed suitable for administration to turkey poults up to 3 weeks of age.

Figure imgf000292_0001

In some embodiments, this feed formulation is supplemented with various concentrations of the protease(s) of the present invention (e.g., 2,000 units/kg, 4,000 units/kg and 6,000 units/kg).

All patents and publications mentioned in the specification are indicative of the levels of those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains. All patents and publications are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

Having described the preferred embodiments of the present invention, it will appear to those ordinarily skilled in the art that various modifications may be made to the disclosed embodiments, and that such modifications are intended to be within the scope of the present invention.

Those of skill in the art readily appreciate that the present invention is well adapted to carry out the objects and obtain the ends and advantages mentioned, as well as those inherent therein. The compositions and methods described herein are representative of - 291 - preferred embodiments, are exemplary, and are not intended as limitations on the scope of the invention. It is readily apparent to one skilled in the art that varying substitutions and modifications may be made to the invention disclosed herein without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. The invention illustratively described herein suitably may be practiced in the absence of any element or elements, limitation or limitations which is not specifically disclosed herein. The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention that in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed. Thus, it should be understood that although the present invention has been specifically disclosed by preferred embodiments and optional features, modification and variation of the concepts herein disclosed may be resorted to by those skilled in the art, and that such modifications and variations are considered to be within the scope of this invention as defined by the appended claims.

The invention has been described broadly and generically herein. Each of the narrower species and subgeneric groupings falling within the generic disclosure also form part of the invention. This includes the generic description of the invention with a proviso or negative limitation removing any subject matter from the genus, regardless of whether or not the excised material is specifically recited herein.

Claims

- 292 -
5
1. An isolated serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae.
2. The serine protease of Claim 1 , wherein said protease is a cellulomonadin. o 3. The serine protease of Claim 1 , wherein said protease is obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora.
4. The serine protease of Claim 3, wherein said protease is obtained froms Cellulomonas 69B4.
δ. The serine protease of Claim 4, wherein said protease comprises the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID N0:δ. 0 6. A composition comprising an isolated serine protease having immunological cross-reactivity with said serine protease of Claim 4.
7. A composition comprising an isolated serine protease having immunological cross-reactivity with said serine protease of Claim 1. 5
8. An isolated serine protease comprising at least 60% amino acid identity with said serine protease of Claim δ.
9. The amino acid sequence of Claim 4, wherein said sequence compriseso substitutions at least one amino acid position selected from the group comprising positions 2, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 31 , 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 43, 46, 49, 51 , 54, 61 , 64, 65, 67, 70, 71 , 76, 78, 79, 81 , 83, 85, 86, 90, 93, 99, 100, 105, 107, 109, 112, 113, 116, 118, 119, 121 , 123, 127, 145, 155, 159, 160, 163, 165, 170, 174, 179, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, and 186. 5 - 293 -
10. The amino acid sequence of Claim 4, wherein said sequence comprises substitutions at least one amino acid position selected from the group comprising positions 1 , 4, 22, 27, 26, 30, 32, 41 , 47, 48, δδ, 59, 63, 66, 69, 75, 77, 60, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 96, 110, 111, 114, 115, 117, 128, 134, 144, 143, 146, 151 , 154, 1δ6, 158, 161 , 166, 176, 177, 181 , 182, 187, and 189.
11. An isolated protease variant having an amino acid sequence comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.
12. The isolated protease of Claim 11 , wherein said substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 2, δ, 10, 11 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 31 , 33, 35, 36, 33, 39, 40, 43, 46, 49, 51 , 54, 61, 64, 65, 67, 70, 71 , 76, 76, 79, 81 , 83, δδ, 86, 90, 93, 99, 100, 106, 107, 109, 112, 113, 116, 1 18, 119, 121 , 123, 127, 146, 155, 159, 160, 163, 166, 170, 174, 179, 183, 184, 186, 186, 187, and 188 in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.
13. The isolated protease of Claim 11 , wherein said substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 1 , 4, 22, 27, 28, 30, 32, 41 , 47, 48, δδ, 59, 63, 66, 69, 76, 77, 80, 84, 87, δδ, 89, 92, 96, 110, 111 , 114, 116, 117, 128, 134, 144, 143, 146, 151 , 154, 166, 158, 161 , 166, 176, 177, 181 , 182, 187, and 189, in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:δ.
14. An isolated protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:δ, wherein at least one amino acid position at positions selected from the group consisting of 14, 16, 35, 36, 65, 75, 76, 79, 123, 127, 159, and 179, are substituted with another amino acid.
15. The protease of Claim 14, wherein said protease comprises at least one mutation selected from the group consisting of R14L, R16I, R16L, R16Q, R35F, T36S,
G66Q, Y76G, N76L, N76V, R79T, R123L, R123Q, R127A, R127K, R127Q, R169K, R169Q, and R179Q. - 294 -
16. The protease of Claim 16, wherein said protease comprises multiple mutations selected from the group consisting of R16Q/R3δF/R1δ9Q, R16Q/R123L, R14L/R127Q/R169Q, R14L/R179Q, R123L/R1 27Q/R179Q, R16Q/R79T/R127Q, and R16Q/R79T.
17. The protease of Claim 15, wherein said protease comprises the following mutations R123L, R127Q, and R179Q.
18. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at le'ast one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, A36R, N170Y, N73T, G77T, N24A, T36G, N24E, L69S, T36N, T36S, E119R, N74G, T36W, S76W, N24T, N24Q, T36P, S76Y, T36H, G54D, G78A, S137P, R179V, N24V, V90P, T36D, L69H, G6δP, G66R, N7L, W103M, N65F, G1δ6E, A70H, S76V, G186V, R159F, T36Y, T36V, G66V, N24M, S51A, G66Y, Q71 I, V66H, P113A, T116F, A33F, N24H, V66D, S76L, G177M, G186I, HδδQ, Q71 K, Q71G, G65S, A3δD, P11 8F, A3δS, G65T, N67G, T36R, P118R, S114G, Y76I, I181 H, G66Q, Y75G, T36F, A38H, R179M, T163I, G76S, A64W, Y75F, G77S, N24L, W103I, V3L, Q81V, R179D, G64R, T36L, Q71 M, A70S, G49F, G64L, G64H, G76H, R179I, Qδ1K, V90I, A3δL, N67L, T109I, R179N, V66I, G7δT, R179Y, S187T, N67K, N73S, E119K, V3I, Q71 H, I11Q, A64H, R14E, R179T, L69V, V160L, Q71A, G6δL, Q71 N, V90S, A64N, 111A, N145I, H85T, A64Y, N145Q, V66L, S92G, S1δδM, G7δD, N67A, N7S, V60H, G64K, A70D, P118H, D2G, G64M, Q81 H, D2Q, V66E, R79P, A38N, N146E, R179L, T109H, R179K, V66A, G64A, G7δN, T109A, R179A, N7A, R179E, H104K, A64R, and VδOL.
19. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of HδδR, HδδL, T62I, N67H, G54I, N24F, T40V, Tδ6A, G63V, G54Q, A64F, G77Y, R36F, T129S, R61 M, I126L, S76N, T162V, R79G, T109P, R127F, R123E, P11δl, T109R, 171S, T163K, N67T, P69N, F1T, A64K, G78I, T109L, G78V, A64M, A64S, T10G, G77N, A64L, N67D, S76T, N42H, D164F, D1δ4R, S76I, S7δR, A38K, V72I, V3T, T107S, A38V, F47I, NδδQ, S76E, P118Q, T109G, Q71 D, P118K, N67S, Q167N, N145G, I28L, I11T, A64I, G49K, G49A, G66A, N170D, HδδK, S186I, I181 N, V80F, L69W, S76R, D164H, V160M, T1δ3M, N67Q, S61Q, A38Y, T107V, N146T, Q71 F, A83N, S76A, N67R, T151 L, T163L, S51 F, Q61 I, F47M, A41 N, P118E, N67Y, T107M, N73H, 67V, G63W, T10K, Mδ1 G, S187E, T107H, D2A, L142V, - 295 -
A143N, AδG, S1δ7L, V90A, G49L, N170L, G65H, T36C, G12W, S76Q, A143S, F1A, N7H, S185V, A110T, N55K, N67F, N7I, A110S, N170A, Qδ1 D, A64Q, Q71 L, A38I, N112I, V90T, N145L, A64T, I11S, A30S, R123I, D2H, V66M, Q71 R, V90L, L68W, N24S, R159E, V66N, D184Q, E133Q, A64V, D2N, G13M, T40S, S76K, G177S, G63Q, S15F, A6K, A70G, and A3δG.
20. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of R36E, R3δD, R14E, R14D, Q167E, G49C, S15R, S15H, 111W, S15C, G49Q, R35Q, R35V, G49E, R123D, R123Y, G49H, A38D, R35S, F47R, R123C, T151L, R14T, R36T, R123E, G49A, G49V, D66L, R36N, R35A, G12D, R35C, R123N, T46V, R123H, S15δC, T121 E, R127E, S113C, R123T, R16E, T46F, T121L, A38C, T46E, R123W, T44E, NδδG, A8G, E119G, R3δP, R14G, F69W, R127S, R61 E, R14S, SlδδW, R123F, R123S, G49N, R127D, E119Y, A43E, N170D, R159T, S99A, G12Q, P118R, F165W, R127Q, R35H, G12N, A22C, G12V, R16T, Y67G, T100A, T46Y, R159E, E119R, T107R, T151C, G54C, E119T, R61V, I11 E, R14I, R61 M, S16E, A22S, R16C, T36C, R16V, L126Q, M180L, R123Q, R14A, R14Q, R36M, R127K, R159Q, N112P, G124D, R179E, G49L, A41D, G177D, R123V, E119V, T10L, T109E, R179D, G12S, T10C, G91Q, S15Y, S1δδY, R14C, T163D, T121 F, R14N, F166E, N24E, A41C, R61T, G12I, P118K, T46C, I11T, R169D, N170C, R169V, S1δδl, 111Q, D2P, T100R, R159S, S114C, R16D, and P134R.
21. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of S99G, T100K, R127A, F1 P, S155V, T128A, F166H, G177E, A70M, S140P, A67E, D2I, R169K, T36V, R179C, E119N, T10Y, I172A, A8T, F47V, W103L, R61K, D2V, R179V, D2T, R169N, E119A, G54E, R16Q, G49S, R16I, S51L, S165E, S16M, R179I, T10Q, G12H, R169C, R179T, T163C, R169A, A132S, N167D, G13E, L141 M, A41T, R123M, R14M, A3R, Qδ1P, N24T, T10D, AδδF, R61Q, S99K, R179Y, T121A, N112E, S155T, T161V, S99Q, T10E, S92T, T109K, T44C, R123A, Aδ7C, S15F, S156F, D66F, T10F, Aδ3H, R179M, T121 D, G13D, P113C, G49F, Q174C, S114E, T86E, F1 N, T115C, R127C, R123K, V66N, G12Y, S113A, S16N, A176T, R79T, R123G, R179S, R179N, R123I, P116A, S1δ7E, N112D, A70G, E119L, E119S, R159M, R14H, R179F, A64C, A41S, R179W, N24G, T100Q, P11δW, Qδ1G, G49K, R14L, Nδ5A, R35K, R79V, D2M, T160D, A83D, R179L, S51A, G12P, S99H, N42D, SlδδE, T10M, L125M, T116N, A70P, Q174S, G65D, S113D, E119Q, Aδ3E, N170L, Q61A, Sδ1C, P11δG, Q174T, !2δV, S16G, and T116G. - 296 -
22. The protease of Claim 1 1 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of G26I, G26K, G26Q, G26V, G26W, F27V, F27W, I28P, T29E, T129W, T40D, T40Q, R43D, P43H, P43K, s P43L, A22C, T40H, Pδ9W, G91L, S18E, F69K, A30M, A30N, G31 M, C33M, G161 L, G161V, P43N, G26E, N73P, Gδ4C, G64P, G45V, C33L, Y9E, Y9P, A147E, C1δδH, I26W, A4δP, A22S, T62R, S137R, S166P, S165R, G156I, G166L, Q61A, R96C, I4D, I4P, A70P, C106E, C105G, C105K, C106M, C106N, C105S, T126A, T12δV, T126G, S140P, G12D, C33N, C33E, T164G, G45A, G166P, S99A, Q167L, SlδδW, I26T, R96F, A30P, R123W, T40P,o T39R, C1 OδP, T100A, C1 OδW, S1 δδK, T46Y, R123F, I4G, S1 δδY, T46V, A93S, Yδ7N, Q61S, G166S, G31 H, T10Y, G31V, Aδ3H, A3δD, R123Y, R79T, C1δδG, G31Y, Q61 P, R96E, A30Y, R169K, A22T, T40N, Y57M, G31 N, Q61G, T164L, T121 E, T10F, Q146P, R123N, V3R, P43G, Q31 H, Qδ1 D, G161 1, C156M, N24T, T10W, T12δS, T160I, Y176P, S166F, T12δC, L126A, P166Y, T62G, F166S, S1δδA, Qδ1 F, T46W, A70G, and A36G.5
23. The protease of Claim 1 1 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of S188E, S1SδV, Y117K, Y117Q, Y117R, Y117V, R127K, R127Q, R123L, T66S, R123I, Q61 E, L126M, H32A, S186T, N74F, C33D, F27I, A83M, Q71Y, R123T, V90A, F69W, L141 C, N170E,0 T46F, S61V, G162P, S1δδR, A41S, R79V, T161C, T107S, T129Y, M1δ0L, F166C, C106T, T160E, Pδ9A, R169T, T183P, S18δM, T10L, G26S, N24S, E119L, T107L, T107Q, G161 K, G15Q, S15R, G153K, G163V, S1δδG, A83E, G186P, T121 D, G49A, S16C, C106Y, C105A, R127F, Q71A, T10C, R179K, Tδ6l, W103N, Aδ7S, F166A, A63F, R123Q, A132C, A143H, T163I, T39V, A93D, V90M, R123K, P134W, G177N, V115I, SlδδT, T110D, G106L, N170D,5 T107A, G84V, G64M, L111K, P168I, G154L, T183I, S99G, S15T, AδG, S15N, P1δ9S, S1δδC, T100Q, A110G, A121A, G12A, R169V, G31A, G164R, T182L, V116L, T160Q, T107F, R169Q, G144A, S92T, T101S, A83R, G12HM S1δH, T116Q, T36V, G164, Q81C, V130T, T163A, P11δT, Aδ7E, Tδ6M, V150N, and N24E. o 24. The protease of Claim 1 1 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, I172T, N24E, N170Y, G77T, G1δ6N, I181 L, N73T, A38R, N74G, N24A, G64D, S76D, R123E, 169E, N112E, R35E, R179V, R123D, N24T, R179T, R14L, A33D, V90P, R14Q, R123I, R179D, S76V, R79G, R35L, S76E, S76Y, R79D, R79P, R36Q, R179N, N112D, R179E, G6δP,s Y7δG, V90S, R179M, R36F, R123F, A64I, N24Q, R14I, R179A, R127A, R179I, N170D, - 297 -
R35A, R169F, T109E, R14D, N67D, G49A, N112Q, G76D, T121 E, L69S, T116E, V90I, T36S, T36G, N146E, T66D, Sδ1D, R179K, T107E, T129S, L142V, R79A, R79E, A3δH, T107S, R123A, N56E, R123L, R169N, G66D, R14N, G65Q, R123Q, N24V, R14G, T116Q, A33N, R169Q, R179Y, A63E, N112L, S99N, G7δA, T10N, HδδQ, R36Q, N24L, N24H, G49S, R79L, S76T, S76L, G6δS, N55F, R79V, G65T, R123N, T86E, Y75F, F1T, S76N, S99V, R79T, N112V, R79M, T107V, R79S, G54E, G65V, R127Q, R169D, T107H, H86T, R36T, T36N, Qδ1 E, R123H, S76I, A3δF, V90T, and R14T.
26. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of G66L, S99D, T107M, S113T, S99T, G77S, R14M, A64N, R61M, A70D, Q71G, A93D, S92G, N112Y, S1δW, R169K, N67G, T10E, R127H, A64Y, R169C, A38L, T160E, T183E, R127S, A8E, S61Q, N7L, G63D, A36S, R36H, R14K, T107I, G12D, A64L, S76W, A41N, R3δM, A64V, A33Y, T183I, W103M, A41D, R127K, T36D, R61T, G66Y, G13S, R36Y, R123T, A64H, G49H, A70H, A64F, R127Y, R61 E, A64P, T121D, V1 1δA, R123Y, T101S, T182V, H86L, N24M, R127E, N145D, Q71H, S76Q, A64T, G49F, A64Q, T10D, F1D, A70G, R35W, Q71D, N121 I, A64M, T36H, A8G, T107N, R36S, N67T, S92A, N170L, N67E, S114A, R14A, R14S, Q81 D, S61 H, R123S, A93S, R127F, 119V, T40V, S185N, R123G, R179L, S51V, T163D, T109I, A64S, V72I, N67S, R169S, HδδM, T109G, Q71S, R61 H, T107A, Qδ1V, V90N, T109A, A3δT, N146T, R169A, A110S, Q61 H, A4δE, S61T, A64W, R169L, N67H, A93E, T116F, R61S, R123V, V3L, and R159Y.
26. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, Pδ9D, A93T, A93S, T36N, N73T, T36G, R159F, T36S, A36R, S99W, S76W, T36P, G77T, G64D, R127A, R169E, HδδQ, T36D, S76L, S99N, Y76G, S76Y, R127S, N24E, R127Q, D184F, N170Y, N24A, S76T, HδδL, Y7δF, S76V, L69S, R169K, R127K, G66P, N74G, R169H, G6δQ, G136V, A4δQ, T36H, N67L, R14I, R127L, T36Y, S76I, S114G, R127H, S1δ7P, V3L, G7δD, R123I, Hδ1Q, R36F, H35R, R127Y, N67S, Q61P, R123F, R159N, S99A, S76D, A132V, R127F, A143N, S92A, N24T, R79P, S76N, R14M, G 186E, N24Q, N67A, R127T, H85K, G6δT, G6δY, R179V, Y76I, 111Q, A3δL, T36L, R159Y, R169D, N24V, G66S, N167D, G186I, G64Q, N67Y, R127G, S76A, A3δS, T109E, V66H, T116F, R123L, G49A, A64H, T36W, D164H, S99D, G161K, P134E, A64F, N67G, S99T, D2Q, S76E, R16Q, G54N, N67V, R35L, Q71 I, N7L, N112E, L69H, N24H, G54I, R16L, N24M, A64Y, S1 13A, H35F, R79G, I11A, T121D, R61V, and G65L - 298 -
27. The protease of Claim 11, wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of N67Q, S187Q, Q71 H, T163D, R61 K, R159V, Q71 F, V31 F, V90I, R79D, T160E, R123Q, A3δY, S113G, AδδF, A70G, 111T, G7δA, N24L, S92G, R14L, D184R, G54L, N112L, H65Y, R16N, G77S, R179T, VδOL, G65V, T121 E, Q71 D, R16G, P89N, N42H, G49F, I11S, R61 M, R159C, G65R, T183I, A93D, L111 E, S51Q, G7δN, N67T, A33N, T40V, A64W, R159L, T10E, R179K, R123E, V90P, A64N, G161E, Hδ5T, AδG, L142V, A41 N, S185I, Q71 L, A64T, R16I, A38D, G54M, N112Q, R16A, R14E, VδOH, N170D, S99G, R179N, S15E, G49H, A70P, A64S, G54A, S1δ5W, R61 H, T10Q, A3δF, N170L, T10L, N67F, G12D, D1δ4T, R14N,
S167E, R14P, N112D, S140A, N112G G49S, L111 D, N67M, V150L, G12Y, R123K, P89V, V66D, G77N, S51T, A8D, Hδ1 H, T66N, R179D, N55F, N24S, D164L, R61S, N67K, G166L, F1T, R159A, I11 L, R61T, D1δ4Q, A93E, Q71T, R179E, L69W, T163I, S1δδQ, L125V, A3δV, R35A, P134G, A64V, N145D, V90T, and A143S.
26. The protease of Claim 1 1 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of T36I, N170Y, A33R, R79P, G77T, L69S, N73T, S76V, S76Y, R179V, T36N, N55F, R159F, G54D, G65P, L69H, T36G, G177M, N24E, N74G, R159E, T36S, Y75G, S76I, S76D, AδR, A24A, V90P, R159C, G65Q, T121 E, AδV, S76L, T109E, R179M, A8T, T107N, G186E, S76W, R123E, A36F, T36P, N67G, Y75F, S76N, R179I, S167P, N67V, V90S, R127A, R179Y, R35F, N145S, G65S, R61 M, S51A, R179N, R123D, N24T, N55E, R79C, G186V, R123I, G161 E, G65Y, A3δS, R14L, V90I, R79G, N145E, N67L, R127S, R150Y, M1δ0D, N67T, A93D, T121D, Q31V, T109I, A93E; T107S, R179T, R179L, R179K, R159D, R179A, R79E, R123F, R79D, T36D, A64N, L142V, T109A, 1172V, A63N, T65A, R179D, A3δL, I126L, R127Q,
R127L, L69W, R127K, G65T, R127H, P134A, N67D, R14M, N24Q, A143N, N55S, N67M., S51 D, S76E, T163D, A38D, R159K, T133I, G63V, AδS, T107M, H65Q, N112E, N67F, N67S, A64H, T86I, P134E, T162V, N67Y, A64S, Q78D, V90T, R61T, R16Q, G65R, T86L, V90N, R159Q, G54I, S76C, R179E, V66D, L69V, R127Y, R35L, R14E, and T66F.
29. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the amino acid sequence of said protease comprises at least one substitution selected from the group consisting of G1δ6l, A64Q, T109G, G64L, N24L, AδE, N112D, A38H, R179W, S114G, R123L, A8L, T129S, N170D, R159N, N67C, S92C, T107A, G54E, T107E, T36V, R127T, AδN, Hδ5L, A110S, N170C, A64R, A132V, T36Y, G63D, W103M, T151V, R123P, W103Y, S76T, S167T, R127F, N67A, - 299 -
P171M, A70S, R159H, S76Q, L125V, G54Q, G49L, R1 41, R14Q, A83I, V90L, T133E, R159A, T101S, G65D, G54A, T107Q, Q71 M, T66E, N24M, N55Q, R61V, P134D, R96K, AδδF, N145Q, A64M, A64T, N24V, S140A, A8H, A64I, R123Q, T163Q, N24H, A64W, T62I, T129G, R35A, T40V, 111T, A33N, N145G, A175T, G77Q, T109H, AδP, R35E, T109N, A110T, N67Q, G63P, Hδ5R, S92G, A175V, S51Q, G63Q, T116F, G65A, R79L, N145P, L69Q, Q146D, Aδ3D, F166Y, R123A, T121 L, R123H, A70P, T162W, S76A, A64F, T107H, G1δ6L,Qδ1 l, R123K, A64L, N67R, V3L, S167E, S161 K, T66M, I4M, G77N, G49A, A41 N, G54M, T107V, Qδ1E, A3δl, T109L, T163K, A70G, Q71 D, T183L, Q81H, A64V, A93Q, SlδδE, S51 F, G166P, G1δ6T, R159L, P134G, N145T, N55V, V66E, R159V, Y176L, and R16L
30. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the arnino acid of said protease comprises Arg14, Ser15, Arg16, Cys17, His32, Cys33, Phe52, Asp56, ThhOO, Val115, Thr116, Tyr117, Pro118, Glu119, Ala132, Glu133, Pro134, Gly1 35, Asp136, Ser137, Thr151 , Ser152, Gly153, Gly154, Ser155, Gly156, Asn157, Thr164, and Phe165.
31. The protease of Claim 30, wherein the catalytic triad of said protease comprises His 32, Asp56, and Ser137.
32. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the arnino acid sequence of said protease comprises Cys131 , Ala132, Glu133, Pro134, Gly135, Thr151 , Ser152, Gly153, Gly154, Ser155, Gly156, Asn157 and Gly 162, Thr 163, and Thr164.
33. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the arnino acid sequence of said protease comprises Phe52, Tyr117, Pro11δ and Glu119.
34. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein the arnino acid sequence of said protease has main-chain to main-chain hydrogen bonding from Gly 154 to the substrate main-chain.
35. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein said protease comprises three disulfide bonds.
36. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein said variant has an altered substrate specificity as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease. - 300 -
37. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein said variant has an altered pi as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.
38. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein said variant has improved stability as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.
39. The protease of Claim 11 , wherein said variant exhibits an altered surface property.
40. The protease of Claim 39, wherein said variant comprises mutations at least one substitution at sites selected from the group consisting of 1 , 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 22, 24, 25, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41 , 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51 , 52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 59, 61 , 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 71 , 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81 , 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 8δ, 69, 90, 91 , 92, 93, 95, 99, 100, 101 , 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 10δ, 109, 110, 111 , 112, 113, 114, 115, 1 16, 117, 116, 119, 120, 121 , 123, 124, 126, 127, 123, 130, 131 , 132, 133, 134, 135, 137, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 14δ, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161 , 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 170, 171 , 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181 , 182, 183, and 184.
41. The protease of Claim 1 , wherein said protease is a variant protease having at least one improved property as compared to wild-type protease.
42. The protease of Claim 41 , wherein said at least one improved property is selected from the group consisting of acid stability, thermostability, casein hydrolysis, keratin hydrolysis, cleaning performance, and LAS stability.
43. An expression vector comprising a polynucleotide sequence encoding the protease variant of Claim 11.
44. A host cell comprising said expression vector of Claim 43.
45. The host cell of Claim 43, wherein said host is selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp.
46. A serine protease produced by said host cell of Claim 45. - 301 -
47. A variant protease comprising an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 6δ, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 7δ,
48. The variant protease of Claim 41 , wherein said amino acid sequence is encoded by a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:53, 55, 57, 59, 61 , 63, 65, 67, 69, 71 , 73, 75, and 77.
49. An expression vector comprising a polynucleotide sequence encoding the protease variant of Claim 46.
50. A host cell comprising said expression vector of Claim 49.
51. The host cell of Claim 50, wherein said host is selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp.
52. A serine protease produced by said host cell of Claim 51.
53. A composition comprising at least a portion of the isolated serine protease of Claim 1, wherein said protease is encoded by a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:1 , SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:3, and SEQ ID NO:4.
54. The polynucleotide sequence of Claim 53, wherein said sequence comprises at least a portion of SEQ ID NO:1.
55. An expression vector comprising the polynucleotide sequence of Claim 54.
56. A host cell comprising said expression vector of Claim 55.
57. The host cell of Claim 56, wherein said host is selected from the group consisting of Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus sp., and Trichoderma sp.
5δ. A serine protease produced by said host cell of Claim 57.
59. A variant serine protease, wherein said protease comprises at least one substitution corresponding to the amino acid positions in SEQ ID NO:δ, and wherein said - 302 - variant protease has better performance in at least one property selected from the group consisting of keratin hydrolysis, thermostability, casein activity, LAS stability, and cleaning, as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.
60. An isolated polynucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence (i) having at least 70% identity to SEQ ID NO:4, or (ii) being capable of hybridizing to a probe derived from the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, under conditions of intermediate to high stringency, or (iii) being complementary to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:4. 61. A vector comprising the polynucleotide of Claim 60.
62. A host cell transformed with the vector of Claim 61.
63. A polynucleotide comprising a sequence complementary to at least a portion of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:4.
64. A method of producing an enzyme having protease activity, comprising:
(a) transforming a host cell with an expression vector comprising a polynucleotide having at least 70% sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4; (b) cultivating said transformed host cell under conditions suitable for said host cell to produce said protease; and
(c) recovering said protease.
65. The method of Claim 64, wherein said host cell is a Streptomyces, Aspergillus, Trichoderma or Bacillus species.
66. A probe comprising a 4 to 150 polynucleotide sequence substantially identical to a corresponding fragment of SEQ ID NO:4, wherein said probe is used to detect a nucleic acid sequence coding for an enzyme having proteolytic activity, and wherein said nucleic acid sequence is obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae.
67. The probe of Claim 66, wherein said Micrococcineae is a Cellulomonas spp..
66. The probe of Claim 67, wherein said Cellulomonas is Cellulomonas strain 69B4. - 303 -
69. A cleaning composition comprising at least one serine protease obtained from a member of the Micrococcineae.
70. The cleaning composition of Claim 69, wherein said protease is a serine protease obtained from an organism selected from the group consisting of Cellulomonas, Oerskovia, Cellulosimicrobium, Xylanibacterium, and Promicromonospora.
71. The cleaning composition of Claim 70, wherein said protease is obtained from Cellulomonas 69B4.
72. The cleaning composition of Claim 71 , wherein said protease comprises the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.
73. The cleaning composition of Claim 71 , wherein said serine protease has at least 60% amino acid identity with the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:δ.
75. A cleaning composition comprising an serine protease, wherein said serine protease has immunological cross-reactivity with the serine protease of Claim 71.
76. A cleaning composition comprising an serine protease, wherein said serine protease has immunological cross-reactivity with the serine protease of Claim 1.
77. The cleaning composition of Claim 69, wherein said protease is a variant protease having an amino acid sequence comprising at least one substitution of an amino acid made at a position equivalent to a position in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease having an amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:8.
7δ. The cleaning composition of Claim 77, wherein said substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 2, δ, 10, 11 , 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 31 , 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 43, 46, 49, 51 , 54, 61 , 64, 65, 67, 70, 71 , 76, 78, 79, 81 , 83, 85, 86, 90, 93, 99, 100, 105, 107, 109, 112, 113, 116, 116, 119, 121 , 123, 127, 145, 155, 159, 160, 163, 165, 170, 174, 179, 183, 184, 185, 166, 1δ7, and 1δδ in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:δ. - 304 -
79. The cleaning composition of Claim 77, wherein said substitutions are made at positions equivalent to positions 1 , 4, 22, 27, 28, 30, 32, 41 , 47, 48, 55, 59, 63, 66, 69, 75, 77, 80, 64, 87, 88, 89, 92, 96, 110, 111 , 114, 115, 117, 128, 134, 144, 143, 146, 151 , 154, 156, 158, 161 , 166, 176, 177, 181 , 1δ2, 187, and 1δ9, in a Cellulomonas 69B4 protease comprising the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:δ.
60. The cleaning composition of Claim 77, wherein said protease comprises at least one amino acid substitutions at positions 14, 16, 35, 36, 65, 75, 76, 79, 123, 127, 159, and 179, in an equivalent amino acid sequence to that set forth in SEQ ID NO:δ.
δ1. The cleaning composition of Claim δ1 , wherein said protease comprises at least one mutation selected from the group consisting of R14L, R16I, R16L, R16Q, R35F, T36S, G65Q, Y75G, N76L, N76V, R79T, R123L, R123Q, R127A, R127K, R127Q, R159K, R159Q, and R179Q.
62. The cleaning composition of Claim 81, wherein said protease comprises a set of mutations selected from the group consisting of the sets R16Q/R35F/R159Q, R16Q/R123L, R14L/R127Q/R159Q, R14L/R179Q, R123L/R127Q/R179Q, R16Q/R79T/R127Q, and R16Q/R79T.
83. The cleaning composition of Claim 81 , wherein said protease comprises the following mutations R123L, R127Q, and R179Q.
84. The cleaning composition of Claim 80, wherein said variant serine protease comprises at least one substitution corresponding to the amino acid positions in SEQ ID NO:8, and wherein said variant protease has better performance in at least one property selected from the group consisting of keratin hydrolysis, thermostability, casein activity, LAS stability, and cleaning, as compared to wild-type Cellulomonas 69B4 protease.
δ5. The cleaning composition of Claim 70, wherein said variant protease comprises an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOS:54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 78,
86. The cleaning composition of Claim 70, wherein said variant protease amino acid sequence is encoded by a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting - 305 - of SEQ ID NOS:53, 55, 57, 59, 61 , 63, 65, 67, 69, 71 , 73, 75, and 77.
67. A cleaning composition comprising a cleaning effective amount of a proteolytic enzyme, said enzyme comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 70 % sequence identity to SEQ ID NO:4, and a suitable cleaning formulation.
δδ. The cleaning composition of Claim 67, further comprising one or more additional enzymes or enzyme derivatives selected from the group consisting of proteases, amylases, lipases, mannanases, pectinases, cutinases, oxidoreductases, hemicellulases, and cellulases.
69. A composition comprising the serine protease of Claim 1 and at least one stabilizing agent.
90. The composition of Claim 1 , wherein said stabilizing agent is selected from the group consisting of borax, glycerol, and competitive inhibitors.
91. The composition of Claim 90, wherein said competitive inhibitors stabilize said serine protease to anionic surfactants.
92. An animal feed comprising the serine protease of Claim 1.
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