WO2005032133A2 - Method and apparatus for high- speed data multiplexing - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for high- speed data multiplexing Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2005032133A2
WO2005032133A2 PCT/US2004/031600 US2004031600W WO2005032133A2 WO 2005032133 A2 WO2005032133 A2 WO 2005032133A2 US 2004031600 W US2004031600 W US 2004031600W WO 2005032133 A2 WO2005032133 A2 WO 2005032133A2
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
number
transport streams
internal
configured
user
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2004/031600
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2005032133A3 (en )
Inventor
Vicky B. Kaku
James R. Heaton
Original Assignee
General Instrument Corporation
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/41Structure of client; Structure of client peripherals
    • H04N21/426Characteristics of or Internal components of the client
    • H04N21/42607Characteristics of or Internal components of the client for processing the incoming bitstream
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/21Server components or server architectures
    • H04N21/222Secondary servers, e.g. proxy server, cable television Head-end
    • H04N21/2221Secondary servers, e.g. proxy server, cable television Head-end being a cable television head-end
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/21Server components or server architectures
    • H04N21/222Secondary servers, e.g. proxy server, cable television Head-end
    • H04N21/2225Local VOD servers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/234Processing of video elementary streams, e.g. splicing of content streams, manipulating MPEG-4 scene graphs
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/234Processing of video elementary streams, e.g. splicing of content streams, manipulating MPEG-4 scene graphs
    • H04N21/2347Processing of video elementary streams, e.g. splicing of content streams, manipulating MPEG-4 scene graphs involving video stream encryption
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/235Processing of additional data, e.g. scrambling of additional data, processing content descriptors
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/236Assembling of a multiplex stream, e.g. transport stream, by combining a video stream with other content or additional data, e.g. inserting a Uniform Resource Locator [URL] into a video stream, multiplexing software data into a video stream; Remultiplexing of multiplex streams; Insertion of stuffing bits into the multiplex stream, e.g. to obtain a constant bit-rate; Assembling of a packetised elementary stream
    • H04N21/23608Remultiplexing multiplex streams, e.g. involving modifying time stamps or remapping the packet identifiers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/236Assembling of a multiplex stream, e.g. transport stream, by combining a video stream with other content or additional data, e.g. inserting a Uniform Resource Locator [URL] into a video stream, multiplexing software data into a video stream; Remultiplexing of multiplex streams; Insertion of stuffing bits into the multiplex stream, e.g. to obtain a constant bit-rate; Assembling of a packetised elementary stream
    • H04N21/2365Multiplexing of several video streams
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/236Assembling of a multiplex stream, e.g. transport stream, by combining a video stream with other content or additional data, e.g. inserting a Uniform Resource Locator [URL] into a video stream, multiplexing software data into a video stream; Remultiplexing of multiplex streams; Insertion of stuffing bits into the multiplex stream, e.g. to obtain a constant bit-rate; Assembling of a packetised elementary stream
    • H04N21/2368Multiplexing of audio and video streams
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/238Interfacing the downstream path of the transmission network, e.g. adapting the transmission rate of a video stream to network bandwidth; Processing of multiplex streams
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/238Interfacing the downstream path of the transmission network, e.g. adapting the transmission rate of a video stream to network bandwidth; Processing of multiplex streams
    • H04N21/2389Multiplex stream processing, e.g. multiplex stream encrypting
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/25Management operations performed by the server for facilitating the content distribution or administrating data related to end-users or client devices, e.g. end-user or client device authentication, learning user preferences for recommending movies
    • H04N21/258Client or end-user data management, e.g. managing client capabilities, user preferences or demographics, processing of multiple end-users preferences to derive collaborative data
    • H04N21/25866Management of end-user data
    • H04N21/25891Management of end-user data being end-user preferences
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/43Processing of content or additional data, e.g. demultiplexing additional data from a digital video stream; Elementary client operations, e.g. monitoring of home network, synchronizing decoder's clock; Client middleware
    • H04N21/434Disassembling of a multiplex stream, e.g. demultiplexing audio and video streams, extraction of additional data from a video stream; Remultiplexing of multiplex streams; Extraction or processing of SI; Disassembling of packetised elementary stream
    • H04N21/4344Remultiplexing of multiplex streams, e.g. by modifying time stamps or remapping the packet identifiers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/43Processing of content or additional data, e.g. demultiplexing additional data from a digital video stream; Elementary client operations, e.g. monitoring of home network, synchronizing decoder's clock; Client middleware
    • H04N21/438Interfacing the downstream path of the transmission network originating from a server, e.g. retrieving MPEG packets from an IP network
    • H04N21/4385Multiplex stream processing, e.g. multiplex stream decrypting
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/47End-user applications
    • H04N21/472End-user interface for requesting content, additional data or services; End-user interface for interacting with content, e.g. for content reservation or setting reminders, for requesting event notification, for manipulating displayed content
    • H04N21/47202End-user interface for requesting content, additional data or services; End-user interface for interacting with content, e.g. for content reservation or setting reminders, for requesting event notification, for manipulating displayed content for requesting content on demand, e.g. video on demand
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/60Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand] using Network structure or processes specifically adapted for video distribution between server and client or between remote clients; Control signaling specific to video distribution between clients, server and network components, e.g. to video encoder or decoder; Transmission of management data between server and client, e.g. sending from server to client commands for recording incoming content stream; Communication details between server and client
    • H04N21/63Control signaling related to video distribution between client, server and network components; Network processes for video distribution between server and clients or between remote clients, e.g. transmitting basic layer and enhancement layers over different transmission paths, setting up a peer-to-peer communication via Internet between remote STB's; Communication protocols; Addressing
    • H04N21/647Control signaling between network components and server or clients; Network processes for video distribution between server and clients, e.g. controlling the quality of the video stream, by dropping packets, protecting content from unauthorised alteration within the network, monitoring of network load, bridging between two different networks, e.g. between IP and wireless
    • H04N21/64707Control signaling between network components and server or clients; Network processes for video distribution between server and clients, e.g. controlling the quality of the video stream, by dropping packets, protecting content from unauthorised alteration within the network, monitoring of network load, bridging between two different networks, e.g. between IP and wireless for transferring content from a first network to a second network, e.g. between IP and wireless
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N7/00Television systems
    • H04N7/16Analogue secrecy systems; Analogue subscription systems
    • H04N7/173Analogue secrecy systems; Analogue subscription systems with two-way working, e.g. subscriber sending a programme selection signal
    • H04N7/17309Transmission or handling of upstream communications
    • H04N7/17336Handling of requests in head-ends

Abstract

The present method and apparatus provide high-speed data multiplexing of telecommunications data signals. In one of many possible embodiments, an apparatus provides for high-speed multiplexing of Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG) transport streams in a cable network. The apparatus includes an input interface (416), a demultiplexer (412), and an output interface (470). The input interface (416) is configured to receive a number of transport streams carrying programming services. The demultiplexer (412) is configured to access user-defined logic and to generate the internal transport streams based on the user-defined logic. The demultiplexer (412) is further configured to add the programming services to at least one of the internal transport streams based on the user-defined logic. The output interface (470) is configured to output the internal transport streams.

Description

TITLE Method and Apparatus for High-Speed Data Multiplexing

RELATED APPLICATIONS [0001] This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/506,274, filed on September 26, 2003, the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

FIELD [0002] The present method and apparatus relate to telecommunications. More specifically, the present method and apparatus relate to high-speed data multiplexing of telecommunications data signals.

BACKGROUND [0003] People have generally come to rely on telecommunications more than ever before. The growing demand for telecommunications services has fueled improvements in the capabilities of devices and protocols designed to reliably and quickly process and transmit the service signals. For example, video-on-demand (VOD) services now allow subscribers to order and view video programs anytime. [0004] However, VOD services are highly demanding of resources. In satellite or cable television communications for example, a VOD program is typically assigned to a single telecommunications transport stream that delivers the video program signals to the subscriber. When many people order different programs, bandwidth and other system resources are quickly consumed. Moreover, the increasing number of program signals being requested and delivered to specific subscriber locations at selectable times complicates the processing, routing, and delivery of VOD programs. There exists a need for telecommunications devices that have improved capabilities for flexibly and quickly processing large quantities of telecommunications signals, especially demanding signals such as video-on-demand. [0005] Further, in mixed-protocol networks, video program signals are typically transmitted to subscribers using different transmissions protocols and mediums. One common protocol used for compressing video programs for transmission is known as Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG). A video program can be represented and transmitted as an MPEG transport stream over mediums such as digital video broadcast over asynchronous serial interfaces (commonly referred to as ASI) and gigabit Ethernet (GigE). Each transport stream may carry single or multiple service programs. While GigE mediums are generally capable of higher performance when compared with ASI mediums, ASI compliant devices are already deployed in many networks. Therefore, it is desirable for telecommunications devices to support different types of video transport streams.0 SUMMARY [0006] The present method and apparatus provide high-speed data multiplexing of telecommunications data signals. In one of many possible embodiments, an apparatus provides for high-speed multiplexing of Motion Picture Experts Group5 (MPEG) transport streams in a cable network. The apparatus includes an input interface, a demultiplexer, and an output interface. The input interface is configured to receive a number of transport streams carrying progra ming services. The demultiplexer is configured to access user-defined logic and to generate the internal transport streams based on the user-defined logic. The demultiplexer is further o configured to add the programming services to at least one of the internal transport streams based on the user-defined logic. The output interface is configured to output the internal transport streams.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS5 [0007] The accompanying drawings illustrate various embodiments of the present method and apparatus and are a part of the specification. Together with the following description, the drawings demonstrate and explain the principles of the present method and apparatus. The illustrated embodiments are examples of the present method and apparatus and do not limit the scope thereof. o [0008] Figure 1 is a block diagram illustrating an implementation of SEM devices in a cable network, according to one embodiment. [0009] Figure 2 is a block diagram illustrating input and output ports of the SEM device of Figure 1, according to one embodiment. [0010] Figure 3 is a block diagram illustrating high-level components of the SEM device of Figure 1, according to one embodiment. 5 [0011] Figure 4 is a block diagram illustrating components of the multiplexer field-programmable gate array (FPGA) of Figure 3, according to one embodiment. [0012] Figure 5 is a block diagram illustrating components of the demultiplexer of Figure 4, according to one embodiment. [0013] ' Figure 6 is a map of an exemplary lookup table implemented in0 synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) of Figure 4, according to one embodiment. [0014] Figure 7 is a flowchart diagram illustrating a method for multiplexing transport streams, according to one embodiment. [0015] Throughout the drawings, identical reference numbers designate5 similar, but not necessarily identical, elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

I. Introduction o [0016] The present specification describes apparatuses and methods for highspeed data multiplexing. More specifically, the present apparatuses and methods provide the ability to multiplex and otherwise process large quantities of MPEG data at high speeds. This can be accomplished by implementing logic and devices configured to perform aliasing, duplicating, demultiplexing, multiplexing, and routing functions on 5 MPEG transport streams. A host controller operating in the background can receive logic configurations from a cable operator and load the logic configurations into a lookup table. The values in the lookup table can be accessed and entries identified based on packet and source identifiers association with the MPEG transport streams. The MPEG transport streams are then multiplexed according to the identified values in o the lookup table. With these features and the features described below, the present apparatuses and methods can be implemented to provide high-speed multiplexing and reliable delivery of data transport streams carrying audio/video programs (e.g., video-on- demand programs) to subscribers over cable, satellite, or other networks. [0017] In addition, the present methods and apparatuses can be configured to receive and process MPEG data in different formats (e.g., Ethernet and ASI). The 5 MPEG data can then be output in different formats, including Ethernet, ASI, and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) radio f equency (RF) outputs. This allows cable operators to implement the present methods and apparatuses to utilize the speed of Ethernet technologies while still leveraging already-deployed ASI units. [0018] In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous0 specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the present method and apparatus for high-speed data multiplexing. It will be apparent, however, to one skilled in the art that the present apparatus and method may be practiced without these specific details. Reference in the specification to "one embodiment" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in5 connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment. The appearance of the phrase "in one embodiment" in various places in the specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment. [0019] Figure 1 is a block diagram illustrating an implementation of a number of super encryption modulation (SEM) devices (100) in a cable network, o according to one embodiment. In the cable network shown in Figure 1, the SEM devices (100) are included in a cable headend (110) (or simply the "headend (110)"). The cable headend (110) is communicatively coupled to a video-on-demand (VOD) server (120) such that the SEM devices (100) are able to receive data transport streams (also referred to as audio/video transport streams or simply transport streams) from the5 VOD server (120). In other embodiments, the VOD server (120) may be located in the cable headend (110). While only one VOD server (120) is shown in Figure 1, multiple VOD servers (120) can feed data transport streams to the SEM devices (100). [0020] As will be discussed in detail below, the SEM devices (100) are configured to process the received data transport streams in preparation for sending o multiplexed output transport streams downstream to subscriber locations (150). Communication mediums and protocols between the headend (110) and the subscriber locations (150) may comprise any communications mediums and protocols known to those skilled in the art, including but not limited to fiber optics, coaxial cable, hybrid fiber-coax, wireless, Ethernet, ASI, radio frequency (RF), etc. [0021] While Figure 1 shows specific numbers of the SEM devices (100), 5 cable headends (110), VOD servers (120), and subscriber locations (150), it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that different numbers of these items can be employed in the cable network. Moreover, the SEM device (100) is not limited to cable network applications. For example, the SEM device (100) can be employed in satellite networks that provide encrypted audio/visual programming to subscribers.0 [0022] The cable network shown in Figure 1 enables delivery of audio/visual programs (e.g., television programs) to the subscribers (150) via data transport streams. The data transport streams carry data representative of the programs. The headend (110), which can include any type of cable or satellite system operator (e.g., a local cable operator (LCO) or a multi-service operator (MSO)), typically transmits numerous5 transport streams downstream toward the subscriber locations (150), and receives signals upstream from the subscriber locations (150). Usually, the cable headend (110) directs the transmission of downstream transport streams such that appropriate service programs are delivered to appropriate subscribers. For example, a particular subscriber . may subscribe to a certain package of service programs. The headend (110) can o implement logic that directs the routing of the correct service programs to the particular subscriber. With video-on-demand programs, subscribers are able to dynamically order specific programs. With the SEM device (100), the headend (110) is able to configure and update logic that directs the routing and delivery of service programs to subscribers via transport streams. 5 [0023] The transport streams can be in the form of different signaling protocols. For example, the VOD server (120) and/or the headend (110) are able to provide transport streams in MPEG (e.g., MPEG-2) format, which includes streams of MPEG packetized data. The SEM device (100) receives and processes the MPEG transport streams. The SEM device (100) is configured to selectively encrypt and route o the MPEG transport streams to appropriate subscriber locations (150) based on routing instructions defined by the cable operator in the SEM device (100). The SEM device (100) can then output service program signals to appropriate subscribers at the subscriber locations (150). These functions and features of the SEM device (100) will be described in detail below. [0024] In the context of video-on-demand programs, a subscriber at a 5 particular subscriber location (150) may request delivery of a video-on-demand (VOD) program. In response, the VOD server (120) provides the requested VOD program, and the SEM device (100) at the headend (110) receives a transport stream containing data representative of the requested program. The SEM device (100) processes the transport stream in accordance with parameters defined by the cable operator to prepare output0 containing data representative of the requested program for transmission to the subscriber locations (150). As will be discussed below, the SEM device (100) is configured to process large quantities of such transport streams in this manner to provide high-speed multiplexing and reliable delivery of service programs to the subscriber locations (150).5 [0025] MPEG data transport streams can be propagated through the cable network of Figure 1 using different data communications technologies. For example, the SEM device (100) can be configured to receive MPEG-2 transport streams via Ethernet technologies (e.g., gigabit Ethernet (GigE) and/or asynchronous serial interface (AST) technologies. This allows cable operators to employ the SEM device (100) in o mixed networks utilizing various technologies. With the SEM device (100), cable operators can utilize newer technologies (e.g., GigE) while leveraging already-deployed technologies (e.g., ASI).

II. SEM Device Inputs and Outputs 5 [0026] Figure 2 is a block diagram illustrating input and output ports of the SEM device (100) of Figure 1, according to one embodiment. As shown in Figure 2, the SEM device (100) includes a number of ports for receiving input and sending output signals of different types. A. GigE Ports o [0027] The SEM device (100) can include gigabit Ethernet (GigE) ports (210) configurable for receiving and/or transmitting GigE input and/or output (212). The GigE ports (210) can comprise small form factor pluggable (SFP) optical interfaces. Figure 1 shows three gigabit Ethernet ports (210). In one embodiment, two GigE ports (210) are configured for input, and one GigE port (230) is configured for output. Transport streams of MPEG-2 program data in GigE format may be received and transmitted through the GigE ports (230). In one embodiment, up to 1,024 audio transport streams or up to 256 video transport streams can be concurrently received by the SEM device (100) via the GigE ports (210). The SEM device (100) can be configured to handle an aggregate input bandwidth on the GigE ports (210) of up to nearly one gigabit per second (e.g., 900 Mbits per second). B. ASI Ports [0028] Figure 2 further shows the SEM device (100) to include a number of asynchronous serial interface (AST) ports (220) for receiving and sending ASI input/output (222). The ASI ports (220) can comprise Bayonet Neill Concelman (BNC) ( interfaces. In one embodiment, the SEM device (100) includes eight ASI ports (220) with four of the ASI ports dedicated to receiving ASI input (222), while the other four ports (220) are configurable for either ASI input or output (222) signals. Thus, the SEM device (100) is equipped to receive and output transport streams of MPEG-2 program data in ASI format. Typically, each ASI port (220) can handle one transport stream at a time. The ASI input (222) transport streams may carry single or multiple service programs with information rates ranging from 50 Kbits per second to 213 Mbits per second for each transport stream, hi one embodiment, the SEM device (100) can handle an aggregate information rate of up to nearly one gigabit per second (e.g., 900 Mbits per second) across all four to eight incoming ASI transport streams. [0029] The GigE ports (210) and ASI ports (220) are configured not only to receive MPEG transport streams from the headend (110; Figure 1) or VOD server (120;

Figure 1) in different formats, but also to output MPEG transport streams to other SEM devices (100). As a result, the cable operator may employ cascaded SEM devices (100) in a scalable fashion to increase capacity for processing transport streams. For example, Figure 1 shows three SEM devices (100) connected together to share transport streams. In this manner a first SEM device (100) can pass a transport stream received from the

VOD server (120; Figure 1) through to another SEM device (100). Accordingly, the cable operator can cascade SEM devices (100) to increase the number of subscriber locations (150; Figure 1) served by the headend (110; Figure 1). C. 10/100 Base-T Ports [0030] The SEM device (100) can include a number of 10/100 Base-T ports (230) for receiving and transmitting 10/100 Base-T signals (232). The 10/100 Base-T ports (230) can comprise RJ-45 interfaces. Typically, the 10/100 Base-T ports (230) are configured for both input and output. As will be discussed below in more detail, the SEM device (100) generally uses the 10/100 Base-T signals (232) for control commands and feedback. D. ASI Monitor Port [0031] Figure 2 further shows the SEM device (100) to include an ASI monitor port (250) for outputting any of the 16 transport streams as an ASI monitor signal (252). As will be described in more detail below, the ASI monitor port (250) and ASI monitor signal (252) allow an operator of the SEM device (100) to monitor processing of any transport streams by the SEM device (100). E. RF Output Ports [0032] The SEM device (100) can include a number of RF output ports (260) for transmitting RF output (262). The RF output (262) can include quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) signals that can carry service programs to the subscriber locations (150; Figure 1). Two transport streams may be concurrently output from each RF port

(260). The input and output signals shown in Figure 2, as well are their processing within the SEM device (100) will be described in more detail below. III. SEM Device Components and Operation [0033] Figure 3 is a block diagram illustrating high-level components of the SEM device (100) of Figure 1, according to one embodiment. As shown in Figure 3, the SEM device (100) can include a gigabit Ethernet (GigE) transceiver (310) for receiving and transmitting GigE input and output (212). The GigE transceiver (310) is coupled to a gigabit Ethernet (GigE) processor (320), which is in turn coupled to a multiplexer (Mux) field-programmable gate array (FPGA) (330) (referred to as "the Mux FPGA (330)"). GigE input (212) can be received by the GigE transceiver (310) and sent to the

GigE processor (320) for processing that will be described below. The GigE processor (320) then sends the GigE input (212) to the Mux FPGA for multiplexing into internal multiple program transport streams (MPTS) in accordance with predefined logic, and for other processing that will be discussed below. The multiplexed internal transport streams can be sent back to the GigE processor (320) and GigE transceiver (310) for 5 outputting as GigE output (212) transport streams. [0034] Figure 3 further shows the SEM device (100) to include an ASI transceiver (340), an ASI monitor transmitter (350), and a quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) modulator (360) each communicatively coupled to the Mux FPGA (330). The ASI transceiver (340) is able to transmit or receive ASI input or output0 (222). Received ASI input (222) is sent to the Mux FPGA (330) for further processing, which will be described below. The ASI transmitter (350) can transmit the ASI monitor signal (252) to enable the cable operator to monitor performance of the SEM device (100) related to processing of any output transport stream. [0035] The QAM modulator (360) receives multiplexed transport streams5 from the Mux FPGA (330) and is able to modulate the transport streams for output as RF output (262). For example, the QAM modulator (360) can modulate the transport streams up to 256-QAM for transmission to the subscriber locations (150; Figure 1). [0036] The internal transport streams can be selectively sent to an encryption module (370) for encryption processing. The SEM device (100) is configured to append o encryption identifiers to the transport stream packets to indicate whether the transport stream should be encrypted with the encryption module (370). The encryption module (370) can be bypassed by transport streams that include a "no encryption" identifier. The appending and monitoring of the encryption identifiers will be described in more detail below.5 [0037] The processing of input transport streams, internal transport streams, and output transport streams through the GigE transceiver (310), GigE processor (320), Mux FPGA (330), ASI transceiver (340), ASI monitor transmitter (350), QAM modulator (360), and encryption module (370) is controlled by a host processor (380) that is coupled to the GigE processor (310), Mux FPGA (330), and encryption module o (370) via a peripheral connection interface (PCI) bus (390). The cable operator can utilize control signals (e.g., 10/100 Base-T input/output (232)) to direct or configure the host processor (380). The host processor (380) can then communicate instructions to and receive feedback signals from the GigE processor (320), Mux FPGA (330), and encryption module (370) over the PCI bus (390). The components shown in Figure 3 and their functions will now be described in more detail in relation to a process flow of 5 data through the components. A. GigE Transceiver [0038] With respect to the reception and processing of GigE input (212), MPEG-2 input transport streams in GigE format can be received by the GigE transceiver (310). The GigE transceiver can employ any technology known in the art for interfacing0 with SFP connector interfaces to receive and transmit GigE transport streams. B. GigE Processor [0039] The GigE transceiver (310) sends the received GigE transport streams to the GigE processor (320). The transport streams received from the GigE transceiver (310) are encapsulated in gigabit Ethernet frames. Each GigE frame includes an IP5 datagram and a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) segment having up to seven MPEG-2 transport packets from one or more unique packet identifier (PLD) streams. The UDP segment may contain MPEG packets from a single or multiple service program transport streams. The GigE processor (320) can remove jitter from the MPEG Ethernet packets based on the incoming transport stream bit rate and the variable delay through the cable o network. The GigE processor (320) buffers and time-stamps the incoming transport streams. [0040] The GigE processor (320) identifies the IP addresses of the incoming packets to determine whether the packets are to be processed by the particular SEM device (100). The GigE processor (320) then peels the IP packets to their user datagram5 protocol (UDP) layer and informs the host processor (380) via the PCI bus (390) of what is identified as incoming input. The GigE processor (320) can be configured to append routing tags to packet streams to indicate an internal transport stream to which the packet should be routed. This selection may be based on logic loaded by the host processor (380). In one embodiment, the GigE processor (320) is based on the o BCM1250 processor provided by Broadcom Corporation of Irvine, California. An integrated chip mulip-processor (CMP) based on the BCM1250 dual processor can be configured to perform the GigE processor (320) functions described herein. C. Host Processor [0041] The host processor (380) can process the packet messages in accordance with logic defined by the cable operator, thereby taking user entry into account for the processing of the packets. Based on the user-defined logic, the host processor (380) determines which data packets to filter and which data packets to encrypt and compose into a transport stream. The host processor (380) is able to instruct the GigE processor (320) and Mux FPGA (330) of how to package and build sixteen internal transport streams from the input transport streams, including setting the outgoing bit rate for each of the sixteen output transport streams. In one embodiment, each of the outgoing transport streams is generated with the same rate. The process of generating up to sixteen output transport streams from the input transport streams based on user-defined logic includes functions such as buffering, demultiplexing, multiplexing, collecting MPEG program association tables (PATs), collecting MPEG program map tables (PMTs), MPEG packet identifier (PTJD) aliasing, MPEG PID remapping, rate conversion, and routing. The host processor (380) is configured to work with the Mux FPGA (330) and the GigE processor (320) to perform these steps, which steps will be discussed in detail below. D. Encryption Module [0042] Once the internal transport streams have been generated, the encryption module 370 can encrypt any of the transport streams having an encryption identifier. As denoted by the dotted lines of the encryption module (370) shown in Figure 3, the encryption module (370) may be implemented on a separate board. The encryption module (370) can employ any encryption method known in the art for encrypting MPEG packet transport streams. The encrypted output transport streams may then be transmitted to the GigE processor (320) and GigE transceiver (310) for transmittal to subscribers or to other units of the cable network through one of the GigE ports (210; Figure 2). E. ASI Transceiver [0043] The SEM device (100) can process ASI input (222) similar to the processing of GigE input (212) described above. The ASI transceiver (340) receives ASI input (222) transport streams via the ASI ports (220; Figure 2). The ASI transceiver 5 (340) can perform preprocessing steps on the ASI input (222) transport stream data before sending the stream data to the Mux FPGA (330) for further processing. As will be discussed below in relation to the Mux FPGA (330), the host processor (380) can request incoming MPEG program association tables (PATs) and MPEG (program map tables (PMTs) associated with incoming ASI transport streams. Similar to the above0 functions performed for the GigE transport streams, the host processor (380) can instruct, based on user-defined logic, which packets are filtered and which are used to compose the sixteen internal transport streams. Encryption is selectively handled in the same way discussed above, and data is sent out either via GigE, QAM modulated, or ASI output. These functions will be described in more detail below.5 F. Mux FPGA [0044] Figure 4 is a block diagram illustrating components of the Mux FPGA (330) of Figure 3, according to one embodiment. In one embodiment, the Mux FPGA (33) is implemented on a single integrated chip. [0045] GigE transport streams are received from the GigE processor (320; o Figure 3) via a hyper transport core interface (404), which enables large bandwidths of data flow between the Mux FPGA (330) and the GigE processor (320; Figure 3). The hyper transport interface (404) can be implemented by a hyper transport block of the BCM1250 processor on the GigE processor (320; Figure 3), which HT block is known to those skilled in the art. Optimum throughput is typically achieved when 32-byte 5 cache blocks are transferred over the hyper transport. [0046] The GigE transport streams are received into a first-in-first-out (FIFO) buffer (408), where the transport stream packets are held before being sent to a demultiplexer (Demux) (412). [0047] The Mux FPGA (330) is also configured to receive ASI transport o streams from the ASI transceiver (340; Figure 3). The ASI transport streams are received by an ASI input interface (IF) (416). In one embodiment, the ASI input interface (416) can concurrently receive up to eight ASI transport streams. The ASI input interface (416) can include FIFO buffers for storing packets of each ASI transport stream. The ASI input interface (416) should be configured to drop null MPEG packets from the ASI transport streams. The aggregate bit rate of the ASI inputs (222) can 5 approach up to nearly one gigabit per second (e.g., approximately 900 Mbps). In one embodiment, the Mux FPGA (330) is configured to handle up to 8,192 unique incoming MPEG-2 service programs'. [0048] From the ASI input interface (416), the ASI transport streams travel to a multiplexer (Mux) (420), which multiplexes the ASI transport streams into a single0 transport stream having a bit rate equal to the aggregate of the bit rates of the incoming ASI transport streams (up to a maximum of approximately 900 Mbits per second). This single transport stream is then received by a FIFO buffer (424), where the transport stream packets are held before being sent to the demultiplexer (Demux) (412). [0049] In one embodiment, the transport streams received by the Demuxs (412) comprise MPEG-2 data packets. The packet structure received at the Demux (412) can include 196 bytes, of which four bytes identify the source port that received the packet, four bytes contain a timestamp, and 188 bytes contain the MPEG-2 packet. The timestamp and source port bytes can be appended to incoming MPEG-2 packets when received by the SEM device (100). The five lowest significant bits of the first four o bytes of each packet identify a target transport stream, i.e., one of the sixteen internal transport streams that will be generated by the Demux (412), to which the incoming packet will be added. The packet also contains an additional bit to differentiate between GigE transport streams and ASI transport streams to enable the SEM device (100) to recognize in which form of input the packets are encapsulated.5 [0050] The Demux (412) is configured to generate internal transport streams from multiplexed ASI transport stream (now a single transport stream) and the GigE transport streams. In the embodiment shown in Figure 3, up to sixteen internal transport streams (TS 0-15) may be formed by the Demux (412) from the GigE and ASI input streams. o [0051] Figure 5 is a block diagram illustrating components of the Demux (412) of Figure 4, according to one embodiment. As shown in Figure 5, ASI and GigE transport streams are received into the Demux (412) and multiplexed together at an ASI/GigE Mux (432). In one embodiment, the ASI/GigE Mux (432) can handle input rates of up to approximately 900 Mbits per second of aggregate input. [0052] The multiplexed transport stream is sent from the ASI/GigE Mux (432) to a packet buffer (434) and a PID/Source extractor (436). The packet buffer (434) holds the transport stream packets while the PID/Source extractor (436) extracts packet identifiers (PIDs) and source identifiers from the packets. The packet buffer (434) can comprise a random access memory (RAM) or other suitable type of memory. [0053] The PID/Source extractor (436) is configured to extract packet identifiers (PID) and source identifiers from the packets of the transport stream received from the ASI/GigE Mux (432). The source identifier indicates the port by which the packets were received. As mentioned above, the source identifier is appended to incoming packets of the transport streams. MPEG packet identifiers (PIDs) are known to those skilled in the art and can be used to identify particular service programs or transport streams with which packets are associated. For example, a stream of packets representative of a particular service program may carry a particular PID. [0054] The extracted identifiers can be sent to a synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) (440), which contains a lookup table configured for using the extracted PID and source identifiers to identify new PIDs to be assigned to packets of generated internal transport streams. An embodiment of the look-up table will be discussed in more detail below. The assignment of new PIDs to the packets is referred to as PID aliasing and is utilized to allow for PID duplication replication without introducing identical PID values into the same transport stream. This allows output transport streams to contain multiple duplicate programs because the duplicate programs are assigned unique new MPEG packet identifiers (PIDs). With this feature, the SEM device (100) can take an incoming program and replicate it multiple times across any of the sixteen internal fransport streams, which allows the program to be distributed to multiple subscribers. l [0055] To enable PLD duplication, the entries in the lookup table of the SDRAM 440 should include a number of options for new PID values. For example, in one embodiment, up to sixteen entries exist for every PID lookup, one for each internal transport stream. In other words, sixteen PID aliases are available for each PLD lookup. Each packet can be subjected to the PID aliasing process multiple times (e.g., eight times) to allow for PID duplication. [0056] The new PTDs are sent to two PID alias buffers (442). The PID alias 5 buffers (442) also receive the transport stream packets from the packet buffer (434). Each of the PID alias buffers (442) receives a separate transport stream. The new PIDs are then inserted into the appropriate packets of the transport streams. The transport streams having the new PTDs are then sent to a transport sfream buffer (444) having two separate RAM buffers (446, 448). The first RAM buffer (446) forms internal transport0 streams buffers for the received transport streams [0-7]. The second RAM (448) buffer forms internal transport stream buffers for received transport streams [8-15]. The formation of the internal transport streams, including steps for determining which incoming service programs are assigned to which internal transport stream buffers, will be discussed in further detail below in relation to the look-up table of the SDRAMs (440). hi one embodiment, each of the RAM buffers (446, 448) includes a buffer for each of the sixteen internal transport streams. These buffers can be configured to hold up to forty-two packets for each of the internal transport streams. [0057] Each RAM buffer (446, 448) is read out independently by read buffers (450, 452). An arbiter is implemented for each RAM buffer (446, 448) to o determine which of the eight internal transport stream buffers should be read. The generated internal transport streams are sent from the RAM buffers (446, 448) to rate conversion blocks (458, 460; Figure 4), which will be discussed below. When any of the sixteen transport stream buffers of the RAM buffers (446, 448) is full, and its corresponding rate conversion buffer (450, 452) is full, an overflow may be flagged to 5 reset the rate conversion buffer (450, 452) . [0058] Returning now to Figure A, the SDRAM (440) is in communication with the Demux (412). As discussed above, the SDRAM (440) contains a lookup table for determining fransport stream demultiplexing/routing and PID aliasing. The incoming transport stream packets are passed through the lookup table. The PID o identifiers and the source identifiers of the incoming transport stream packets are used to address the lookup table in the SDRAM (440). The SDRAM can include a 64 Megabit external SDRAM. Upon initialization of the SEM device (100; Figure 1), the SDRAM (440) will be configured to drop all packets as part of power-up sequencing. The Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) will write zeros to all locations in memory. [0059] As shown in Figure 4, the SDRAM (440) is connected to an SDRAM 5 Load Control (454), which is in turn connected with a PCI core (456). The PCI core (456) is connected to the host processor (380; Figure 3) via the PCI bus (390). By these connections, the host processor (380; Figure 3) is able to operate in the background to load values into the lookup table, which values reflect logic defined by the cable operator. The values are determined in advance by an operator choosing and setting0 parameters in the host processor (380; Figure 3). For example, the cable operator may send a set of parameters to the host processor (380; Figure 3) via 10/100 Base-T input (232) or any other input interface known in the art. The parameters can reflect the desired routing of transport streams and service programs based on configurations of the cable network. Thus, the cable operator is able to configure and update the lookup table5 to reflect current and changing configurations of the cable network. [0060] Figure 6 is a table showing one example of a lookup table (600) that can be loaded into the SDRAM (440), according to one embodiment. As mentioned above, the lookup table (600) can be addressed by PID identifiers and source identifiers contained in incoming packet sfreams. Each entry in the table (600) may comprise a 16- o bit field comprising an add/drop bit indicating whether to add or drop a packet, a encryption bit indicating whether to encrypt the packet, a reserved bit, and 13 bits that contain new PID values (also referred to as the PID aliases). These bits can be appended to or inserted into the packet to effectively control the aliasing and multiplexing of the packet into appropriate internal transport streams based on user-defined preferences. 5 [0061] Returning now to Figure 4, the demultiplexed and aliased internal transport streams are sent from the RAM buffers (446, 448) of the Demux (412) to the rate conversion blocks (458, 460). The rate conversion blocks (458, 460) convert the bit rates of the aliased internal fransport streams to programmed bit rates. The rate conversion blocks (458, 460) may utilize a FIFO RAM buffer to receive the aliased PLD o packets. The packets include a bit indicating whether the packet should be added or dropped. The packets are collected at the rate conversion blocks (458, 460), where the packets are converted to desired bit rates. In one embodiment, the internal transport streams can be programmed at bit rates up to approximately 213 Mbits per second. [0062] Two different sources are included for generating bit rates for the internal transport streams. If the output is to be by QAM RF output (262; Figure 2), the bit rate will be determined by a counter running at a QAM information clock rate. For all other output cases, the bit rate will be determined by a programmable numerically controlled oscillator (NCO). In one embodiment, the MUX FPGA (330; Figure 3) includes eight NCOs. Each transport stream can be programmed to derive its bit rate from any of the eight NCOs. [0063] In one embodiment, the NCO uses a twenty-two bit accumulator and a 188 down counter both running at 54 MHz. Every time the accumulator rolls over, the down counter is incremented. When the down counter count reaches zero, a packet tick is generated. The accumulator rollover rate, the packet tick rate, and thus the bit rate can be determined using the following equations, in which A is a twenty-one bit programmable offset value, RO is the accumulator rollover rate, TR is the packet tick rate, and BR is the bit rate:

Equation 1 : RO = (-^) * 54MHz 2

Equation 2: 0 < < (222 ~1) RO

Equation 3: TR = 188 * RO SAMbs * A Equation 4: BR = ιg Σ [0064] Based on the above equations, the NCΟ is capable of producing bit rate values from approximately 103 bits per second up to approximately 432 Mega bits per second. [0065] A timestamp counter will be latched at each packet tick as a packet is read from the Demux (412) to the rate conversion blocks (458, 460). The latched timestamp is then compared with the appended timestamp (discussed above) to determine a program clock reference (PCR) correction value. Those skilled in the art will understand the use of the PCR correction value in the bit rate conversions performed at the rate conversion blocks (458, 460). A programmable eight-bit offset can also be added to the PCR correction value to offset fixed delays. [0066] The programmable rate conversion for the internal transport sfreams allows the SEM device (100) to maximize utilization of available bandwidth. If only a 5 few transport streams are being generated, those transport sfreams can be converted to higher bit rates up to an aggregate value of nearly 1 gigabit per second (e.g., 900 Mbits per second). The SEM device (100) is also able to use rate conversion to support higher numbers of transport streams by converting the bit rates to lower values that preferably add up to the maximum aggregate bit rate. In this manner, the SEM device (100) is able0 to assign bit rates that maximize utilization of available bandwidth for different and varying numbers of transport sfreams. [0067] As shown in Figure 4, the multiplexed ASI transport sfream can be sent from the Mux (420) to a message capture control (462), which is connected with the PCI core (456). Through the message capture control (462), the host processor (380;s Figure 3) can obtain information from the ASI transport streams. For example, the host processor (380; Figure 3) is able to request and receive program association tables (PATs) and program map tables (PMTs) associated with incoming ASI data streams. The host processor (380; Figure 3) is configured to use this extracted information together with the user-defined lookup table to filter packets and to compose the internal o transport streams from packets. [0068] The message capture control (462) can be configured to extract messages from the incoming ASI streams. In one embodiment, the message capture control (462) can extract up to 128 PIDs and write them to memory at the host processor (380; Figure 3). The message capture control (462) is configured to perform a parallel 5 lookup to compare incoming PTDs against predefined filter values. When the filter identifies a packet or a message within a packet, it is extracted and written to buffers in the host processor (380; Figure 3). In this manner, the message capture control (462) identifies messages that should be sent to the host processor (380; Figure 3) for further processing. o [0069] As the internal transport streams are being generated, the host processor (380; Figure 3) is able to insert or inject messages and packets into the internal transport streams. As shown in Figure 4, the Mux FPGA (330) includes a data injection control (464) and a message insertion block (466). These components are configured to enable the host processor (380; Figure 3) to inject message data into the internal transport streams. For example, the host processor (380; Figure 3) can direct the 5 insertion of IP encapsulation data, new PATs, new PMTs, and ECM/EMM (Entitlement Control Message/Entitlement Management) message templates. The host processor (380; Figure 3) determines what messages and data to insert into particular internal transport streams based on identified entries in the lookup table. Based on the lookup table, the host processor (380; Figure 3) is able to build PATs and PMTs that referenceo the new PID values of the internal transport streams. [0070] Once the packets of the internal transport streams have been converted to desired bit rates and appropriate data messages have been inserted, the internal fransport streams are sent to an encryption input interface (468). The encryption input interface (468) processes the packets of the transport streams in preparation fors fransmission to the encryption module (370), which may be on a board separate from the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3). The encryption input interface (468) can operate under different modes of operation, including a high-speed mode and a low-speed mode. In the high-speed mode, the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) can output up to four fransport streams to the encryption module (370), with each of the transport streams being o transferred with bit rates up to approximately 160 Mbits per second limited by the maximum speed of the encryption modules (370). In the low-speed mode, the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) can transmit up to 16 fransport streams to the encryption module (370), with each of the fransport streams having a bit rate up to approximately 54 Mbits per second. Packets sent from the encryption input interface (468) to the encryption5 module (370) should include four bytes containing time stamp information, four bytes containing an identifier indicating the destination transport stream (out of the sixteen fransport streams), and 188 bytes of MPEG data. [0071] The encryption module (370) can include an access control processor (ACP) configured to encrypt the fransport streams according to any known encryption o methods. The encryption module (370) then sends the encrypted transport streams back to the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3). At the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3), an encryption output interface (470) receives the encrypted transport sfreams in either the high-speed mode or low-speed mode described above in relation to the encryption input interface (468). The encrypted transport streams are now ready for processing in preparation for output from the MUX FPGA (330; Figure 3). [0072] Not every transport stream or program in a transport stream will be sent to the encryption module (370) for encryption. As shown in Figure 4, the encryption module (370) can be bypassed. The Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) is configured to determine which transport streams will be encrypted. This selective encryption can be based on an encryption bit in the packets of the transport streams. As mentioned above, the values in the lookup table (600; Figure 6) include a bit designating whether encryption should be performed on the packet to which the lookup value is appended. Based on the value of this bit, the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) is able to selectively route transport streams to the encryption module (370) for encryption in accordance with logic specified by the cable operator. [0073] The transport streams can be sent from the encryption output interface

(470) to different interfaces for different types of output. As shown in Figure 4, transport streams [0-15] can be sent to an Ethernet multiplexer (Mux) (472), transport streams [0-7] can be sent to a QAM output interface (IF) (474), and transport sfreams [0- 3] can be sent to an ASI output interface (IF) (476). Each of these components will now be described in more detail. [0074] The Ethernet Mux (472) is configured to re-mulitplex the transport streams (e.g., transport streams [0-15]) into a single transport stream. The Ethernet Mux (472) appends a time stamp and an identifier indicating the source port to each packet of the incoming fransport streams. The packets for each fransport stream are then stored in FIFO buffers. The packets are then read from the FIFO buffers into a multiplexer that multiplexes the transport streams into the single transport stream. The single transport sfream undergoes PCR correction and is sent to the GigE processor (320; Figure 3) via the HyperTransport (HT) core interface (404). [0075] The QAM output interface (474) includes a channel for each of the transport streams [0-7]. The QAM output interface (474) receives an information clock signal from a QAM module (not shown) of the SEM device (100). The information clock signal is at the MPEG rate for each of the channels. The QAM output interface (474) can include FIFO buffers for each of the channels and can output one data bit from each FIFO buffer on the rising edge of each information clock cycle. The QAM output interface (474) further includes a packet counter that counts and issues packet ticks to the rate conversion blocks (458, 460). On each packet tick, an MPEG packet is converted to a serial stream and written into the FIFO buffer along with a sync bit. The sync bit will be "true" for the first bit of the MGEG packet. [0076] Note that while only four RF output ports (260; Figure 2) are shown in Figure 2, each of the RF output ports (260; Figure 2) can be configured to output two QAM RF output (262; Figure 2) signals. The RF output (262; Figure 2) can then be sent from the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) to a QAM module (not shown) of the SEM device (100), which QAM module is able to perform further processing for transmission of service programs to the subscriber locations (150; Figure 1). [0077] The ASI interface (476) shown in Figure 4 can be configured to select up to four of the sixteen transport streams to be output. The packets of the selected transport sfreams can be output from the ASI interface (476) in burst or byte mode, h burst mode, an entire MPEG-2 packet is sent out as a 188-byte burst. In byte mode, a byte of the MPEG packet can be sent out once every predetermined number of clock cycles (e.g., three clock cycles). [0078] The ASI interface (476) is also configured to receive and output the

ASI monitor signal (252; Figure 2). The ASI monitor signal (252; Figure 2) maybe received from the encryption input interface (468) and stored in a FIFO buffer for output. The operator is able to access the ASI monitor signal (252; Figure 2) to observe performance of the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3) in processing any transport streams.

IV. Exemplary Process Flow [0079] Figure 7 is a flow diagram of an exemplary method for multiplexing MPEG transport streams, according to one embodiment. At step 700, incoming MPEG transport streams are received. In one embodiment, the incoming fransport streams include both GigE and ASI MPEG data sfreams. At step 710, the incoming transport sfreams are preprocessed. This can include peeling off layers and extracting messages from the packets in any of the ways discussed above. Information taken from the packets can be selectively presented to the host processor (380; Figure 3) for further processing related to multiplexing of the transport streams. The host processor (380; Figure 3) runs in the background to make multiplexing determinations and to load the 5 lookup table (600; Figure 6) to the Mux FPGA (330; Figure 3). [0080] At step 720, target internal transport sfreams are determined for routing based on the logic in the lookup table (600; Figure 6). The PID and source identifiers from the MPEG packets are used for addressing the lookup table (600; Figure 6) to identify appropriate entries. The entries include data that indicates the targeto internal transport stream to which the incoming transport stream packets are to be routed. [0081] At step 730, PIDs can be replicated to duplicate service programs across or within the internal fransport streams. PID duplication is made possible by aliasing PIDs at step 740. New PIDs are identified in the lookup table (600; Figure 6)5 entries for service programs that are to be duplicated, particularly when duplicate programs are to be routed to the same internal transport stream because the programs in a particular transport stream should include unique PIDs. PID aliasing can be performed in any of the ways discussed above. [0082] At step 750, messages are injected in the internal transport streams. o The host processor (380; Figure 6) is able to direct the injection of messages as described above. [0083] At step 760, the internal transport streams are generated at user- defined bit rates. The bit rates can be determined from information in the lookup table. The ability to convert fransport streams to different bit rates provides the capability to 5 maximize usage of available bandwidth based on the number of transport sfreams and service programs that are being processed. The bit rate conversion can be performed in any of the ways discussed above. [0084] At step 770, the internal transport streams are selectively encrypted based on encryption bits in the packets. The encryption bits are appended to the internal o fransport stream packets based on the identified logic in the lookup table (600; Figure 6). Accordingly, the encryption of transport streams can be determined based on user- defined logic. [0085] At step 780, the internal transport streams are output. Output sfreams can take the form of GigE, ASI, and QAM RF signals. In one embodiment, incoming 5 GigE transport streams can be multiplexed by the SEM device (100) as described above and output as GigE transport streams, while incoming ASI transport streams can be multiplexed and output as GigE, ASI, or QAM RF signals. In one embodiment, the aggregate rate of the output signals can reach up to nearly one gigabit per second (e.g., approximately 900 Mbits per second). Any of the functions described above can be o implemented to perform the steps shown in Figure 7. [0086] The steps discussed above can be performed by processors being directed by instructions stored on computer-readable mediums. The instructions direct execution of the steps described above. Any type of computer-readable medium known in the art may be used. In one embodiment, SDRAM is used to store the instructions.5 The instructions can be in the form of software, firmware, embedded code, microcode, machine language, and the like. V. Conclusion [0087] In conclusion, the present apparatuses and methods described above provide capabilities for high-speed data multiplexing, routing, and selectively encrypting o of MPEG transport sfreams of different formats. Transport sfream packets can be aliased, duplicated, and multiplexed into internal fransport sfreams for transmittal to appropriate subscriber locations. A host processor running in the background allows cable operators to define and implement logic to control the multiplexing of transport streams according to the operator's desired configuration. The logic is made accessible5 to a multiprocessor integrated chip for controlling multiplexing processes. The transport sfreams are multiplexed based on logic implemented in a lookup table with reduced latency that enables high-speed performance. Wide buses and high transmission and clock frequencies also help enable the high-speeds of the transport streams. [0088] Moreover, the methods and apparatuses convert multiplexed transport o streams to rates that utilize available bandwidth. The aggregate bit rates for the multiplexed fransport sfreams can reach up to approximately 900 Mbits per second, according to one embodiment, i one embodiment, an MPEG-2 cross-point switch is provided that is able to handle up to approximately 900 Mbits per second of MPEG-2 data. [0089] The apparatuses and methods allow cable operators to utilize Ethernet speeds and technologies while still leveraging deployed ASI devices. The SEM device (100; Figure 1) described herein can be cascaded to expand network capabilities and to service increased numbers of subscribers. VI. Alternative Embodiments [0090] The preceding description has been presented only to illustrate and describe the present method and apparatus. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the present method and apparatus to any precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching. [0091] The foregoing embodiments were chosen and described in order to illustrate principles of the method and apparatus as well as some practical applications. The preceding description enables others skilled in the art to utilize the method and apparatus in various embodiments and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the method and apparatus be defined by the following claims.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. An apparatus for high-speed multiplexing of Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG) transport streams in a cable network, the apparatus comprising: an input interface (416) configured to receive a number of fransport streams carrying programming services; a demultiplexer (412) configured to access user-defined logic and to generate a number of internal transport sfreams based on said user-defined logic, said demultiplexer (412) being configured to add said programming services to at least one of said number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic; and an output interface (470) configured to output said number of internal fransport streams.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a rate conversion block
(458, 460) configured to convert said number of internal transport streams to selectable bit rates, said bit rates being determined based on said user-defined logic.
3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said rate conversion block (458, 460) is configured to select said bit rates from eight available bit rates.
4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said rate conversion block (458, 460) is configured to select said bit rates based on the number of said number of internal fransport sfreams.
5. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said rate conversion block (458, 460) is configured to insert messages into said number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising encryption interfaces (468) configured for providing said number of internal transport streams to an encryption module (370) and for receiving encrypted said number of internal transport sfreams from the encryption module (370).
7. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein said encryption interfaces (468) are configured to selectively send each of said number of internal transport streams to the encryption module (370) based on said user-defined logic.
8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said demultiplexer (412) is configured to access new packet identifiers (PIDs) in said user-defined logic based on source identifiers and incoming packet identifiers associated with said number of transport streams.
9. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein said demultiplexer (412) is configured to assign said new packet identifiers (PIDs) to packets of said number of internal fransport streams.
10. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said demultiplexer (412) is configured to duplicate said programming services across any of said number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic.
11. The apparatus of claim 1 , wherein said number of transport sfreams have an aggregate bit rate of approximately 900 Megabits per second.
12. The apparatus of claim 1 , wherein said number of internal fransport sfreams have an aggregate bit rate of approximately 900 Megabits per second.
13. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said input interface (416) is configured to concurrently receive up to 1,024 said fransport sfreams via Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) inputs.
14. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said input interface (416) is configured to receive up to eight said fransport sfreams via asynchronous serial interface (AST) inputs, each of said up to eight said fransport streams including a plurality of said programming services.
5 15. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said number of internal transport streams includes up to sixteen said internal fransport streams.
16. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said demultiplexer (412) is configuredo to multiplex said programming services into said number of internal fransport sfreams based on said user-defined logic, said user-defined logic being contained in a lookup table (600) accessible by said demultiplexer (412).
17. The apparatus of claim 16, wherein said demultiplexer (412) iss configured to perform said multiplexing at approximately 900 Megabits per second.
18. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said output interface (470) is configured to distribute said number of internal fransport streams for Gigabit Ethernet output, quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) output, and asynchronous serial o interface (ASI) output.
19. A method for high-speed multiplexing of Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG) transport streams in a cable network, the method comprising: receiving a number of transport streams carrying programming services; 5 accessing user-defined logic; generating a number of internal transport sfreams based on said user-defined logic; and adding said programming services to at least one of said number of internal fransport sfreams based on said user-defined logic.0
20. The method of claim 19, further comprising converting said number of internal transport sfreams to selectable bit rates, said bit rates being determined based on said user-defined logic.
21. The method of claim 20, further comprising selecting said bit rates from eight available bit rates.
22. The method of claim 20, wherein further comprising selecting said bit rates based on the number of said number of internal fransport streams.
23. The method of claim 20, further comprising inserting messages into said number of internal transport sfreams based on said user-defined logic.
24. The method of claim 19, further comprising: selectively providing said number of internal transport sfreams to an encryption module (370) based on said user-defined logic; and receiving encrypted said number of internal transport streams from the encryption module (370).
25. The method of claim 19, wherein said step of accessing includes locating new packet identifiers (PTDs) in said user-defined logic based on source identifiers and incoming packet identifiers associated with said number of transport streams.
26. The method of claim 25, further comprising assigning said new packet identifiers (PLDs) to packets of said number of internal transport sfreams.
27. The method of claim 19, further comprising duplicating said programming services across any of said number of internal fransport sfreams based on said user-defined logic.
28. The method of claim 19, wherein said number of transport streams have an aggregate bit rate of approximately 900 Megabits per second.
29. The method of claim 19, wherein said number of internal fransport 5 sfreams have an aggregate bit rate of approximately 900 Megabits per second.
30. The method of claim 19, wherein said step of receiving includes concurrently taking in up to 1,024 said transport streams via Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) inputs.0
31. The method of claim 19, wherein said step of receiving includes concurrently taking in up to eight said fransport streams via asynchronous serial interface (ASI) inputs, each of said up to eight said transport streams including a plurality of said programming services.5
32. The method of claim 19, wherein said steps of generating and adding are performed at approximately 900 Megabits per second.
33. The method of claim 19, further comprising outputting said number of o internal transport streams, wherein said step of outputting includes distributing said number of internal transport streams for Gigabit Ethernet output, quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) output, and asynchronous serial interface (ASI) output.
34. A processor-readable medium having instructions thereon for enhancing5 high-speed multiplexing of Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG) fransport streams in a cable network, said instructions being configured to instruct a processor (320) to perform the steps of: receiving a number of fransport sfreams carrying programming services; accessing user-defined logic; o generating a number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic; and adding said programming services to at least one of said number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic.
35. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said instructions
5 are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of converting said number of internal transport streams to selectable bit rates, said bit rates being determined based on said user-defined logic.
36. The processor-readable medium of claim 35, wherein said instructionso are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of selecting said bit rates from eight available bit rates.
37. The processor-readable medium of claim 35, wherein said instructions are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of selecting said bit rates 5 based on the number of said number of internal fransport sfreams.
38. The processor-readable medium of claim 35 , wherein said instructions are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of inserting messages into said number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic.0
39. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said instructions are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform the steps of: selectively providing said number of internal transport streams to an encryption module (370) based on said user-defined logic; and 5 receiving encrypted said number of internal fransport sfreams from the encryption module (370).
40. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said step of accessing includes locating access new packet identifiers (PTDs) in said user-defined o logic based on source identifiers and incoming packet identifiers associated with said number of transport sfreams.
41. The processor-readable medium of claim 40, wherein said instructions are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of assigning said new packet identifiers (PTDs) to packets of said number of internal transport streams.
42. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said instructions are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of duplicating said programming services across any of said number of internal transport streams based on said user-defined logic.
43. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said step of receiving includes concurrently taking in up to 1,024 said transport sfreams via Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) inputs.
44. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said step of receiving includes concurrently taking in up to eight said transport sfreams via asynchronous serial interface (ASI) inputs, each of said up to eight said fransport streams including a plurality of said programming services.
45. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said steps of generating and adding are performed at approximately 900 Megabits per second.
46. The processor-readable medium of claim 34, wherein said instructions are configured to cause the processor (320) to perform a step of outputting said number of internal transport sfreams, wherein said step of outputting includes distributing said number of internal transport streams for Gigabit Ethernet output, quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) output, and asynchronous serial interface (AST) output.
PCT/US2004/031600 2003-09-26 2004-09-24 Method and apparatus for high- speed data multiplexing WO2005032133A3 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US50627403 true 2003-09-26 2003-09-26
US60/506,274 2003-09-26
US10949500 US20050068992A1 (en) 2003-09-26 2004-09-24 Method and apparatus for high-speed data multiplexing
US10/949,500 2004-09-24

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2005032133A2 true true WO2005032133A2 (en) 2005-04-07
WO2005032133A3 true WO2005032133A3 (en) 2008-01-03

Family

ID=34381215

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2004/031600 WO2005032133A3 (en) 2003-09-26 2004-09-24 Method and apparatus for high- speed data multiplexing

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20050068992A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2005032133A3 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN102300120A (en) * 2010-06-23 2011-12-28 中兴通讯股份有限公司 A kind of multi-channel signal output from the selection switch and method

Families Citing this family (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050152372A1 (en) * 2004-01-13 2005-07-14 Sang-Ho Kim System and method for performing transmission and reception operations based on broadcast/communication convergence
EP1605687B1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2012-11-28 STMicroelectronics (Research & Development) Limited System for receiving packet streams
EP1605618A1 (en) * 2004-06-11 2005-12-14 Alcatel Alsthom Compagnie Generale D'electricite Bandwidth optimization in transport of Ethernet frames
US9722850B2 (en) * 2004-08-09 2017-08-01 Arris Enterprises Llc Method and system for transforming video streams using a multi-channel flow-bonded traffic stream
WO2006020559A3 (en) * 2004-08-09 2007-03-01 Arris Int Inc Very high speed cable modem for increasing bandwidth
US20060104305A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-05-18 William Yoshida Audio/video streaming system
WO2006099695A1 (en) * 2005-03-21 2006-09-28 Newtec Cy Managing traffic in a satellite transmission system
WO2007044326A3 (en) * 2005-10-04 2011-05-26 Adaptive Spectrum And Signal Alignment, Inc. Dsl system
US9026677B2 (en) * 2006-03-17 2015-05-05 Cisco Technology, Inc. Method and apparatus for providing video on demand
US20070230356A1 (en) * 2006-04-04 2007-10-04 Kalantri Sacchindrakumar G Method and apparatus for enabling FLO device certification
JP2009081591A (en) * 2007-09-26 2009-04-16 Hitachi Ltd Recording method and recording apparatus for internal information of video apparatus
US7822039B2 (en) * 2008-04-23 2010-10-26 Newport Media, Inc. Look-up table based approach for layer combining in ISDB-T and ISDB-TSB receivers
KR101777347B1 (en) * 2009-11-13 2017-09-11 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for adaptive streaming based on segmentation
US9317702B2 (en) * 2011-11-29 2016-04-19 Sony Corporation System and method for providing secure inter-process communications
US20130312046A1 (en) * 2012-05-15 2013-11-21 Mark Robertson Smart stream delivery server, system and methods for assembling a mix of services to be delivered to a subscriber's premises
US10021735B2 (en) 2013-06-04 2018-07-10 Attobahn, Inc. Viral molecular network architecture and design

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0822718A1 (en) * 1992-12-09 1998-02-04 Discovery Communications, Inc. Network controller for cable television delivery systems
WO1998016067A2 (en) * 1996-10-08 1998-04-16 Tiernan Communications, Inc. Apparatus and method for multi-service transport multiplexing
US5835493A (en) * 1996-01-02 1998-11-10 Divicom, Inc. MPEG transport stream remultiplexer
EP1130927A2 (en) * 2000-03-02 2001-09-05 Media Glue Corporation Apparatus, method and computer program product for transcoding a coded multiplex sound and moving pictuture sequence
WO2001097526A1 (en) * 2000-06-12 2001-12-20 General Instrument Corporation Apparatus and method for resolution of conflicts in protocol data of multiple data streams
US6434141B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2002-08-13 Bigband Networks, Inc. Communication management system and method
US20020184649A1 (en) * 2001-06-04 2002-12-05 Wilson Thomas C. System and method for allocating packet identifiers in a transport stream in a subscriber network
US20030031211A1 (en) * 2000-03-03 2003-02-13 Philippe Leyendecker Demultiplexing devices and process for at least two transport streams and a corresponding digital stream

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6035037A (en) * 1995-08-04 2000-03-07 Thomson Electronic Consumers, Inc. System for processing a video signal via series-connected high speed signal processing smart cards
US6275507B1 (en) * 1997-09-26 2001-08-14 International Business Machines Corporation Transport demultiplexor for an MPEG-2 compliant data stream
US6940876B1 (en) * 1999-05-17 2005-09-06 Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc. System target decoder with secondary multiplexing

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0822718A1 (en) * 1992-12-09 1998-02-04 Discovery Communications, Inc. Network controller for cable television delivery systems
US5835493A (en) * 1996-01-02 1998-11-10 Divicom, Inc. MPEG transport stream remultiplexer
WO1998016067A2 (en) * 1996-10-08 1998-04-16 Tiernan Communications, Inc. Apparatus and method for multi-service transport multiplexing
US6434141B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2002-08-13 Bigband Networks, Inc. Communication management system and method
EP1130927A2 (en) * 2000-03-02 2001-09-05 Media Glue Corporation Apparatus, method and computer program product for transcoding a coded multiplex sound and moving pictuture sequence
US20030031211A1 (en) * 2000-03-03 2003-02-13 Philippe Leyendecker Demultiplexing devices and process for at least two transport streams and a corresponding digital stream
WO2001097526A1 (en) * 2000-06-12 2001-12-20 General Instrument Corporation Apparatus and method for resolution of conflicts in protocol data of multiple data streams
US20020184649A1 (en) * 2001-06-04 2002-12-05 Wilson Thomas C. System and method for allocating packet identifiers in a transport stream in a subscriber network

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
BUNGUM O W: "TRANSMULTIPLEXING, TRANSCONTROL AND TRANSSCRAMBLING OF MPEG-2/DVB SIGNAL" INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING CONVENTION, LONDON, GB, 12 September 1996 (1996-09-12), pages 288-293, XP002040478 *

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN102300120A (en) * 2010-06-23 2011-12-28 中兴通讯股份有限公司 A kind of multi-channel signal output from the selection switch and method
WO2011160539A1 (en) * 2010-06-23 2011-12-29 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Switch and method for selecting and outputting multiple paths of signals
CN102300120B (en) * 2010-06-23 2015-06-10 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Switch and method for selectively outputting multiple signals

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20050068992A1 (en) 2005-03-31 application
WO2005032133A3 (en) 2008-01-03 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6400720B1 (en) Method for transporting variable length and fixed length packets in a standard digital transmission frame
US5477263A (en) Method and apparatus for video on demand with fast forward, reverse and channel pause
US5613191A (en) Customer premise wireless distribution of audio-video, control signals and voice using CDMA
US5940738A (en) Video pedestal network
US6219358B1 (en) Adaptive rate control for insertion of data into arbitrary bit rate data streams
US6909715B1 (en) Method and apparatus for the reduction of upstream request processing latency in a cable modem termination system
US7184433B1 (en) System and method for providing media content to end-users
US6002687A (en) MPEG transport stream remultiplexer
US5696765A (en) Configurable hybrid medium access control for cable metropolitan area networks
US6226794B1 (en) Set top terminal for an interactive information distribution system
US6678740B1 (en) Process carried out by a gateway in a home network to receive video-on-demand and other requested programs and services
US20050198680A1 (en) Conditional access method and apparatus of a receiver system for controlling digital TV program start time
US7298846B2 (en) Method of identifying multiple digital streams within a multiplexed signal
US20080209489A1 (en) System and method for transmitting digital content using cable modem termination system (cmts) bypass architecture
US20060010477A1 (en) Method and system for providing VOD services in a digital cable TV network
US5572517A (en) Configurable hybrid medium access control for cable metropolitan area networks
US20070121678A1 (en) Apparatus and methods for utilizing variable rate program streams in a network
US20020007494A1 (en) Interactive digital program material encoder and system
US20060242240A1 (en) Milestone synchronization in broadcast multimedia streams
US7089577B1 (en) Process for supplying video-on-demand and other requested programs and services from a headend
US20050180568A1 (en) Time-multiplexed multi-program encryption system
US20090022154A1 (en) Reception device, reception method, and computer-readable medium
US6996129B2 (en) Advanced, adaptive video multiplexer system
US20070074256A1 (en) Apparatus for receiving cable TV broadcasting program, and multiplexer and de-multiplexer thereof
US20090207866A1 (en) Apparatus and methods for utilizing statistical multiplexing to ensure quality of service in a network

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A2

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BW BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE EG ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NA NI NO NZ OM PG PH PL PT RO RU SC SD SE SG SK SL SY TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VC VN YU ZA ZM ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A2

Designated state(s): BW GH GM KE LS MW MZ NA SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HU IE IT LU MC NL PL PT RO SE SI SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase