WO2003052073A2 - Novel corn event - Google Patents

Novel corn event Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2003052073A2
WO2003052073A2 PCT/US2002/040099 US0240099W WO03052073A2 WO 2003052073 A2 WO2003052073 A2 WO 2003052073A2 US 0240099 W US0240099 W US 0240099W WO 03052073 A2 WO03052073 A2 WO 03052073A2
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seq id
com
plant
nucleotide sequence
corn
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PCT/US2002/040099
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French (fr)
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WO2003052073A3 (en
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Henry-York Steiner
John Dawson
Eric Dunder
Moez Meghji
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Syngenta Participations Ag
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Priority to US60/341,456 priority
Priority to US34666002P priority
Priority to US60/346,660 priority
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Publication of WO2003052073A2 publication Critical patent/WO2003052073A2/en
Publication of WO2003052073A3 publication Critical patent/WO2003052073A3/en

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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07KPEPTIDES
    • C07K14/00Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof
    • C07K14/415Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from plants
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H5/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their plant parts; Angiosperms characterised otherwise than by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H5/10Seeds
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12NMICROORGANISMS OR ENZYMES; COMPOSITIONS THEREOF; PROPAGATING, PRESERVING OR MAINTAINING MICROORGANISMS; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING; CULTURE MEDIA
    • C12N15/00Mutation or genetic engineering; DNA or RNA concerning genetic engineering, vectors, e.g. plasmids, or their isolation, preparation or purification; Use of hosts therefor
    • C12N15/09Recombinant DNA-technology
    • C12N15/63Introduction of foreign genetic material using vectors; Vectors; Use of hosts therefor; Regulation of expression
    • C12N15/79Vectors or expression systems specially adapted for eukaryotic hosts
    • C12N15/82Vectors or expression systems specially adapted for eukaryotic hosts for plant cells, e.g. plant artificial chromosomes (PACs)
    • C12N15/8241Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology
    • C12N15/8261Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield
    • C12N15/8271Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance
    • C12N15/8274Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance for herbicide resistance
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12NMICROORGANISMS OR ENZYMES; COMPOSITIONS THEREOF; PROPAGATING, PRESERVING OR MAINTAINING MICROORGANISMS; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING; CULTURE MEDIA
    • C12N15/00Mutation or genetic engineering; DNA or RNA concerning genetic engineering, vectors, e.g. plasmids, or their isolation, preparation or purification; Use of hosts therefor
    • C12N15/09Recombinant DNA-technology
    • C12N15/63Introduction of foreign genetic material using vectors; Vectors; Use of hosts therefor; Regulation of expression
    • C12N15/79Vectors or expression systems specially adapted for eukaryotic hosts
    • C12N15/82Vectors or expression systems specially adapted for eukaryotic hosts for plant cells, e.g. plant artificial chromosomes (PACs)
    • C12N15/8241Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology
    • C12N15/8261Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield
    • C12N15/8271Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance
    • C12N15/8279Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance for biotic stress resistance, pathogen resistance, disease resistance
    • C12N15/8286Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance for biotic stress resistance, pathogen resistance, disease resistance for insect resistance
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A40/00Adaptation technologies in agriculture, forestry, livestock or agroalimentary production
    • Y02A40/10Adaptation technologies in agriculture, forestry, livestock or agroalimentary production in agriculture
    • Y02A40/11Specially adapted for crops
    • Y02A40/16Pest or insect control
    • Y02A40/162Genetically modified [GMO] plants resistant to insects

Abstract

A novel transgenic corn event designated VIP1034, is disclosed. The invention relates to seeds of corn plants comprising the transgenic genotype of the transgenic corn event VIP1034, to corn plants comprising the transgenic genotype of VIP1034 and to methods for producing a corn plant by crossing a corn plant comprising the transgenic genotype with itself or another corn variety. The invention further relates to assays for detecting the presence of the VIP1034 event based on DNA sequences of the recombinant constructs inserted into the corn genome that resulted in the VIP1034 event and of genomic sequences flanking the insertion sites.

Description

Novel Corn Event

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates generally to the field of plant molecular biology, plant transformation, and plant breeding. More specifically, the present invention relates to a transgenic corn event designated NIP 1034 comprising a novel transgenic genotype.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Plant pests are a major factor in the loss of the world's important agricultural crops. About $8 billion are lost every year in the U.S. alone due to infestations of non- mammalian pests including insects. In addition to losses in field crops, insect pests are also a burden to vegetable and fruit growers, to producers of ornamental flowers, and to home gardeners.

[0003] Insect pests are mainly controlled by intensive applications of chemical pesticides, which are active through inhibition of insect growth, prevention of insect feeding or reproduction, or cause death. Good insect control can thus be reached, but these chemicals can sometimes also affect other, beneficial insects. Another problem resulting from the wide use of chemical pesticides is the appearance of resistant insect varieties. This has been-partially alleviated by various resistance management practices, but there is an increasing need for alternative pest control agents. Biological pest control agents, such as Bacillus thuringiensis strains expressing pesticidal toxins like δ-endotoxins, have also been applied to crop plants with satisfactory results, offering an alternative or compliment to chemical pesticides. The genes coding for some of these δ-endotoxins have been isolated and their expression in heterologous hosts have been shown to provide another tool for the control of economically important insect pests. In particular, the expression of insecticidal toxins in transgenic plants, such as Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins, has provided efficient protection against selected insect pests, and transgenic plants expressing such toxins have been commercialized, allowing farmers to reduce applications of chemical insect control agents. Recently, a new family of insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus during the vegetative stages of growth (Vegetative Insecticidal Proteins (VIP)) has been identified. U.S. Patents 5,877,012, 6,107,279, and 6,137,033, all of which are incorporated herein by reference, describe vip3K toxin genes isolated from Bacillus species. The Nip3 A toxins possess insecticidal activity against a wide spectrum of lepidopteran insects including but not limited to fall armyworm, Spodopterafrugiperda, black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon, sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis, and lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus. Transgenic corn events expressing the Nip3 A protein are protected from insect feeding damage.

[0004] The expression of foreign genes in plants can to be influenced by their chromosomal position, perhaps due to chromatin structure or the proximity of transcriptional regulation elements close to the integration site (See for example, Weising et al, 1988, "Foreign Genes in Plants," Ann. Rev. Genet. 22:421-477). For this reason, it is often necessary to screen a large number of events in order to identify an event characterized by optimal expression of an introduced gene of interest. For example, it has been observed in plants and in other organisms that there may be wide variations in levels of expression of aheterologous gene introduced into the chromosome of a plants' genome among individually selected events. There may also be differences in spatial or temporal patterns of expression, for example, differences in the relative expression of a transgene in various plant tissues, that may not correspond to the patterns expected from transcriptional regulatory elements present in the introduced gene construct. For this reason, it is common to produce hundreds to thousands of different events and screen those events for a single event that has desired transgene expression levels and patterns for commercial purposes. An event that has desired levels or patterns of transgene expression is useful for introgressing the transgene into other genetic backgrounds by sexual outcrossing using conventional breeding methods. Progeny of such crosses maintain the transgene expression characteristics of the original transformant. This strategy is used to ensure reliable gene expression in a number of varieties that are well adapted to local growing conditions.

[0005] It would be advantageous to be able to detect the presence of a particular event in order to determine whether progeny of a sexual cross contain a transgene of interest. In addition, a method for detecting a particular event would be helpful for complying with regulations requiring the pre-market approval and labeling of foods derived from recombinant crop plants, for example. It is possible to detect the presence of a transgene by any well-known nucleic acid detection method including but not limited to thermal amplification (polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) using polynucleotide primers or DΝA hybridization using nucleic acid probes. Typically, for the sake of simplicity and uniformity of reagents and methodologies for use in detecting a particular DNA construct that has been used for transforming various plant varieties, these detection methods generally focus on frequently used genetic elements, for example, promoters, terminators, and marker genes, because for many DNA constructs, the coding sequence region is interchangeable. As a result, such methods may not be useful for discriminating between constructs that differ only with reference to the coding sequence. In addition, such methods may not be useful for discriminating between different events, particularly those produced using the same DNA construct unless the sequence of chromosomal DNA adjacent to the inserted heterologous DNA ("flanking DNA") is known. [0006] The instant invention includes an insect resistant transgenic corn event that has incorporated into its genome a vip A gene, encoding a Nip3A insecticidal toxin, useful in controlling a wide spectrum of lepidopteran insect pests, and a. pat gene, encoding a phosphinothricin acetyltransferase enzyme (PAT) that confers tolerance to a herbicide. The present invention further includes novel and useful isolated nucleic acid sequences which are unique to the transgenic corn event, useful for identifying the transgenic corn event and for detecting nucleic acids from the transgenic corn event in a biological sample, as well as kits comprising the reagents necessary for use in detecting these nucleic acids in a biological sample.

SUMMARY

[0007] The present invention is drawn to a transgenic corn event, designated NIP 1034, comprising a novel transgenic genotype that comprises a vip3A gene and a. pat gene which confers insect resistance and herbicide tolerance, respectively, to the transgenic corn event and progeny thereof. The invention also provides seed of any corn plant comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention, corn plants comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention, and to methods for producing a corn plant comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention by crossing a corn inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention with itself or another corn line of a different genotype. Preferably, the corn plants of the invention have essentially all of the morphological and physiological characteristics of the corresponding isogenic non- transgenic corn plant in addition to those conferred upon the corn plant by the transgenic genotype. The present invention also provides compositions and methods for detecting the presence of nucleic acids from corn event NIP 1034 based on the DΝA sequence of the recombinant expression cassettes inserted into the com genome that resulted in the NIP 1034 event and of genomic sequences flanking the insertion sites. |

[0008] According to one aspect, the present invention provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least one junction sequence of com event NIP1034 selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, and complements thereof. A junction sequence spans the junction between the heterologous DNA inserted into the com genome (i.e. expression cassettes) and DNA from the com genome flanking the insertion site and is diagnostic for the NIP 1034 event.

[0009] According to another aspect of the invention, com plants comprising such nucleic acid molecules and seed from such corn plants are provided.

[0010] According to another aspect, the present invention provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, or complements thereof.

[0011] According to still another aspect of the invention, flanking sequence primers for detecting corn event NIP 1034 are provided. Such flanking sequence primers comprise an isolated nucleic acid sequence comprising at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 1-716 of SEQ ID NO: 6 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 5' flanking sequence to the intact first expression cassette (intact vip3A insert)), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 822-1590 of SEQ ID NO: 7 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 3' flanking sequence to the intact vip3 insert), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 1-754 of SEQ ID NO: 8 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 5' flanking sequence to the intact second expression cassette (intact pat insert)), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 704-797 of SEQ ID NO: 9 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 3' flanking sequence to the intact at insert), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 1-94 of SEQ ID NO: 10 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 5' flanking sequence to the fragmented first expression cassette (fragmented vip3 A insert)), or the complements thereof.

[0012] According to another aspect of the invention, primer sets that are useful for nucleic acid amplification, for example, are provided. Such primer sets comprise a first primer comprising a nucleotide sequence of at least 10-15 contiguous nucleotides in length which is or is complementary to one of the above-described genomic flanking sequences (SEQ ID NO: 6, SEQ ID NO: 7, SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 9, or SEQ ID NO: 10) and a second primer comprising a nucleotide sequence of at least 10-15 contiguous nucleotides of heterologous DNA inserted into the plant DNA sequence, i.e., the expression cassettes inserted into the recombinant corn event NIP 1034. The second primer preferably comprises a nucleotide sequence which is or is complementary to; a) the intact vip3K insert sequence adjacent to the plant genomic flanking DΝA sequence as set forth in SEQ ID O: 6 from nucleotide position 717 through 2100 and in SEQ ID NO: 7 from nucleotide position 1 through 821, b) the intact at insert sequence adjacent to the plant genomic flanking DNA sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 8 from nucleotide position 755 through 1320 and in SEQ ID NO: 9 from nucleotide position 1 through 703, or c) the fragmented vip3K insert sequence adjacent to the plant genomic flanking DNA sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 10 from nucleotide position 95 through 700.

[0013] According to another aspect of the invention, methods of detecting the presence of DNA corresponding to the com event NIP 1034 in a biological sample are provided. Such methods comprise: (a) contacting the sample comprising DΝA with a primer set that, when used in a nucleic-acid amplification reaction with genomic DΝA from corn event NIP 1034, produces an amplicon that is diagnostic for corn event NIP 1034; (b) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction, thereby producing the amplicon; and (c) detecting the amplicon.

[0014] According to another aspect, the present invention provides a method of detecting the presence of a DΝA corresponding to the NIP 1034 event in a biological sample comprising: (a) contacting the biological sample comprising DΝA or RΝA with a probe that hybridizes under high stringency hybridization conditions with genomic DΝA from com event VIP 1034 and does not hybridize under the same high stringency hybridization conditions with DΝA from a control com plant; (b) subjecting the sample and probe to high stringency hybridization and wash conditions; and (c) detecting hybridization of the probe to the DΝA.

[0015] According to another aspect of the invention, a kit is provided for the detection of com event VIP 1034. The kit includes at least one DΝA sequence of sufficient length of polynucleotides which is or is complementary to SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, or SEQ ID NO: 5, wherein the DNA sequences are useful as primers or probes that hybridize to isolated DNA from com event VIP 1034 or its progeny, and which, upon hybridization to a nucleic acid sequence in a sample followed by detection of the hybridization to the target sequence, are diagnostic for the presence of nucleic acid sequences from corn event VIP 1034 in the sample. The kit further includes other materials necessary to enable nucleic acid hybridization or amplification methods.

[0016] According to one aspect, the present invention provides seed of any corn inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the transgenic corn event V-P1034, wherein the transgenic genotype comprises an intact copy and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette and an intact copy of a second expression cassette. The intact copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16. The fragmented copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17. The intact copy of the second expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18. One example of seed of any com inbred provided for in this aspect of the invention has been deposited on 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.

[0017] In another aspect, the present invention provides a com plant, or parts thereof, comprising the transgenic genotype of the transgenic corn event VIP 1034, wherein the transgenic genotype comprises an intact copy and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette and an intact copy of a second expression cassette, wherein the intact copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and wherein the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17, and wherein the intact copy of the second expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18.

[0018] In one embodiment of this aspect, the intact copy of the first expression cassette, the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette, and the intact copy of the second expression cassette, form part of the com plant's genome. In a preferred embodiment of this aspect, the part of the genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence of the intact first expression cassette (SEQ ID NO: 16) comprises the nucleotide sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO: 11 and SEQ ID NO: 12. In another preferred embodiment, the part of the genome that is adjacent to the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette (SEQ ID NO: 17) comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID: 15. Iii still another preferred embodiment, the part of the genome that is adjacent to the intact second expression cassette (SEQ ID NO: 18) comprises the nucleotide sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO: 13 and SEQ ID NO: 14.

[0019] According to one aspect, the present invention provides a method for producing com seed comprising crossing a first parent com plant with a second parent com plant and harvesting the resultant first generation com seed, wherein the first or second parent corn plant is an inbred com plant of the invention.

[0020] According to another aspect, the present invention provides a method of producing hybrid com seeds comprising the steps of: (a) planting seeds of a first inbred com line according to the invention and seeds of a second inbred corn line having a different genotype; (b)cultivating com plants resulting from said planting until time of flowering; (c) emasculating flowers of com plants of one of the com inbred lines; (d) allowing pollination of the other inbred line to occur, and (e) harvesting the hybrid seed produced thereby.

[0021] The foregoing and other aspects of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEQUENCES IN THE SEQUENCE LISTING

SEQ ID NO: 1 is the 5' genome-intact vz 3A insert junction.

SEQ ID NO: 2 is the 3' intact vip3A insert-genome junction.

SEQ ID NO: 3 is the 5' genome-pαt insert junction.

SEQ ID NO: 4 is the pat insert-genome junction.

SEQ ID NO: 5 is the 5' genome-fragmented vip3A insert junction.

SEQ ID NO: 6 is the 5' genome + intact vip3A insert sequence.

SEQ ID NO: 7 is the 3' intact vip3A insert + genome sequence.

SEQ ED NO: 8 is the 5' genome +pat insert sequence.

SEQ ID NO: 9 is the 3' pat insert + genome sequence.

SEQ ID NO: 10 is the 5' genome + fragmented vip3A insert sequence.

SEQ ID NO: 11 is corn genome flanking 5' intact vip3A insert.

SEQ ID NO: 12 is corn genome flanking 3' intact vip3A insert.

SEQ ID NO: 13 is corn genome flanking 5' pat insert.

SEQ ID NO: 14 is corn genome flanking 3' pat insert.

SEQ ID NO: 15 is corn genome flanking 5' fragmented vip3A insert.

SEQ ID NO: 16 is the nucleotide sequence of the intact vip3A insert.

SEQ ID NO: 17 is the nucleotide sequence of the fragmented vip3A insert.

SEQ ID NO: 18 is the nucleotide sequence of the t insert.

SEQ ID NOs: 19-21 are sequences of vzp3A-specific hybridization probes useful in the present invention. SEQ ID NO: 22 is the sequence of a αt-specific hybridization probe useful in the present invention.

SEQ ID NO: 23 is a forward primer anchored within the terminal portion of the vz 3A structural gene.

SEQ ID NO: 24 is a reverse primer anchored in flanking plant DNA.

DEFINITIONS

[0022] The following definitions and methods are provided to better define the present invention and to guide those of ordinary skill in the art in the practice of the present invention. Unless otherwise noted, terms used herein are to be understood according to conventional usage by those of ordinary skill in the relevant art. Definitions of common terms in molecular biology may also be found in Rieger et al, Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th edition, Springer-Verlag: New York, 1994.

[0023] As used herein, the term "amplified" means the construction of multiple copies of a nucleic acid molecule or multiple copies complementary to the nucleic acid molecule using at least one of the nucleic acid molecules as a template. Amplification systems include the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system, ligase chain reaction (LCR) system, nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA, Cangene, Mississauga, Ontario), Q- Beta Replicase systems, transcription-based amplification system (TAS), and strand displacement amplification (SDA). See, e.g., Diagnostic Molecular Microbiology: Principles and Applications, D. H. Persing et al., Ed., American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C. (1993). The product of amplification is termed an amplicon.

[0024] A "coding sequence" is a nucleic acid sequence that is transcribed into RNA such as mRNA, rRNA, tRNA, snRNA, sense RNA or antisense RNA. Preferably the RNA is then translated in an organism to produce a protein.

[0025] "Detection kit" as used herein refers to a kit used to detect the presence or absence of DNA from a VIP 1034 event in a sample comprising nucleic acid probes and primers of the present invention, which hybridize under high stringency conditions to a target DNA sequence, and other materials necessary to enable nucleic acid hybridization or amplification methods.

[0026] As used herein the term transgenic "event" refers to a recombinant plant produced by transformation and regeneration of a single plant cell with heterologous DNA, for example, an expression cassette that includes a gene of interest. The term "event" refers to the original transformant and progeny of the transformant that include the heterologous DNA. The term "event" also refers to progeny produced by a sexual outcross between the transformant and another com line. Even after repeated backcrossing to a recurrent parent, the inserted DNA and the flanking DNA from the transformed parent is present in the progeny of the cross at the same chromosomal location. Normally, transformation of plant tissue produces multiple events, each of which represent insertion of a DNA construct into a different location in the genome of a plant cell. Based on the expression of the transgene or other desirable characteristics, a particular event is selected. 7] "Expression cassette" as used herein means a nucleic acid molecule capable of directing expression of a particular nucleotide sequence in an appropriate host cell, comprising a promoter operably linked to the nucleotide sequence of interest which is operably linked to termination signals. It also typically comprises sequences required for proper translation of the nucleotide sequence. The expression cassette may also comprise sequences not necessary in the direct expression of a nucleotide sequence of interest but which are present due to convenient restriction sites for removal of the cassette from an expression vector. The expression cassette comprising the nucleotide sequence of interest may be chimeric, meaning that at least one of its components is heterologous with respect to at least one of its other components. The expression cassette may also be one that is naturally occurring but has been obtained in a recombinant form useful for heterologous expression. Typically, however, the expression cassette is heterologous with respect to the host, i.e., the particular nucleic acid sequence of the expression cassette does not occur naturally in the host cell and must have been introduced into the host cell or an ancestor of the host cell by a transformation process known in the art. The expression of the nucleotide sequence in the expression cassette may be under the control of a constitutive promoter or of an inducible promoter that initiates transcription only when the host cell is exposed to some particular external stimulus. In the case of a multicellular organism, such as a plant, the promoter can also be specific to a particular tissue, or organ, or stage of development. An expression cassette, or fragment thereof, can also be referred to as "inserted sequence" or "insertion sequence" when transformed into a plant. For example, in the present invention, the intact first expression cassette, the fragmented first expression cassette, and the intact second expression cassette are referred to as the intact vip3A insert, the fragmented vip3A insert, and the intact pat insert, respectively. [0028] A "gene" is a defined region that is located within a genome and that, besides the aforementioned coding nucleic acid sequence, comprises other, primarily regulatory, nucleic acid sequences responsible for the control of the expression, that is to say the transcription and translation, of the coding portion. A gene may also comprise other 5' and 3' untranslated sequences and termination sequences. Further elements that may be present are, for example, introns.

[0029] "Gene of interest" refers to any gene which, when transferred to a plant, confers upon the plant a desired characteristic such as antibiotic resistance, vims resistance, insect resistance, disease resistance, or resistance to other pests, herbicide tolerance, improved nutritional value, improved performance in an industrial process or altered reproductive capability. The "gene of interest" may also be one that is transferred to plants for the production of commercially valuable enzymes or metabolites in the plant.

[0030] "Genotype" as used herein is the genetic material inherited from parent com plants not all of which is necessarily expressed in the descendant com plants.

[0031] A "heterologous" nucleic acid sequence is a nucleic acid sequence not naturally associated with a host cell into which it is introduced, including non- naturally occurring multiple copies of a naturally occurring nucleic acid sequence.

[0032] A "homologous" nucleic acid sequence is a nucleic acid sequence naturally associated with a host cell into which it is introduced.

[0033] "Insecticidal" is defined as a toxic biological activity capable of controlling insects, preferably by killing them.

[0034] A "nucleic acid molecule" or "nucleic acid sequence" is a linear segment of single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA that can be isolated from any source. In the context of the present invention, the nucleic acid molecule is preferably a segment of DNA.

[0035] "Operably-linked" refers to the association of nucleic acid sequences on a single nucleic acid fragment so that the function of one affects the function of the other. For example, a promoter is operably-linked with a coding sequence or functional RNA when it is capable of affecting the expression of that coding sequence or functional RNA (i.e., that the coding sequence or functional RNA is under the transcriptional control of the promoter). Coding sequences in sense or antisense orientation can be operably-linked to regulatory sequences.

[0036] "Primers" as used herein are isolated nucleic acids that are annealed to a complimentary target DNA strand by nucleic acid hybridization to form a hybrid between the primer and the target DNA strand, then extended along the target DNA strand by polymerase, such as DNA polymerase. Primer pairs or sets can be used for amplification of a nucleic acid molecule, for example, by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

[0037] A "probe" is an isolated nucleic acid to which is attached a conventional detectable label or reporter molecule, such as a radioactive isotope, ligand, chemiluminescent agent, or enzyme. Such a probe is complimentary to a strand of a target nucleic acid, in the case of the present invention, to a strand of genomic DNA from com event, VIP1034. The genomic DNA of V-P1034 can be from a com plant or from a sample that includes DNA from the event. Probes according to the present invention include not only deoxyribonucleic or ribonucleic acids but also polyamides and other probe materials that bind specifically to a target DNA sequence and can be used to detect the presence of that target DNA sequence.

[0038] Primers and probes are generally between 10 and 15 nucleotides or more in length, preferably 20 nucleotides or more, more preferably 25 nucleotides, and most preferably 30 nucleotides or more. Such primers and probes hybridize specifically to a target sequence under high stringency hybridization conditions. Preferably, primers and probes according to the present invention have complete sequence complementarity with the target sequence, although probes differing from the target sequence and which retain the ability to hybridize to target sequences may be designed by conventional methods.

[0039] A "promoter" is an untranslated DNA sequence upstream of the coding region that contains the binding site for RNA polymerase 11 and initiates transcription of the DNA. The promoter region may also include other elements that act as regulators of gene expression.

[0040] "Stringent conditions" or "stringent hybridization conditions" include reference to conditions under which a probe will hybridize to its target sequence, to a detectably greater degree than to other sequences. Stringent conditions are target-sequence- dependent and will differ depending on the structure of the polynucleotide. By controlling the stringency of the hybridization and/or wash conditions, target sequences can be identified which are 100% complementary to the probe (homologous probing). Alternatively, stringency conditions can be adjusted to allow some mismatching in sequences so that lower degrees of similarity are detected (heterologous probing). Longer sequences hybridize specifically at higher temperatures. An extensive guide to the hybridization of nucleic acids is found in Tijssen (1993) Laboratory Techniques in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology-Hybridization with Nucleic Acid Probes, Part I, Chapter 2 "Overview of principles of hybridization and the strategy of nucleic acid probe assays", Elsevier: New York; and Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, Chapter 2, Ausubel et al, Eds., Greene Publishing and Wiley-Interscience: New York (1995), and also Sambrook et al. (2001) Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual (5l Ed. Cols Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY).

[0041] Specificity is typically the function of post-hybridization washes, the critical factors being the ionic strength and temperature of the final wash solution. Generally, high stringency hybridization and wash conditions are selected to be about 5°C lower than the thermal melting point (Tm) for the specific sequence at a defined ionic strength and pH. The Tm is the temperature (under defined ionic strength and pH) at which 50% of the target sequence hybridizes to a perfectly matched probe. Typically, under high stringency conditions a probe will hybridize to its target subsequence, but to no other sequences.

[0042] An example of high stringency hybridization conditions for hybridization of complementary nucleic acids which have more than 100 complementary residues on a filter in a Southern or northern blot is 50% formamide with 1 mg of heparin at 42°C, with the hybridization being carried out overnight. An example of very high stringency wash conditions is 0.15M NaCl at 72°C for about 15 minutes. An example of high stringency wash conditions is a 0.2x SSC wash at 65°C for 15 minutes (see, Sambrook, infra, for a description of SSC buffer).

[0043] Preferred hybridization conditions for the present invention include hybridization in 7% SDS, 0.25 M NaPO4 pH 7.2 at 67°C overnight, followed by two washings in 5% SDS, 0.20 M NaPO4 pH7.2 at 65°C for 30 minutes each wash, and two washings in 1% SDS, 0.20 M NaPO4pH7.2 at 65°C for 30 minutes each wash. An exemplary medium stringency wash for a duplex of, e.g., more than 100 nucleotides, is lx SSC at 45°C for 15 minutes. An exemplary low stringency wash for a duplex of, e.g., more than 100 nucleotides, is 4-6x SSC at 40°C for 15 minutes. For short probes (e.g., about 10 to 50 nucleotides), high stringency conditions typically involve salt concentrations of less than about 1.0 M Na ion, typically about 0.01 to 1.0 M Na ion concentration (or other salts) at pH 7.0 to 8.3, and the temperature is typically at least about 30°C. High stringency conditions can also be achieved with the addition of destabilizing agents such as formamide. In general, a signal to noise ratio of 2x (or higher) than that observed for an unrelated probe in the particular hybridization assay indicates detection of a specific hybridization. Nucleic acids that do not hybridize to each other under high stringency conditions are still substantially identical if the proteins that they encode are substantially identical. This occurs, e.g., when a copy of a nucleic acid is created using the maximum codon degeneracy permitted by the genetic code.

[0044] The following are exemplary sets of hybridization/wash conditions that may be used to hybridize nucleotide sequences that are substantially identical to reference nucleotide sequences of the present invention: a reference nucleotide sequence preferably hybridizes to the reference nucleotide sequence in 7% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 0.5 M NaPO4, 1 mM EDTA at 50°C with washing in 2X SSC, 0.1% SDS at 50°C, more desirably in 7% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 0.5 M NaPO4, 1 mM EDTA at 50°C with washing in IX SSC, 0.1% SDS at 50°C, more desirably still in 7% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 0.5 M NaPO4, 1 mM EDTA at 50°C with washing in 0.5X SSC, 0.1% SDS at 50°C, preferably in 7% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 0.5 M NaPO4, 1 mM EDTA at 50°C with washing in 0.1X SSC, 0.1% SDS at 50°C, more preferably in 7% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 0.5 M NaPO , 1 mM EDTA at 50°C with washing in 0.1X SSC, 0.1%o SDS at 65°C. The sequences of the present invention maybe detected using all the above conditions. For the purposes of defining the invention, the high stringency conditions are used.

[0045] "Transformation" is a process for introducing heterologous nucleic acid into a host cell or organism. In particular, "transformation" means the stable integration of a DNA molecule into the genome of an organism of interest.

[0046] "Transformed / transgenic / recombinant" refer to a host organism such as a bacterium or a plant into which a heterologous nucleic acid molecule has been introduced. The nucleic acid molecule can be stably integrated into the genome of the host or the nucleic acid molecule can also be present as an extrachromosomal molecule. Such an extrachromosomal molecule can be auto-replicating. Transformed cells, tissues, or plants are understood to encompass not only the end product of a transformation process, but also transgenic progeny thereof. A "non-transformed", "non-transgenic", or "non- recombinant" host refers to a wild-type organism, e.g., a bacterium or plant, which does not contain the heterologous nucleic acid molecule.As used herein, "transgenic" refers to a plant, plant cell, or multitude of structured or unstructured plant cells having integrated, via well known techniques of genetic manipulation and gene insertion, a sequence of nucleic acid representing a gene of interest into the plant genome, and typically into a chromosome of a cell nucleus, mitochondria or other organelle containing chromosomes, at a locus different to, or in a number of copies greater than, that normally present in the native plant or plant cell. Transgenic plants result from the manipulation and insertion of such nucleic acid sequences, as opposed to naturally occurring mutations, to produce a non-naturally occurring plant or a plant with a non-naturally occurring genotype. Techniques for transformation of plants and plant cells are well known in the art and may comprise for example electroporation, microinjection, agrobacterium mediated transformation, and ballistic transformation.

[0047] "Transgenic genotype" as used herein refers to the heterologous genetic material that, by the hand of man, is transformed into the genome of a plant wherein the genetic material is inheritable through descendants of the transformed plant. For example, the transgenic genotype of the transformed corn event VIP 1034 comprises an intact and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette, wherein the intact copy comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and the fragmented copy comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17, and an intact copy of a second expression cassette comprising the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18, and this transgenic genotype is inheritable from descendents of VIP 1034.

[0048] The nomenclature for DNA bases and amino acids as set forth in 37 C.F.R. § 1.822 is used herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0049] This invention relates to a genetically improved line of com that produces the insect control protein, Vip3 A, and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT), an enzyme that confers herbicide tolerance. The invention is particularly drawn to a transgenic com event designated VIP 1034 comprising a novel transgenic genotype, as well as to compositions and methods for detecting nucleic acids from this event in a biological sample. The invention is further drawn to seed of any com inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention, to com plants comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention, and to methods for producing a corn plant comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention by crossing a com inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention with itself or another corn line. This invention further relates to hybrid com seeds and plants produced by crossing an inbred line comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention with another corn line of a different genotype. Com plants comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention are useful in controlling lepidopteran insect pests including but not limited to fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon, sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis, and lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus. Com plants comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention are also useful in tolerating herbicides, particularly glufosinate herbicides.

[0050] In one preferred embodiment, the invention encompasses an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence which comprises at least one junction sequence of com event VIP 1034, which is described in Example 1, selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, and complements thereof, wherein a junction sequence spans the junction between a heterologous expression cassette inserted into the com genome and DNA from the com genome flanking the insertion site and is diagnostic for the event. Included are nucleotide sequences that comprise at least 10 or more (e.g., 15, 25, 50) nucleotides of insert sequence from com event VIP 1034 and similar length of flanking DNA from com event VIP 1034. Also included are nucleotide sequences that comprise 15 or more nucleotides of contiguous insert sequence from com event VIP 1034 and at lease one nucleotide of flanking DNA from com event VIP 1034 adjacent to the insert sequence. Such nucleotide sequences are diagnostic for com event VIP 1034. Nucleic acid amplification of genomic DNA from the VIP 1034 event produces an amplicon comprising such diagnostic nucleotide sequences.

[0051] In another preferred embodiment, the invention encompasses an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, and complements thereof.

[0052] In another preferred embodiment, the present invention encompasses flanking sequence primers for detecting com event VIP 1034. Such flanking sequence primers comprise a nucleotide sequence comprising at least 10-15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 1-716 of SEQ ID NO: 6 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 5' flanking sequence to the intact vip3A insert), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 822-1590 of SEQ ID NO: 7 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 3' flanking sequence to the intact vzp3A insert), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 1-754 of SEQ ID NO: 8 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 5' flanking sequence to the intact t insert), at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 704-797 of SEQ ID NO: 9 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 3' flanking sequence to the intact pat insert), or at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from nucleotides 1-94 of SEQ ID NO: 10 (arbitrarily designated herein as the 5' flanking sequence to the fragmented vip3A insert), or the complements thereof. [0053] In still another preferred embodiment, the present invention encompasses a pair of polynucleotide primers for detecting com event VIP 1034 in a sample, wherein the first primer comprises a nucleotide sequence of at least 10-15 contiguous nucleotides of the genomic flanking sequences described above (SEQ ID NO: 6, SEQ ID NO: 7, SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 9 or SEQ ID NO: 10) and a second primer comprises a nucleotide sequence which is or is complementary to at least 10-15 contiguous nucleotides from; a) position 717 through 2100 of SEQ ID NO: 6 or position 1-821 of SEQ ID NO: 7; which is the intact vzp3A insert sequence adjacent to the genomic flanking DNA sequence, b) position 755 through 1320 of SEQ ID NO: 8 or position 1-703 of SEQ ID NO: 9, which is the intact pat insert sequence adjacent to the genomic flanking DNA sequence, or c) position 95 through 700 of SEQ ID NO: 10, which is the fragmented vzp3A insert sequence adjacent to the genomic flanking DNA sequence. Of course, it is well within the skill in the art to obtain additional sequence further out into the genome sequence flanking either end of the inserted heterologous DNA sequences for use as a primer sequence that can be used in such primer pairs for amplifying the sequences that are diagnostic for the VIP 1034 com event. For the purposes of this disclosure, the phrase "further out into the genome sequence flanking either end of the inserted heterologous DNA sequences" refers specifically to a sequential movement away from the ends of the inserted heterologous DNA sequences, the points at which the inserted DNA sequences are adjacent to native genomic DNA sequence, and out into the genomic DNA of the particular chromosome into which the heterologous DNA sequences were inserted. Preferably, a primer sequence corresponding to or complementary to a part of the insert sequence should prime the transcriptional extension of a nascent strand of DNA or RNA toward the nearest flanking sequence junction. Consequently, a primer sequence corresponding to or complementary to a part of the genomic flanking sequence should prime the transcriptional extension of a nascent strand of DNA or RNA toward the nearest flanking sequence junction. A primer sequence can be, or can be complementary to, a heterologous DNA sequence inserted into the chromosome of the plant, or a genomic flanking sequence. One skilled in the art would readily recognize the benefit of whether a primer sequence would need to be, or would need to be complementary to, the sequence as set forth within the inserted heterologous DNA sequence or as set forth in SEQ ID NO: . 6, SEQ ID NO: 7, SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 9, or SEQ ID NO: 10 depending upon the nature of the product desired to be obtained through the use of the nested set of primers intended for use in amplifying a particular flanking sequence containing the junction between the genomic DNA sequence and the inserted heterologous DNA sequence.

[0054] In another preferred embodiment, the present invention encompasses a method of detecting the presence of DNA corresponding to the com event VIP 1034 in a sample, wherein the method comprises the steps of: (a) contacting the sample comprising DNA with a pair of primers that, when used in a nucleic-acid amplification reaction with genomic DNA from com event VIP1034, produces an amplicon that is diagnostic for corn event VIP 1034; (b) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction, thereby producing the amplicon; and (c) detecting the amplicon. In a preferred aspect of this embodiment, the amplicon comprises a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, and complements thereof.

[0055] In still another preferred embodiment, the present invention encompasses a method of detecting the presence of a DNA corresponding to the VIP 1034 event in a sample, wherein the method comprises the steps of: (a) contacting the sample comprising DNA with a probe that hybridizes under high stringency conditions with genomic DNA from com event VIP 1034 and does not hybridize under high stringency conditions with DNA of a control corn plant; (b) subjecting the sample and probe to high stringency hybridization conditions; and (c) detecting hybridization of the probe to the DNA corresponding to the VIP 1034 event. Detection can be by any means well known in the art including but not limited to fluorescent, chemiluminescent, radiological, immunological, or otherwise. In the case in which hybridization is intended to be used as a means for amplification of a particular sequence to produce an amplicon which is diagnostic for the VIP 1034 corn event, the production and detection by any means well known in the art of the amplicon is intended to be indicative of the intended hybridization to the target sequence where one probe or primer is utilized, or sequences where two or more probes or primers are utilized. The term "biological sample" is intended to comprise a sample that contains or is suspected of containing a nucleic acid comprising from between five and ten nucleotides either side of the point at which one or the other of the two terminal ends of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence contacts the genomic DNA sequence within the chromosome into which the heterologous DNA sequence was inserted, herein also known as the junction sequences. In addition, the junction sequence comprises as little as two nucleotides: those being the first nucleotide within the flanking genomic DNA adjacent to and covalently linked to the first nucleotide within the inserted heterologous DNA sequence.

[0056] In yet another preferred embodiment, the present invention encompasses a kit for detecting the presence of VIP 1034 nucleic acids in a sample, wherein the kit comprises at least one nucleic acid molecule of sufficient length of contiguous nucleotides homologous or complementary to a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, that functions as DNA primer or probe specific for com event VIP 1034 and its progeny, and other materials necessary to enable nucleic acid hybridization or amplification methods. A variety of detection methods can be used including TAQMAN (Perkin Elmer), thermal amplification, ligase chain reaction, southern hybridization, ELISA methods, and colorimetric and fluorescent detection methods. In particular the present invention provides for kits for detecting the presence of the target sequence, i.e., at least one of the junctions of the insert DNA with the genomic DNA of the com plant in VIP 1034, in a sample containing genomic nucleic acid from VIP 1034. The kit is comprised of at least one polynucleotide capable of binding to the target site or substantially adjacent to the target site and at least one means for detecting the binding of the polynucleotide to the target site. The detecting means can be fluorescent, chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or isotopic and can be coupled at least with immunological methods for detecting the binding. A kit is also envisioned which can detect the presence of the target site in a sample, i.e., at least one of the junctions of the insert DNA with the genomic DNA of the com plant in VIP 1034, taking advantage of two or more polynucleotide sequences which together are capable of binding to nucleotide sequences adjacent to or within about 100 base pairs, or within about 200 base pairs, or within about 500 base pairs or within about 1000 base pairs of the target sequence and which can be extended toward each other to form an amplicon which contains at least the target site

[0057] In another preferred embodiment, the present invention encompasses a method for detecting com event VIP 1034 in a biological sample or progeny thereof, the method comprising the steps of (a) extracting protein from a tissue sample of com event VIP 1034; (b) assaying the extracted protein using an immunological method comprising antibody specific for the insecticidal or herbicide resistance protein produced by the VIP 1034 event; and (c) detecting the binding of the antibody to the insecticidal or herbicide resistance protein. [0058] In one prefeπed embodiment, the invention encompasses seed of any com inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the transgenic corn event VIP1034, wherein the transgenic genotype comprises an intact copy and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette and an intact copy of a second expression cassette, both of which are described in Example 1, wherein the intact copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and wherein the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17, and wherein the intact copy of the second expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18. One exemplification of this embodiment is the inbred com seed deposited 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.

[0059] In one aspect of this embodiment, the intact copy of the first expression cassette, the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette, and the intact copy of the second expression cassette, form part of the corn inbred genome. Preferably, the intact copy of the first expression cassette that forms part of the com inbred genome comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16. Preferably, the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette that forms part of the corn inbred genome comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17. Preferably, the intact copy of the second expression cassette that forms part of the corn inbred genome comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18. In a prefeπed embodiment of this aspect, the part of the com inbred genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16 comprises the nucleotide sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO: 11 and SEQ ID NO: 12. In another prefeπed embodiment, the part of the com inbred genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17 comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 15. In still another prefeπed embodiment, the part of the corn inbred genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18 comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 13 and SEQ ID NO: 14.

[0060] In a further prefeπed aspect of this embodiment, the corn inbred is from the inbred com lines CG00526, CG00716, 2010, NP2166, NP2161, NP2275, BCTT609, AF031, H8431, 894, BUTT201, and NP904, preferably from com inbred line CG00526, seed of the com inbred line CG00526 comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention having been deposited on 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925. One skilled in the art will recognize however, that the transgenic genotype of the invention can be introgressed into any com inbred and thus the prefeπed inbred lines of this embodiment are not meant to be limiting.

[0061] Another prefeπed embodiment of the present invention encompasses a corn plant, or parts thereof, comprising the transgenic genotype of the transgenic corn event VIP 1034, wherein the transgenic genotype comprises an intact copy and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette and an intact copy of a second expression cassette, wherein the intact copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and wherein the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17, and wherein the intact copy of the second expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18. One exemplification of this embodiment is the inbred corn seed deposited 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.

[0062] In one embodiment of this aspect, the intact copy of the first expression cassette, the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette, and the intact copy of the second expression cassette, form part of the com plants' genome. Preferably, the intact copy of the first expression cassette that forms part of the com plants' genome comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16. Preferably, the fragmented copy of the first expression cassette that forms part of the com plants' genome comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17. Preferably, the intact copy of the second expression cassette that forms part of the com plants' genome comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18. In a prefeπed embodiment of this aspect, the part of the com plants' genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16 comprises the nucleotide sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO: 11 and SEQ ID NO: 12. In another prefeπed embodiment, the part of the com plants' genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17 comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 15. In still another prefeπed embodiment, the part of the plants' genome that is adjacent to the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18 comprises u e nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 13 and SEQ ID NO: 14.

[0063] In a further prefeπed aspect of this embodiment, the com plant is from the inbred com lines CG00526, CG00716, 2010, NP2166, NP2161, NP2275, BCTT609, AF031, H8431, 894, BUTT201, andNP904, preferably from com inbred line CG00526, seed of the com inbred line CG00526 comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention having been deposited on 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925. One skilled in the art will recognize however, that the transgenic genotype of the invention can be introgressed into any com plant and thus the prefeπed inbred lines of this embodiment are not meant to be limiting.

[0064] h one prefeπed aspect of this embodiment, a corn plant of the invention is characterized in that simultaneously digesting the com plants' genomic DNA with the restriction endonucleases BamHl and Sαcl results in a vzp3 A hybridizing first band of about 2.4 kb and a vzp3A hybridizing second band of about 5.2 kb using a vzp3A-specific probe under high stringency conditions, as described in Example 2. The nucleotide sequence of an exemplified vzp3A-specific probe is set forth in SEQ ID NO: 19.

[0065] In another prefeπed aspect of this embodiment, a com plant of the invention is characterized in that digesting the com plants' genomic DNA with the restriction endonuclease Hindlll results in a single pat hybridizing band using apα£-specific probe under high stringency conditions, as described in Example 3. The nucleotide sequence of an exemplified pαt-specific probe is set forth in SEQ ID NO: 20.

[0066] In one embodiment, the present invention provides a corn plant, wherein the transgenic genotype of the invention confers upon the corn plant insect resistance or tolerance to a herbicide. Preferably, the corn plant comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention confers upon the corn plant insect resistance and tolerance to a herbicide.

[0067] In a prefeπed aspect of this embodiment, the transgenic genotype conferring upon the com plant insect resistance comprises a vzp3 A gene.

[0068] In yet another prefeπed aspect of this embodiment, the transgenic genotype conferring upon the com plant tolerance to a herbicide comprises a p t gene.

[0069] In one prefeπed embodiment, the present invention provides a com plant of the invention, wherein the com plant expresses a Vip3 A protein at substantially the same level as the Vip3 A protein level in plants grown from the seed comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention deposited 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.

[0070] The present invention also encompasses pollen or ovules of a com inbred of the invention.

[0071] A prefeπed embodiment of the present invention encompasses hybrid com seed produced by crossing a com inbred of the invention with a com inbred having a different genotype. Further encompassed by the invention is a hybrid com plant produced by this hybrid corn seed.

[0072] The present invention provides a method for producing com seed comprising crossing a first parent corn plant with a second parent corn plant and harvesting the resultant first generation corn seed, wherein the first or second parent com plant is the inbred corn plant of the invention. Preferably, the first parent corn plant is different from said second parent com plant, wherein the resultant seed is a first generation (FI) hybrid corn seed. According to this method, the inbred corn plant of the invention can be either the female parent of the male parent. Further encompassed by the present invention is FI hybrid com seed produced by this method and an FI hybrid corn plant, or parts thereof, grown from the seed.

[0073] Also provided by the present invention is a method of producing hybrid corn seeds comprising the following steps: planting seeds of a first inbred com line of the invention and seeds of a second inbred line having a different genotype; cultivating corn plants resulting from said planting until time of flowering; emasculating said flowers of plants of one of the com inbred lines; and harvesting the hybrid seed produced thereby. Further encompassed by the invention is the hybrid seed produced by this method and the hybrid corn plants produced by growing this seed.

[0074] One skilled in the art will recognize that the transgenic genotype of the present invention can be introgressed by breeding into other com lines comprising different transgenic genotypes. For example, a com inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the present invention can be crossed with a corn inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the lepidopteran resistant Btl 1 event, which is known in the art, thus producing com seed that comprises both the transgenic genotype of the invention and the Btll transgenic genotype. This is exemplified in Example 6. Examples of other transgenic events which can be crossed with an inbred of the present invention include, the glyphosate tolerant GA21 event, the glyphosate tolerant/lepidopteran insect resistant MON802 event, the lepidopteran resistant DBT418 event, the male sterile event MS 3, the phosphinothricin tolerant event B16, the lepidopteran insect resistant event MON 80100, the phosphinothricin tolerant events T14, T25, and the lepidopteran insect resistant event 176, all of which are known in the art. It will be further recognized that other combinations can be made with the transgenic genotype of the invention and thus these examples should not be viewed as limiting.

Breeding

[0075] The transgenic genotype of the present invention can be introgressed in any corn inbred or hybrid using art recognized breeding techniques. The goal of plant breeding is to combine in a single variety or hybrid various desirable traits. For field crops, these traits may include resistance to insects and diseases, tolerance to herbicides, tolerance to heat and drought, reducing the time to crop maturity, greater yield, and better agronomic quality. With mechanical harvesting of many crops, uniformity of plant characteristics such as germination and stand establishment, growth rate, maturity, and plant and ear height, is important.

[0076] Field crops are bred through techniques that take advantage of the plant's method of pollination. A plant is self-pollinated if pollen from one flower is transfeπed to the same or another flower of the same plant. A plant is cross-pollinated if the pollen comes from a flower on a different plant.

[0077] Plants that have been self-pollinated and selected for type for many generations become homozygous at almost all gene loci and produce a uniform population of true breeding progeny. A cross between two different homozygous lines produces a uniform population of hybrid plants that may be heterozygous for many gene loci. A cross of two plants each heterozygous at a number of gene loci will produce a population of hybrid plants that differ genetically and will not be uniform.

[0078] Maize (Zea mays L.), often refeπed to as com, can be bred by both self- pollination and cross-pollination techniques. Corn has separate male and female flowers on the same plant, located on the tassel and the ear, respectively. Natural pollination occurs in com when wind blows pollen from the tassels to the silks that protmde from the tops of the ears.

[0079] A reliable method of controlling male fertility in plants offers the opportunity for improved plant breeding. This is especially true for development of corn hybrids, which relies upon some sort of male sterility system. There are several options for controlling male fertility available to breeders, such as: manual or mechanical emasculation (or detasseling), cytoplasmic male sterility, genetic male sterility, gametocides and the like.

[0080] Hybrid com seed is typically produced by a male sterility system incorporating manual or mechanical detasseling. Alternate strips of two com inbreds are planted in a field, and the pollen-bearing tassels are removed from one of the inbreds (female). Providing that there is sufficient isolation from sources of foreign com pollen, the ears of the detasseled inbred will be fertilized only from the other inbred (male), and the resulting seed is therefore hybrid and will form hybrid plants.

[0081] The laborious, and occasionally unreliable, detasseling process can be avoided by using one of many methods of conferring genetic male sterility in the art, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. These methods use a variety of approaches such as delivering into the plant a gene encoding a cytotoxic substance associated with a male tissue specific promoter or an antisense system in which a gene critical to fertility is identified and an antisense to that gene is inserted in the plant (see: Fabinjanski, et al. EPO 89/3010153.8 publication no. 329,308 and PCT application PCT/CA90/00037 published as WO 90/08828).

Development of Corn Inbred Lines

[0082] The use of male sterile inbreds is but one factor in the production of com hybrids. Plant breeding techniques known in the art and used in a com plant breeding program include, but are not limited to, recuπent selection, backcrossing, pedigree breeding, restriction length polymorphism enhanced selection, genetic marker enhanced selection and transformation. The development of com hybrids in a com plant breeding program requires, in general, the development of homozygous inbred lines, the crossing of these lines, and the evaluation of the crosses. Pedigree breeding and recuπent selection breeding methods are used to develop inbred lines from breeding populations. Com plant breeding programs combine the genetic backgrounds from two or more inbred lines or various other germplasm sources into breeding pools from which new inbred lines are developed by selfing and selection of desired phenotypes. The new inbreds are crossed with other inbred lines and the hybrids from these crosses are evaluated to determine which of those have commercial potential. Plant breeding and hybrid development, as practiced in a corn plant-breeding program, are expensive and time-consuming processes.

[0083] Pedigree breeding starts with the crossing of two genotypes, each of which may have one or more desirable characteristics that is lacking in the other or which complements the other. If the two original parents do not provide all the desired characteristics, other sources can be included in the breeding population. In the pedigree method, superior plants are selfed and selected in successive generations. In the succeeding generations the heterozygous condition gives way to homogeneous lines as a result of self-pollination and selection. Typically in the pedigree method of breeding five or more generations of selfing and selection is practiced: Fi -^ F2; F2 - F3; F3 ->F ; F4 - F.5; etc.

[0084] Recuπent selection breeding, backcrossing for example, can be used to improve an inbred line and a hybrid that is made using those inbreds. Backcrossing can be used to transfer a specific desirable trait from one inbred or source to an inbred that lacks that trait. This can be accomplished, for example, by first crossing a superior inbred (recurrent parent) to a donor inbred (non-recuπent parent), that carries the appropriate gene(s) for the trait in question. The progeny of this cross is then mated back to the superior recurrent parent followed by selection in the resultant progeny for the desired trait to be transfeπed from the non-recuπent parent. After five or more backcross generations with selection for the desired trait, the progeny will be homozygous for loci controlling the characteristic being transfeπed, but will be like the superior parent for essentially all other genes. The last backcross generation is then selfed to give pure breeding progeny for the gene(s) being transfeπed. A hybrid developed from inbreds containing the transfeπed gene(s) is essentially the same as a hybrid developed from the same inbreds without the transfeπed gene(s). 1

[0085] Elite inbred lines, that is, pure breeding, homozygous inbred lines, can also be used as starting materials for breeding or source populations from which to develop other inbred lines. These inbred lines derived from elite inbred lines can be developed using the pedigree breeding and recuπent selection breeding methods described earlier. As an example, when backcross breeding is used to create these derived lines in a com plant breeding program, elite inbreds can be used as a parental line or starting material or source population and can serve as either the donor or recurrent parent.

Development of Corn Hybrids

[0086] A single cross com hybrid results from the cross of two inbred lines, each of which has a genotype that complements the genotype of the other. The hybrid progeny of the first generation is designated F\. In the development of commercial hybrids in a corn plant-breeding program, only the Fi hybrid plants are sought. Prefeπed Fi hybrids are more vigorous than their inbred parents. This hybrid vigor, or heterosis, can be manifested in many polygenic traits, including increased vegetative growth and increased yield.

[0087] The development of a com hybrid in a corn plant breeding program involves three steps: (1) the selection of plants from various germplasm pools for initial breeding crosses; (2) the selfing of the selected plants from the breeding crosses for several generations to produce a series of inbred lines, which, although different from each other, breed tine and are highly uniform; and (3) crossing the selected inbred lines with different inbred lines to produce the hybrid progeny (Fi). During the inbreeding process in corn, the vigor of the lines decreases. Vigor is restored when two different inbred lines are crossed to produce the hybrid progeny (Fi). An important consequence of the homozygosity and homogeneity of the inbred lines is that the hybrid between a defined pair of inbreds will always be the same. Once the inbreds that give a superior hybrid have been identified, the hybrid seed can be reproduced indefinitely as long as the homogeneity of the inbred parents is maintained.

[0088] A single cross hybrid is produced when two inbred lines are crossed to produce the Fi progeny. A double cross hybrid is produced from four inbred lines crossed in pairs (A X B and C X D) and then the two Fi hybrids are crossed again (A X B) X (C X D). A three-way cross hybrid is produced from three inbred lines where two of the inbred lines are crossed (A X B) and then the resulting Fi hybrid is crossed with the third inbred (A X B) X C. Much of the hybrid vigor exhibited by Fi hybrids is lost in the next generation (F2). Consequently, seed from hybrids is not used for planting stock.

[0089] Hybrid seed production requires elimination or inactivation of pollen produced by the female parent. Incomplete removal or inactivation of the pollen provides the potential for self-pollination. This inadvertently self-pollinated seed may be unintentionally harvested and packaged with hybrid seed.

[0090] Once the seed is planted, it is possible to identify and select these self-pollinated plants. These self-pollinated plants will be genetically equivalent to the female inbred line used to produce the hybrid.

[0091] Typically these self-pollinated plants can be identified and selected due to their decreased vigor. Female selfs are identified by their less vigorous appearance for vegetative and/or reproductive characteristics, including shorter plant height, small ear size, ear and kernel shape, cob color, or other characteristics.

[0092] Identification of these self-pollinated lines can also be accomplished through molecular marker analyses. See, "The Identification of Female Selfs in Hybrid Maize: A Comparison Using Electrophoresis and Morphology", Smith, J. S. C. and Wych, R. D., Seed Science and Technology 14, pp. 1-8 (1995), the disclosure of which is expressly incorporated herein by reference. Through these technologies, the homozygosity of the self-pollinated line can be verified by analyzing allelic composition at various loci along the genome. Those methods allow for rapid identification of the invention disclosed herein. See also, "Identification of Atypical Plants in Hybrid Maize Seed by Postcontrol and Electrophoresis" Sarca, V. et al., Probleme de Genetica Teoritica si Aplicata Vol. 20 (1) p. 29-42. [0093] As is readily apparent to one skilled in the art, the foregoing are only some of the various ways by which the inbred of the present invention can be obtained by those looking to introgress the transgenic genotype of the invention other com lines. Other means are available, and the above examples are illustrative only.

EXAMPLES

[0094] The invention will be further described by reference to the following detailed examples. These examples are provided for purposes of illustration only, and are not intended to be limiting unless otherwise specified. Standard recombinant DNA and molecular cloning techniques used here are well known in the art and are described by Ausubel (ed.), Cuπent Protocols in Molecular Biology, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. (1994); J. Sambrook, et al, Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 3d Ed., Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (2001); and by TJ. Silhavy, MX. Berman, and L.W. Enquist, Experiments with Gene Fusions, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (1984).

Example 1. Transformation and Selection of the VIP 1034 Event

[0095] The transformation of the Vip3A com event VIP 1034 was conducted in a proprietary com (Zea mays) line CG00526, an elite inbred of Lancaster parentage. Transformation was achieved through microprojectile bombardment of type-I embryogenic callus (Wright et al, 2001, Plant Cell Rep. 20:429-436), using two linear expression cassettes.

[0096] The first expression cassette, set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, is a 4.6 kb nucleic acid comprising a maize ubiquitin constitutive promoter operably linked to a vzp3 A gene operably linked to a 35S terminator, and the second expression cassette, set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18, is a 2.9 kb nucleic acid comprising a maize ubiquitin constitutive promoter operably linked to a p t gene operably linked to a Nos terminator.

[0097] Prior to transformation, both expression cassettes were electrophoresed on a 0.8% agarose gel, and the bands containing the appropriate DNA fragment were excised from the gel and elecfroeluted. The DNA was then concentrated and resuspended in buffer for transformation. No additional DNA (e.g., carrier DNA) was used during the transformation process.

[0098] The selection procedure for transformed cells was based on the method of Wright et al, 2001. Following microprojectile bombardment, the com tissue was placed on a medium containing phosphinothricin (PPT). Non-transformed com cells did not survive in the presence of PPT while the expression of the pat gene in transformed cells allowed for survival and growth of transformed cells. The surviving callus tissue was then regenerated into plants.

[0099] The original regenerant (To generation) was backcrossed to inbred CG00526, creating the Fi population. The Fi plants were self-pollinated to create the F2 generation, and this process was repeated to create an F3 generation. Progeny testing of the F3 plants was employed to identify homozygous (converted) families. The vzp3A-converted CG00526 inbred was crossed to other elite inbred lines to create the hybrids used in further studies.

Example 2. Analysis of the vzp3A Insert

Southern Blotting Procedure

[00100] Zeta-Probe GT blotting membranes (BioRad) were UV crossed linked after blotting overnight. The membrane was prehybridized at 67° C for at least 30 minutes in the Zeta Probe hybridization buffer (0.25 M NaPO4, pH 7.2 and 7 % SDS). A radiolabeled probe was made using the Rediprime II Random Prime Labeling System (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech), 32P-labeled dCTP, and 25 ng of probe DNA (PCR generated fragment). The radiolabeled probe DNA was denatured at 95° C in 45 μl of TE for five minutes and then cooled on ice. The DNA/TE mixture was added to the RediPrime reaction tube along with 5.0 μCi 32P labeled dCTP. The reaction tube was incubated at 37° C for 10 minutes. The probe reaction mix was pipetted onto a Probe Quant G-50 Micro Spin column (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech) and spun at 2000 rpm for 2 minutes to collect labeled probe. The probe was then denatured at 95° C for 5 minutes. The pre-hybridization buffer was replaced with fresh Zeta Probe hybridization buffer and the probe was added. The membrane and the probe were incubated at 67° C overnight. The membrane was washed twice in 20 mM NaPO , pH 7.2 and 5 % SDS for 30 minutes each wash. The membrane was then washed twice in 20 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7.2 and 1 % SDS for 30 minutes each wash. The membrane was wrapped in plastic wrap and placed in a film cartridge with Kodak BioMax X-ray film and placed at -80° C.

Copy Number

[00101] Total (genomic) DNA from VIP1034 was digested with the restriction endonuclease BamHl, which has a single recognition site within the vzp3A insert DNA, and hybridized to a vzp3A-specific probe. Two hybridizing bands were evident, indicating the presence of two copies of the vzp3A gene in the plant genome. This observation was confirmed by digesting genomic DNA with a second enzyme (EcoRI) that also digests once within the inserted DNA.

[00102] VIP 1034 DNA was double-digested with Sαcl and Dral, and Southern analyzed using a vzp3A-specific hybridization probe. Two hybridizing bands were evident; a approximately 4.2 kb band, the expected size of an intact vzp3 A insert spanning the ubiquitin promoter through the vzp3A structural gene, and a second band about 3.4 kb in length. These results confirmed that two copies of the vzp3A gene were present in event VIP 1034, and the evidence suggested that one of the vzp3A inserts had a deletion.

Insert integrity

[00103] Genomic DNA was double-digested with BamHl and Sαcl, and Southern analyzed using a vzp3A-specific probe. Two hybridizing bands were evident; a 2.4 kb band, the expected size of a BamHVSacl fragment that spans the vzp3 A structural gene, and a approximately 5.2 kb band. This larger band was the same size observed with the RαrnHI-digested DNA probed with vip3A, suggesting that the Sαcl site located at the 3'- terminus of one copy of the vzp3A gene had been altered or deleted. This interpretation was supported by analysis of VIP 1034 DNA double-digested with EcoRI and Sαcl. While a band of about 3.0 kb was evidence of an intact vzp3A fragment that spans Intronl through the vzp3 A structural gene, there was a second hybridizing band of about 4.4 kb, the same size as seen with the EcoRI-digested DNA probed with vzp3A, affirming that, at a minimum, the Sαcl site has been altered or deleted in one copy of the vzp3A gene.

[00104] The integrity of the two copies of the vzp3A insert in VIP 1034 was further investigated by conducting a series of double digests and probing with a vzpJ 4-specific probe. For analysis of the 5' portion of the vzp3A gene and the promoter region, DNA was double-digested withNmπl/EcoRI, XmnUXhol, or XmnVDral. If both inserts were fully intact over this region, a single band for each digest would have been evident. The Xmήl/EcoRI digest appeared to yield a single band of about 1.3 kb, suggesting that the 5 ' portion of the vip3A gene and the 3' portion of h tronl were intact in both copies of the vzp3A insert. The XmnUXhol digest yielded one band of the expected size for an intact copy of about 2.0 kb, as well as a smaller band. The XmnVDral also yielded two bands, the anticipated size for an intact copy of the insert of about 2.6 kb, in addition to a smaller band. This data suggested that one vzp3A insert was intact up to the -Drαl site in the 5' portion of the ubiquitin promoter, while the other vzp3A insert suffered a deletion in the ubiquitin promoter, spanning the region at or near the EcoRI site (located in Intronl) through the Dral site, essentially eliminating the entire ubiquitin promoter and the non- translated leader. [00105] A second set of double digests was used to investigate the integrity of the vzp3A structural gene. VIP1034 DNA digested with BamHVXmnl and hybridized with a vzp3A- specific probe yielded the expected single band of about 0.7 kb. The BamHVNhel digest also provided a band of the expected size of about 1.6 kb, and an additional band of about 5.2 kb. Similarly, the BamHllAval digest yielded one band of the expected size of about 2.0kb and a larger band of about 2.6 kb. This Southern data suggested that one (copy of the vzp3 A gene was intact through the ^4 αl site, while the second vzp3 A insert had suffered a deletion 3' to the Xmnl site in the vzp3A coding region, eliminating the Nhel site. The size of the BamHVNhel hybridizing fragment of about 5.2 kb was consistent with the band noted in the RαmHI digest of VIP 1034 DNA probed with vzp3A, demonstrating that the 5.2 kb band represents a RαmHI fragment comprised of a small portion of vzp3A coding region and plant DNA sequences. The interpretation of these findings is consistent with the deletion of the Sαcl restriction site at the 3' end of one copy of the vzp3A gene. The Southern data showed that this copy of the vzp3A gene lacked a functional promoter, and suffered a large deletion of its coding region at its 3' end. Thus, there should no expression of a truncated version of the Vip3A protein, which

I is supported by the presence of a single protein on gels when protein extracts from V1P1034 leaf tissue are probed with a polyclonal antibody made to the Nip3A protein. [00106] The presence of 35S terminator sequences at the 3 ' end of the intact vzp3 A gene was verified by DΝA sequence analysis using (1) a forward primer anchored within the terminal portion of the vzp3A structural gene (SΕQ ID NO: 23), and (2) a reverse primer anchored within the adjacent plant DNA sequences (SΕQ ID NO: 24). [00107] Nip3A-specific probes useful for this example are disclosed in SEQ ID Νos: 19- 21.

Example 3. Analysis of the pat Insert Southern Blotting Procedure

[00108] The southern blotting procedure was the same as described in Example 1 above.

Copy Number

[00109] Total (genomic) DNA from VIP 1034 was digested with Hindlϊl. Following electrophoresis, the DNA was hybridized to apαt-specific probe (SEQ ID NO: 22), yielding a single hybridizing band to indicate a single copy of the pat gene in the plant genome. VIP 1034 DNA was also digested with Nhel, which cuts at a single site within the Intronl (Intl) element of the ubiquitin promoter adjacent to the pat gene. Hybridization using a pat-specific probe yielded a single band, providing further evidence that a single at insert exists in event VIP 1034. NIP 1034 genomic DΝA was double- digested with the restriction enzymes Hindlll and Sαcl, each having a single recognition site at the 5 '-terminus and 3 '-terminus, respectively, of the pat transformation DΝA. The detection of a single hybridizing band (>10 kb) greater than the expected 2.9 kb of the transforming DΝA suggested that either one or both of the terminal restriction enzyme sites (Hindlll or Sαcl) were not accurately reformed when the transforming DΝA integrated into the plant chromosome, not an unexpected finding. A single hybridizing band in the absence of one or both of these terminal restriction sites indicates a single insert of the pat DΝA.

Insert Integrity

[00110] NIP 1034 genomic DΝA was digested with the restriction enzyme Pst , which digests the pat expression cassette DΝA at the 5' and 3' ends of the pat structural gene. A single hybridizing band coπesponding to the size of the pat gene of about 0.6 kb was visualized following hybridization with apαt-specific probe. This indicated that the pat structural gene in NIP 1034 is intact.

[00111] NIP 1034 DΝA was double-digested with Sphl and Notl, which have recognition sites at the 5' and 3' termini, respectively, of the transforming DΝA. Hybridizing with a pat-specific probe yielded a single band of the expected size (2.9 kb), evidence that the single pat insert is intact from the 5' end of the ubiquitin promoter to the 3' end of the nos terminator.

[00112] The intact and fragmented vzp3A insert and the intact pat insert were sequenced at a minimum of 4x coverage and the sequence obtained confirmed the conclusions drawn from the Southern analysis described in Examples 1 and 2. In general, the approximate size of the hybridization bands derived from the Southern blots were very comparable to the predicted DNA fragments which would result from digests employing restriction endonuclease enzyme sites which could be identified in the sequence data obtained for each insert. The nucleotide sequence obtained for the intact vzp3 A insert is shown in SEQ ID NO: 16, the nucleotide sequence obtained for the fragmented vzp3A insert is shown in SEQ ID NO: 17, and the nucleotide sequence obtained for the intact pat insert is shown in SEQ ID NO: 18.

Example 4. Analysis of Flanking DNA Sequence

[00113] DNA sequence flanking the intact and fragmented vzp3A insert and the intact pat insert was obtained using OmniPlex™ Technology (Kamberov et al, 2002, Use of in vitro OmniPlex libraries for high-throughput comparative genomics and molecular haplotyping. Proceedings of SPIE, Tools for Molecular Analysis and High-Throughput Screening, 4626:1-12, herein incorporated by reference. One skilled in the art will recognize that other known methods for obtaining the flanking DNA sequences can be used.

[00114] The intact vzp3A insert comprising the full-length vzp3A gene was found to be flanked 5' by the com genomic sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 11 and flanked 3' by the com genomic sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 12. The fragmented vip3A insert was found to be flanked 5' by the corn genomic sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 15. The intact pat insert was found to be flanked 5' by the com genomic sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 13 and flanked 3' by the corn genomic sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 14.

Example 5. Agronomic Performance of NIP1034-Derived Com

Insect Efficacy Evaluations [00115] CG00526 plants comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention were self- pollinated and progeny tested to identify homozygous lines that comprise the vipSA gene or do not comprise the zp5^4 gene (negative segregants). These isoline selections were then crossed to elite tester inbreds to produce hybrid seed for field tests. In addition, standard non-transformed plants of inbred CG00526 were crossed to the same testers to produce a hybrid that did not comprise the vip3A gene and was not derived from transformed plants (non-transgenic isoline). Where possible, the efficacy of NIP1034- derived hybrids in field tests was compared to negative segregants and/or non-transgenic isolines. In those trials where negative segregant and non-transgenic isoline seed quantities were limited, non-transgenic near isolines were used. The data from these trials was analyzed using an analysis of variance and means were compared using the least significant difference (LSD) at the 5% significance level.

[00116] The efficacy of NIP1034-derived com hybrids towards FAW feeding on leaves and ears was compared to controls at several locations in the Midwestern U.S. Hybrids appropriate for each trial location were tested for insect control efficacy, utilizing a randomized complete block design. Each entry was planted in single row plots replicated 2-5 times depending on location. To ensure adequate FAW pressure, N6 stage corn plants were manually infested with first instars (LI) (30 - 150 larvae/plant). Two weeks after infestation, foliar damage was rated using the following scale: 1) No feeding marks on whorl leaf, marks on 2 or 3 feral leaves, 2) Feeding marks on whorl leaf, or pinholes in feral leaves, 3) Whorl leaf with pinholes or small circular holes and lesions in feral leaves, 4) Small lesions up to 1/2", 5) Lesions from V" - 1", 6) Lesions greater than 1", 7) Many large and small lesions on whorl and feral leaves, 8) Whorl partially consumed, 9) Large holes in all leaves, plant dieing. To assess the level of protection of NIP 1034 hybrids against FAW ear damage, an efficacy trial was conducted in McLean, IL. Green silks were infested with 15 - 20 neonate larvae per plant. Ear damage (tunnel length; % ear infection) was assessed four weeks after flowering.

[00117] Each FAW efficacy trial included a number of NIP1034-derived and control hybrid entries, each representing a distinct genetic background. The foliar FAW damage rating of each entry is presented in Table 1. Genotype designations assigned to hybrids (e.g., NIP1034 hybrid 1) distinguish different genetic backgrounds within a trial, and do not necessarily represent a relationship to genotype designations across trials. Control hybrids manually infested with FAW suffered extensive foliar damage while the NIP 1034 hybrids exhibited little or no feeding damage. Similarly, ears of NIP1034-derived hybrids suffered little or no damage from FAW larvae, while the ears of non-transgenic control hybrids suffered substantial feeding damage (Table 2).

Table 1. Efficacy of NIP 1034 and Νon-transgenic Control Hybrids against Fall Armyworm leaf damage.

Figure imgf000035_0001

1 Least significant difference at the 5% significance level.

Table 2. Efficacy of NIP 1034 and non-transgenic control hybrids against fall armyworm ear damage.

Figure imgf000036_0001

Morphological and Agronomic Characteristics

[00118] The agronomic performance of NIP1034-derived com hybrids was evaluated in about 106 field trials in 13 states. Sites throughout the corn growing regions of the continental U.S. and Hawaii were chosen to enable performance evaluations of the plants under diverse environmental conditions, as well as exposure to a broad group of pathogens and pests indigenous to the various geographic regions. At each site, plant breeders and agronomists monitored the transgenic varieties and their genetically equivalent non-transgenic counterparts throughout the growing season. In addition to regular inspections for disease and insect pests, qualitative comparisons for a large number of morphological and agronomic traits were made between the transgenic and non-transgenic lines. The parameters chosen for this comparison were those which are typically monitored by professional breeders and agronomists in the seed industry, and cover a broad range of characteristics that encompass the entire life cycle of the corn plant, including, stand establishment, early plant vigor, leaf orientation, leaf color, plant height, root strength (lodging), silk date, silk color, ear height, ear shape, ear tipfill, intactness, dry ear weight, tassel color, tassel size, and yield.

[00119] The observations of the agronomists and breeders were documented. Their assessment was that, except for tolerance to lepidopteran pests, the performance of the NIP1034-derived hybrids was identical to the non-transformed isogenic counterparts. This was true for hybrids evaluated across all the geographic regions in this study

Evaluation of Herbicide Tolerance [00120] Expression of the transgenic genotype of the invention, particularly the pat gene, renders NIP1034-derived corn plants tolerant to glufosinate ammonium herbicides. To determine if the application of glufosinate-ammonium had an impact on yield and other agronomic properties, early and late maturity NIP1034-derived hybrids were treated with glufosinate ammonium and evaluated at nine field locations. Three replications of two- row plots/entry were planted at each location using a split plot design. Each hybrid was treated with IX or 2X field level rates of glufosinate ammonium. An untreated plot (NT) of each hybrid was included for comparison. The data from these trials were analyzed using an analysis of variance, and means are compared between hybrids treated with different levels of herbicide using the LSD at the 5% significance level.

[00121] A number of genetically different com lines derived from backcrosses of elite inbreds to CG00526-NIP1034 were tested in the field. The performance of the transgenic lines was compared with isogenic or closely related non-transgenic lines. Entomologists, pathologists, plant breeders and product development agronomists highly experienced in commercial corn production, monitored the trials. The plants were evaluated for insect efficacy, incidence of disease and pests, reactions to herbicides, morphological characteristics, and yield.

[00122] The general health of the plants appeared to benefit from the lack of insect damage due to expression of Nip3A protein. Further, there was no indication that the transformation process or expression of the vip3A or pat genes had any unintended effects on agronomic performance or increased the weediness potential of corn plants derived from event NIP 1034.

Example 6. Compositional Analysis of NIP1034-Derived Plants

[00123] A comparative study of the major components of NIP1034-derived com and isogenic (non-transgenic) controls was performed. The composition of kernels and whole plant material (greenchop) was examined in three hybrids representing different maturity groups. Proximates (ash, fat, total fiber, moisture, protein, starch), carotenoids (xanthophylls and b-carotene), amino acid composition, vitamin, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and fatty acid profiles were determined. Sporadic differences between the NIP1034-derived and control tissue were observed from some of the components tested, but no pattern emerged that indicates that these differences are attributable to the transformation process of the expression of the transgenes in the NIP1034-derived plants. The findings of this study indicate that the composition of NIP1034-derived corn tissue is substantially similar to its non-transformed counterpart

Example 6. Quantification of Nip3A and Pat Proteins in NIP1034 Com

Experiment 1

[00124] Plants representing two NIP1034-derived field com hybrids, H8431 x CG00526- NIP1034 and 894 x CG00526NIP1034, plus their respective non-transgenic isoline controls were field-grown concuπently using standard local agronomic procedures. The transgenic hybrids were hemizygous for the transgenic genotype. Ten plants of each hybrid comprising the transgenic genotype, plus two plants from each of the coπesponding control genotypes, were harvested at each of five developmental time points:

Whorl stage, ca. 6 weeks after planting

Anthesis (pollen shed), ca. 10 - 11 weeks after planting

Dough stage, ca. 13 - 14 weeks after planting

Grain maturity, ca. 18 - 20 weeks after planting

Senescence, ca. 23 - 24 weeks after planting [00125] For each stage, five transgenic plants from each hybrid were separated into parts and five retained as whole-plant samples. Concuπently, one control plant per genotype was separated into parts and the other retained as a whole-plant sample. After weighing, all samples were stored frozen at about -80°C until the tissue was processed further prior to extraction and analysis. Tissue samples from leaves, roots, silks, kernels, pith, pollen and whole plants were processed and extracted as described below and quantitatively analyzed for Viρ3 A and PAT by ELISA.

Plant tissue processing

[00126] Whole plants, and individual parts (except for tassels) were reduced to a fine powder by processing using either a coffee grinder, blender, Grindomix™ grinder (Brinkmann Instruments, Westbury, ΝY), mortar with a pestle or mill, or a combination of these devices. All processing was done in the presence of either dry ice or liquid nitrogen. Samples were mixed well to ensure homogeneity. The entire plant tissue sample, or a representative sub-sample, was retained for analysis, allowing sufficient sample size for archival storage of reserve plant tissue samples. The percent dry weight of each sample was determined. Processed samples were stored at about -80°C until lyophilization.

[00127] Pollen was collected from individual tassels from field-grown plants by homogenizing spikelets in a Waring blender (using two four-second pulses) in 50 ml extraction buffer [50 mM Tris-HCl, 0.1 M NaCl, 2 mM EDTA, 1 mM dithiothreitol, 1 mM 4-(l-aminoethyl) benzenesul-fonylfluoride HCl, 1 mM leupeptin, pH 9.5]. The pollen was separated from anther and tassel material by filtration through cheesecloth into parachute cloth. The pollen was washed off the parachute cloth into a centrifuge tube, the buffer was removed by aspiration after the pollen has settled, and the pollen was lyophilized.

[00128] Pollen from greenhouse grown plants was collected, filtered through 100 μm sieves and air-dried overnight. All pollen samples were stored at ca. -80°C. Pollen processed by both methods was extracted and analyzed as described in the next section.

Tissue Extraction

[00129] Lyophilized tissue (except pollen) and whole-plant samples were extracted as follows: 0.1 g aliquot of the powdered dry material was weighed into a 15-ml polypropylene tube, resuspended in 3 ml extraction buffer and extracted using a Polytron® homogenizer (Brinkmann Instruments). After centrifugation for 15 min at 10,000 x g at ca. 4°C, the supernatant was used for Vip3A and PAT analyses by ELISA. After treatment with iodoacetamide as described by Hill and Straka (1988), total protein in the extracts was quantitated using the BCA™ Protein Assay Reagent (Pierce, Rockford, IL).

[00130] Pollen extracts were prepared by suspending lyophilized pollen 1:30 (w/v) in extraction buffer. After 30 min on ice, the pollen suspensions were disrupted by three passages through a French pressure cell at ca. 15,000 psi, followed by centrifugation at 14,000 x g for 5 min at ca. 4°C. The supernatant was used for Vip3A and PAT analyses by ELISA. Total protein was quantitated as described above.

VIP3A quantification [00131] The extracts prepared as described above were quantitatively analyzed for VIP3A by ELISA using Protein A-purified polyclonal rabbit and immunoaffinity-purified polyclonal goat antibodies generated to Vip3 A protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli over-expressing the vip3A gene. The lower limit of quantification of the double-sandwich ELISA was estimated based on the lowest concentration of pure reference protein lying on the linear portion of the standard curve, the maximum volume of a control extract that could be analyzed without background interference, and the coπesponding weight of the sample that the aliquot represented.

PAT quantification

[00132] The extracts prepared as described above were quantitatively analyzed for PAT by ELISA using immunoaffinity-purified polyclonal rabbit and goat antibodies generated to PAT protein purified from recombinant E. coli over-expressing the pat gene. The lower limit of quantification of the double-sandwich ELISA was estimated based on the lowest concentration of pure reference protein lying on the linear portion of the standard curve, the maximum volume of a control extract that could be analyzed without background interference, and the coπesponding weight of the sample that the aliquot represented.

Experiment 2

[00133] The developmental study for Experiment 2 was conducted following the same procedures as in Experiment 1 described above, using plants from one VIP1034-derived inbred field com line, CG00526-VIP1034, and one VIP1034-derived sweet com hybrid, together with their respective non-transgenic controls. The inbred line was homozygous for the transgenic genotype and the hybrid was hemizygous for the transgenic genotype.

[00134] Estimates of the quantities of Vip3A and PAT protein that were present per acre and per hectare were calculated using the values measured for whole plants analyzed in the Experiment 1 and Experiment 2 developmental studies described above. Estimates were calculated as follows:

g VIP3A (or PAD = mean g VIP3 A (or PAD Ύ mean g dry wt. x 26.500 plants acre g dry wt. plant acre Similar calculations were also made using a value of 60,000 plants/hectare.

Experiment 3

[00135] The stability of Vip3A and PAT protein expression in anthesis-stage leaves was evaluated in plants representing successive generations in the breeding process. Grain (seed) was collected from four successive backcross generations (BC1, BC2, BC3, and BC4) derived by using field com line CG00526-VIP1034 (the initial inbred line that is homozygous for the transgenic genotype) as the source of the transgenes and either field com line 2010 or line CG00716 as the recurrent inbred parent. Seed representing all four backcross generations were planted concuπently in the greenhouse and leaf-pieces of the seedlings were bioassayed against fall armyworm (FAW) larvae, the target pest, to cull out negative segregants. The remaining 2 — 10 plants per generation (having demonstrated activity against FAW larvae) were grown in the greenhouse to anthesis at which time the leaves were collected and frozen at about -80°C. As negative controls, two negative segregant plants per generation were retained, and were concuπently sampled, stored and analyzed in the same manner. Samples were processed and extracted as described in Experiment 1 and quantitatively analyzed for Vip3 A and PAT by ELISA.

Experiment 4

[00136] To further characterize the range of Vip3A and PAT expression ihVTP1034- derived hybrids, anthesis-stage leaves and pollen from two pre-commercial field corn hybrids, NP2166 x NP2161-VIP1034 and NP2275 x NP2161-VIP1034, representing different early maturity hybrid groups, were analyzed. Nine or 10 plants per transgenic hybrid were greenhouse-grown and sampled at anthesis (control, non-transgenic plants were not included in this experiment). Leaves from individual plants were collected and stored frozen at about -80°C. A pooled pollen sample was collected from each genotype, and stored frozen at about -80°C. Samples were processed and extracted as described in Experiment 1 and quantitatively analyzed for Vip3 A and PAT by ELISA.

Experiment 5 [00137] To determine the levels of Nip3A and PAT protein in corn silage, plants representing both an early- (H8431 x CG00526-NIP1034) and a late-maturing (894 x CG00526-NIP1034) NIP1034-derived field com hybrid, together with the corresponding non-transgenic control hybrids, were grown concuπently in the field using conventional local agronomic practices. Whole plants (minus the roots) were harvested at dough stage and chopped using a chipper. The mini-silos were filled completely with the freshly chopped plant material and sealed with rubber stoppers to initiate the fermentation process. A single sample of the freshly chopped, non-ensiled material ("pre-silage") together with six mini-silos were prepared for each transgenic and control hybrid. A representative sub-sample of each pre-silage sample was ground in a coffee grinder with dry ice and stored at about -80°C, and the mini-silos were placed in a area outdoors under ambient conditions. Duplicate mini-silos for each hybrid comprising the transgenic and control genotype were opened at 15, 29 and 75 days post-ensiling and sampled. At the time of sampling, the contents of each designated silo were mixed thoroughly. A representative aliquot from each silo was ground in a coffee grinder with presence of dry ice and stored frozen at about -80°C until lyophilized. Samples of the pre-silage and silage material were subsequently analyzed for NIP3 A and PAT protein levels as described in Experiment 1.

Results

[00138] To characterize the range of expression of transgenic proteins in com plants derived from event NIP 1034, the concentrations of Nip3A protein and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) were determined for several plant tissues and whole plants at various developmental stages. Two field com hybrids, an inbred field com line, and a sweet com hybrid were analyzed from field tests. The quantities of Nip3A and PAT protein were estimated on a per-acre and a per-hectare basis. In addition, Vip3A and PAT levels were measured in: anthesis-stage leaves from four successive backcross generations of two VIP1034-derived field com genotypes; anthesis-stage leaves and pollen from two pre-commercial VIP1034-derived field com hybrids; and silage prepared from two VIP1034-derived field com hybrids.

[00139] Vip3A protein was found in all tissues examined and at all developmental stages. The transgenic inbred line (CG00526-VIP1034) generally expressed about 50% higher levels of Vip3A than the hybrid genotypes derived from event VIP1034. This was consistent with the fact that the inbred line and the hybrid genotypes were homozygous and hemizygous, respectively, for the transgenic genotype. Across all sampling times, mean Vip3A concentrations in kernels (grain) ranged from about 11 - 16 μg Vip3A/g fresh wt. (16 - 28 μg VIP3A/g dry wt.) in field com hybrids, about 24 - 52 μg Vip3A/g fresh wt. (55 - 84 μg VIP3A/g dry wt.) in the sweet com hybrid, and about <19 - 48 μg Nip3A/g fresh wt. (<24 - 77 μg NIP3A/g dry wt.) in the inbred line. Across all sampling times, mean Nip3 A levels in roots, pith and silks did not exceed about 7 μg/g fresh wt. (37 μg/g dry wt.) in the hybrid genotypes and about 29 μg/g fresh wt. (158 μg/g dry wt.) in the inbred line. Across multiple experiments, Nip3A expression in non-senescent leaves of NBP1034-derived hybrids ranged from about 5 - 19 μg/g fresh wt. (about 7 - 84 μg/g dry wt.). In the inbred line, Nip3A expression in non-senescent leaves ranged from about 27 - 44 μg/g fresh wt. (about 36 -186 μg/g dry wt.). Across multiple experiments, the highest Vip3A concentrations in pollen were measured in the VIP1034-derived inbred line, which averaged about 31 μg/g fresh wt. (67 μg VDP3 A/g dry wt.) in this tissue. Among the VIP1034-derived hybrids (field and sweet corn) in all experiments, the range of mean Vip3A levels was about 4 - 9 μg/g fresh wt. (9 - 19 μg/g dry wt.). Estimates of Vip3A in VIP1034-derived plants (across genotypes) ranged from mean levels of about 23 g/acre (52 g/hectare) at whorl stage to about 226 g/acre (512 g/hectare) at dough stage, assuming a planting density of 26,500 plants per acre (60,000 plants/hectare).

[00140] Vip3A protein levels of inbred com lines comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention were found to be substantially identical to a CG00526 X VIP 1034 inbred line, progeny of which were deposited 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925. For example, the level of Viρ3A protein in a leaf CG00526 X VIP1034, VIP1034 X 6B197, (CG00526 X VIP1034) X CG00526, and 2NA217A X (CG00526 X VIP1034) was 163 ng/mg, 108 ng/mg, 142 ng/mg, and 74 ng/mg soluble protein, respectively.

[00141] PAT protein was detected in all tissues although not at all developmental stages. In leaf tissue, PAT was undetectable or not quantifiable beyond the dough-stage sampling time. Where PAT concentrations could be quantified in leaves, mean levels ranged from about 8 to 131 ng/g fresh wt. (about 38 - 550 ng/g dry wt.) across multiple experiments, sampling times and genotypes. PAT levels in roots, pith, silks, and kernels (grain) were generally comparable to or lower than those in leaves. In pollen, mean PAT concentrations across all genotypes and all experiments ranged from about 27 - 180 ng/g fresh wt. (57 - 383 ng/g dry wt.). Over the growing season and across genotypes, estimates of PAT in VIP1034-derived plants ranged from mean levels of about 0.03 to 1.73 g/acre (0.07 and 3.92 g/hectare).

[00142] During introgression of the transgenic genotype of the invention from the initial homozygous inbred line (CG00526-VIP1034) into two genetically distinct corn inbred lines via backcross breeding, the levels of both Vip3A and PAT were very similar across four successive backcross generations and across the two genetic backgrounds. This suggests that the transgenes are stably expressed, independently of wildtype genotype, in successive breeding generations. Additionally, Vip3 A and PAT levels for various tissues were substantially similar between different field com hybrids comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention when tested concuπently in multiple experiments, indicating that the levels of transgene expression are independent of the com germplasm background.

[00143] The pre-silage levels of Vip3A and PAT protein were determined to be 16.6-18.9 μg Vip3A/g dry weight and 12-16 ng PAT/g dry weight, respectively. Vip3A and PAT protein levels in silage rapidly decreased such that within 15 days of ensiling, only 10% of the initial VIP3A protein remained and there was no detectable PAT protein. At 75 days post-ensiling, Vip3 A protein levels were less than 5% of the initial levels for both hybrids.

DEPOSIT

[00144] Applicants have made a deposit of at least 975 seeds of the inbred corn line

CG00526/NIP1034, as an example of any com inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the invention, with the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), NA 20110 USA, ATCC Deposit No. PTA-3925. The seeds deposited with the ATCC on 13 December 2001 were taken from the deposit maintained by Syngenta Seeds, Bloomington, Illinois, since prior to the filing date of this application. This deposit of the inbred com line CG00526/VIP1034 will be maintained in the ATCC depository, which is a public depository, for a period of 30 years, or 5 years after the most recent request, or for the effective life of the patent, whichever is longer, and will be replaced if it becomes nonviable during that period. Applicants impose no restrictions on the availability of the deposited material from the ATCC; however, Applicants have no authority to waive any restrictions imposed by law on to transfer of biological material or its transportation in commerce. Applicants do not waive any infringement of their rights granted under this patent or under the Plant Variety Protection Act (7 USC 2321 et seq.).

[00145] All publications and patent applications mentioned in this specification are indicative of the level of skill of those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains. All publications and patent applications are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

[00146] Although the foregoing invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it will be obvious that certain changes and modifications may be practiced within the scope of the present invention.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. An isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence which comprises at least one junction sequence of co event VIP 1034 selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, and compliments thereof.
2. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1 comprising at least 10 contiguous nucleotides of insert DNA sequence from com event VIP 1034 and at least 10 contiguous nucleotides of corn plant genome flanking DNA sequence from com event VIP 1034.
3. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1 comprising at least 20 contiguous nucleotides of insert DNA sequence from corn event VIP 1034 and at least 20 contiguous nucleotides of com plant genome flanking DNA sequence from com event VIP 1034.
4. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1 comprising at least 50 contiguous nucleotides of insert DNA sequence from com event VIP 1034 and at least 50 contiguous nucleotides of corn plant genome flanking DNA sequence from com event VIP 1034.
5. An amplicon comprising the nucleic acid molecule of claim 1.
6. An isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 5, and compliments thereof.
7. A polynucleotide primer for detecting com event VIP1034 in a sample comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 1-716 of SEQ ID NO: 6 or complements thereof.
8. A pair of polynucleotide primers for detecting com event VIP 1034 DNA in a sample comprising the primer of claim 7 and a second primer comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 717-2100 of SEQ ID NO: 6 or complements thereof.
9. A polynucleotide primer for detecting com event VIP1034 in a sample comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 822- 1590 of SEQ ID NO: 7 or complements thereof.
10. A pair of polynucleotide primers for detecting com event NIP 1034 DΝA in a sample comprising the primer of claim 9 and a second primer comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises g at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 1-821 of SEQ ID NO: 7 or complements thereof.
11. A polynucleotide primer for detecting corn event NIP 1034 in a sample comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 1-754 of SEQ ID NO: 8 or complements thereof.
12. A pair of polynucleotide primers for detecting com event VIP1034 DNA in a sample comprising the primer of claim 11 and a second primer comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 755-1320 of SEQ ID NO: 8 or complements thereof.
13. A polynucleotide primer for detecting corn event NIP 1034 in a sample comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 704-797 of SEQ ID NO: 9 or complements thereof.
14. A pair of polynucleotide primers for detecting com event NIP1034 DΝA in a sample comprising the primer of claim 13 and a second primer comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 1-703 of SEQ ID NO: 9 or complements thereof.
15. A polynucleotide primer for detecting corn event NIP 1034 in a sample comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 1-94 of SEQ ID NO: 10 or complements thereof.
16. A pair of polynucleotide primers for detecting com event VIP1034 DNA in a sample comprising the primer of claim 15 and a second primer comprising a nucleotide sequence that comprises at least 15 contiguous nucleotides from position 95-700 of SEQ ID NO: 10 or complements thereof.
17. A method of detecting the presence of DNA coπesponding to the com event VIP 1034 in a sample, the method comprising:
(a) contacting the sample comprising DNA with a pair of primers that, when used in a nucleic-acid amplification reaction with genomic DNA from corn event VIP 1034; produces an amplicon that is diagnostic for com event VIP 1034;
(b) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction, thereby producing the amplicon; and
(c) detecting the amplicon.
18. The method of claim 17 wherein said amplicon comprises a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 5, SEQ ID NO: 6, and SEQ ID NO: 7, and compliments thereof.
19. A method of detecting the presence of a DNA coπesponding to the VIP1034 event in a sample, the method comprising:
(a) contacting the sample comprising DNA with a probe that hybridizes under high stringency conditions with genomic DNA from com event VIP1034 and does not hybridize under high stringency conditions with DNA of a control com plant;
(b) subjecting the sample and probe to high stringency hybridization conditions; and
(c) detecting hybridization of the probe to the DNA.
20. A kit for detecting the presence of VIP 1034 nucleic acids in a sample, said kit comprising at least one DNA molecule of sufficient length of contiguous nucleotides homologous or complementary to SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 5, SEQ ID NO: 6, or SEQ ID NO: 7 that functions as a DNA primer or probe specific for com event VIP 1034 and its progeny.
21. A method of detecting com event VIP 1034 in a biological sample and progeny thereof comprising the steps of (a) extracting protein from a sample of corn event VIP 1034 tissue; (b) assaying the extracted protein using an immunological method comprising antibody specific for the insecticidal or herbicide resistance protein produced by the VIP 1034 event; and (c) detecting the binding of said antibody to the insecticidal or herbicide resistance protein.
22. Seed of any corn inbred comprising the transgenic genotype of the com event VIP1034, wherein said transgenic genotype comprises an intact copy and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette and an intact copy of a second expression cassette,
(a) wherein said intact copy of said first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and
(b) wherein said fragmented copy of said first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17, and
(c) wherein said intact copy of said second expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18,
one example of said seed of any com inbred having been deposited 13 December, 2001 under ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.
23. Seed according claim 22, wherein said intact copy of said first expression cassette, said fragmented copy of said first expression cassette, and said intact copy of said second expression cassette, form part of said com inbred genome.
24. Seed according to claim 23, wherein said intact copy of said first expression cassette characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 forms part of said com inbred genome.
25. Seed according to claim 23, wherein said fragmented copy of said first expression cassette characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 17 forms part of said com inbred genome.
26. Seed according to claim 23, wherein said intact copy of said second expression cassette characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 18 forms part of said com inbred genome.
27. Seed according to claim 24, wherein the parts of said genome directly linked to said nucleotide sequence are characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 11 and SEQ ID NO: 12.
28. Seed according to claim 25, wherein the parts of said genome directly linked to said nucleotide sequence are characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13 and SEQ ID NO: 14.
29. Seed according to claim 26, wherein the parts of said genome directly linked to said nucleotide sequence are characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 15.
30. Seed according to claim 22, wherein said inbred is selected from the group consisting of the inbred lines CG00526, CG00716, 2010, NP2166, NP2161, NP2275, 2B609, JHAF031, H8431, 894, 6B209, and NP904.
31. Seed according to claim 30, wherein said inbred line is CG00526 having been deposited 13 December 2001 and assigned the ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.
32. A corn plant, or parts thereof, comprising the transgenic genotype of the transgenic com event VIP 1034, wherein said transgenic genotype comprises an intact copy and a fragmented copy of a first expression cassette and an intact copy of a second expression cassette, wherein said intact copy of said first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and wherein said fragmented copy of said first expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 17, and wherein said intact copy of said second expression cassette comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 18.
33. The com plant according to claim 32, wherein said intact copy of said first expression cassette, said fragmented copy of said first expression cassette, and said intact copy of said second expression cassette, form part of said plant's genome.
34. The com plant according to claim 33, wherein said intact copy of said first expression cassette characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 16 forms part of said plant's genome.
35. The corn plant according to claim 33, wherein said fragmented copy of said first expression cassette characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 17 forms part of said plant's genome.
36. The com plant according to claim 33, wherein said intact copy of said second pxpression cassette characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 18 forms part of said plant's genome.
37. The corn plant according to claim 34, wherein the parts of said genome directly linked to said nucleotide sequence are characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 11 and SEQ ID NO: 12.
38. The com plant according to claim 35, wherein the parts of said genome directly linked to said nucleotide sequence are characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13 and SEQ ID NO: 14.
39. The corn plant according to claim 36, wherein the part of said genome directly linked to said nucleotide sequence is characterized by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 15.
40. The com plant according to claim 32, wherein said inbred is selected from the group consisting of the com inbred lines CG00526, CG00716, 2010, NP2166, NP2161, NP2275, 2B609, JHAF031, H8431, 894, 6B209, and NP904.
41. The corn plant according to claim 32 characterized in that simultaneously digesting said plant's genomic DNA with the restriction endonucleases BamHl and Sαcl results in a vzp3A hybridizing first band of about 2.4 kb and a vzp3A hybridizing second band of about 5.2 kb using a vzp3A-specific probe under high stringency conditions.
42. The com plant of claim 41 , wherein said probe comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 19.
43. The com plant according to claim 32 characterized in that digesting said plant's genomic DNA with the restriction endonuclease Hindlll results in a single pat hybridizing band using a pat-specific probe under high stringency conditions.
44. The com plant of claim 43, wherein said probe comprises the nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 20.
45. The com plant according to claim 32, wherein said transgenic genotype confers upon said com plant insect resistance and tolerance to a herbicide.
46. The com plant according to claim 45, wherein said transgenic genotype confers upon said com plant insect resistance.
47. The com plant according to claim 46, wherein said transgenic genotype conferring upon said com plant insect resistance comprises a vzp3 A gene.
48. The com plant according to claim 47, wherein said plant expresses a Vip3A protein at substantially at least the same level as the Vip3 A protein level in plants grown from the seed comprising said transgenic genotype deposited 13 December 2001 under ATCC Accession No. PTA-3925.
49. The com plant according to claim 45, wherein said transgenic genotype confers upon said com plant tolerance to a herbicide.
50. A corn plant according to either of claims 49, wherein said transgenic genotype conferring upon said corn plant tolerance to a herbicide comprises a p t gene.
51. Pollen of the com plant of claim 32.
52. An ovule of the corn plant of claim 32.
53. Hybrid com seed produced by crossing the corn plant according to claim 32 with an inbred corn plant having a different genotype.
54. Hybrid com plant produced by growing hybrid corn seed of claim 53.
55. A method for producing com seed comprising crossing first parent com plant with a second parent com plant and harvesting the resultant first generation com seed, wherein said first or second parent com plant is the inbred com plant of claim 32.
56. The method according to claim 55, wherein said first parent com plant is different from said second parent corn plant, wherein the resultant seed is a first generation (FI) hybrid com seed.
57. The method according to claim 55, wherein the inbred com plant of claim 32 is the female parent.
58. The method according to claim 55, wherein the inbred com plant of claim 32 is the male parent.
59. An FI hybrid corn seed produced by the method of claim 56.
60. An FI hybrid corn plant, or parts thereof, grown from the seed of claim 59.
61. A method of producing hybrid com seeds comprising the following steps:
a. planting seeds of a first inbred com line according to claim 22 and seeds of a second inbred line having a different genotype; b. cultivating corn plants resulting from said planting until time of flowering; c. emasculating said flowers of plants of one of the com inbred lines; d. harvesting the hybrid seed produced thereby.
62. Hybrid seed produced by the method of claim 61.
63. Hybrid corn plant produced by growing hybrid corn seed of claim 62.
PCT/US2002/040099 2001-12-17 2002-12-16 Novel corn event WO2003052073A2 (en)

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