Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Percutaneous pringle occlusion device

Info

Publication number
WO2003020138A1
WO2003020138A1 PCT/US2002/027664 US0227664W WO2003020138A1 WO 2003020138 A1 WO2003020138 A1 WO 2003020138A1 US 0227664 W US0227664 W US 0227664W WO 2003020138 A1 WO2003020138 A1 WO 2003020138A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
vessel
balloon
assembly
cannula
end
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2002/027664
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
David J. Sauvageau
Robert Garabedian
Robert F. Rioux
Original Assignee
Scimed Life Systems, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B17/12022Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires
    • A61B17/12027Type of occlusion
    • A61B17/12036Type of occlusion partial occlusion
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B17/12022Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B17/12022Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires
    • A61B17/12099Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires characterised by the location of the occluder
    • A61B17/12109Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires characterised by the location of the occluder in a blood vessel
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B17/12022Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires
    • A61B17/12131Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires characterised by the type of occluding device
    • A61B17/12136Balloons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B17/12022Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires
    • A61B17/12131Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires characterised by the type of occluding device
    • A61B17/12181Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires characterised by the type of occluding device formed by fluidized, gelatinous or cellular remodelable materials, e.g. embolic liquids, foams or extracellular matrices
    • A61B17/1219Occluding by internal devices, e.g. balloons or releasable wires characterised by the type of occluding device formed by fluidized, gelatinous or cellular remodelable materials, e.g. embolic liquids, foams or extracellular matrices expandable in contact with liquids
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1477Needle-like probes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1485Probes or electrodes therefor having a short rigid shaft for accessing the inner body through natural openings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00535Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets pneumatically or hydraulically operated
    • A61B2017/00557Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets pneumatically or hydraulically operated inflatable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/22Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2017/22051Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for with an inflatable part, e.g. balloon, for positioning, blocking, or immobilisation
    • A61B2017/22065Functions of balloons
    • A61B2017/22067Blocking; Occlusion
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00053Mechanical features of the instrument of device
    • A61B2018/00214Expandable means emitting energy, e.g. by elements carried thereon
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00571Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body for achieving a particular surgical effect
    • A61B2018/00577Ablation

Abstract

Devices for occluding a vessel in a percutaneous ablation procedure. An elongated access device having a lumen and a tissue piercing, open distal end in communication with the lumen is used to percutaneously access a vessel that supplied blood to the tissue to be treated. An elongated balloon deployment device is used to deliver a balloon into the interior of the vessel. Subsequently, the balloon is inflated, resulting in the occlusion of the vessel. The tissue to be treated is then ablated. Because there is little or no blood to transfer the thermal energy away from the heated tissue, the ablation procedure is performed more efficiently. The balloon may be subsequently deflated allowing normal flow through the vessel to return.

Description

PERCUTANEOUS PRINGLE OCCLUSION DEVICE

Background The present invention relates to apparatus for performing tissue ablation and, in particular, to apparatus for occluding vessels that supply blood to the tissue to enhance the effectiveness of the ablation.

Solid tissue tumors, such as those found in the liver, traditionally have been treated with systematic chemotherapy, surgical resection, or local radiation therapy. Many tumors, however, remain poorly responsive to these therapeutic modalities and necessitate the use of alternative treatments, such as thermal ablation of the tumor. Thermal sources for these treatment modalities include high-intensity ultrasound, laser, microwave, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Of these different types of ablation techniques, RF ablation has proven to be safe, predictable, and inexpensive, and has emerged as the thermal ablation modality that most easily creates large volumes of tissue necrosis.

Although RF ablation of the tumor can be implemented during open surgery, it is most often performed percutaneously. One RF ablation technique utilizes a single needle electrode or a multiple needle electrode array that is inserted percutaneously using a surgical probe and guided with real-time ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRS) into the tumor. One properly positioned, the needle electrode is activated, and alternating current is transferred from the needle electrode into the surrounding tissue, causing ionic agitation of the surrounding cells, ultimately leading to the production of frictional heat. As tissue temperatures increase between 60-100°C, there is an instantaneous induction of irreversible cellular damage referred to as coagulation necrosis. The treatment area is monitored ultrasonographically for increased echogenicity during the procedure, which corresponds to the formation of tissue and water vapor microbubbles from the heated tissue and is used to roughly estimate the boundaries of the treatment sphere.

Often, when performing a RF ablation procedure, the presence of blood vessels within or near the tumor causes the conduction of thermal energy away from the target tissue and into the relatively cooler blood. This may cause irregular shaped ablation regions, or sometimes even prevent ablation. When such procedures are performed using open surgical procedures, a surgeon may typically clamp the respective blood vessel, e.g., by using his or her fingers or by using a pair of forceps, thereby reducing or eliminating the blood flow adjacent or through the ablation site. For example, if the tumor is within the liver, the portal vein and/or hepatic artery at the porta hepatis may be clamped. This technique is called a "Pringle maneuver."

When a percutaneous ablation procedure is performed, however, a Pringle maneuver may not be possible, due to the lack of direct access to the vessel and/or the distance from the abdominal wall to the vessel. Angiographic portal arterial, or major vessel balloon occlusion has been used to prevent or minimize blood flow through the ablation site. This technique, however, is not flexible in that the human vasculature often prevents or makes difficult the introduction of the balloon into certain blood vessels, e.g., the portal vein in the liver. Accordingly, apparatus for occluding vessels in connection with an organ being treated by an RF ablation or other hyperthermic procedures would be useful. Summary of the Invention In accordance with a one aspect of the invention, a vessel occlusion assembly comprises a rigid elongated member having a tissue piercing distal end, and an expandable occlusive device configured to be expanded to partially or completely occlude fluid flow through the vessel when the distal end of the elongate member is disposed within a lumen of a vessel, e.g. a blood vessel or any other vessel that transports fluid. The occlusive device can also be collapsible so that it can be collapsed to allow fluid flow through the vessel. The occlusive device can be, e.g., a balloon configured to be expanded when a medium is introduced into the balloon. If collapsible, the balloon can be deflated by removing the medium from it.

The occlusive device can be variously associated with the distal of the rigid member. For example, the occlusive device can be mounted to the distal end of the elongated member. Or the elongated member can include a device introduction lumen, in . which case, the occlusive device can mounted to the distal end of another elongated member that is slidably disposed within the device introduction lumen. The distal end of the rigid member can have a sharpened tip, so that the rigid member can be percutaneously introduced into the vessel. The vessel occlusion assembly may further comprise a handle mounted to the proximal end of the rigid member. Optionally, the handle may be attachable/detachable. Other and further aspects and embodiments will be apparent in view of the following drawings and detailed description. Brief Description of the Drawings The drawings illustrate the design and utility of preferred embodiments of the invention, in which similar elements are referred to by common reference numerals. In order to better appreciate how the above-recited and other advantages and objects of the invention are obtained, a more particular description of the invention briefly described above will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments thereof, which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Understanding that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered limiting of its scope, the invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a ian view of a tissue ablation/vessel occlusion system constructed in accordance with one preferred embodiment of the invention, wherein a tissue ablation assembly and a vessel occlusion assembly are particularly shown;

Fig. 2 is a partially cut-away cross-sectional view of the distal end of a vessel occlusion assembly of Fig. 1, wherein the balloon is particularly shown in a deflated state; Fig. 3 is a partially cut-away cross-sectional view of the distal end of the vessel occlusion assembly of Fig. 1, wherein the balloon is particularly shown in an inflated state;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of an attachable/detachable handle used by the vessel occlusion assembly of Fig. 1, wherein the handle is particularly shown opened; Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the attachable/detachable handle of Fig. 4, wherein the handle is particularly clamped on the proximal end of the vessel occlusion assembly of Fig. 1; Fig. 6 is an alternative embodiment of a vessel occlusion assembly that can be used in the system of Fig. 1; and

Figs. 7A-7D illustrated perspective views of one preferred method of operating the system of Fig. 1 to ablate a tumor within the liver of a patient, while occluding the blood flow through the left hepatic artery.

Detailed Description of the Illustrated Embodiments Referring to Fig. 1, a tissue ablation/vessel occlusion system 100 constructed in accordance with one preferred embodiment of the invention is described. The ablation system 100 generally comprises a tissue ablation assembly 102 and a vessel occlusion assembly 104.

The tissue ablation assembly 102 comprises an electrosurgical probe assembly 106 that includes a cannula 108, a reciprocating RF electrosurgical probe 110 disposed within the cannula 108, and a RF generator 112 operable to deliver RF energy from the electrosurgical probe 110 (shaft portion shown in phantom) into tissue, e.g., a solid tumor within the liver of a patient.

The RF generator 112 provides a standard source of RF energy for electrosurgical applications and includes a cable 114 coupled to the electrosurgical probe 110. The electrosurgical probe 110 comprises a rigid elongated shaft 116 (shown in phantom) having a proximal end 118 and a distal end 120, an electrical connector 122 mounted to the proximal end 118 of the shaft 116, and an electrode device 124 mounted to the distal end 120 of the shaft 116. The electrical connector 122 is configured to mate with the cable 114 of the RF generator 112. In the illustrated embodiment, the electrode device 124 comprises an array of tissue penetrating needle electrodes. It should be appreciated, however, that other types of electrode devices can be used.

The cannula 108 comprises an elongated rigid shaft 126 having a proximal end 128 and a distal end 130, and a lumen 132 (shown in phantom) extending through the interior of the cannula shaft 126. The cannula shaft 126 is composed of a suitable material, such as plastic, metal or the like, and has a suitable length, typically in the range from 5 cm to 30 cm, preferably from 10 cm to 20 cm. The cannula shaft 126 has an outside diameter consistent with its intended use, typically being from 1 mm to 5 mm, usually from 1.3 mm to 4 mm. The cannula shaft 126 has an inner diameter in the range from 0.7 mm to 4 mm, preferably from 1 mm to 3.5 mm.

The cannula 108 further comprises a handle 134 mounted to the proximal end 128 of the shaft 126. The shaft 116 of the electrosurgical probe 110 is reciprocably disposed within the lumen 132 of the cannula 108, so that the electrode device 124 can be alternately deployed from the distal end 130 of the cannula shaft 126 and withdrawn within the cannula shaft 126. The distal end 116 of the cannula 108 comprises a shaφened tip to allow it be percutaneously introduced through the patient's skin to deliver the distal end of the surgical probe 110 to the tissue to be treated. Further details related to the construction and operation of needle electrode array-type probe arrangements are disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 6,379,353, entitled "Apparatus and Method for Treating Tissue with Multiple Electrodes."

The vessel occlusion assembly 104 is configured for being percutaneously introduced through the wall of a vessel, such as, e.g., a blood vessel, and operated to occlude the fluid flow, e.g., blood flow, through the vessel. It is designed to be operated in conjunction with the tissue ablation assembly 102 during a tissue ablation procedure, but can be operated in conjunction with other medical devices to treat tissue adjacent to the vessel. As used here, a vessel refers to any duct, canal, or other tube that contains or conveys a body fluid; thus, a vessel includes blood vessels, such as the portal vein and the hepatic artery. For brevity and clarity, the invention shall be discussed with reference to a vessel, and it should be understood to those in the art that the invention may be used in conjunction with any vessel carrying a bodily fluid within a living animal, whether human or non-human. To this end, the vessel occlusion assembly 104 generally comprises a cannula 140, an expandable/collapsible occlusive device 142, such as a balloon, a inflation medium interface 144, a handle 146, and a syringe 148.

The cannula 140 comprises a cannula shaft 150 having a proximal end 152 and a distal end 154, and a common inflation/deflation lumen 156 (shown in phantom) extending through the cannula shaft 150. The cannula shaft 150 is composed of a suitable material, such as plastic, metal or the like, and has a suitable length similar to the cannula shaft 108 of the electrosurgical probe assembly 106.

The balloon 142 is mounted to the distal end 154 of the cannula shaft 150. As used herein, a balloon 142 may include any expandable member capable of being expanded. In other words, for ease of explanation, the operation of embodiments of the invention shall be described with reference to a balloon 142, but it is contemplated that other expandable members may be used as an equivalent to the balloon 142. The balloon 142 is preferably

made of a compliant material, such as, e.g., latex, Pebax®, C-flex®, urethane or silicone. Preferably, the balloon 142 has a fully inflated diameter that is consistent with the inner diameter of the vessel in which the balloon 142 to be introduced into, e.g., about one to three centimeters.

Referring now to Fig. 2 and Fig. 3, the distal end 154 of the cannula shaft 150 includes a sharpened distal tip 158 for piercing through a patient's abdomen wall, e.g., percutaneously through skin and intervening tissue into the vessel. The distal tip 158 is preferably echogenic, thereby allowing it to be seen as an acoustic shadow when ultrasonically imaged. In the illustrated embodiment, the balloon 142 is mounted proximate the distal tip 158, such that its interior is in fluid communication with the common lumen 156. When deflated, as shown in Fig. 2, the balloon 142 is preferably carried completely inside of the distal portion of lumen 156, so as to not interfere with, or be damaged by, the shaφ distal tip 158. For example, the opening of the balloon may be bonded or otherwise attached circumferentially about an interior wall of lumen 156, thereby substantially sealing the lumen 156. The balloon 142 is configured to inflate distally beyond the distal tip 158 of the cannula 140 when a medium, such as saline or contrast agent, is conveyed distally through the common lumen 156 into the interior of the balloon 142, as shown in Fig. 3, and is configured to deflate and withdraw back within the distal end of the lumen 156 when the inflation medium is conveyed from the interior of the balloon 142 proximally through the common lumen 156, shown in Fig. 2. Alternatively, separate inflation and deflation lumens made be provided through the cannula 140, with each of the separate lumens in communication with the interior of the balloon 142. In this case, the balloon 142 is configured to inflate when the medium is conveyed distally through the separate inflation lumen, and deflate when the medium is conveyed proximally through the separate deflation lumen.

The inflation medium interface 144 comprises a flexible branched tubing assembly 160 having a common branch 162 mounted within the proximal end 152 of the cannula shaft 150 in fluid communication with the common lumen 156, and first and second branches 164 and 166 extending from the common branch 146. The tubing assembly 160 maybe composed of a suitable material, such as, e.g., hypodermic polyimide catheter tubing. The medium interface 144 further comprises an inflation port 168 mounted to the proximal end of the first branch 164, and a deflation port 170 mounted to the proximal end of the second branch 166. The medium interface 144 further comprises a pair of clamps 172 and 174 disposed on the respective branches 164 and 166 for sealing the respective inflation and deflation ports 168 and 170. In the illustrated embodiment, the inflation and deflation ports 168 and 170 are configured for mating with the syringe 148. Alternatively, the inflation and deflation ports 168 and 170 can be configured for mating with a pump or some other automated device.

Thus, to inflate the balloon 142 distally beyond the distal tip 158 of the cannula shaft 150, the fluid medium is injected through the inflation port 168 with the syringe 148, while the deflation port 170 is sealed with the clamp 174, to create a positive pressure within the interior of the balloon 142. To deflate and withdraw the balloon 142 within the distal end 154 of the cannula shaft 150, the fluid medium is withdrawn from the deflation port 170 with the syringe 148, while the inflation port 168 is sealed with the clamp 172, to create a negative pressure within the interior of the balloon 142. It should be noted that the existence of separate inflation and deflation ports 168 and 170 allows the physician to conveniently remove any air bubbles within the interior of the balloon 142 by conveying the medium, while leaving both ports 168 and 170 undamped. In this manner, any air bubbles within the interior of the balloon 142 are flushed out through the undamped deflation port 170 when the medium is injected into the inflation port 168. Alternatively, a single inflation/deflation port can be provided, e.g., if the existence of air bubbles within the balloon 142 is not a concern or if the air bubbles can be removed from the balloon 142 using another technique.

The handle 146 provides for easy handling of the vessel occlusion assembly 104 by the surgeon or radiologist during the procedure, hi the illustrated embodiment, the handle 146 is an attachable/detachable handle that can be alternately clamped around, and removed from, the proximal end 152 of the cannula shaft 150 and the common branch 162 of the tubing assembly 160 once the distal end 154 of the cannula shaft 150 is placed in the vessel to be occluded. By using an attachable-detachable handle 146, the access procedure is made easier, since the length of the cannula 140 can be reduced to only that needed to reach from the interior of the vessel to slightly outside of the abdomen wall of the patient. Employing an attachable/detachable can be helpful in a CT or MPJ environment, which have working diameters that require the use of relatively short electrodes. Employing a removable handle would reduce the overall length of the device. hi the illustrated embodiment, the handle 146 comprises two clam-shell portions

176 and 178 and a hinge 180 coupling the portions 176 and 178 together. The respective handle portions 176 and 178 have respective recesses 180 and 182 formed in their facing surfaces to accommodate proximal end 152 of the cannula shaft 150 and common branch 162 of the tubing assembly 160 when the portions 176 and 178 are closed together about the hinge 180. The inflation medium interface 144 and the cannula 140 will then be affixed relative to each other to provide a fully integrated assembly. The handle portions 176 and 178 are preferably provided with some means for locking them together, e.g., an interference fit fastener (not shown) that is easily opened.

In certain embodiments, a removable handle allows the physician to remove the obstruction to the external working area, while leaving the internal occlusive device in place. This may be especially helpful if multiple occlusive devices are to be inserted in a patient as part of a single procedure. Further, if left unsupported, the weight of the handle may place a rotational force on the cannula, causing displacement of the occlusive device or other harm to the patient, especially if the occlusive device is close to the surface of the skin. The handle can be reattached as needed to facilitate removal of the occlusive device from the patient.

Referring now to Fig. 6, an alternative embodiment of a vessel occlusion assembly 190 that can be used with the tissue ablation/vessel occlusion system 100 is described. The vessel occlusion assembly 190 differs from the previously described vessel occlusion assembly 104 in that the balloon 142 is not mounted to the end of the cannula shaft 150. Instead, the vessel occlusion assembly 190 comprises a separate tubular member 192 that is reciprocally disposed within the lumen 156 (which acts as a device introduction lumen, rather than an inflation lumen) of the cannula 140. The tubular member 192 a proximal end 194 to which the common branch 162 of the tubing assembly 160 is mounted, a distal end 196 to which the balloon 142 is mounted, and a lumen 198 in fluid communication with the interior of the balloon 142. The tubular member 192 may be composed of a rigid, semi-rigid, or flexible material as long as it, along with the deflated balloon 142, can be introduced through the lumen 156 of the cannula shaft 150. If composed of a flexible material, the common branch 162 of the tubing assembly 160 can actually form the tubular member 192. In the illustrated embodiment, the distal end 196 of the tubular member 192 is blunt, thereby minimizing any damage that can be caused to the balloon 142.

Thus, it can be appreciated that the balloon 142 is inflated when a medium is conveyed through the inflation port 168 from the syringe 148, through the flexible tubing assembly 160, through the lumen 198 of the tubular member 192, and into the balloon 142. The balloon 142 is deflated when the medium is conveyed from the interior of the balloon 142, out through the lumen 198 of the tubular member 192, through the flexible tubing assembly 160, and out of the deflation port 170 into the syringe 148. In one embodiment, the balloon has a flexible echogenic coating, which provides a clinical benefit in that the physician would not need to use contrast agent. Further, some contrast agents may crystallize, and clog the lumens, not allowing balloon deflation. In some embodiments, it may be desirable to coat the balloon surface with an agent to help prevent blood from clotting on the balloon surface.

Having described the structure of the tissue ablation/vessel occlusion system 100, its operation will now be described in treating a tumor 202 located in a patient's liver 204, as illustrated in Figs. 7A-E. Initially, a doctor, e.g., a surgeon or radiologist, identifies and/or locates the patient's tumor 202 and the vessel 204 for occlusion, in this case, the portal vein, at a location upstream from the tumor 202, e.g., using ultrasound or a fluoroscope. The cannulae 108 and 140 of the respective tissue ablation assembly 102 and vessel occlusion assembly 104 are introduced into the patient's abdominal cavity 206 by piercing their distal tips through the patient's abdominal wall 208 until the distal end 130 of the cannula shaft 126 resides adjacent the tumor 202 to be treated, and the distal end 154 of the cannula shaft 150 resides adjacent the left hepatic artery 204 (Fig. 7A). It should be noted that the cannulae 108 and 140 can be introduced into the abdominal cavity 206 in any order. It should also be noted that if the non-integrated vessel occlusion assembly 190 is used rather than the vessel occlusion assembly 104, the cannula 140 can be introduced into the abdominal cavity 206 with or without the tubular member 192 and balloon 142. The abdominal cavity 206 is preferably imaged, e.g., using ultrasound or a fluoroscope, to guide the distal ends 130 and 154 of the respective cannula shafts 126 and 150 to their desired locations. Other types of imaging modalities may be used for assisting the guiding of the cannula shafts 126 and 150 into their desired positions. For example, the cannulae 108 and 140 can be equipped with an optical viewing port for providing a distal facing view illuminated by a light source, such as a laser provided through an optical fiber. Next, the electrosurgical probe 110 is then distally pushed through the cannula 108 until the electrode device 124 is fully deployed out from the distal end 130 of the cannula shaft 126 into the tumor 202, and the distal tip 158 of the cannula shaft 150 is pierced through the wall of the vessel 204, such that it resides within the lumen of the vessel 204 (Fig. 7B). Again, this can be accomplished in any order. Next, the handle 146 is clamped onto the proximal end 152 of the cannula shaft 150 and the common branch 162 of the tube assembly 160, and then the balloon 142 is inflated out from the distal end 154 of the cannula 140 into the lumen of the vessel 204 by injecting the medium from the syringe 148 through the inflation port 168, while the deflation port 170 is clamped off with clamp 174 (Fig. 7C). As a result, the blood flow through the blood vessel 204 is occluded, thereby cutting off any blood flow to the tumor 202. If the non-integrated vessel occlusion assembly 104 is utilized, the tubular member 192 and balloon 142 are preferably disposed within the lumen 156 of the cannula 140, so that blood does not flow back through the cannula 140.

The RF generator 112 is then operated to convey RF energy from the electrode device 124 into the tumor 202, thereby ablating at least a portion of the tumor 202. Depending on the size of the tumor 202, the ablation process can be repeated to ablate any remaining portions of the tumor 202. After the ablation process is completed, the electrode device 124 is withdrawn into the distal end 130 of the cannula shaft 130 by proximally pulling the electrosurgical probe 110, and the balloon 142 is deflated and withdrawn into the distal end 145 of the cannula shaft 145 by withdrawing the medium from the deflation port 170 into the syringe 148, while the inflation port 168 is clamped off with the clamp 172 (Fig. 7D). Alternatively, the balloon 142 can be deflated between ablation steps to intermittently supply blood flow to the liver should it become necessary. The cannulae 108 and 140 are then removed from the patient's abdominal cavity 206.

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be understood there is no intention to limit the invention to the illustrated embodiments, and it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the attached claims and their equivalents.

By way of non-limiting examples, it may be desirable to use more than one occlusion device in a patient for a single procedure. In may also be desirable to use the cannula or other delivery device for inserting objects other than the occlusion balloon, such as temperature sensors or therapeutic agents. It maybe desirable to shape the occlusion balloon so that it fills a particular vessel shape that is not round. It may be desirable to add one or more fluid lumens through the insertion cannula that are in communication with respective distal ports external to the balloon, e.g., for injecting a dye into, or for aspiration of, the occluded vessel or ablation site. In alternate embodiments, a hydrogel passed through a lumen may be used in place of the balloon as the occlusive member.

By way of further non-limiting examples, the occlusion device may be inserted into the vessel site through a small needle, where upon the needle is removed, leaving the balloon in place in the vessel, with an inflation lumen extending out of the patient. The occlusion balloon may alternatively be placed with a traditional introducer, such as used in a Seldinger technique for accessing blood vessels.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A vessel occlusion assembly, comprising: a rigid elongated member having a tissue piercing distal end; and an expandable occlusive device configured to be expanded to at least partially occlude fluid flow through the vessel when the distal end of the elongate member is disposed within a lumen of the vessel.
2. The vessel occlusion assembly of claim 1, wherein the occlusive device is an expandable/collapsible occlusive device configured to be collapsed, such that the fluid flow through the vessel is unobstructed.
3. The vessel occlusion assembly of any of the above claims, wherein the occlusive device is configured to be expanded to completely occlude the fluid flow through the vessel.
4. The vessel occlusion assembly of claim any of the above claims, wherein the occlusive device is mounted to the distal end of the rigid member.
5. The vessel occlusion assembly of any of the above claims, wherein the rigid member comprises a device introduction lumen, and the occlusive device is slidably disposed within the device introduction lumen.
6. The vessel occlusion assembly of any of the above claims, further comprising another elongated member having a distal end to which the occlusive device is mounted, wherein the other elongated member is slidably disposed within the device introduction lumen.
7. The vessel occlusion assembly of any of the above claims, wherein the occlusive device comprises a balloon configured to be expanded when a medium is introduced into the balloon.
8. The vessel occlusion assembly of claim 7, wherein the distal end of the rigid member has a shaφened distal tip.
9. The vessel occlusion assembly of claim any of the above claims, further comprising a handle mounted to a proximal end of the rigid member.
10. The vessel occlusion assembly of claim 9, wherein the handle is an attachable/detachable handle.
11. The vessel occlusion assembly of any of the above claims, further comprising an actuator configured for expanding the occlusive device.
12. The vessel occlusion assembly of claim 11 , wherein the occlusive device comprises an expandable balloon, and the actuator comprises a syringe in fluid communication with the balloon.
13. The vessel occlusion assembly of any of the above claims, wherein the occlusive device comprises a flexible, echogenic coating.
PCT/US2002/027664 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Percutaneous pringle occlusion device WO2003020138A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US31673801 true 2001-08-31 2001-08-31
US60/316,738 2001-08-31

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE2002603806 DE60203806T2 (en) 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Percutaneous occlusion pringle
CA 2453568 CA2453568A1 (en) 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Percutaneous pringle occlusion method and device
JP2003524455A JP4280865B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Transdermal Pringle occlusion device
DE2002603806 DE60203806D1 (en) 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Percutaneous occlusion pringle
EP20020768754 EP1420702B1 (en) 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Percutaneous pringle occlusion device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2003020138A1 true true WO2003020138A1 (en) 2003-03-13

Family

ID=23230436

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2002/027664 WO2003020138A1 (en) 2001-08-31 2002-08-30 Percutaneous pringle occlusion device

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (3) US6962588B2 (en)
JP (1) JP4280865B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2453568A1 (en)
DE (2) DE60203806D1 (en)
EP (1) EP1420702B1 (en)
WO (1) WO2003020138A1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2004082497A1 (en) * 2003-03-13 2004-09-30 Scimed Life Systems Inc. Apparatus for treating tissue using implanted electrode devices
JP2008526429A (en) * 2005-01-14 2008-07-24 シーオー−・リペア・インコーポレーテッド Systems and methods for treating cardiac tissue

Families Citing this family (87)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8048070B2 (en) 2000-03-06 2011-11-01 Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc. Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
JP2004500207A (en) 2000-03-06 2004-01-08 ティシューリンク・メディカル・インコーポレーテッドTissuelink Medical,Inc. Fluid delivery system and electrosurgical instrument controller
US7811282B2 (en) 2000-03-06 2010-10-12 Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc. Fluid-assisted electrosurgical devices, electrosurgical unit with pump and methods of use thereof
US6558385B1 (en) 2000-09-22 2003-05-06 Tissuelink Medical, Inc. Fluid-assisted medical device
US6689131B2 (en) 2001-03-08 2004-02-10 Tissuelink Medical, Inc. Electrosurgical device having a tissue reduction sensor
US8150519B2 (en) 2002-04-08 2012-04-03 Ardian, Inc. Methods and apparatus for bilateral renal neuromodulation
US8774913B2 (en) 2002-04-08 2014-07-08 Medtronic Ardian Luxembourg S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for intravasculary-induced neuromodulation
US7653438B2 (en) 2002-04-08 2010-01-26 Ardian, Inc. Methods and apparatus for renal neuromodulation
JP2006504472A (en) 2002-10-29 2006-02-09 ティシューリンク・メディカル・インコーポレーテッドTissuelink Medical,Inc. Fluid auxiliary electrosurgical scissors and methods
US9713730B2 (en) 2004-09-10 2017-07-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Apparatus and method for treatment of in-stent restenosis
DE202004021944U1 (en) 2003-09-12 2013-07-16 Vessix Vascular, Inc. Selectable eccentric remodeling and / or ablation of atherosclerotic material
US7727232B1 (en) 2004-02-04 2010-06-01 Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc. Fluid-assisted medical devices and methods
DE102004048265A1 (en) * 2004-10-04 2006-04-06 Bock-Sun Han Expandable and contractable device comprises expandable and contractable base containing a substance, which excites due to radiation and a presentation of the base in in vivo events is obtained by picture forming procedures
WO2006074060A3 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-11-30 Cook Inc Inverting occlusion devices and systems
US7517322B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2009-04-14 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Biopsy device with variable side aperture
US20060200041A1 (en) * 2005-03-04 2006-09-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Biopsy device incorporating an adjustable probe sleeve
EP2532310A3 (en) * 2005-04-29 2014-08-20 Cook Biotech Incorporated Volumetric grafts for treatment of fistulae and related methods and systems
US7615050B2 (en) * 2005-06-27 2009-11-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Systems and methods for creating a lesion using transjugular approach
US20070088346A1 (en) * 2005-10-14 2007-04-19 Mirizzi Michael S Method and apparatus for varicose vein treatment using acoustic hemostasis
US7704248B2 (en) 2005-12-21 2010-04-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Ablation device with compression balloon
US7766843B2 (en) * 2006-03-03 2010-08-03 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Biopsy method
US8019435B2 (en) 2006-05-02 2011-09-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Control of arterial smooth muscle tone
US20080125708A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2008-05-29 Da-Li Feng Intra-pericardial protective device
CN100405981C (en) 2006-06-28 2008-07-30 磊 金 Occluder delivery system for cardiac surgery department
WO2008049084A3 (en) 2006-10-18 2008-08-07 Minnow Medical Inc Tuned rf energy and electrical tissue characterization for selective treatment of target tissues
JP5559539B2 (en) 2006-10-18 2014-07-23 べシックス・バスキュラー・インコーポレイテッド System to induce the temperature desired effect on the body tissue
WO2008083044A1 (en) * 2006-12-27 2008-07-10 Boston Scientific Limited Rf ablation probe array advancing device
EP2146667A2 (en) * 2007-04-11 2010-01-27 Henry Ford Health System Cardiac repair, resizing and reshaping using the venous system of the heart
US9474571B2 (en) * 2007-10-15 2016-10-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Percutaneous tissue ablation probe with occlusive bodies
US20090259210A1 (en) * 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 Sabbah Hani N Method, apparatus and kits for forming structural members within the cardiac venous system
US20100004595A1 (en) * 2008-07-01 2010-01-07 Ethicon, Inc. Balloon catheter systems for treating uterine disorders having fluid line de-gassing assemblies and methods therefor
US8396548B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2013-03-12 Vessix Vascular, Inc. Selective drug delivery in a lumen
EP2355737A4 (en) 2008-11-17 2013-01-16 Vessix Vascular Inc Selective accumulation of energy with or without knowledge of tissue topography
US20100160731A1 (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-06-24 Marc Giovannini Ultrasound-visualizable endoscopic access system
US8652129B2 (en) 2008-12-31 2014-02-18 Medtronic Ardian Luxembourg S.A.R.L. Apparatus, systems, and methods for achieving intravascular, thermally-induced renal neuromodulation
US8500688B2 (en) * 2009-04-16 2013-08-06 Medtronic, Inc. Retrograde coronary sinus perfusion cannula and methods of using same
US8906007B2 (en) 2009-09-28 2014-12-09 Covidien Lp Electrosurgical devices, directional reflector assemblies coupleable thereto, and electrosurgical systems including same
US8845682B2 (en) 2009-10-13 2014-09-30 E-Pacing, Inc. Vasculature closure devices and methods
KR20130108067A (en) 2010-04-09 2013-10-02 베식스 바스큘라 인코포레이티드 Power generating and control apparatus for the treatment of tissue
US9192790B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2015-11-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Focused ultrasonic renal denervation
US8870863B2 (en) 2010-04-26 2014-10-28 Medtronic Ardian Luxembourg S.A.R.L. Catheter apparatuses, systems, and methods for renal neuromodulation
US8473067B2 (en) 2010-06-11 2013-06-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Renal denervation and stimulation employing wireless vascular energy transfer arrangement
US9358365B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2016-06-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Precision electrode movement control for renal nerve ablation
US9155589B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2015-10-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Sequential activation RF electrode set for renal nerve ablation
US9408661B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2016-08-09 Patrick A. Haverkost RF electrodes on multiple flexible wires for renal nerve ablation
US9463062B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2016-10-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cooled conductive balloon RF catheter for renal nerve ablation
US9084609B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2015-07-21 Boston Scientific Scime, Inc. Spiral balloon catheter for renal nerve ablation
US8974451B2 (en) 2010-10-25 2015-03-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Renal nerve ablation using conductive fluid jet and RF energy
US9220558B2 (en) 2010-10-27 2015-12-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. RF renal denervation catheter with multiple independent electrodes
US9028485B2 (en) 2010-11-15 2015-05-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Self-expanding cooling electrode for renal nerve ablation
US9668811B2 (en) 2010-11-16 2017-06-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Minimally invasive access for renal nerve ablation
US9089350B2 (en) 2010-11-16 2015-07-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Renal denervation catheter with RF electrode and integral contrast dye injection arrangement
US9326751B2 (en) 2010-11-17 2016-05-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Catheter guidance of external energy for renal denervation
US9060761B2 (en) 2010-11-18 2015-06-23 Boston Scientific Scime, Inc. Catheter-focused magnetic field induced renal nerve ablation
US9023034B2 (en) 2010-11-22 2015-05-05 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Renal ablation electrode with force-activatable conduction apparatus
US9192435B2 (en) 2010-11-22 2015-11-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Renal denervation catheter with cooled RF electrode
US20120157993A1 (en) 2010-12-15 2012-06-21 Jenson Mark L Bipolar Off-Wall Electrode Device for Renal Nerve Ablation
WO2012100095A1 (en) 2011-01-19 2012-07-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Guide-compatible large-electrode catheter for renal nerve ablation with reduced arterial injury
EP2734259B1 (en) 2011-07-20 2016-11-23 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Percutaneous device to visualize, target and ablate nerves
US9186209B2 (en) 2011-07-22 2015-11-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Nerve modulation system having helical guide
EP2765942B1 (en) 2011-10-10 2016-02-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices including ablation electrodes
US9420955B2 (en) 2011-10-11 2016-08-23 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Intravascular temperature monitoring system and method
US9364284B2 (en) 2011-10-12 2016-06-14 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Method of making an off-wall spacer cage
WO2013059202A1 (en) 2011-10-18 2013-04-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Integrated crossing balloon catheter
EP2768563B1 (en) 2011-10-18 2016-11-09 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Deflectable medical devices
WO2013070724A1 (en) 2011-11-08 2013-05-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Ostial renal nerve ablation
US9119600B2 (en) 2011-11-15 2015-09-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Device and methods for renal nerve modulation monitoring
US9119632B2 (en) 2011-11-21 2015-09-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Deflectable renal nerve ablation catheter
CN107080561A (en) * 2011-12-09 2017-08-22 麦特文申公司 Device, system, and method for neuroregulation
US9265969B2 (en) 2011-12-21 2016-02-23 Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. Methods for modulating cell function
WO2013096919A1 (en) 2011-12-23 2013-06-27 Vessix Vascular, Inc. Expandable balloon or an electrode pad with a heat sensing device
CN104135958B (en) 2011-12-28 2017-05-03 波士顿科学西美德公司 There are new methods and apparatus with an ablation catheter ablation element becomes transferred polymer nerve
US9050106B2 (en) 2011-12-29 2015-06-09 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Off-wall electrode device and methods for nerve modulation
US9510891B2 (en) * 2012-06-26 2016-12-06 Covidien Lp Surgical instruments with structures to provide access for cleaning
US9173696B2 (en) 2012-09-17 2015-11-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Self-positioning electrode system and method for renal nerve modulation
US9333035B2 (en) 2012-09-19 2016-05-10 Denervx LLC Cooled microwave denervation
US9693821B2 (en) 2013-03-11 2017-07-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices for modulating nerves
US9808311B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-11-07 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Deflectable medical devices
EP2967734A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for remodeling tissue of or adjacent to a body passage
US9297845B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices and methods for treatment of hypertension that utilize impedance compensation
WO2014204593A1 (en) 2013-05-31 2014-12-24 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Access needles and stylet assemblies
US9707036B2 (en) 2013-06-25 2017-07-18 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Devices and methods for nerve modulation using localized indifferent electrodes
CN105358084A (en) 2013-07-01 2016-02-24 波士顿科学国际有限公司 Medical devices for renal nerve ablation
CN105592778A (en) 2013-10-14 2016-05-18 波士顿科学医学有限公司 High resolution cardiac mapping electrode array catheter
US9770606B2 (en) 2013-10-15 2017-09-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Ultrasound ablation catheter with cooling infusion and centering basket
WO2015079322A3 (en) 2013-11-26 2015-11-26 Newuro, B.V. Bladder tissue modification for overactive bladder disorders
US20150305800A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2015-10-29 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Devices and methods for radiofrequency ablation having an inflatable anchor member

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20010001114A1 (en) * 1996-05-14 2001-05-10 Embol-X, Inc. Cardioplegia balloon cannula
US6231544B1 (en) * 1996-05-14 2001-05-15 Embol-X, Inc. Cardioplegia balloon cannula

Family Cites Families (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4299227A (en) * 1979-10-19 1981-11-10 Lincoff Harvey A Ophthalmological appliance
US4332254A (en) * 1980-11-17 1982-06-01 Advanced Catheter Systems, Inc. System for filling and inflating and deflating a vascular dilating cathether assembly
US4708718A (en) * 1985-07-02 1987-11-24 Target Therapeutics Hyperthermic treatment of tumors
US4950238A (en) * 1988-07-07 1990-08-21 Clarence E. Sikes Hydro-rotary vascular catheter
US4929246A (en) * 1988-10-27 1990-05-29 C. R. Bard, Inc. Method for closing and sealing an artery after removing a catheter
US4976711A (en) * 1989-04-13 1990-12-11 Everest Medical Corporation Ablation catheter with selectively deployable electrodes
WO1993021844A1 (en) * 1992-04-23 1993-11-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for sealing vascular punctures
US5370675A (en) * 1992-08-12 1994-12-06 Vidamed, Inc. Medical probe device and method
US5807395A (en) * 1993-08-27 1998-09-15 Medtronic, Inc. Method and apparatus for RF ablation and hyperthermia
US5672173A (en) * 1995-08-15 1997-09-30 Rita Medical Systems, Inc. Multiple antenna ablation apparatus and method
JP3306854B2 (en) 1994-07-29 2002-07-24 ニプロ株式会社 Atheromatous thrombectomy catheter - ether
US5709224A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-01-20 Radiotherapeutics Corporation Method and device for permanent vessel occlusion
EP0873087A1 (en) 1995-12-29 1998-10-28 Medical Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for electrosurgery
US6066139A (en) * 1996-05-14 2000-05-23 Sherwood Services Ag Apparatus and method for sterilization and embolization
US6106473A (en) * 1996-11-06 2000-08-22 Sts Biopolymers, Inc. Echogenic coatings
WO1998038929A1 (en) * 1997-03-06 1998-09-11 Percusurge, Inc. Intravascular aspiration system
US6033401A (en) * 1997-03-12 2000-03-07 Advanced Closure Systems, Inc. Vascular sealing device with microwave antenna
US6238389B1 (en) * 1997-09-30 2001-05-29 Boston Scientific Corporation Deflectable interstitial ablation device
US6212433B1 (en) 1998-07-28 2001-04-03 Radiotherapeutics Corporation Method for treating tumors near the surface of an organ
US6152943A (en) * 1998-08-14 2000-11-28 Incept Llc Methods and apparatus for intraluminal deposition of hydrogels
US6221039B1 (en) * 1998-10-26 2001-04-24 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Multi-function surgical instrument
US6010518A (en) * 1998-12-23 2000-01-04 Prywes; Arnold S. Ophthalmologic instrument for dissecting scar tissue
WO2000038783A1 (en) * 1998-12-31 2000-07-06 Ball Semiconductor, Inc. Injectable thermal balls for tumor ablation
DE60008072D1 (en) * 1999-08-05 2004-03-11 Broncus Tech Inc Methods and devices for production of collateral channels in the lungs
US6770070B1 (en) * 2000-03-17 2004-08-03 Rita Medical Systems, Inc. Lung treatment apparatus and method
US7306591B2 (en) * 2000-10-02 2007-12-11 Novasys Medical, Inc. Apparatus and methods for treating female urinary incontinence

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20010001114A1 (en) * 1996-05-14 2001-05-10 Embol-X, Inc. Cardioplegia balloon cannula
US6231544B1 (en) * 1996-05-14 2001-05-15 Embol-X, Inc. Cardioplegia balloon cannula

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2004082497A1 (en) * 2003-03-13 2004-09-30 Scimed Life Systems Inc. Apparatus for treating tissue using implanted electrode devices
US6979330B2 (en) 2003-03-13 2005-12-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. System for indirectly ablating tissue using implanted electrode devices
US7749219B2 (en) 2003-03-13 2010-07-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Method for indirectly ablating tissue using implanted electrode device
US8753336B2 (en) 2003-03-13 2014-06-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Method for indirectly ablating tissue using implanted electrode devices
JP2008526429A (en) * 2005-01-14 2008-07-24 シーオー−・リペア・インコーポレーテッド Systems and methods for treating cardiac tissue

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20050288661A1 (en) 2005-12-29 application
DE60203806T2 (en) 2005-10-06 grant
CA2453568A1 (en) 2003-03-13 application
JP2005505323A (en) 2005-02-24 application
US20030060817A1 (en) 2003-03-27 application
US20100114084A1 (en) 2010-05-06 application
JP4280865B2 (en) 2009-06-17 grant
US8641709B2 (en) 2014-02-04 grant
EP1420702B1 (en) 2005-04-20 grant
DE60203806D1 (en) 2005-05-25 grant
US7655006B2 (en) 2010-02-02 grant
EP1420702A1 (en) 2004-05-26 application
US6962588B2 (en) 2005-11-08 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6746465B2 (en) Catheter based balloon for therapy modification and positioning of tissue
US6544211B1 (en) Tissue liquefaction and aspiration
US5545161A (en) Catheter for RF ablation having cooled electrode with electrically insulated sleeve
US5102410A (en) Soft tissue cutting aspiration device and method
US6647281B2 (en) Expandable diagnostic or therapeutic apparatus and system for introducing the same into the body
US5433708A (en) Method and device for thermal ablation having improved heat transfer
US5891094A (en) System for direct heating of fluid solution in a hollow body organ and methods
US7048733B2 (en) Surgical perforation device with curve
US6425853B1 (en) Treating body tissue by applying energy and substances with a retractable catheter and contained cooling element
US20050137662A1 (en) Tissue surface treatment apparatus and method
US20050277918A1 (en) Electrosurgical cannula
US6595958B1 (en) Tortuous path injection device and method
US20060149136A1 (en) Elongating balloon device and method for soft tissue expansion
US4273128A (en) Coronary cutting and dilating instrument
US4985027A (en) Soft tissue aspiration device and method
US20050256405A1 (en) Ultrasound-based procedure for uterine medical treatment
US20050065509A1 (en) Flat electrode arrays for generating flat lesions
US20050245920A1 (en) Cell necrosis apparatus with cooled microwave antenna
US5188602A (en) Method and device for delivering heat to hollow body organs
US20080171944A1 (en) Devices, systems, and methods for peripheral arteriovenous fistula creation
US20060271036A1 (en) Radio frequency ablation cooling shield
EP0668058A1 (en) Electrophysiology positioning catheter
US20030014016A1 (en) Methods and apparatuses for navigating the subaracnhnoid space
US20060111704A1 (en) Devices, systems, and methods for energy assisted arterio-venous fistula creation
US5800428A (en) Linear catheter ablation system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DM DZ EC EE ES FI GB GD GE GH HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MN MW MX MZ NO NZ OM PH PL PT RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TN TR TZ UA UG UZ VN YU ZA ZM

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NO NZ OM PH PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG UZ VN YU ZA ZM ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW MZ SD SL SZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DK EE ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC PT SE SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW MZ SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2453568

Country of ref document: CA

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2002768754

Country of ref document: EP

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2003524455

Country of ref document: JP

WWP Wipo information: published in national office

Ref document number: 2002768754

Country of ref document: EP

WWG Wipo information: grant in national office

Ref document number: 2002768754

Country of ref document: EP