WO2002103641A1 - Method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2002103641A1
WO2002103641A1 PCT/GB2002/002800 GB0202800W WO02103641A1 WO 2002103641 A1 WO2002103641 A1 WO 2002103641A1 GB 0202800 W GB0202800 W GB 0202800W WO 02103641 A1 WO02103641 A1 WO 02103641A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
method according
passenger
including
example
step
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/GB2002/002800
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Adrian John Heywood
Original Assignee
Dna Group Limited
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B3/00Audible signalling systems; Audible personal calling systems
    • G08B3/10Audible signalling systems; Audible personal calling systems using electric transmission; using electromagnetic transmission
    • G08B3/1008Personal calling arrangements or devices, i.e. paging systems
    • G08B3/1016Personal calling arrangements or devices, i.e. paging systems using wireless transmission
    • G08B3/1083Pager locating systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/10Office automation, e.g. computer aided management of electronic mail or groupware; Time management, e.g. calendars, reminders, meetings or time accounting
    • G06Q10/109Time management, e.g. calendars, reminders, meetings, time accounting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C11/00Arrangements, systems, or apparatus for checking, e.g. the occurrence of a condition, not provided for elsewhere
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C9/00Individual entry or exit registers
    • G07C9/00007Access-control involving the use of a pass
    • G07C9/00111Access-control involving the use of a pass the pass performing a presence indicating function, e.g. identification tag or transponder
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B3/00Audible signalling systems; Audible personal calling systems
    • G08B3/10Audible signalling systems; Audible personal calling systems using electric transmission; using electromagnetic transmission
    • G08B3/1008Personal calling arrangements or devices, i.e. paging systems
    • G08B3/1016Personal calling arrangements or devices, i.e. paging systems using wireless transmission
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C11/00Arrangements, systems, or apparatus for checking, e.g. the occurrence of a condition, not provided for elsewhere
    • G07C2011/02Arrangements, systems, or apparatus for checking, e.g. the occurrence of a condition, not provided for elsewhere related to amusement parks
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C11/00Arrangements, systems, or apparatus for checking, e.g. the occurrence of a condition, not provided for elsewhere
    • G07C2011/04Arrangements, systems, or apparatus for checking, e.g. the occurrence of a condition, not provided for elsewhere related to queuing systems

Abstract

A method for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic in, for example an airport, which method comprises the steps of: a) providing a person, for example a passenger, with a device on or shortly before entry to a specific area, for example a duty-free area; and b) transmitting a signal to said device at a specific time, for example when the passenger should make his or her way to a boarding gate. The method also finds applicability in theme parks and similar places where it is desired to ensure that people get to a desired location at a particular time.

Description

Method and Apparatus for facilitating the flow of

Pedestrian Traffic

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic and, more particularly but not exclusively, is concerned with a method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic in airports and amusement parks.

Modern airports are now extremely busy at peak periods and, as a result, if a plane is unable to push back at its appointed time due to the late arrival of a passenger, the plane will not be able to take off until the next available departure slot which may be as much as 40 to 60 minutes later.

Normally, a passenger who arrives at an airport less than a predetermined time before the departure of a flight is not given a boarding card for his or her intended flight and consequently this does not cause a problem. The general cause of passengers arriving late at a departure gate is delays waiting to pay for last minute duty free shopping followed closely by passengers waiting for their bills to be prepared and processed in restaurants in the duty free area. Other reasons include the passenger getting lost and finding himself at the opposite end of a large airport at the appointed time and disabled people being unable to obtain assistance at the required time.

The costs to the airline and the airport authority are very high. If the airport authority losses a slot it is unable to work at full potential capacity. The airline may arrive late at its destination with tired and upset passengers unable to make connections and attend business meetings on time.

The present invention provides a method for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic in, for example an airport, which method comprises the steps of: a) . providing a person, for example a passenger, with a device on or shortly before entry to a specific area, for example a duty-free area; and b) . transmitting a signal to said device at a specific time, for example when the passenger should make his or her way to a boarding gate. Preferably, said device is a locating device. This can enable, for example a central computer to Λ now' where a passenger is in relation to a departure gate. This information can be used in several ways, for example if the time has come for a passenger to make his way to the departure gate the computer may send an appropriate signal to the passenger. Such a sijnal could conveniently be a vibration to avoid annoying other passengers. The timing of the signal could take into account specific factors, for example how far the passenger is from the departure gate and where he is located. Thus a passenger in a duty free shop or restaurant should be sent a signal significantly in advance of a passenger seated in a waiting area adjacent the restaurant. The timing of the signal might also take into account the passengers seating allocation. This will become increasingly important as the capacity of airplanes increases as there is little more infuriating than being trapped in a queue trying to move to seats in rows 40 to 50 when another passenger is passing the time of day blocking the aisle adjacent row 6.

The computer can then monitor the progress of the passenger towards the departure gate. Provided that the passenger is in an appropriate area with respect to the departure gate at a given time the location device will remain quiescent. However, if the passenger is not in the correct area then a further signal is sent to the passenger to alert him to the problem. If the passenger is moving away from the gate then an audible alarm may sound. If the passenger delays so that he is an area where he needs to walk briskly to arrive at the departure gate on time the locating device will vibrate continuously. At this stage the ground staff at the gate will be alerted of a potential problem and given the location of the passenger. If the delay continues an airline official will be dispatched to find the passenger who may need assistance. At a certain time it may be appropriate for the computer to cause the location device to emit a continuous audible tone to allow the passenger to be immediately identified. This is particularly important if the passenger has suffered an acute medical problem and is unable to fly. This enables the information to be transmitted to the pilot who can then decide whether to take-off or arrange for the passengers baggage to be removed before pushing back.

Although it is conceivable that one receiver could scan a large modern airport it is anticipated that a multiplicity of receivers will be disposed at strategic locations around an airport so that the exact whereabouts of a passenger can be determined within a few meters.

With modern computers it is a relatively simple task to interrogate a large number of locating devices so that the departure gate and location of any passenger can be quickly located. By using colour coding problem areas can be quickly identified and remedial action taken. Thus, a screen could show a map of the airport with derelict passengers identified by red dots. A cluster of such red dots could identify a potential problem, for example inadequate staffing of check-out tills at the duty free.

A flash red dot could be used to identify a passenger in danger of delaying the take off of a plane. The computer could automatically activate a screen connected to security cameras in the area to allow ground staff to see the problem and send the appropriate assistance .

At the present time it is envisaged that the locating device will resemble a portable telephone or pager or watch and will be separate and distinct from the ticket and which will be attached to the passenger at the check-in gate via a disposable strap. An alarm will immediately be raised if the device is removed other than by an authorized official.

However, it is also envisaged that the locating device will eventually form a part of the ticket which may resemble a PCMCIA card for a modern laptop computer.

Whilst the present invention has been described in relation to an airport it is also applicable to any venue where a large number of people may wish to arrive at prescribed destinations at a particular time. Thus, for example in theme parks it is becoming increasingly common for a guest to be able to visit an attraction and take a ticket entitling him to go to the head of the queue provided that he returns between C€irtain specified times. At peak times there can be several hours between the time the guest takes his ticket and the ride. This results in people forgetting their time slot or, having remembered their time slot shortly after it has expired, arriving at the attraction and having to be admitted at an unscheduled time.

In the context of a theme park the present invention also has additional advantages. In particular, visitors can decide to leave the theme park regardless of prior bookings on attractions. This can be for a variety of reasons and mass movements can occur with little or no obvious reason. At these times it is not unusual for the queue at certain attractions to diminish quite dramatically. With the locating device it is possible for a computer to 'see' the distribution of visitors around an attraction and, if the queue is short, alert the visitors with the closest bookings and/or other visitors in close proximity to the attraction that it is available if they so wish. For the former purpose it is necessary for the locating device to know' that a booking has been made and for this purpose it is envisaged that the locating device will be programmed at the booking machine adjacent the attraction. For a better understanding of the present invention reference will now be made, by way of example, to the accompanying drawing which is a schematic plan view of an airport.

Referring to Figure 1 there is shown an airport which is generally identified by the reference numeral 100.

The airport 100 comprises a departures area 101 provided with rows of departure piers 102 only two of which are shown. Each departure pier 102 comprises a multiplicity of check-in desks 103.

The departure area 101 is separated from a waiting/duty free area 104 by a wall 105, access to the waiting/duty free area 104 being through passport and security control in the security area 106.

The waiting/duty free area 104 accommodates a plurality of retail outlets including duty free shops 107-118, restrooms 119, restaurant 120 and bar 121. Three departure piers 122, 123 and 124 extend from the waiting/duty free area 104.

Each departure pier 122,123 and 124 accommodates a number of departure gates, only one of which, 125 has been identified. In use, a passenger, Mr A. Jones, arrives at the airport at 1000 hours for a transatlantic flight due to push back at 1200 hours. The passenger first goes to check-in desk 103 where he is provided with a ticket and a locating device which resembles a mobile telephone. As the ticket is processed the locating device is automatically programmed to tell the locating device that the passenger, Mr A. Jones is due to leave on Virgin Flight VA001 which will be departing from departure gate 125 at 1200 hours. He will be sitting in seat 2A in the upper level.

As the locating device is handed over a central computer picks up a signal from the locating device (which it knows as device 4096) via a local transmitter/receiver 126. The computer then knows that a Mr A. Jones is in the departures area 101 and is scheduled to depart from departure gate 125 at 1200 hours. The computer knows Mr Jones seating allocation. A green dot representing Mr Jones appears on a screen in a passenger traffic control area 126.

Mr A. Jones then passes through the security area 106 where his passport maybe checked and his hand luggage is examined. He arrives in the waiting/duty free area 104 at 1050 hours.

After a quick look in the retail outlets 107 to 118 he decides to go to the restaurant 120 at 1100 hours for an early lunch. The computer knows that Mr A Jones is in the restaurant and that it takes an average of 5 minutes to walk from the restaurant to the departure gate 125. It also knows that the plane should be fully boarded by 11.50 and that because of his seat allocation Mr A. Jones should ideally arrive at the departure gate at 1140 hours and at the door of the plane by 1145 hours. It also knows that because Mr A. Jones is in the restaurant 120 he should be given an additional 15 minutes warning to enable him to finish his meal and attend to the payment of his meal.

Accordingly, at 1110 hours Mr A. Jones location device vibrates to remind him to make his way to the departure gate 125. Mr A. Jones asks the waiter to expedite service and bring his bill which he is in the process of paying at 11.36. By this time the computer has realised that Mr A. Jones should be in the departure pier 124. However, the transmitter/ receiver 128 clearly identifies Mr A. Jones as being in the restaurant 120. The computer sends a signal which causes the locating device to vibrate continuously and start beeping as Mr A. Jones is in the restaurant 120, Mr A. Jones now becomes a red dot on the screen in the passenger control area 127 and the staff at the gate 125 receive a message telling them that passenger Mr A. Jones is still at the restaurant 120.

In the meantime the beeping has alerted the restaurant staff to Mr A. Jones problem and he is promptly dispatched and after a few seconds of brisk walking towards the departure gate 125 he becomes another green dot who arrives at the departure gate 125 at 1140 hours where he hands over his locating device before boarding the plane at 1145 hours precisely.

Mr A. Jones locating device is reset by the ground staff and returned to the check-in desk 103 for use by the next customer.

Had Mr A. Jones left the restaurant and ran towards departure pier 122 then he would have received a verbal message from his locating device saying 'wrong way, wrong way' .

Had Mr Jones collapsed and still been in the restaurant 120 by 1140 hours his red dot would start flashing and ground staff would he dispatched to assist him and the captain of the plane notified immediately thereafter.

It will be appreciated that the present method will reduce the likelihood of a passenger delaying the departure of a plane. If desired the locating device may be provided with a screen on which a message can be displayed. Such messages may include advising a passenger that he has left part of his luggage in the security area 106 or that the departure of his plane has been delayed. It can also be used to relay messages from one passenger to another or to facilitate groups of passengers meeting.

The application with respect to a theme park is generally similar in overall concept. However, in addition to help ensure that the visitors arrive at their attractions on time it can also be used to modify crowd movement. Thus, if an attraction is temporarily disabled the reminder provided by the locating device may be delayed by the appropriate time. Similarly, if an attraction is quiet a message could be sent to all the visitors in the area of the proximity of the attraction advising them that the wait for the attraction is minimal. The locating devices can also be used to monitor when a visitor enters the park, which attractions he or she visits, and when they leave. This information, when combined with a brief exit interview, can be invaluable to understanding the rhythm of the theme park and how that rhythm can be adjusted to allow a visitor to obtain the maximum enjoyment from his visit.

Various modifications to the embodiments described are envisaged, for example the locating device may be provided with means to enable a person to communicate with the computer. Thus, for example the locating device may be provided with one or more buttons which a user can press in response to specific questions. Thus in the airport scenario the computer might issue an advisory message, for example 'Your Departure Gate has been changed to Gate 1 - Press Button Y to acknowledge and Button Z if you require assistance.'

If a passenger presses button Z then the computer sends a message to the nearest available ground staff to contact the passenger who will be identifiable by an intermittent beep generated from his locating device.

Other message might advise the passenger of delays in the proposed departure time. In such a case the computer would automatically reset all the warning signals intended to ensure that the passenger arrives at the departure gate on time to the new departure time.

If desired the passenger's baggage could be provided with a disposable transponder which could be interrogated by the computer to ensure that the passenger and the luggage are on the same airplane. It should be noted that although uncommon in Europe it is not unusual for internal flights in the US to be preceded by an announcement of the destination of the plane and suggesting that passengers not requiring the intended destination alight! The computer could easily bring the attention of the ground staff to a discrepancy between the departure gate of the passenger and the location of the luggage in a different airplane.

If the locating device is in the general configuration of a wrist watch and worn as such by the passenger, it could be provided with a screen on which general information and commercial material could be displayed. The general information might include information on the location of the nearest restrooms and the operational status of internal transport such as shuttle trains, shuttle buses, travelators and escalators. Commercial material could include promotional offers by shops and restaurants and 'collect at gate' gift management. It is envisaged that a passenger could opt out of receiving commercial material when checking in and his or her locating device would then be disabled in this regard.

The locating device might also have a facility for making 'freguently asked questions' such as 'where is the nearest restroom' . The computer would supply the answer 'knowing' the location of the passenger. The locating device should be able to send the computer a Λlow power' signal if its batteries run low - as might happen in a long delay situation. It should also be able to notify the computer immediately if it is removed by the wearer as this could signal a terrorist act.

Finally, the passenger can sit quietly in the bar awaiting the dreaded 'cancelled flight' announcement and simultaneously receive this together with information on where he should go to be bussed to the local hotel. This is significantly less painful than the usual situation of seeing the flight cancelled on the departures board and finding everyone at the airline's desk has departed for the day.

Claims

Claims:
1. A method for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic in, for example an airport, which method comprises the steps of: a) . providing a person, for example a passenger, with a device on or shortly before entry to a specific area, for example a duty-free area; and b) . transmitting a signal to said device at a specific time, for example when the passenger should make his or her way to a boarding gate.
2. A method according to Claim 1, wherein said device is a locating device.
3. A method according to Claim 2, including the step of adjusting the time at which said signal is transmitted as a function of the distance the person has to travel to a given destination, for example the distance of a passenger from a boarding gate.
4. A method according to Claim 2 or 3, including the step of adjusting the time at which said signal is transmitted as a function of the location of the person, for example at a restaurant where additional time may be required to finish a meal and pay the bill.
5. A method according to Claim 2, 3 or 4, including the step of adjusting the time at which said signal is transmitted as a function of the destination of said person, for example the persons seat allocation on an aircraft.
6. A method according to Claim 2, 3, 4 or 5, including the step of changing said signal if it appears that the purpose of transmitting the first signal has not been achieved, for example if a passenger has ignored a signal to walk to a departure date.
7. A method according to Claim 5, including the step of sounding an audible warning if it appears that the purpose of transmitting the first signal has not been achieved.
8. A method according to any preceding Claim including the step of forming an image of the whereabouts of said person on a screen.
9. A method according to Claim 8, including the step of allocating a colour to aperson in accordance whether they are responding in accordance with the signal, for example green to a person who is moving towards a departure gate at an appropriate rate to arrive at or before his or her scheduled arrival time, and red for a person who appears to have been delayed.
10. A method according to any preceding Claim, including the step of dispatching an official to assist a person who has not acted in accordance with said signal.
11. A method according to any preceding Claim, wherein said person is a passenger planning to depart from an airport.
12. A method according to any preceding Claim, including the step of providing said device with information regarding one or more of the following parameters: a) . the name of the passenger b) . the number of the flight the passenger is booked on; c) . the departure time of the flight; d) . the departure gate; e) . the seating allotted to the passenger; and f) . any disability which the passenger may have which would cause him or her to take longer to reach the departure gate.
13. A method according to any preceding Claim, wherein said person is a visitor to a theme park.
14. A method according to Claim 12, including the step of providing said device with booking information for particular attractions.
15. A method according to Claim 13 or 14, including the step of adjusting the time at which said signal is transmitted as a function of the availability of the attraction (earlier if the pre-booked queue is short; later if the pre-booked queue is long) .
16. A method according to any of Claims 12 to 15, including the step of using the device to monitor one or more of the following: a) . the duration of the visit; and b) . the route taken by the visitor.
17. A method according to any of Claims 12 to 16, including the steps of: a). noting the attractions which the visitor wishes to visit; and b) . booking said attractions.
18. A method according to Claim 17, including the step of dynamically allocating the order in which said visitor visits said attractions in response to parameters relating to said park.
19. A method according to Claim 18, wherein said parameters include one or more of the following: a) . the functioning of the attractions; b) . the queue at each attraction; c) . any obstruction preventing easy movement from one attraction to another (for example a parade) .
20. An apparatus for carrying out a method according to any preceding claim.
PCT/GB2002/002800 2001-06-20 2002-06-20 Method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic WO2002103641A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0115056A GB0115056D0 (en) 2001-06-20 2001-06-20 Method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic
GB0115056.4 2001-06-20
GB0115274A GB0115274D0 (en) 2001-06-21 2001-06-21 Method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic
GB0115274.3 2001-06-21

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2002103641A1 true true WO2002103641A1 (en) 2002-12-27

Family

ID=26246211

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/GB2002/002800 WO2002103641A1 (en) 2001-06-20 2002-06-20 Method and apparatus for facilitating the flow of pedestrian traffic

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2002103641A1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102004062624A1 (en) * 2004-12-24 2006-07-13 Schmidt, Günther Processing system allows time passenger aircraft is waiting in airport to be minimised by using passenger information handles by special mobile phones
WO2007004193A1 (en) * 2005-07-05 2007-01-11 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Communication system and method
GB2469026A (en) * 2009-03-30 2010-10-06 Nec Europe Ltd Information delivery method to registered terminals

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2650095A1 (en) * 1989-07-21 1991-01-25 Pioneer Electronic Tohoku Information device and method for supplying information in situ to a person carrying the device on him or herself, for example a passenger in an airport
WO1993002433A1 (en) * 1991-07-18 1993-02-04 Anagnostopoulos A Panagiotis Method of personally addressed communication, information, guidance and quick processing of the procedures in the airports
GB2307324A (en) * 1995-11-15 1997-05-21 Leonard Sim Queue management system
US6127917A (en) * 1997-02-27 2000-10-03 Micron Technology, Inc. System and method for locating individuals and equipment, airline reservation system, communication system
JP2000311145A (en) * 1999-04-28 2000-11-07 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Device and method for managing schedule and recording medium storing schedule managing program
WO2001092910A2 (en) * 2000-05-31 2001-12-06 Nigel John Walker Method and apparatus for determinig the location of a plurality of users

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2650095A1 (en) * 1989-07-21 1991-01-25 Pioneer Electronic Tohoku Information device and method for supplying information in situ to a person carrying the device on him or herself, for example a passenger in an airport
WO1993002433A1 (en) * 1991-07-18 1993-02-04 Anagnostopoulos A Panagiotis Method of personally addressed communication, information, guidance and quick processing of the procedures in the airports
GB2307324A (en) * 1995-11-15 1997-05-21 Leonard Sim Queue management system
US6127917A (en) * 1997-02-27 2000-10-03 Micron Technology, Inc. System and method for locating individuals and equipment, airline reservation system, communication system
JP2000311145A (en) * 1999-04-28 2000-11-07 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Device and method for managing schedule and recording medium storing schedule managing program
WO2001092910A2 (en) * 2000-05-31 2001-12-06 Nigel John Walker Method and apparatus for determinig the location of a plurality of users

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 2000, no. 14 5 March 2001 (2001-03-05) *

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102004062624A1 (en) * 2004-12-24 2006-07-13 Schmidt, Günther Processing system allows time passenger aircraft is waiting in airport to be minimised by using passenger information handles by special mobile phones
WO2007004193A1 (en) * 2005-07-05 2007-01-11 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Communication system and method
GB2469026A (en) * 2009-03-30 2010-10-06 Nec Europe Ltd Information delivery method to registered terminals

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5987420A (en) Reservation media issuing system using fuzzy logic
Maister The psychology of waiting lines
US20020116235A1 (en) Reservation system and methods for theme parks
Van Landeghem et al. Reducing passenger boarding time in airplanes: A simulation based approach
US20110307547A1 (en) Electronic queuing systems and methods
US6748364B1 (en) Assigning and managing patron reservations for distributed services using wireless personal communication devices
US6615179B1 (en) Data distribution network and method of use
Jarach The evolution of airport management practices: towards a multi-point, multi-service, marketing-driven firm
US6329919B1 (en) System and method for providing reservations for restroom use
US6173209B1 (en) Method and system for managing attraction admission
US20030083889A1 (en) Hotel guest services online
Jones Introduction to hospitality operations: An indispensable guide to the industry
US20090259549A1 (en) Methods and systems for optimizing flow
US20050288937A1 (en) System and method for monitoring and tracking individuals
US20100224727A1 (en) System and a method for making functions available to a passenger
Long et al. The Hajj Today: A Survey of the Contemporary Pilgrimage to Makkah
US20030236706A1 (en) System and method for providing a third party originating item to a passenger on a commercial airliner
Adey ‘May I have your attention’: airport geographies of spectatorship, position, and (im) mobility
US20040158482A1 (en) Management of the flow of persons in relation to centers of crowd concentration via wireless corntrol
US7047205B2 (en) Management of the flow of persons in relation to centers of crowd concentration via priority control
US20100190510A1 (en) Systems and methods for accessing travel services using a portable electronic device
US20030214407A1 (en) Method and system for airport and building security
US20020080198A1 (en) System for real-time location of people in a fixed environment
US7030765B2 (en) Message communication system and method
US20060287898A1 (en) Reservation method offering an alternative event

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW MZ SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NO NZ OM PH PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VN YU ZA ZM ZW

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase
WWW Wipo information: withdrawn in national office

Country of ref document: JP

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: JP