WO2002078567A2 - Prosthetic foot with tunable performance - Google Patents

Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Info

Publication number
WO2002078567A2
WO2002078567A2 PCT/US2002/009573 US0209573W WO2002078567A2 WO 2002078567 A2 WO2002078567 A2 WO 2002078567A2 US 0209573 W US0209573 W US 0209573W WO 2002078567 A2 WO2002078567 A2 WO 2002078567A2
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
ofthe
foot
calf shank
prosthetic foot
keel
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2002/009573
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2002078567A3 (en )
Inventor
Barry W. Townsend
Byron K. Claudino
Original Assignee
Townsend Barry W
Claudino Byron K
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/76Means for assembling, fitting or testing prostheses, e.g. for measuring or balancing, e.g. alignment means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K9/00Medicinal preparations characterised by special physical form
    • A61K9/48Preparations in capsules, e.g. of gelatin, of chocolate
    • A61K9/4816Wall or shell material
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2/6607Ankle joints
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2002/30001Additional features of subject-matter classified in A61F2/28, A61F2/30 and subgroups thereof
    • A61F2002/30316The prosthesis having different structural features at different locations within the same prosthesis; Connections between prosthetic parts; Special structural features of bone or joint prostheses not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2002/30329Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2002/30433Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using additional screws, bolts, dowels or rivets, e.g. connecting screws
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2002/30001Additional features of subject-matter classified in A61F2/28, A61F2/30 and subgroups thereof
    • A61F2002/30316The prosthesis having different structural features at different locations within the same prosthesis; Connections between prosthetic parts; Special structural features of bone or joint prostheses not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2002/30329Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2002/30433Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using additional screws, bolts, dowels or rivets, e.g. connecting screws
    • A61F2002/30434Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using additional screws, bolts, dowels or rivets, e.g. connecting screws using bolts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2002/30001Additional features of subject-matter classified in A61F2/28, A61F2/30 and subgroups thereof
    • A61F2002/30316The prosthesis having different structural features at different locations within the same prosthesis; Connections between prosthetic parts; Special structural features of bone or joint prostheses not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2002/30329Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2002/30433Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using additional screws, bolts, dowels or rivets, e.g. connecting screws
    • A61F2002/30438Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using additional screws, bolts, dowels or rivets, e.g. connecting screws using nuts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2002/30001Additional features of subject-matter classified in A61F2/28, A61F2/30 and subgroups thereof
    • A61F2002/30316The prosthesis having different structural features at different locations within the same prosthesis; Connections between prosthetic parts; Special structural features of bone or joint prostheses not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2002/30329Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2002/30462Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable
    • A61F2002/30464Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable using bands, belts or straps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2002/30001Additional features of subject-matter classified in A61F2/28, A61F2/30 and subgroups thereof
    • A61F2002/30316The prosthesis having different structural features at different locations within the same prosthesis; Connections between prosthetic parts; Special structural features of bone or joint prostheses not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2002/30329Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2002/30462Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable
    • A61F2002/30466Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable being elastic
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5001Cosmetic coverings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5003Prostheses not implantable in the body having damping means, e.g. shock absorbers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5003Prostheses not implantable in the body having damping means, e.g. shock absorbers
    • A61F2002/5006Dampers, e.g. hydraulic damper
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5007Prostheses not implantable in the body having elastic means different from springs, e.g. including an elastomeric insert
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5007Prostheses not implantable in the body having elastic means different from springs, e.g. including an elastomeric insert
    • A61F2002/5009Prostheses not implantable in the body having elastic means different from springs, e.g. including an elastomeric insert having two or more elastomeric blocks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5016Prostheses not implantable in the body adjustable
    • A61F2002/503Prostheses not implantable in the body adjustable for adjusting elasticity, flexibility, spring rate or mechanical tension
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5016Prostheses not implantable in the body adjustable
    • A61F2002/5032Prostheses not implantable in the body adjustable for adjusting fluid pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5016Prostheses not implantable in the body adjustable
    • A61F2002/5033Prostheses not implantable in the body adjustable for adjusting damping
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5072Prostheses not implantable in the body having spring elements
    • A61F2002/5073Helical springs, e.g. having at least one helical spring
    • A61F2002/5075Multiple spring systems including two or more helical springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5072Prostheses not implantable in the body having spring elements
    • A61F2002/5079Leaf springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2002/5081Additional features
    • A61F2002/5083Additional features modular
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2002/607Lower legs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6621Toes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6621Toes
    • A61F2002/6628Big toes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6635Metatarsals
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6642Heels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/665Soles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6657Feet having a plate-like or strip-like spring element, e.g. an energy-storing cantilever spring keel
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6657Feet having a plate-like or strip-like spring element, e.g. an energy-storing cantilever spring keel
    • A61F2002/6664Dual structures made of two connected cantilevered leaf springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6657Feet having a plate-like or strip-like spring element, e.g. an energy-storing cantilever spring keel
    • A61F2002/6671C-shaped
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6657Feet having a plate-like or strip-like spring element, e.g. an energy-storing cantilever spring keel
    • A61F2002/6678L-shaped
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/60Artificial legs or feet or parts thereof
    • A61F2/66Feet; Ankle joints
    • A61F2002/6614Feet
    • A61F2002/6657Feet having a plate-like or strip-like spring element, e.g. an energy-storing cantilever spring keel
    • A61F2002/6685S-shaped
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/68Operating or control means
    • A61F2/70Operating or control means electrical
    • A61F2002/704Operating or control means electrical computer-controlled, e.g. robotic control
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/68Operating or control means
    • A61F2002/74Operating or control means fluid, i.e. hydraulic or pneumatic
    • A61F2002/745Operating or control means fluid, i.e. hydraulic or pneumatic hydraulic
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/68Operating or control means
    • A61F2002/74Operating or control means fluid, i.e. hydraulic or pneumatic
    • A61F2002/747Operating or control means fluid, i.e. hydraulic or pneumatic pneumatic
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/50Prostheses not implantable in the body
    • A61F2/76Means for assembling, fitting or testing prostheses, e.g. for measuring or balancing, e.g. alignment means
    • A61F2002/7615Measuring means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/0041Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using additional screws, bolts, dowels or rivets, e.g. connecting screws
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/0075Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements sutured, ligatured or stitched, retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable

Abstract

A prosthetic foot (70) incorporates a foot keel (71) and a calf shank (72) connected to the foot keel to form an ankle joint area of the prosthetic foot. The foot keel has forefoot and hindfoot portions and an upwardly arched midfoot portion extending between the forefoot and midfoot portions. The calf shank includes a downward convexly curved lower end which is adjustably attached at a portion thereof to the foot keel by way of a releasable fastener arrangement which includes a coupling element (73) intermediate the calf shank and foot keel. The coupling element includes a resilient material forming a joint permitting subtalar joint-like motion of the prosthetic foot in gait.

Description

PROSTHETIC FOOT WITH TUNABLE PERFORMANCE

TECHNICAL FIELD The present invention relates to a high performance prosthetic foot providing improved dynamic response capabilities as these capabilities relate to applied force mechanics.

BACKGROUND ART

A jointless artificial foot for a leg prosthesis is disclosed by Martin et al. in U.S. Patent No. 5,897,594. Unlike earlier solutions wherein the artificial foot has a rigid construction provided with a joint in order to imitate the function ofthe ankle, the jointless artificial foot of Martin et al. employs a resilient foot insert which is arranged inside a foot molding. The insert is of approximately C-shaped design in longitudinal section, with the opening to the rear, and takes up the prosthesis load with its upper C- limb and via its lower C-limb transmits that load to a leaf spring connected thereto. The leaf spring as seen from the underside is of convex design and extends approximately parallel to the sole region, forward beyond the foot insert into the foot-tip region. The

Martin et al. invention is based on the object of improving the jointless artificial foot with regard to damping the impact ofthe heel, the elasticity, the heel-to-toe walking and the lateral stability, in order thus to permit the wearer to walk in a natural manner, the intention being to allow the wearer both to walk normally and also to carry out physical exercise and to play sports. However, the dynamic response characteristics of this known artificial foot are limited. There is a need for a higher performance prosthetic foot having improved applied mechanics design features which can improve amputee athletic performances involving activities such as running, jumping, sprinting, starting, stopping and cutting, for example. Other prosthetic feet have been proposed by Nan L. Phillips which allegedly provide an amputee with an agility and mobility to engage in a wide variety of activities which were precluded in the past because ofthe structural limitations and corresponding performances of prior art prostheses. Running, jumping and other activities are allegedly sustained by these known feet which, reportedly, may be utilized in the same manner as the normal foot ofthe wearer. See U.S. Patent Nos. 6,071,313; 5,993,488; 5,899,944; 5,800,569; 5,800,568; 5,728,177; 5,728,176; 5,824,112; 5,593,457 5,514,185; 5,181,932; and 4,822,363, for example.

DISCLOSURE OF INVENTION In order to allow the amputee athlete to attain a higher level of performance, there is a need for a high performance prosthetic foot having improved applied mechanics, which foot can out perform the human foot and also out perform the prior art prosthetic feet. It is of interest to the amputee athlete to have a high performance prosthetic foot having improved applied mechanics, high low dynamic response, and alignment adjustability that can be fine tuned to improve the horizontal and vertical components of activities which can be task specific in nature. The prosthetic foot ofthe present invention addresses these needs. According to an example embodiment disclosed herein, the prosthetic foot ofthe invention comprises a longitudinally extending foot keel having a forefoot portion at one end, a hindfoot portion at an opposite end and a relatively long midfoot portion extending between and upwardly arched from the forefoot and hindfoot portions. A calf shank including a downward convexly curved lower end is also provided. An adjustable fastening arrangement attaches the curved lower end ofthe calf shank to the upwardly arched midfoot portion of the foot keel to form an ankle joint area ofthe prosthetic foot.

The adjustable fastening arrangement permits adjustment ofthe alignment ofthe calf shank and the foot keel with respect to one another in the longitudinal direction of the foot keel for tuning the performance ofthe prosthetic foot. By adjusting the alignment ofthe opposed upwardly arched midfoot portion ofthe foot keel and the downward convexly curved lower end ofthe calf shank with respect to one another in the longitudinal direction ofthe foot keel, the dynamic response characteristics and motion outcomes ofthe foot are changed to be task specific in relation to the needed/desired horizontal and vertical linear velocities. A multi-use prosthetic foot is disclosed having high and low dynamic response capabilities, as well as biplanar motion characteristics, which improve the functional outcomes of amputees participating in sporting and/or recreational activities. A prosthetic foot especially for sprinting is also disclosed.

The prosthetic foot can also include a coupling element by which the calf shank is connected to the foot keel. In an example embodiment, the coupling element includes a resilient material forming a joint permitting closed kinetic chain motion ofthe prosthetic foot in gait. The joint has a joint axis oriented for permitting motion ofthe foot about the joint axis which is at least primarily in the frontal and transverse planes. In effect, the joint mimics a subtalar joint to allow the prosthetic foot to function like a human foot.

These and other objects, features and advantages ofthe present invention become more apparent from a consideration ofthe following detailed description of disclosed example embodiments ofthe invention and the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Fig. 1 is a schematic illustration representing the two adjacent radii of curvatures Rj. and R2, one against the other, of a foot keel and calf shank of a prosthetic foot of the invention which creates a dynamic response capability and motion outcome ofthe foot in gait in the direction of arrow B which is perpendicular to the tangential line A connecting the two radii.

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but showing the alignment ofthe two radii having been changed in the prosthetic foot according to the invention to increase the horizontal component and decrease the vertical component ofthe dynamic response capability and motion outcome ofthe foot in gait so that arrow Bi, perpendicular to tangential line Ai, is more horizontally directed than is the case depicted in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a side view of a prosthetic foot according to an example embodiment of the invention with pylon adapter and pylon connected thereto for securing the foot to the lower leg of an amputee.

Fig. 4 is a front view ofthe prosthetic foot with pylon adapter and pylon of Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a top view ofthe embodiment of Figs. 3 and 4.

Fig. 6 is a side view of another foot keel ofthe invention, especially for sprinting, which may be used in the prosthetic foot ofthe invention. Fig. 7 is a top view ofthe foot keel of Fig. 6. Fig. 8 is a bottom view ofthe foot keel in the prosthetic foot in Fig. 3 which provides high low dynamic response characteristics as well as biplanar motion capabilities.

Fig. 9 is a side view of an additional foot keel ofthe invention for the prosthetic foot particularly useful for sprinting by an amputee that has had a Symes amputation of the foot.

Fig. 10 is a top view ofthe foot keel of Fig. 9.

Fig. 11 is a further variation of foot keel for the prosthetic foot ofthe invention for a Symes amputee, the foot keel providing the prosthetic foot with high low dynamic response characteristics as well as biplanar motion capabilities.

Fig. 12 is a top view ofthe foot keel of Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is a side view of a foot keel ofthe invention wherein the thickness ofthe keel tapers, e.g., is progressively reduced, from the midfoot portion to the hindfoot portion ofthe keel. Fig. 14 is a side view of another form ofthe foot keel wherein the thickness tapers from the midfoot toward both the forefoot and hindfoot ofthe keel.

Fig. 15 is a side view from slightly above and to the front of a parabola shaped calf shank ofthe prosthetic foot ofthe invention, the thickness ofthe calf shank tapering toward its upper end. Fig. 16 is a side view like Fig. 15 but showing another calf shank tapered from the middle towards both its upper and lower ends.

Fig. 17 is a side view of a C-shaped calf shank for the prosthetic foot, the calf shank thickness tapering from the middle towards both its upper and lower ends.

Fig. 18, is a side view of another example of a C-shaped calf shank for the prosthetic foot, the thickness ofthe calf shank being progressively reduced from its midportion to its upper end.

Fig. 19 is a side view of an S-shaped calf shank for the prosthetic foot, both ends being progressively reduced in thickness from the middle thereof.

Fig. 20 is a further example of an S-shaped calf shank which is tapered in thickness only at its upper end.

Fig. 21 is a side view of a J-shaped calf shank, tapered at each end, for the prosthetic foot ofthe invention.

Fig. 22 is a view like Fig. 21 but showing a J-shaped calf shank which is progressively reduced in thickness towards only its upper end.

Fig. 23 is a side view, from slightly above, of an aluminum or plastic coupling element used in the adjustable fastening arrangement ofthe invention for attaching the calf shank to the foot keel as shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 24 is a view from the side and slightly to the front of a pylon adapter used on the prosthetic foot of Figs. 3-5 for connecting the foot to a pylon to be attached to an amputee's leg. Fig. 25 is a side view of another prosthetic foot ofthe invention similar to that in

Fig. 3, but showing use of a coupling element with two releasable fasteners spaced longitudinally connecting the element to the calf shank and foot keel, respectively.

Fig. 26 is an enlarged side view ofthe coupling element in Fig. 25.

Fig. 27 is an enlarged side view ofthe calf shank ofthe prosthetic foot of Fig. 25. Fig. 28 is a side view of a further example embodiment ofthe prosthetic foot similar to those in Figs. 3 and 25 wherein the coupling element between the calf shank and foot keel is constructed to mimic in function a subtalar joint to allow the prosthetic foot to function like a human foot.

Fig. 29 is a front view ofthe prosthetic foot as seen from the left side ofthe prosthetic foot depicted in Fig. 28 showing the dog bone shape of coupling element from the anterior side thereof.

Fig. 30 is a rear view ofthe prosthetic foot shown in Fig. 28.

Fig. 31 is a bottom view ofthe prosthetic foot of Fig. 28.

Fig. 32 is an end view ofthe coupling element as seen in the direction of arrow F along the joint axis G-G ofthe coupling element.

Fig. 33 is a cross-sectional view ofthe coupling element taken along the joint axis G-G in Fig. 28.

Fig. 34 is a side view ofthe variation ofthe embodiment ofthe prosthetic foot in Figs- 28-33 wherein the coupling element is integrally molded to the calf shank and foot keel to provide a non-adjusted foot.

Fig. 35 is a side view of another variation ofthe embodiment ofthe prosthetic foot in Figs. 28-33 wherein the coupling element is integrally formed with the calf shank but adjustably connected to the foot keel.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawings, a prosthetic foot 1 in the example embodiment of

Figures 3-5 is seen to comprise a longitudinally extending foot keel 2 having a forefoot portion 3 at one end, a hindfoot portion 4 at an opposite end and an upwardly arched midfoot portion 5 extending between the forefoot and hindfoot portions. The midfoot portion 5 is upward convexly curved over its entire longitudinal extent between the forefoot and hindfoot portions in the example embodiment.

An upstanding calf shank 6 ofthe foot 1 is attached at a portion of a downward convexly curved lower end 7 thereof to a proximate, posterior surface ofthe keel midfoot portion 5 by way of a releasable fastener 8 and coupling element 11. The fastener 8 is a single bolt with nut and washers in the example embodiment, but could be a releasable clamp or other fastener for securely positioning and retaining the calf shank on the foot keel when the fastener is tightened.

A longitudinally extending opening 9 is formed in a proximate, posterior surface ofthe keel midfoot portion 5, see Figure 8. A longitudinally extending opening 10 is also formed in the curved lower end 7 ofthe calf shank 6 like that shown in Figure 15, for example. The releasable fastener 8 extends through the openings 9 and 10 which permit adjusting the alignment ofthe calf shank and the foot keel with respect to one another in the longitudinal direction, A- A in Figure 5, when the fastener 8 is loosened or released for tuning the performance ofthe prosthetic foot to be task specific. Thus, the fastener 8, coupling element 11 and longitudinally extending openings 9 and 10 constitute an adjustable fastening arrangement for attaching the calf shank to the foot keel to form an ankle joint area ofthe prosthetic foot.

The effects of adjusting the alignment ofthe calf shank 6 and foot keel 2 are seen from a consideration of Figures 1 and 2, wherein the two radii Ri and R2, one next to another, represent the adjacent, facing, domed or convexly curved surfaces ofthe foot keel midportion 5 and the calf shank 6. When two such radii are considered one next to another, motion capability exists perpendicular to a tangential line, A in Figure 1, Ai in Figure 2, drawn between the two radii. The interrelationship between these two radii determines a direction of motion outcomes. As a consequence, dynamic response force application ofthe foot 1 is dependent on this relationship. The larger the radius of a concavity, the more dynamic response capability. However, the tighter a radius, the quicker it responds.

The alignment capability ofthe calf shank and foot keel in the prosthetic foot of the invention allows the radii to be shifted so that horizontal or vertical linear velocities with the foot in athletic activities are affected. For example, to improve the horizontal linear velocity capability ofthe prosthetic foot 1, an alignment change can be made to affect the relationship ofthe calf shank's radius and the foot keel radius. That is, to improve the horizontal linear velocity characteristic, the bottom radius R2, ofthe foot k eel, is made more distal than its start position, Figure 2 as compared with Figure 1. This changes the dynamic response characteristics and motion outcomes ofthe foot 1 to be more horizontally directed and as a result greater horizontal linear velocity can be achieved with the same applied forces.

The amputee can, through practice, find a setting for each activity that meets his/her needs as these needs relate to horizontal and vertical linear velocities. A jumper and a basketball player, for example, need more vertical lift than a sprint runner. The coupling element 11 is a plastic or metal alloy alignment coupling (see Figures 3, 4 and 23), or a resilient coupling element introducing a subtalar joint as in the example embodiment of Figs. 28-33 as discussed hereinafter, sandwiched between the attached foot keel 2 and calf shank 6. The releasable fastener 8 in Figs. 3 and 4 extends through a hole 12 in the coupling element. The coupling element extends along the attached portion ofthe calf shank and the proximate, posterior surface ofthe keel midfoot portion 5. The curved lower end 7 ofthe calf shank 6 is in the shape of a parabola with the smallest radius of curvature ofthe parabola located at the lower end and extending upwardly, and initially anteriorly in the parabola shape. A posteriorly facing concavity is formed by the curvature ofthe calf shank as depicted in Figure 3. The parabola shape is advantageous in that it has increased dynamic response characteristics in creating both improved horizontal linear velocity associated with the relatively larger radii proximal terminal end thereof, while having a smaller radius of curvature at its lower end for quicker response characteristics. The larger radii of curvature at the upper end ofthe parabola shape enable the tangential line A, explained with reference to Figures 1 and 2, to remain more vertically oriented with changes in alignment, which creates improved horizontal linear velocity. A pylon adapter 13 is connected to the upper end ofthe calf shank 6 by fasteners

14. The adapter 13 in turn is secured to the lower end of pylon 15 by fasteners 16. Pylon 15 is secured to the lower limb ofthe amputee by a supporting structure (not shown) attached to the leg stump.

The forefoot, midfoot and hindfoot portions ofthe foot keel 2 are formed of a single piece of resilient material in the example embodiment. For example, a solid piece of material, plastic in nature, having shape-retaining characteristics when deflected by the ground reaction forces can be employed. More particularly, the foot keel and also the calf shank can be formed of laminated composite material having reinforcing fiber laminated with polymer matrix material. In particular, a high strength graphite, laminated with epoxy thermosetting resins, or extruded plastic utilized under the tradename of Delran, or degassed polyurethane copolymers, may be used to form the foot keel and also the calf shank. The functional qualities associated with these materials afford high strength with low weight and minimal creep. The thermosetting epoxy resins are laminated under vacuum utilizing prosthetic industry standards. The polyurethane copolymers can be poured into negative molds and the extruded plastic can be machined. Each material of use has its advantages and disadvantages. It has been found that the laminated composite material for the foot keel and the calf shank can also advantageously be a thermo-formed (prepreg) laminated composite material manufactured per industry standards, with reinforcing fiber and a thermoplastic polymer matrix material for superior mechanical expansion qualities. A suitable commercially available composite material of this kind is CYLON® made by Cytec Fiberite Inc. of Havre de Grace, Maryland.

The resilient material's physical properties as they relate to stiffness, flexibility and strength are all determined by the thickness ofthe material. A thinner material will deflect easier than a thicker material ofthe same density. The material utilized, as well as the physical properties, are associated with the stiffness to flexibility characteristics in the prosthetic foot keel and calf shank. The thickness ofthe foot keel and calf shank are uniform or symmetrical in the example embodiment of Figures 3-5, but the thickness along the length of these components can be varied as discussed below, such as by making the hindfoot and forefoot areas thinner and more responsive to deflection in the midfoot region. To aid in providing the prosthetic foot 1 with a high low dynamic response capability, the midfoot portion 5 is formed by a longitudinal arch such that the medial aspect ofthe longitudinal arch has a relatively higher dynamic response capability than the lateral aspect ofthe longitudinal arch. For this purpose, in the example embodiment, the medial aspect ofthe longitudinal arch concavity is larger in radius than the lateral aspect thereof. The posterior end 17 ofthe hindfoot portion 4 is shaped in an upwardly curved arch that reacts to ground reaction forces during heel strike by compressing for shock absorption. The heel formed by the hindfoot portion 4 is formed with a posterior lateral corner 18 which is more posterior and lateral than the medial corner 19 to encourage hindfoot eversion during initial contact phase of gait. The anterior end 20 of the forefoot portion 3 is shaped in an upwardly curved arch to simulate the human toes being dorsifiexed in the heel rise toe off position ofthe late stance phase of gait. Rubber or foam pads 53 and 54 are provided on the lower forefoot and hindfoot as cushions.

Improved biplanar motion capability ofthe prosthetic foot is created by medial and lateral expansion joint holes 21 and 22 extending through the forefoot portion 3 between dorsal and plantar surfaces thereof. Expansion joints 23 and 24 extend forward from respect ones ofthe holes to the anterior edge ofthe forefoot portion to form medial, middle and lateral expansion struts 25-27 which create improved biplanar motion capability ofthe forefoot portion ofthe foot keel. The expansion joint holes 21 and 22 are located along a line, B-B in Figure 5, in the transverse plane which extends at an angle of 35° to the longitudinal axis A-A ofthe foot keel with the medial expansion joint hole 21 more anterior than the lateral expansion joint hole 22. The expansion joint holes 21 and 22 as projected on a sagittal plane are inclined at an angle of 45° to the transverse plane with the dorsal aspect ofthe holes being more anterior than the plantar aspect. With this arrangement, the distance from the releasable fastener 8 to the lateral expansion joint hole 22 is shorter than the distance from the releasable fastener to the medial expansion joint hole 21 such that the lateral portion ofthe prosthetic foot 1 has a shorter toe lever than the medial for enabling midfoot high and low dynamic response.

The anterior ofthe hindfoot portion 4 ofthe foot keel 2 further includes an expansion joint hole 28 extending through the hindfoot portion 4 between dorsal and plantar surfaces thereof. An expansion joint 29 extends posteriorly from the hole 28 to the posterior edge ofthe hindfoot portion to form expansion struts 30 and 31. These create improved biplanar motion capability ofthe hindfoot portion ofthe foot.

A dorsal aspect ofthe midfoot portion 5 and the forefoot portion 3 ofthe foot keel 2 form the upwardly facing concavity, 32 in Figure 3, so that it mimics in function the fifth ray axis of motion of a human foot. That is, the concavity 32 has a longitudinal axis C-C which is oriented at an angle β of 150° to 35° to the longitudinal axis A-A ofthe foot keel with the medial being more anterior than the lateral to encourage fifth ray motion in gait as in the oblique low gear axis of rotation ofthe second to fifth metatarsals in the human foot.

The importance of biplanar motion capability can be appreciated when an amputee walks on uneven terrain or when the athlete cuts medially or laterally on the foot. The direction ofthe ground force vector changes from being sagittally oriented to having a frontal plane component. The ground will push medially in opposite direction to the foot pushing laterally. As a consequence to this, the calf shank leans medially and weight is applied to the medial structure ofthe foot keel. In response to these pressures, the medial expansion joint struts 25 and 31 ofthe foot keel 2 dorsiflex (deflect upward) and evert, and the lateral expansion joint struts 27 and 30 plantar flex (deflect downwards) and evert. This motion tries to put the plantar surface ofthe foot flat on the ground (plantar grade).

Another foot keel 33 ofthe invention, especially for sprinting, may be used in the prosthetic foot ofthe invention, see Figures 6 and 7. The body's center of gravity in a sprint becomes exclusively sagittal plane oriented. The prosthetic foot does not need to have a low dynamic response characteristic. As a consequence, the 15°-35° external rotation orientation ofthe longitudinal axis ofthe forefoot, midfoot concavity as in foot keel 2 is not needed. Rather, the concavity's longitudinal axis D-D orientation should become parallel to the frontal plane as depicted in Figures 6 and 7. This makes the sprint foot respond in a sagittal direction only. Further, the orientation ofthe expansion joint holes 34 and 35 in the forefoot and midfoot portions, along line E-E, is parallel to the frontal plane, i.e., the lateral hole 35 is moved anteriorly and in line with the medial hole 34 and parallel to the frontal plane. The anterior terminal end 36 ofthe foot keel 33 is also made parallel to the frontal plane. The posterior terminal heel area 37 ofthe foot keel is also parallel to the frontal plane. These modifications effect in a negative way the multi-use capabilities ofthe prosthetic foot. However, its performance characteristics become task specific. Another variation in the sprint foot keel 33 is in the toe, ray region ofthe forefoot portion ofthe foot where 15° of dorsiflexion in the foot keel 2 are increased to 25-40° of dorsiflexion in foot keel 33. Figures 9 and 10 show an additional foot keel 38 ofthe invention for the prosthetic foot particularly useful for sprinting by an amputee that has had a Symes amputation ofthe foot. For this purpose, the midfoot portion ofthe foot keel 38 includes a posterior, upwardly facing concavity 39 in which the curved lower end ofthe calf shank is attached to the foot keel by way ofthe releasable fastener. This foot keel can be utilized by all lower extremity amputees. The foot keel 38 accommodates the longer residual limb associated with the Symes level amputee. Its performance characteristics are distinctively quicker in dynamic response capabilities. Its use is not specific to this level of amputation. It can be utilized on all transtibial and transfemoral amputations. The foot keel 40 in the example embodiment of Figures 11 and 12 also has a concavity 41 for a Symes amputee, the foot keel providing the prosthetic foot with high low dynamic response characteristic as well as biplanar motion capabilities like those ofthe example embodiment in Figures 3-5 and 8.

The functional characteristics ofthe several foot keels for the prosthetic foot 1 are associated with the shape and design features as they relate to concavities, convexities, radii size, expansion, compression, and material physical properties - all of these properties relating, to reacting to, ground forces in walking, running and jumping activities.

The foot keel 42 in Figure 13 is like that in the example embodiment of Figures 3- 5 and 8, except that the thickness ofthe foot keel is tapered from the midfoot portion to the posterior ofthe hindfoot. The foot keel 43 in Figure 14 has its thickness progressively reduced or tapered at both its anterior and posterior ends. Similar variations in thickness are shown in the calf shank 44 of Figure 14 and the calf shank 45 of Figure 16 which may be used in the prosthetic foot 1. Each design ofthe foot keel and calf shank create different functional outcomes, as these function outcomes relate to the horizontal and vertical linear velocities which are specific to improving performance in varied athletic related tasks. The capability of multiple calf shank configurations and adjustments in settings between the foot keel and the calf shank create a prosthetic foot calf shank relationship that allows the amputee and/or the prosthetist the ability to tune the prosthetic foot for maximum performance in a selected one of a wide variety of sport and recreational activities. Other calf shanks for the prosthetic foot 1 are illustrated in Figures 17-22 and include C-shaped calf shanks 46 and 47, S-shaped calf shanks 48 and 49 and J-shaped calf shanks 50 and 51. The upper end ofthe calf shank could also have a straight vertical end with a pyramid attachment plate attached to this proximal terminal end for connection to a prosthetic socket on the leg stump ofthe user, for example. A male pyramid could be bolted to and through this vertical end ofthe calf shank. Plastic or aluminum fillers to accept the proximal male pyramid and the distal foot keel could also be provided in the elongated openings at the proximal and distal ends ofthe calf shank. The prosthetic foot ofthe invention is a modular system preferably constructed with standardized units or dimensions for flexibility and variety in use. All track related running activities take place in a counter-clockwise direction.

Another, optional feature ofthe invention takes into account the forces acting on the foot advanced along such a curved path. Centripetal acceleration acts toward the center of rotation where an object moves along a curved path. Newton's third law is applied for energy action. There is an equal and opposite reaction. Thus, for every "center seeking" force, there is a "center fleeing" force. The centripetal force acts toward the center of rotation and the centrifugal force, the reaction force, acts away from the center of rotation. If an athlete is running around the curve on the track, the centripetal force pulls the runner toward the center ofthe curve while the centrifugal force pulls away from the center ofthe curve. To counteract the centrifugal force which tries to lean the runner outward, the runner leans inward. If the direction of rotation ofthe runner on the track is always counter-clockwise, then the left side is the inside ofthe track. As a consequence, according to a feature ofthe present invention, the left side ofthe right and left prosthetic foot calf shanks can be made thinner than the right side and the amputee runner's curve performance could be improved.

The foot keels 2, 33, 38, 42, 43 and 71 in the several embodiments, are each 29 cm long with the proportions ofthe shoe 1 shown to scale in Figures 3, 4 and 5, and in the several views ofthe different calf shanks and foot keels. However, as will be readily understood by the skilled artisan, the specific dimensions ofthe prosthetic foot can be varied depending on the size, weight and other characteristics ofthe amputee being fitted with the foot. The operation ofthe prosthetic foot 1 in walking and running stance phase gait cycles will now be considered. Newton's three laws of motion, that relate to law of inertia, acceleration and action-reaction, are the basis for movement kinematics in the foot 2. From Newton's third law, the law of action-reaction, it is known that the ground pushes on the foot in a direction equal and opposite to the direction the foot pushes on the ground. These are known as ground reaction forces. Many scientific studies have been done on human gait, running and jumping activities. Force plate studies show us that Newton's third law occurs in gait. From these studies, we know the direction the ground pushes on the foot.

The stance phase of walking/running activities can be further broken down into deceleration and acceleration phases. When the prosthetic foot touches the ground, the foot pushes anteriorly on the ground and the ground pushes back in an equal and opposite direction - that is to say the ground pushes posteriorly on the prosthetic foot. This force makes the prosthetic foot move. The stance phase analysis of walking and running activities begins with the contact point being the posterior lateral corner 18, Figs. 3 and 18, which is offset more posteriorly and laterally than the medial side ofthe foot. This offset at initial contact causes the foot to evert and the calf shank to plantar flex. The calf shank always seeks a position that transfers the body weight through its shank, e.g., it tends to have its long vertical member in a position to oppose the ground forces. This is why it moves posteriorly-plantar flexes to oppose the ground reaction force which is pushing posteriorly on the foot. The ground forces cause the calf shank to compress with the proximal end moving posteriorly. The calf shank lower tight radius compresses simulating human ankle joint plantar flexion and the forefoot is lowered by compression to the ground. At the same time, the posterior aspect ofthe top ofthe foot keel 2 compresses upward through compression. Both of these compressive forces act as shock absorbers. This shock absorption is further enhanced by the offset posterior lateral heel 18 which causes the foot to evert, which also acts as a shock absorber, once the calf shank has stopped moving into plantar flexion and with the ground pushing posteriorly on the foot.

The compressed members ofthe foot keel and calf shank then start to unload - that is they seek their original shape and the stored energy is released - which causes the calf shank proximal end to move anteriorly in an accelerated manner. As the calf shank approaches its vertical starting position, the ground forces change from pushing posteriorly to pushing vertically upward against the foot. Since the prosthetic foot has posterior and anterior plantar surface weight bearing areas and these areas are connected by a non-weight bearing long arch shaped midportion, the vertically directed forces from the prosthesis cause the long arch shaped midportion to load by expansion. The posterior and anterior weight-bearing surfaces diverge. These vertically directed forces are being stored in the long arch midportion ofthe foot - as the ground forces move from being vertical in nature to anteriorly directed. The calf shank expands - simulating ankle dorsiflexion. This causes the prosthetic foot to pivot off of the anterior plantar weight- bearing surface. The midfoot long arch changes from being compressed to being expanded. This releases the stored vertical compressed force energy into improved expansion capabilities.

The long arch ofthe foot keel and the calf shank resist expansion of their respective structures. As a consequence, the calf shank anterior progression is arrested and the foot starts to pivot off the anterior plantar surface weight-bearing area. The expansion ofthe midfoot portion ofthe foot keel has as high and low response capability in the case ofthe foot keels in the example embodiments of Figures 3-5 and 8, Figures 11 and 12, Figure 13 and Figure 14, and Figures 28-33. Since the midfoot forefoot transitional area of these foot keels is deviated 15° to 35° externally from the long axis of the foot, the medial long arch is longer than the lateral long arch. This is important because in the normal foot, during acceleration or deceleration, the medial aspect ofthe foot is used.

The prosthetic foot longer medial arch has greater dynamic response characteristic than the lateral. The lateral shorter toe lever is utilized when walking or running at slower speeds. The body's center of gravity moves through space in a sinusoidal curve. It moves medial, lateral, proximal and distal. When walking or running at slower speeds, the body's center of gravity moves more medial and lateral than when walking or running fast. In addition, momentum or inertia is less and the ability to overcome a higher dynamic response capability is less. The prosthetic foot ofthe invention is adapted to accommodate these principles in applied mechanics. As the ground forces push anteriorly on the prosthetic foot which is pushing posteriorly on the ground, as the heel begins to rise the anterior portion ofthe long arch ofthe midfoot portion is contoured to apply these posteriorly directed forces perpendicular to its plantar surface. This is the most effective and efficient way to apply these forces. The same can be said about the posterior hindfoot portion ofthe prosthetic foot. It is also shaped so that the posteriorly directed ground forces at initial contact are opposed with the foot keel's plantar surface being perpendicular to their applied force direction.

In the later stages of heel rise, toe off walking and running activities, the ray region ofthe forefoot portion is dorsiflexed 15°-35°. This upwardly extending arc allows the anteriorly directed ground forces to compress this region ofthe foot. This compression is less resisted than expansion and a smooth transition occurs to the swing phase of gait and running with the prosthetic foot. In later stages of stance phase of gait, the expanded calf shank and the expanded midfoot long arch release their stored energy adding to the propulsion ofthe amputee's body center of gravity. The posterior aspect ofthe hindfoot and the forefoot region ofthe foot keel incorporate expansion joint holes and expansion joint struts in several ofthe embodiments as noted previously. The orientation ofthe expansion joint holes act as a mitered hinge and biplanar motion capabilities are improved for improving the total contact characteristics ofthe plantar surface ofthe foot when walking on uneven terrain. The Symes foot keels in Figures 9-12 are distinctively different in dynamic response capabilities - as these capabilities are associated with walking, running and jumping activities. These foot keels differ in four distinct features. These include the presence of a concavity in the proximate, posterior ofthe midfoot portion for accommodating the Symes distal residual limb shape better than a flat surface. The alignment concavity requires that the corresponding anterior and posterior radii ofthe arched foot keel midportion be more aggressive and smaller in size. As a consequence, all ofthe midfoot long arch radii and the hindfoot radii are tighter and smaller. This significantly affects the dynamic response characteristics. The smaller radii create less potential for a dynamic response. However, the prosthetic foot responds quicker to all of the aforementioned walking, running and jumping ground forces. The result is a quicker foot with less dynamic response.

Improved task specific athletic performance can be achieved with alignment changes using the prosthetic foot ofthe invention, as these alignment changes affect the vertical and horizontal components of each task. The human foot is a multi-functional unit - it walks, runs and jumps. The human tibia fibula calf shank structure on the other hand is not a multi-functional unit. It is a simple lever which applies its forces in walking, running and jumping activities parallel to its long proximal-distal orientation. It is a non-compressible structure and it has no potential to store energy. On the other hand, the prosthetic foot ofthe invention has dynamic response capabilities, as these dynamic response capabilities are associated with the horizontal and vertical linear velocity components of athletic walking, running and jumping activities and out-performing the human tibia and fibula. As a consequence, the possibility exists to improve amputee athletic performance. For this purpose, according to the present invention, the fastener 8 is loosened and the alignment ofthe calf shank and the foot keel with respect to one another is adjusted in the longitudinal direction ofthe foot keel. Such a change is shown in connection with Figures 1 and 2. The calf shank is then secured to the foot keel in the adjusted position with the fastener 8. During this adjustment, the bolt ofthe fastener 8 slides relative to one or both ofthe opposed, relatively longer, longitudinally extending openings 9 and 10 in the foot keel and calf shank, respectively. An alignment change that improves the performance characteristic of a runner who makes initial contact with the ground with the foot flat as in sprinting, for example, is one wherein the foot keel is slid anterior relative to the calf shank and the foot plantar flexed on the calf shank. This new relationship improves the horizontal component of running. That is, with the calf shank plantar flexed to the foot, and the foot making contact with the ground in a foot flat position as opposed to initially heel contact, the ground immediately pushes posteriorly on the foot that is pushing anteriorly on the ground. This causes the calf shank to move rapidly forward (by expanding) and downwardly. Dynamic response forces are created by expansion which resists the calf shank's direction of initial movement. As a consequence, the foot pivots over the metatarsal plantar surface weight-bearing area. This causes the midfoot region ofthe keel to expand which is resisted more than compression. The net effect ofthe calf shank expansion and the midfoot expansion is that further anterior progression ofthe calf shank is resisted which allows the knee extenders and hip extenders in the user's body to move the body's center of gravity forward and proximal in a more efficient manner (i.e., improved horizontal velocity). In this case, more forward than up than in the case of a heel toe runner whose calf shank's forward progression is less resisted by the calf shank starting more dorsiflexed (vertical) than a foot flat runner.

To analyze the sprint foot in function, an alignment change ofthe calf shank and foot keel is made. Advantage is taken ofthe foot keel having all of its concavities with their longitudinal axis orientation parallel to the frontal plane. The calf shank is plantar flexed and slid posterior on the foot keel. This lowers the distal circles even further than on the flat foot runner with the multi-use foot keel like that in Figures 3-5 and 8, for example. As a consequence, there is even greater horizontal motion potential and the dynamic response is directed into this improved horizontal capability.

The sprinters have increased range of motion, forces and momentum (inertia) - momentum being a prime mover. Since their stance phase deceleration phase is shorter than their acceleration phase, increased horizontal linear velocities are achieved. This means that at initial contact, when the toe touches the ground, the ground pushes posteriorly on the foot and the foot pushes anteriorly on the ground. The calf shank which has increased forces and momentum is forced into even greater flexion and downward movement than the initial contact foot flat runner. As a consequence to these forces, the foot's long arch concavity is loaded by expansion and the calf shank is loaded by expansion. These expansion forces are resisted to a greater extent than all the other previously mentioned forces associated with running. As a consequence, the dynamic response capability ofthe foot is proportional to the force applied. The human tibia fibula calf shank response is only associated with the energy force potential - it is a straight structure and it cannot store energy. These expansion forces in the prosthetic foot ofthe invention in sprinting are greater in magnitude than all the other previously mentioned forces associated with walking and running. As a consequence, the dynamic response capability ofthe foot is proportional to the applied forces and increased amputee athletic performance, as compared with human body function, is possible.

The prosthetic foot 53 depicted in Fig. 25 is like that in Fig. 3 except for the adjustable fastening arrangement between the calf shank and the foot keel and the construction ofthe upper end ofthe calf shank for connection to the lower end of a pylon. In this example embodiment, the foot keel 54 is adjustably connected to the calf shank 55 by way of plastic or aluminum coupling element 56. The coupling element is attached to the foot keel and calf shank by respective releasable fasteners 57 and 58 which are spaced from one another in the coupling element in a direction along the longitudinal direction of the foot keel. The fastener 58 joining the coupling element to the calf shank is more posterior than the fastener 57 joining the foot keel and the coupling element. By increasing the active length ofthe calf shank in this way, the dynamic response capabilities ofthe calf shank itself are increased. Changes in alignment are made in cooperation with longitudinally extending openings in the calf shank and foot keel as in other example embodiments. The upper end ofthe calf shank 55 is formed with an elongated opening 59 for receiving a pylon 15. Once received in the opening, the pylon can be securely clamped to the calf shank by tightening bolts 60 and 61 to draw the free side edges 62 and 63 ofthe calf shank along the opening together. This pylon connection can be readily adjusted by loosening the bolts, telescoping the pylon relative to the calf shank to the desired position and reclamping the pylon in the adjusted position by tightening the bolts. The prosthetic foot 70 shown in Figs. 28-33 is similar to those in Figs. 3-5, 8, 23 and 24 and Figs. 25-27 in that it includes a foot keel 71 and a calf shank 72 connected to the foot keel by way of a coupling element 73. However, in this embodiment the coupling element is formed of a resilient material forming a joint permitting closed kinetic chain motion ofthe prosthetic foot in gait. More particularly, the joint ofthe coupling element has a joint axis, G-G in Figs. 28 and 33, defined by the dog bone shaped structure ofthe coupling element. The axis G-G is oriented for permitting motion ofthe foot about the joint axis which is at least primarily in the frontal and transverse planes, although in the example embodiment some motion in the sagittal plane occurs. As shown in Fig. 28, the joint axis G-G as projected on a sagittal plane preferably makes an angle Δ within the range of 25 to 42° with respect to a transverse plane, represented by H-H in Fig. 28. The joint axis G-G as projected on a transverse plane is preferably externally rotated at an angle Δ' within the range of 16 to 23° with respect to the longitudinal axis ofthe foot, A-A, as shown in Fig. 33. Thus, in the example embodiment the joint axis G-G ofthe coupling element ofthe foot runs from posterior, plantar and lateral to anterior, dorsal and medial.

The coupling device is preferably made of carbon and a high strength polyurethane elastomer material but other materials providing the requisite resilience and strength could be used. The design features ofthe coupling device impart subtalar joint functional motion outcome potential. That is to say that the coupling device is oriented and designed so that it has an axis G-G which affects motion potential outcomes. The motion potential outcomes are to be specifically oriented to mimic human subtalar joint function in human gait and running activities. To this end, the coupling element has the dog bone shaped structure (Fig. 32), as a result of concavely curved lateral and medial side surfaces 74 and 75 ofthe coupling element. The coupling element also has proximal calf shank and distal foot keel carbon plastic reinforced attachment plates 76 and 77 secured thereto by which the coupling element mates complementarily with and is attached between the proximal surface ofthe foot keel and the distal surface ofthe calf shank using releasable fasteners 78 and 79 which extend through longitudinally directed slots 80 and 81 in the foot keel and calf shank for adjustability as in the previously described embodiments. The dog bone shaped structure incorporates in its design the longitudinal axis of rotation G-G which relates to the potential for motion outcomes as described above. The orientation ofthe axis of rotation G-G ofthe coupling device is preferably as close to anatomically correct as possible.

The axis of motion orientation is preferably deviated in the sagittal plane with respect to a transverse plane (oblique axis G-G in Fig. 28 is deviated by angle Δ) and as projected on a transverse plane is deviated on the longitudinal axis ofthe foot (longitudinal axis G-G in Fig. 33 is deviated by angle Δ'). As a result of this orientation, this structure ofthe coupling element will respond to ground reaction forces in an orchestrated and humanoid manner. The oblique axis of orientation creates a 45°-mitered hinge effect of motion outcomes. That is to say, transverse plane motions (19°) ofthe calf shank that occur during the stance phase of gait will be transferred into prosthetic foot inversion and eversion motions. Preferably, a 25-42° oblique axis of orientation of the axis G-G is provided in the high performance foot. It has been found that the oblique axis of orientation improves both frontal and transverse plane motion outcomes. A 25° oblique axis of orientation ofthe axis G-G will improve frontal plane motion outcomes at the expense of transverse plane motion outcomes. A 42° oblique axis of orientation of axis G-G will improve the transverse plane motion at the expense of frontal plane motion. The oblique axis G-G ofthe coupling element ofthe foot is deviated in the sagittal plane so that the anterior is more proximal than the posterior. See Fig. 28. The longitudinal axis of orientation ofthe axis G-G ofthe coupling device in use in the foot is preferably anatomically correct. It is deviated in the transverse plane 16-23° of external rotation to the long axis ofthe foot as noted above. The anterior aspect ofthe longitudinal axis of axis G-G is medial. The longitudinal axis of orientation ofthe axis G-G ofthe coupling device could also be located sagittally, e.g., with no transverse plane deviation from the longitudinal axis ofthe foot, or parallel to the sagittal plane and longitudinal axis ofthe foot. The actual material utilized for the coupling element in the example embodiment is a variable durometer polyurethane elastomer. It is noted that because ofthe convexly curved surface ofthe midfoot portion ofthe foot keel supporting the coupling device, sliding the coupling device on the foot keel in the direction of arrow 84 in Fig. 28 to tune the foot is effective to change the angle of inclination ofthe oblique axis G-G. The prosthetic foot 70' in Fig. 34 is a variation ofthe prosthetic foot of Figs. 28- 33 where the foot keel 71' and calf shank 72' are integrally joined by the coupling element 73', which can be formed of a polyurethane elastomer by molding, for example, to bond the calf shank and foot keel to one another. Like the example embodiment of Figs. 28-33, the coupling element has a joint axis G-G oriented for permitting motion of the foot about the joint axis which is at least primarily in the frontal and transverse planes as explained with reference to the foot 70 in Figs. 28-33. The foot 70', however, is not adjustable. As in the embodiment of Figs. 28-33, the subtalar joint polyurethane elastomer coupling element is located on the anterior half of the hindfoot portion and the posterior third ofthe midfoot portion ofthe foot keel, and on the posterior half ofthe calf shank with the proximal end ofthe calf shank 72' being generally vertically oriented. This one piece foot 70' is beneficial to a Kl,2 level of amputee having fixed cadence rehabilitation potential.

Fig. 35 illustrates a further variation ofthe prosthetic foot of Figs. 28-33 wherein the foot comprises two pieces, e.g., the coupling element 73" is integrally formed as by molding to the calf shank while adjustably connected to the foot keel 71 as in the prosthetic foot 70. The single longitudinal adjustment can be utilized to orient the oblique axis G-G ofthe subtalar joint ofthe coupling element. The foot 70" is useful for the amputee having a K2-3 level of rehabilitation potential. The foot 70 of Figs. 28-33 with its double longitudinal adjustability is utilized on the K3-4 amputee.

The calf shank 72 ofthe prosthetic foot 70 ofthe embodiment of Figs. 28-33 also has longitudinally extending grooves or concavities 82 and corresponding longitudinally extending raised fins 83.

As shown in Fig. 30, these structural modifications 82 and 83 are located on the posteriorly facing concavity side ofthe calf shank 72. They decrease the resistance ofthe calf shank to compression forces. The grooves and fins are linear as shown but could be wavy or "s" shaped. The motion outcomes ofthe calf shank 72 by these structural modifications are tuned to achieve a decrease in compressive resistance ofthe calf shank as compared to expansion resistance, in response to ground force loading in walking, running and jumping activities.

The power potential ofthe human calf musculature can be expressed as the cross- sectional area ofthe specific muscle and/or muscle group. The plantar flexor muscle group has approximately 130 cm of cross-sectional area. On the other hand, the dorsiflexor muscle group has approximately 35 cm cross-sectional area. This is a 3.7 to 1 ratio. The calf shank 72 responds to the initial contact ground reaction forces by resisting compression with a force which mimics the dorsiflexor muscle group's eccentric contraction that occurs in normal gait. The calf shank 72 resists expansion in the late stance phase of gate with a relative force which mimics the larger plantar flexor muscle group's corresponding eccentric contraction, which occurs in human gait from midstance to heel off. The calf shank 72 resistance to compression versus its resistance to expansion can be fine-tuned utilizing 82 and 83 so that humanoid functional motion outcomes can be achieved.

This concludes the description ofthe example embodiments. Although the present invention has been described with reference to a number of illustrative embodiments, it should be understood that numerous other modifications and embodiments can be devised by those skilled in the art that will fall within the spirit and scope ofthe principles of this invention. For example, the lower end ofthe calf shank in the prosthetic foot ofthe invention is not limited to a parabola shape or a generally parabola shape but can be otherwise downward convexly, curvilinearly configured to produce the desired motion outcomes ofthe foot when connected to the foot keel to form the ankle joint area ofthe foot. The various features of respective ones ofthe several embodiments can also be used in the other embodiments and with one another. More particularly, reasonable variations and modifications are possible in the component parts and/or arrangements of the subject combination arrangement within the scope ofthe foregoing disclosure, the drawings, and the appended claims without departing from the spirit ofthe invention. In addition to variations and modifications in the component parts and/or arrangements, alternative uses will also be apparent to those skilled in the art.

Claims

183.39735AP2CLAIMSWhat is claimed is:
1. A prosthetic foot comprising: a longitudinally extending foot keel; a coupling element connected to the foot keel;
. a resilient, upstanding calf shank having a lower end connected to the foot keel by way ofthe coupling element to form an ankle joint area ofthe foot, and an upper end to connect with a supporting structure on an amputee's leg; wherein the coupling element includes a resilient material forming a joint permitting closed kinetic chain motion ofthe prosthetic foot in gait, the joint having a joint axis oriented for permitting motion ofthe foot about the joint axis which is at least primarily in the frontal and transverse planes.
2. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the joint axis as projected on a sagittal plane makes an angle within the range of 25-45° with respect to a transverse plane.
3. The prosthetic foot according to claim 2, including means for changing the angle of inclination which the joint axis as projected on a sagittal plane makes with respect to a transverse plane.
4. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the joint axis is oriented to also permit motion ofthe foot about the joint axis in the sagittal plane.
5. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the joint axis runs from posterior, plantar and lateral to anterior, dorsal and medial.
6. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the joint axis as projected on a transverse plane is externally rotated at an angle within the range of 16-23° with respect to the longitudinal axis ofthe foot.
7. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein medial and lateral side surfaces ofthe coupling element along the joint axis are concavely curved for transferring and absorbing forces in motion ofthe foot about the joint axis.
8. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the joint mimics a subtalar joint to allow the prosthetic foot to function like a human foot.
9. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, further comprising an adjustable fastening arrangement to permit adjustment ofthe alignment ofthe calf shank and the foot keel with respect to one another in the longitudinal direction ofthe foot for tuning the performance ofthe prosthetic foot.
10. The prosthetic foot according to claim 9, wherein the adjustable fastening arrangement includes at least one releasable fastener connecting the coupling element and the foot keel and a longitudinally extending opening in the foot keel through which the fastener extends to permit said adjustment ofthe alignment ofthe foot keel and calf shank.
11. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the lower end ofthe calf shank is downward, convexly curved.
12. The prosthetic foot according to claim 11, wherein the convexly curved lower end ofthe calf shank has a radius of curvature which increases as the calf shank extends upwardly from its curved lower end.
13. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the lower end ofthe calf shank is generally parabola shaped with the smallest radius of curvature thereof located at the lower end and extending upwardly, and initially anteriorly therefrom.
14. The prosthetic foot according to claim 13, wherein a posteriorally facing concavity is formed by the curvature ofthe calf shank, the posteriorally facing concavity having a surface with a plurality of longitudinally extending grooves and fins formed thereon to facilitate resilient compression ofthe calf shank while resisting expansion thereof in response to forces on the calf shank during use ofthe prosthetic foot.
15. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the coupling element is integral with at least one ofthe foot keel and calf shank.
16. The prosthetic foot according to claim 1, wherein the coupling element is bonded to each ofthe foot keel and calf shank to connect the lower end ofthe calf shank to the foot keel.
17. A prosthetic foot comprising: a longitudinally extending foot keel; a calf shank secured to the foot keel, the calf shank and foot keel having respective, facing, convexly curved surfaces whose radii and relationship affect a dynamic response capability and motion outcome ofthe prosthetic foot in gait; and an adjustable fastening arrangement securing the calf shank to the foot keel, the fastening arrangement permitting adjustment ofthe relationship ofthe respective, convexly curved surfaces ofthe foot keel and calf shank to tune the performance ofthe prosthetic foot.
18. The prosthetic foot according to claim 17, wherein the calf shank is secured to the foot keel by way of a coupling element.
19. The prosthetic foot according to claim 18, wherein the coupling element includes a resilient material forming a joint having a joint axis oriented to permit motion ofthe foot about the joint axis which is at least primarily in the frontal and transverse planes.
20. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, wherein the joint axis as projected on a sagittal plane makes an angle within the range of 25-42° with respect to a transverse plane.
21. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, including means for changing the angle of inclination which the joint axis as projected on a sagittal plane makes with respect to a transverse plane.
22. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, wherein the joint axis is oriented to also permit motion ofthe foot about the joint axis in a sagittal plane.
23. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, wherein the joint axis runs from posterior, plantar and lateral to anterior, dorsal and medial.
24. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, wherein the joint axis as projected on a transverse plane is externally rotated at an angle within the range of 16 to 23° with respect to the longitudinal axis ofthe foot.
25. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, wherein medial and lateral side surfaces ofthe coupling element along the joint axis are concavely curved for transferring and absorbing forces in motion ofthe foot about the joint axis.
26. The prosthetic foot according to claim 19, wherein the joint mimics a subtalar joint to allow the prosthetic foot to function like a human foot.
27. A prosthetic foot according to claim 17, wherein the respective convexly curved surfaces include a dorsal surface of a midfoot portion ofthe foot keel and a downward and anteriorly facing surface ofthe calf shank.
28. The prosthetic foot according to claim 17, wherein the adjustable fastening arrangement includes at least one releasable fastener and a longitudinally extending opening in the foot keel through which the fastener extends to permit adjustment ofthe alignment ofthe calf shank and foot keel in the longitudinal direction ofthe foot keel.
29. The prosthetic foot according to claim 17, wherein the lower end ofthe calf shank is generally parabola shaped with the smallest radius of curvature thereof located at the lower end and extending upwardly, and initially anteriorly therefrom.
PCT/US2002/009573 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance WO2002078567A3 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09/820,895 2001-03-30
US09820895 US6562075B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2001-03-30 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CA 2442104 CA2442104C (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
JP2002576838T JP2005503840T5 (en) 2002-03-29
DE2002639263 DE60239263D1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Foot prosthesis with adjustable power
JP2002576838A JP4369125B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic leg with adjustable performance
EP20020733905 EP1372546B1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US10473465 US7429272B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US10131142 US20020143408A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-04-25 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10131142 Continuation-In-Part US20020143408A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-04-25 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2002078567A2 true true WO2002078567A2 (en) 2002-10-10
WO2002078567A3 true WO2002078567A3 (en) 2003-08-21

Family

ID=25231989

Family Applications (6)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2002/006901 WO2002078577A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-08 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2002/009589 WO2002078578A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2002/009571 WO2002078566A3 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2002/009573 WO2002078567A3 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2002/030471 WO2004028416A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-09-26 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2003/009506 WO2004096104A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2003-03-31 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance and improved vertical load/shock absorption

Family Applications Before (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2002/006901 WO2002078577A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-08 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2002/009589 WO2002078578A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2002/009571 WO2002078566A3 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-03-29 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2002/030471 WO2004028416A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2002-09-26 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
PCT/US2003/009506 WO2004096104A1 (en) 2001-03-30 2003-03-31 Prosthetic foot with tunable performance and improved vertical load/shock absorption

Country Status (10)

Country Link
US (5) US6562075B2 (en)
EP (6) EP1372547B1 (en)
JP (7) JP4328095B2 (en)
CN (6) CN100522109C (en)
CA (6) CA2446768C (en)
DE (2) DE60239792D1 (en)
DK (1) DK1372547T3 (en)
ES (1) ES2364815T3 (en)
RU (4) RU2305516C2 (en)
WO (6) WO2002078577A1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7087065B2 (en) 2001-10-04 2006-08-08 Ethicon, Inc. Mesh for pelvic floor repair
EP1729698A2 (en) * 2004-04-01 2006-12-13 Barry W. Townsend Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Families Citing this family (69)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7572299B2 (en) * 2000-06-30 2009-08-11 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with energy transfer
US20060241783A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2006-10-26 Christensen Roland J Variable resistance cell
US20050216098A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2005-09-29 Roland J. Christensen Variable resistance cell
US7341603B2 (en) * 2000-06-30 2008-03-11 Applied Composite Technology, Inc. Prosthetic foot with energy transfer including variable orifice
US7686848B2 (en) * 2000-06-30 2010-03-30 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with energy transfer
US7108723B2 (en) * 2000-12-22 2006-09-19 Townsend Barry W Prosthetic foot
CN1243521C (en) * 2000-12-22 2006-03-01 巴里·W·汤森 Prosthetic foot
US7611543B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2009-11-03 Bioquest Prosthetics, Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US7954502B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2011-06-07 Bioquest Prosthetics, Llc Mobility assistance apparatus
US20060185703A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2006-08-24 Townsend Barry W Mobility assistance apparatus
US7507259B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2009-03-24 Bioquest Prosthetics, Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US7429272B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2008-09-30 Bioquest Prosthetics Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US7374578B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2008-05-20 Bioquest Prosthetics, Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US8236062B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2012-08-07 Bioquest Prosthetics Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US20070213841A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2007-09-13 Townsend Barry W Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US7578852B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2009-08-25 Bioquest Prosthetics, Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance and improved vertical load/shock absorption
US8070829B2 (en) * 2003-09-30 2011-12-06 Bioquest Prosthetics Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US8574314B2 (en) * 2003-09-30 2013-11-05 Bioquest Prosthetics Llc Resilient prosthetic and orthotic components which incorporate a plurality of sagittally oriented struts
US6562075B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2003-05-13 Barry W. Townsend Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US7410503B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2008-08-12 Bioquest Prosthetics Llc Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
WO2006107329A1 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-12 Townsend Barry W Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US6702859B1 (en) * 2002-08-22 2004-03-09 Aldo A. Laghi Dynamic prosthetic foot with multiple load points and anterior/posterior upper sections
US6793683B1 (en) * 2002-08-22 2004-09-21 Aldo A. Laghi Prosthetic foot with medial/lateral stabilization
CN100579771C (en) * 2003-06-25 2010-01-13 约瑟夫·史蒂夫·伊根 Artificial limb and manufacture of same
US8007544B2 (en) * 2003-08-15 2011-08-30 Ossur Hf Low profile prosthetic foot
US6942704B2 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-09-13 S & L, Inc. Prosthetic foot
US7462201B2 (en) * 2003-10-21 2008-12-09 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US7520904B2 (en) * 2003-10-21 2009-04-21 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US20050240284A1 (en) * 2004-04-27 2005-10-27 Allert Daniel A Prosthetic foot devices
US7347877B2 (en) 2004-05-28 2008-03-25 össur hf Foot prosthesis with resilient multi-axial ankle
US7581454B2 (en) * 2004-05-28 2009-09-01 össur hf Method of measuring the performance of a prosthetic foot
DE102004031562A1 (en) 2004-06-29 2006-02-16 Otto Bock Healthcare Ip Gmbh & Co. Kg An artificial foot
JP2008537894A (en) * 2005-01-25 2008-10-02 カレッジ パーク インダストリアー インコーポレイテッド Ankle under a non-articulating prosthesis with improved dorsiflexion
US20060212131A1 (en) * 2005-03-15 2006-09-21 Curtis Michael J Energy returning prosthetic foot
WO2007008803A3 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-05-03 Ossur Hf Energy returing prosthetic joint
US7917468B2 (en) * 2005-08-01 2011-03-29 Seven Networks, Inc. Linking of personal information management data
US20070100466A1 (en) * 2005-09-24 2007-05-03 Allert Daniel A Prosthetic foot devices
US20070169567A1 (en) * 2006-01-20 2007-07-26 Mts Systems Corporation Duty cycle loading for orthopedic simulator
US7618464B2 (en) * 2006-08-03 2009-11-17 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with variable medial/lateral stiffness
US7824446B2 (en) * 2006-12-06 2010-11-02 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with longer upper forefoot and shorter lower forefoot
US7727285B2 (en) * 2007-01-30 2010-06-01 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with variable medial/lateral stiffness
US20080228288A1 (en) * 2007-03-13 2008-09-18 Ronald Harry Nelson Composite Prosthetic Foot
US7794506B2 (en) * 2007-09-18 2010-09-14 Freedom Innovations, Llc Multi-axial prosthetic ankle
US8034121B2 (en) * 2008-04-18 2011-10-11 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with two leaf-springs joined at heel and toe
US9011554B2 (en) * 2008-07-25 2015-04-21 Fillauer Composites Llc High-performance multi-component prosthetic foot
DE102008060177A1 (en) * 2008-12-02 2010-06-17 Otto Bock Healthcare Gmbh An artificial foot
EP2538890A4 (en) 2010-02-23 2014-01-15 Oessur Hf Metatarsal joint shape for prosthetic foot and control mechanism and system for same
US8486156B2 (en) * 2010-02-26 2013-07-16 össur hf Prosthetic foot with a curved split
US8500825B2 (en) 2010-06-29 2013-08-06 Freedom Innovations, Llc Prosthetic foot with floating forefoot keel
DE102010034893A1 (en) 2010-08-19 2012-02-23 Medi Gmbh & Co. Kg Foot prosthesis
DE102011053765A1 (en) 2011-09-20 2013-03-21 Prosthetics-Solutions GmbH & Co KG Foot spring assembly for foot prosthesis for connecting foot portion with artificial lower leg, has support body set between spring elements and on sub region on sides of spring layer and limiting compression of thickness of spring layer
US9028559B2 (en) 2011-09-26 2015-05-12 össur hf Frictionless vertical suspension mechanism for prosthetic feet
EP2760380A4 (en) * 2011-09-29 2016-08-10 Van L Phillips Prosthetic energy storing and releasing apparatus and methods
US9017421B2 (en) 2011-12-01 2015-04-28 össur hf Prosthetic foot with dual foot blades and vertically offset toe
US8961618B2 (en) 2011-12-29 2015-02-24 össur hf Prosthetic foot with resilient heel
CN102700648B (en) * 2012-06-14 2013-11-27 西北工业大学 Adaptive deformation foot of kangaroo-simulated hopping robot
CN102717846A (en) * 2012-06-21 2012-10-10 戴文钟 Foot sole structure of robot
US20140005801A1 (en) 2012-06-27 2014-01-02 Ossur Hf Alignment adapter for prosthetic sport feet
US9259343B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-02-16 Newman Technologies LLC Device for mitigating plantar fasciitis
WO2014022411A1 (en) 2012-08-01 2014-02-06 Ossur Hf Prosthetic ankle module
EP2961355A4 (en) 2013-02-26 2016-11-02 össur hf Prosthetic foot with enhanced stability and elastic energy return
CN103239307B (en) * 2013-04-24 2015-03-25 西南交通大学 Method for detecting load bearing efficiency for power-assisted exoskeletons
WO2015116840A1 (en) * 2014-01-29 2015-08-06 Ossur Hf Prosthetic sport feet
EP3160399A4 (en) 2014-06-30 2018-03-07 Össur HF Prosthetic feet and foot covers
USD795433S1 (en) 2015-06-30 2017-08-22 Össur Iceland Ehf Prosthetic foot cover
DE102014010938A1 (en) * 2014-07-28 2016-01-28 Otto Bock Healthcare Gmbh Prosthetic foot system of prosthetic foot and a shoe as well as methods for adjusting the heel height of a prosthetic foot
WO2016025625A1 (en) * 2014-08-13 2016-02-18 Altair Engineering, Inc. Suit design for a leg prosthetic
WO2016044801A1 (en) * 2014-09-19 2016-03-24 össur hf Variable stiffness prosthetic foot
CN105438310B (en) * 2015-12-17 2017-09-08 常州大学 Two DOF humanoid robot mechanical shock foot

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4822363A (en) 1985-08-01 1989-04-18 Phillips L Van Modular composite prosthetic foot and leg
US5181932A (en) 1989-04-13 1993-01-26 Phillips L Van Foot prosthesis having auxiliary ankle construction
US5514185A (en) 1991-02-28 1996-05-07 Phillips; Van L. Split foot prosthesis
US5728177A (en) 1994-08-15 1998-03-17 Flex-Foot, Inc. Prosthesis with foam block ankle
US5728176A (en) 1989-04-13 1998-03-17 Flex-Foot, Inc. Attachment construction for prosthesis
US5800568A (en) 1996-02-16 1998-09-01 Model & Instrument Development Corporation Prosthetic ankle and walking system
US5824112A (en) 1989-04-13 1998-10-20 Phillips; Van L. Prosthetic device incorporating low ankle design
US5897594A (en) 1996-03-04 1999-04-27 Otto Bock Orthopaedische Industrie Besitz-Und Jointless artificial foot
US5899944A (en) 1991-02-28 1999-05-04 Phillips; Van L. Prosthetic foot incorporating compressible members
WO1999052476A1 (en) 1998-04-10 1999-10-21 Phillips L Van Foot prosthesis having cushioned ankle
DE29920434U1 (en) 1999-11-22 2000-04-06 Goemed Orthopaedie Service Gmb Foot for a leg prosthesis
US6071313A (en) 1991-02-28 2000-06-06 Phillips; Van L. Split foot prosthesis

Family Cites Families (87)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE295807C (en) *
US640540A (en) 1898-07-30 1900-01-02 Richard E Daniels Artificial lime.
US810180A (en) 1905-05-02 1906-01-16 Harris C Wintermute Artificial limb.
DE325171C (en) * 1919-08-19 1920-09-10 Julius Fuchs Dr Artificial foot
DE446938C (en) * 1926-09-04 1927-07-08 Koch Josef Joint for artificial feet
US2453969A (en) 1947-04-03 1948-11-16 Edwin C Carter Artificial limb
US3335428A (en) 1964-11-02 1967-08-15 Goodrich Co B F Resilient prosthetic foot made from elastic polymers of different hardness
US4555817A (en) * 1983-07-18 1985-12-03 Mckendrick Roderick W Prosthetic foot and ankle joint
US4645509A (en) * 1984-06-11 1987-02-24 Model & Instrument Development Corporation Prosthetic foot having a cantilever spring keel
GB8508424D0 (en) * 1985-04-01 1985-05-09 Univ London Slide module
GB8605026D0 (en) 1986-02-28 1986-04-09 Hanger & Co Ltd J E Artificial foot
US4892554A (en) * 1987-12-21 1990-01-09 Robinson David L Prosthetic foot
FR2626463B1 (en) * 1988-01-28 1992-06-19 Espace Composites Sarl An armature for prosthetic foot
GB2216423B (en) 1988-03-04 1992-10-28 Blatchford & Sons Ltd Lower limb prosthesis
US5112356A (en) * 1988-03-04 1992-05-12 Chas A. Blatchford & Sons Limited Lower limb prosthesis with means for restricting dorsi-flexion
US5219365A (en) 1988-03-31 1993-06-15 Sabolich, Inc. Prosthetic foot
US4959073A (en) * 1988-06-06 1990-09-25 John Merlette Foot prosthesis and method of making same
US4911724A (en) * 1988-07-26 1990-03-27 J&J Orthotics Inc. Energy responsive prosthetic leg
US5066305A (en) 1988-10-25 1991-11-19 Model & Instrument Development Corporation Prosthetic foot having a low profile cantilever spring keel
FR2640499A1 (en) * 1988-12-15 1990-06-22 Palfray Michel Novel prosthetic foot structure
US5387246A (en) 1989-04-13 1995-02-07 Phillips; Van L. Prosthetic ski leg
US6406500B1 (en) 1989-04-13 2002-06-18 Van L. Phillips Foot prosthesis having curved forefoot
US4938776A (en) * 1989-05-12 1990-07-03 Masinter Robert A Integrated ankle and foot prosthetic system
DE3918810A1 (en) 1989-06-09 1990-12-13 Bock Orthopaed Ind Loser joint prosthesis foot
WO1991000070A1 (en) * 1989-06-30 1991-01-10 Affa Ortopedi Ab Prosthetic limb
US5139525A (en) 1989-07-31 1992-08-18 Kristinsson Oessur Prosthetic foot
US4994086A (en) 1989-08-09 1991-02-19 United States Manufacturing Company Universal modular frame for above-knee endoskeletal prosthesis
US5217500A (en) 1990-01-12 1993-06-08 Phillips L Van Prosthetic leg
US5019109A (en) 1990-03-09 1991-05-28 Voisin Jerome P Multi-axial rotation system for artificial ankle
US5376133A (en) 1990-04-02 1994-12-27 Gramnaes; Finn An adjustable resilient foot prosthesis
US5549714A (en) * 1990-09-21 1996-08-27 Phillips; Van L. Symes foot prosthesis
US5376141A (en) 1990-09-21 1994-12-27 Phillips; Van L. Low-profile symes foot prosthesis
DE4038063C2 (en) 1990-11-29 1995-04-20 Bock Orthopaed Ind Loser joint prosthesis
US5290319A (en) 1991-02-28 1994-03-01 Phillips L Van Prosthetic foot incorporating adjustable bladders
US5314499A (en) * 1991-04-04 1994-05-24 Collier Jr Milo S Artificial limb including a shin, ankle and foot
CA2119926C (en) 1991-09-30 1996-12-17 Van L. Phillips Energy-storing prosthetic leg pylon
US5258039A (en) 1991-11-15 1993-11-02 The National University Of Singapore Energy storing composite prosthetic foot
US5312669A (en) * 1992-01-03 1994-05-17 Becker Orthopedic Appliance Company Thermoplastic composite reinforcement and method for orthotic, prosthetic and other devices
DE4209974C1 (en) * 1992-03-27 1993-04-15 Otto Bock Orthopaedische Industrie Besitz- Und Verwaltungs-Kommanditgesellschaft, 3408 Duderstadt, De
US5376139A (en) * 1992-09-21 1994-12-27 Pitkin; Mark R. Artificial foot and ankle
WO1994010942A1 (en) * 1992-10-11 1994-05-26 Composites-Busch & Cie Foot prosthesis
US5443528A (en) 1992-11-17 1995-08-22 Allen; Scott Coil spring prosthetic foot
WO1994010943A1 (en) 1992-11-17 1994-05-26 Allen Scott E Coil spring prosthetic foot
US5653767A (en) 1992-11-17 1997-08-05 Medonics, Llc Prosthetic foot
US5482513A (en) 1993-03-31 1996-01-09 Wilson Michael T Ankle joint with dedicated transverse rotator
US5443527A (en) * 1993-03-31 1995-08-22 Wilson Michael T Prosthetic food and three-way ankle joint
US5695526A (en) 1993-10-12 1997-12-09 Wilson Michael T One-piece mechanically differentiated prosthetic foot and associated ankle joint with syme modification
DE9315665U1 (en) * 1993-10-14 1993-12-09 Ipos Gmbh & Co Kg Ankle spring element for leg prostheses and artificial foot
US5509937A (en) 1994-01-14 1996-04-23 Universite De Montreal Prosthetic foot with enhanced heel control
US5653768A (en) 1994-01-21 1997-08-05 Bruce Kania Dual cantilevered leaf spring structure
GB9401585D0 (en) 1994-01-27 1994-03-23 Sen Jung Chen Artificial foot
US5593456A (en) 1994-05-17 1997-01-14 Crp, Inc. Foot and leg prosthesis and method of making same
US5509936A (en) * 1994-06-30 1996-04-23 Rappoport; Albert F. Dual leaf spring strut system
US5545230A (en) 1994-10-11 1996-08-13 Ohio Willow Wood Company Prosthesis mounting adapter and method
FR2734151B1 (en) * 1995-05-15 1997-11-14 Corima Structure of reactive prosthetic foot
US5702488A (en) 1995-09-12 1997-12-30 Model & Instrument Development Corporation Prosthetic pylon having an enclosed compressible volume of fluid to support a patient's weight
EP0957836B1 (en) * 1995-11-07 2004-03-17 Gramtec Innovation Ab Adjustable adapter for lower leg prosthesis
US20020087216A1 (en) * 1996-02-16 2002-07-04 Atkinson Stewart L. Prosthetic walking system
US5746773A (en) 1996-03-13 1998-05-05 United States Manufacturing Company C-shaped spring member for prosthetic limbs
US5766264A (en) * 1996-08-30 1998-06-16 United States Manufacturing Company Multi-axis prosthetic ankle joint
DE29707416U1 (en) 1997-04-24 1998-08-27 Bock Orthopaed Ind Resilient foot insert
DE29823435U1 (en) * 1997-04-24 1999-07-29 Bock Orthopaed Ind Foot insert for an artificial foot
DE19717298C1 (en) 1997-04-24 1998-05-07 Bock Orthopaed Ind Spring-elastic foot prosthesis insert
DE19718580A1 (en) * 1997-05-05 1998-11-19 Biedermann Motech Gmbh Shank adapter for connecting a stump socket with a prosthesis socket
US5879594A (en) * 1997-07-10 1999-03-09 Holtzman; Barry L. Temperature responsive pressure splitter
US6228043B1 (en) * 1997-07-18 2001-05-08 Barry W. Townsend Shoe, ankle orthosis and method for protecting the ankle
US5944760A (en) 1997-08-04 1999-08-31 Roland J. Christensen Family Limited Partnership Prosthetic foot with reinforcing member
US6241776B1 (en) 1997-08-04 2001-06-05 Roland Christensen Prosthetic foot with reinforcing member
GB9724680D0 (en) * 1997-11-21 1998-01-21 Blatchford & Sons Ltd A foot and shin component for a lower limb prosthesis
RU2003112210A (en) 2000-10-26 2004-12-10 Оссур Норс Америка, Инк. (Us) Foot prosthesis ankle cushioning
DE29820904U1 (en) * 1998-11-23 1999-04-29 Schneider Urs Prosthesis for leg amputees
US6206932B1 (en) 1998-11-24 2001-03-27 Timothy Johnson Alignment device for a prosthetic limb
US6290730B1 (en) 1999-03-26 2001-09-18 Ohio Willow Wood Company Artificial foot and ankle
US6602295B1 (en) * 1999-05-24 2003-08-05 Ohio Willow Wood Company Prosthetic foot having shock absorption
CA2277451A1 (en) * 1999-07-06 1999-11-24 Robert Maurice Gabourie Prosthetic foot providing plantar flexion and controlled dorsiflexion
US6187052B1 (en) 1999-07-14 2001-02-13 Joseph L. Molino Prosthetic ankle joint
US6514293B1 (en) 2000-04-03 2003-02-04 Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And Technology Prosthetic foot
WO2002002034A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2002-01-10 Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited Partnership Prosthetic foot
US6402790B1 (en) 2000-07-20 2002-06-11 Dogan Celebi Angularly adjustable reversible prosthetic device
US20020077706A1 (en) 2000-08-30 2002-06-20 Phillips Van L. Energy storing foot prosthesis with improved plantar flexion
WO2002022056A1 (en) * 2000-09-15 2002-03-21 Bjarni Ellert Isleifsson Ankle joints
DE10049714B4 (en) * 2000-10-07 2004-11-11 Otto Bock Orthopädische Industrie Besitz-und Verwaltungs GmbH & Co.KG Foot insert for an artificial foot
US6443995B1 (en) * 2000-12-22 2002-09-03 Barry W. Townsend Prosthetic foot
US6712860B2 (en) 2001-02-09 2004-03-30 Otto Bock Healthcare Lp Lower leg prosthesis
US6562075B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2003-05-13 Barry W. Townsend Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
US20030009238A1 (en) 2001-07-03 2003-01-09 Whayne James G. Artificial limbs incorporating superelastic supports
JP2003164066A (en) * 2001-11-21 2003-06-06 Hitachi Koki Co Ltd Battery pack

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4822363A (en) 1985-08-01 1989-04-18 Phillips L Van Modular composite prosthetic foot and leg
US5181932A (en) 1989-04-13 1993-01-26 Phillips L Van Foot prosthesis having auxiliary ankle construction
US5593457A (en) 1989-04-13 1997-01-14 Phillips; Van L. Foot prosthesis having auxiliary ankle construction
US5728176A (en) 1989-04-13 1998-03-17 Flex-Foot, Inc. Attachment construction for prosthesis
US5824112A (en) 1989-04-13 1998-10-20 Phillips; Van L. Prosthetic device incorporating low ankle design
US5514185A (en) 1991-02-28 1996-05-07 Phillips; Van L. Split foot prosthesis
US5899944A (en) 1991-02-28 1999-05-04 Phillips; Van L. Prosthetic foot incorporating compressible members
US6071313A (en) 1991-02-28 2000-06-06 Phillips; Van L. Split foot prosthesis
US5800569A (en) 1994-08-15 1998-09-01 Phillips; Van L. Prosthesis with resilient ankle block
US5728177A (en) 1994-08-15 1998-03-17 Flex-Foot, Inc. Prosthesis with foam block ankle
US5993488A (en) 1994-08-15 1999-11-30 Phillips; Van L. Prosthesis with resilient ankle block
US5800568A (en) 1996-02-16 1998-09-01 Model & Instrument Development Corporation Prosthetic ankle and walking system
US5897594A (en) 1996-03-04 1999-04-27 Otto Bock Orthopaedische Industrie Besitz-Und Jointless artificial foot
WO1999052476A1 (en) 1998-04-10 1999-10-21 Phillips L Van Foot prosthesis having cushioned ankle
DE29920434U1 (en) 1999-11-22 2000-04-06 Goemed Orthopaedie Service Gmb Foot for a leg prosthesis

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
See also references of EP1372546A4

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7087065B2 (en) 2001-10-04 2006-08-08 Ethicon, Inc. Mesh for pelvic floor repair
EP1729698A2 (en) * 2004-04-01 2006-12-13 Barry W. Townsend Prosthetic foot with tunable performance
EP1729698A4 (en) * 2004-04-01 2010-01-27 Barry W Townsend Prosthetic foot with tunable performance

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA2442113C (en) 2010-06-22 grant
JP4286222B2 (en) 2009-06-24 grant
RU2291676C2 (en) 2007-01-20 grant
EP1372546A2 (en) 2004-01-02 application
CA2500424C (en) 2009-12-15 grant
CN1512858A (en) 2004-07-14 application
CN100522109C (en) 2009-08-05 grant
US20030028256A1 (en) 2003-02-06 application
US7211115B2 (en) 2007-05-01 grant
EP1613250A1 (en) 2006-01-11 application
EP1613250A4 (en) 2009-11-18 application
RU2003131885A (en) 2005-03-10 application
JP4369125B2 (en) 2009-11-18 grant
RU2289362C2 (en) 2006-12-20 grant
EP1372548A4 (en) 2006-07-05 application
US6562075B2 (en) 2003-05-13 grant
ES2364815T3 (en) 2011-09-14 grant
EP1372545A4 (en) 2006-07-12 application
CA2520808C (en) 2009-09-29 grant
EP1372546B1 (en) 2011-02-23 grant
JP4328095B2 (en) 2009-09-09 grant
JP4185775B2 (en) 2008-11-26 grant
CA2442113A1 (en) 2002-10-10 application
WO2004096104A1 (en) 2004-11-11 application
RU2003131886A (en) 2004-11-10 application
WO2002078567A3 (en) 2003-08-21 application
RU2305516C2 (en) 2007-09-10 grant
JP2006500151A (en) 2006-01-05 application
EP1372546A4 (en) 2008-12-10 application
EP1549265A1 (en) 2005-07-06 application
CN1514703A (en) 2004-07-21 application
CN100444814C (en) 2008-12-24 grant
CN1287753C (en) 2006-12-06 grant
US7364593B2 (en) 2008-04-29 grant
WO2004028416A1 (en) 2004-04-08 application
DE60239263D1 (en) 2011-04-07 grant
WO2002078578A1 (en) 2002-10-10 application
CA2442104A1 (en) 2002-10-10 application
US20020143406A1 (en) 2002-10-03 application
WO2002078566A3 (en) 2002-11-28 application
DE60239792D1 (en) 2011-06-01 grant
US20040122529A1 (en) 2004-06-24 application
CN1777401A (en) 2006-05-24 application
CN1512859A (en) 2004-07-14 application
US20080183302A1 (en) 2008-07-31 application
DK1372547T3 (en) 2011-07-25 grant
EP1372547A1 (en) 2004-01-02 application
CN100531686C (en) 2009-08-26 grant
US7708784B2 (en) 2010-05-04 grant
JP2005503840A (en) 2005-02-10 application
CA2442103A1 (en) 2002-10-10 application
CN1694660A (en) 2005-11-09 application
CN100522110C (en) 2009-08-05 grant
CA2446768A1 (en) 2002-10-10 application
CA2446768C (en) 2010-11-30 grant
EP1372547A4 (en) 2006-06-28 application
EP1372547B1 (en) 2011-04-20 grant
WO2002078577A1 (en) 2002-10-10 application
WO2002078566A2 (en) 2002-10-10 application
CA2520808A1 (en) 2004-11-11 application
CN1512860A (en) 2004-07-14 application
CA2442104C (en) 2010-06-15 grant
EP1372548A1 (en) 2004-01-02 application
US7226485B2 (en) 2007-06-05 grant
EP1549265A4 (en) 2009-11-04 application
JP2004526508A (en) 2004-09-02 application
CN100522108C (en) 2009-08-05 grant
EP1372545A2 (en) 2004-01-02 application
JP2004530468A (en) 2004-10-07 application
US20030191540A1 (en) 2003-10-09 application
JP2004526509A (en) 2004-09-02 application
CA2500424A1 (en) 2004-04-08 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5800568A (en) Prosthetic ankle and walking system
US5139525A (en) Prosthetic foot
US5897594A (en) Jointless artificial foot
US5769896A (en) Prosthetic foot with ankle
US20060155385A1 (en) Electronically controlled prosthetic system
US5030239A (en) Biomechanical ankle
US7618463B2 (en) Energy returning prosthetic joint
US6261324B1 (en) Foot prosthesis
US6387134B1 (en) Prosthetic foot
US4377041A (en) Athletic shoe sole
US7503937B2 (en) Prosthetic foot
US5258039A (en) Energy storing composite prosthetic foot
US6811571B1 (en) Universal prosthesis with cushioned ankle
US4652266A (en) Molded elastomeric prosthetic foot having energy-storing articulated keel
US6280479B1 (en) Foot prosthesis having cushioned ankle
US4822363A (en) Modular composite prosthetic foot and leg
US6602295B1 (en) Prosthetic foot having shock absorption
US5701686A (en) Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US5219364A (en) Continuous one-piece prosthesis
US6929665B2 (en) Prosthetic foot with a resilient ankle
US5458656A (en) Energy-storing prosthesis leg pylon vertical shock leg
US20030045944A1 (en) Foot insert for an artificial foot
US6071313A (en) Split foot prosthesis
US5116384A (en) Prosthetic foot
US5156632A (en) Jointless prosthetic foot

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A2

Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NO NZ OM PH PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VN YU ZA ZM ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A2

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW MZ SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2002733905

Country of ref document: EP

Ref document number: 2442104

Country of ref document: CA

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2002576838

Country of ref document: JP

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 10473465

Country of ref document: US

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 028110617

Country of ref document: CN

WWP Wipo information: published in national office

Ref document number: 2002733905

Country of ref document: EP

REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642