WO2002060865A1 - Process of obtaining high purity of zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin & other carotenoids from byadagi chili/chappatta chili & carotenoid composition - Google Patents

Process of obtaining high purity of zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin & other carotenoids from byadagi chili/chappatta chili & carotenoid composition

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WO2002060865A1
WO2002060865A1 PCT/US2002/002424 US0202424W WO2002060865A1 WO 2002060865 A1 WO2002060865 A1 WO 2002060865A1 US 0202424 W US0202424 W US 0202424W WO 2002060865 A1 WO2002060865 A1 WO 2002060865A1
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zeaxanthin
method
cryptoxanthin
reaction
carotenoids
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PCT/US2002/002424
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French (fr)
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Muhammed Majeed
Ajay Pratap Singh
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Sabinsa Corporation
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C403/00Derivatives of cyclohexane or of a cyclohexene or of cyclohexadiene, having a side-chain containing an acyclic unsaturated part of at least four carbon atoms, this part being directly attached to the cyclohexane or cyclohexene or cyclohexadiene rings, e.g. vitamin A, beta-carotene, beta-ionone
    • C07C403/24Derivatives of cyclohexane or of a cyclohexene or of cyclohexadiene, having a side-chain containing an acyclic unsaturated part of at least four carbon atoms, this part being directly attached to the cyclohexane or cyclohexene or cyclohexadiene rings, e.g. vitamin A, beta-carotene, beta-ionone having side-chains substituted by six-membered non-aromatic rings, e.g. beta-carotene

Abstract

A method of isolating Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin, and other carotenoids in a high purity from the Byadagi and Chappatta chili varieties is disclosed. The method may also be used to obtain a mixture of Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids in high purities as well.

Description

PROCESS OF OBTAINING HIGH PURITY OF ZEAXANTHIN,

CRYPTOXANTHIN & OTHER CAROTENOIDS FROM BYADAGI

CHILI/CHAPPATTA CHILI & CAROTENOID COMPOSITION

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/264,721 filed January 30, 2001.

[0002] Carotenoids are a group of fat-soluble pigments which absorb light in the approximately the 400-500 nm region of the visible spectrum. This physical property provides the characteristic red-yellow color of the pigments. Carotenoid molecules contain a conjugated skeleton composed of isoprene units which are usually inverted at the center of the molecule, thereby providing symmetry to the molecule. It is the differences in the geometric configurations around the double bonds which results in the occurrence of many cis and trans isomers of carotenoids.

[0003] The carotenoid group is one of the most important groups of natural pigments and carotenoids can be found in all of the families of the vegetable and animal kingdoms. Being natural pigments, carotenoids are more appealing to consumers and they are also typically better for human health than synthetic pigments and colorations. This is demonstrated by the well known provitamin-A activity of the hydrocarbon carotenoids, and also by the belief that xanthophylls are linked to reducing the risk of cancer (Beecher and Khachik 1984).

[0004] The therapeutic significance of carotenoids is attributed to their well researched antioxidant and immunomodulating/immunostimulating properties. (Osamu Hirayama et. al, Lipids, Vol. 29, No. 2 1994. J. Terao et. al, Lipids Vol. 24, No. 7, 1989) These properties are demonstrated by their ability to reduce oxidative stress and/or the depression of the immune system, in conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, atherosclerosis, and in several forms of cancer (Sics, H., Stahl. et. al. 1992, Ann. N. Y. Acad., Sci. 669, 7-20. Jyonouchi, H. et. al. 1994., Nutr. Cancer, 21 (1 ) 47-58). Because of their yellow to red coloration and natural occurrence in human foods, Zeaxanthin, Lutein, cryptoxanthin, Capsanthin, and Capsorubin are also used as food colorants.

Zeaxanthin

Cryptoxanthin

[0005] Most of the carotenoids are present in uncombined, free forms in the bodies of chromoplasts. The xanthophylls are also typically present in plant chromoplasts, but are typically found as long chain fatty esters, typically diesters, of acids such as palmitic acids and myristic acids. [0006] Carotenoids are represented by Beta-Carotene, Alpha-Carotene, Gamma-Carotene and Lycopene. The term "xanthophyll" is intended to include Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Capsanthin, Capsorubin and Cryptoxanthin. [0007] Several chemical processes for the synthesis of xanthophylls are already known. However, these processes are extremely time-consuming and they also involve multiple steps and do not provide an economical process for the production of xanthophylls.

[0008] United States Patent 5,648,564 describes a process for extracting, isolating and purifying xanthophylls, preferably lutein or zeaxanthin, from a xanthophyll diester-containing plant extract. The plants used in the process of the '564 patent are preferably those known to contain high concentration of the desired xanthophyll diester, an example being lutein in marigold flowers (Tagetes sp. Such as Tagetes erecta), zeaxanthin in the wolfberry (a Lycium sp. Such as Lycium barbarum) or capsanthin and capsorubin in red pepper (a Capsicum sp. Such as Capsicum annum). The process contemplates the use of a xanthophyll diester-containing food-grade plant extract (oleoresin) that is free of organic solvent, i.e., the oleoresin contains less than 1 percent organic solvent. The extract is saponified in a propylene glycol and aqueous alkali solution to form xanthophyll crystals. Crystallization is achieved without the use of added organic solvents. The substantially pure xanthophyll crystals obtained by the process of the '564 patent are suitable for human consumption and can be used as a nutritional supplement or as an additive in food.

[0009] United States Patent 5,830,738 describes a process for extracting pigments, namely carotenoids from plant material. The process includes the step of combining shredded plant material with an enzyme. The enzyme breaks down the plant cellular walls, thereby releasing the carotenoids contained within the plant cells. The enzyme added to the plant material can be pectinase, cellulase, hemicellulase or a mixture thereof. [0010] United States Patent 5,876, 782 describes a method of liberating xanthophylls in situ in either plant, vegetable or fruit material. A xanthophyll in a free form, such as lutein, Zeaxanthin or Capsanthin, is formed from the xanthophyll diester in the plant material.

[0011] United State Patent 5,880,332 describes the purification of a xanthophyll biosynthetic enzyme from capsicum annum (pepper) chromoplasts, which catalyzes the conversion of the ubiquitous, 5,6- epoxycarotenoids, antheraxanthin and violaxanthin into capsanthin and capsorubin, respectively.

[0012] Published PCT Application WO 99/20587A1 describes a process for simultaneously extracting, saponifying, and isolating lutein and Zeaxanthin, as well as a mixture of several rare carotenoids in high purity from plants without the use of harmful organic solvents.

[0013] Published PCT Application WO 99/20587C1 describes a process for simultaneously extracting, saponifying, and isolating lutein and Zeaxanthin, as well as a mixture of several rare carotenoids in high purity from plants without the use of harmful organic solvents. Similarly, this process has been employed to isolate and purify a mixture of lutein, beta-carotene, neoxanthin, violaxanthin and lutein epoxide from green plants, preferably kale, collard green, and spinach. The purified carotenoids isolated by this process are free from impurities and serve as a safe source of nutritional supplement for human consumption as well as providing a suitable and effective color additive for human foods.

[0014] United State Patent 6,074,687 describes a process in which paprika, red pepper, pungent chili, or other plants of the genus capsicum which contain pigments are simultaneously extracted and concentrated with an edible solvent in a series of mixing and high temperature and pressure mechanical pressing steps using edible solvent and a counter current extraction procedures. The extract containing the carotenoid pigments may be hydrated and then centrifuged to remove fine particulate solids and gums. A solution having several times the concentration of the carotenoid pigments and other flavor and aroma components of the starting raw material is obtained. The residual press solids may be cooled and hydrated following the last pressing operation. The residual press solids have significantly reduced bacterial counts as a result of the temperatures, high pressure, and shear utilized, as well as the low moisture levels employed, thus producing not only a food grade extract, but also a food grade residual solid having low bacterial counts and predictable standardized levels of the principal components of interest. The degree of browning or caramelization of the residual press solids is controlled, and the resistance to oxidative deterioration of the carotenoid pigments of both the extract and the residual solid is improved by the control of the temperature employed. Additionally, edible antioxidants can be included in the solvent to enhance the stability of both the extract and the residual solid.

[0015] United States Patent 6,132,790 describes a carotenoid composition comprising (a) a carotenoid in an oil solvent wherein the weight of carotenoid in the carotenoid composition is up to 12 wt %, (b) a dispersion of a water .dispersible matrix and a stabilizer, and optionally a non-oil solvent, and (c) an emulsifier, wherein the carotenoid, non-oil solvent water dispersible matrix, stabilizer and emulsifier all either exist naturally or are derived from natural sources. Further, the carotenoid, non-oil solvent water dispersible matrix, stabilizer and emulsifier are not chemically modified. Jap. Patent 1982000201327 describes a process of obtaining stable and odorless carotenoid pigments by enzymatically converting chemically bonded unsaturated fatty acids in a carotenoid containing oleoresin into saturated fatty acid esters and then carrying out molecular distillation. [0016] Canadian reference 87101314A: concerns a method of extracting natural beta-carotene, which contains Zeaxanthin and is also used as a raw material in the food industry. Synthetic carotene inevitably contains some other organic substances, while natural carotene, usually extracted from vegetables such as tomatoes or red peppers by ether or chloroform, or made from saponification of carotene-containing materials, is of scant supply due to the lack of raw material and the high cost of production. The process of this invention takes crude protein powder, a by-product in large quantity from the production of corn starch, as the starting material, and extracts natural beta- carotene with ethanol. This process has the advantages of low cost, abundant supply of raw material and no waste. The by-product, is a mixture of Zeaxanthin containing carotene and a variety of amino acids. The residue can be used as cattle feed.

[0017] A search of the relevant art has revealed that there is paucity of information regarding the processing and isolation of Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin. Most of the references available are only analytical papers directed to the estimation of carotenoids in capsicum annum, and they are of academic interest only. (Fabio Zonta et.al, J. of Chromatography, 403, 1987, 207-215, Fabio Zonta et.al, J. Agric. Food Chemistry, etal, 1987, Carolyn Fisher et.al, 1987, J. Agric. Food Chemistry, 35, 55-57, Olaf Sommerburg etal, 1998, 82, 907-910, P. Riso et.al, International. J. Vit. Nutr. Res.67, 1997, 47-54, M. Isabel Minguez - Mosquera et.al, J. Agric. Food Chemistry, 1994, 42, 1555- 1560, M. Isabel Mingzez, Mosquera et.al, J. Agric. Food Chemistry, 1994, 42, 38-44). The subject matter of the present invention is the first invention describing a commercially viable process for obtaining Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and mixtures of carotenoids in known proportions, from chili.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION [0018] The present invention is directed towards a novel process for obtaining a composition containing Zeaxanthin (1-90%) Cryptoxanthin (1-90 %) Capsanthin (1-90%), Capsorubin (1-90%) and/or Beta-carotene (1-20 %) in high purity. The present invention also is directed towards a process for obtaining high purity Zeaxanthin Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids from chili. All of the previously known methods have described a process of obtaining xanthophylls from sources other than chili and the resulting yield is significantly lower than that of the present invention. [0019] The present invention relates to a process of isolating and purifying carotenoids from an oleoresin of the Byadagi/Chappatta chili. The process involves the use of a special variety of chili (Byadagi/Chappatta) which has a very low pungency and it also involves the extraction of the carotenoids with food grade solvents. The extract is concentrated at a very low temperature which allows the removal of all the solvents. After concentration, the extract (called an oleoresin) is treated with a solution comprising ethyl alcohol (or any other alcohol containing one to six carbon atoms) and aqueous alkali (preferably, 10-80% concentration of alkali). The reaction mass is then agitated for about 2 hours to 4 hours with an agitator at room temperature. The course of the reaction is preferably monitored by TLC. [0020] After the reaction is completed, as confirmed by TLC, the reaction mass is further diluted with a mixture of alcohol (containing 2 to 4 carbon) and water, preferably in the ratio of 2:1 or 4:3 (or multiples thereof). The xanthophylls are extracted, suitably with ethylacetate or toluene or a mixture of these two solvents. The use of the alcohol/water mixture in the reaction has a major advantage in that the mixture prevents the formation of an emulsion and assists in the selective extraction/isolation of xanthophylls. [0021] The above solution containing the extracted xanthophylls may then concentrated to a volume of about 1/3rd - 1/4th the original volume before the crystallization of the xanthophylls begins. At this stage, the crystallizing mass is kept at a brine temperature of preferably 0-5 deg. C. This low temperature assists in the complete crystallization of the xanthophylls, as well as permitting maximum yield. Additionally, hexane may be used to start the precipitation/crystallization of the xanthophylls. Also, the xanthophylls may be extracted by exposing the reaction mass to supercritical carbon dioxide. [0022] The present invention has several advantages including the use of a solvent-solvent extraction process from which the composition of Zeaxanthin, Capsanthin, Capsorubin, Cryptoxanthin and Beta-Carotene is obtained. Another advantage of this invention is that it provides a process for producing a a Zeaxanthin enriched fraction and a Cryptoxanthin enriched fraction separately. These fractions can then be blended together to achieve a desired percentage of Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin. [0023] The present invention thus relates to a process applicable for the commercial production of Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin in pure free form from a chili source, as well as producing mixtures of Capsanthin, Capsorubin, Beta-Carotene along with Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin in a powder form and in definite concentrations.

DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION [0024] The present invention is directed towards a process for isolating and purifying a composition of Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other Carotenoids (Capsanthin, Capsorubin, Beta-Carotene) into a powder form suitable for human consumption from special varieties of Byadagi or Chappatta chilies.

The invention also involves processes for obtaining a composite mixture of the above said carotenoids in different, but known, proportions.

Description of Byadagi (Kaddi/Dabbi) chili :

[0025] It is typically grown in the Hubli District of Karnataka, (India) and it is red in color with less pungency or without pungency.

Harvesting season- January to May

ASTA color value - 156.9

Capsaicin - Negligible

Description of Chappatta chili:

[0026] It is typically grown in the Warangal, Khammam, and the east and west Godavari districts of Andhra Pradesh (India). It is deep red in color and considered to be less pungent.

Harvesting season - December to March

ASTA color value - 125.26

Capsaicin - 0.17 %

[0027] Previously known methods describe the isolation of Zeaxanthin from

Wolfberry, Lutein from marigold flower, Capsanthin and Capsorubin from red pepper, Beta-Carotene from carrot, and Lycopene from tomato peels. The present invention, however, has a novel approach to obtain Zeaxanthin and

Cryptoxanthin in higher purity than previously possible.

[0028] It is noted that the previously known methods do not describe a process of commercially producing Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin from chilies. The present invention provides a method which is commercially viable. The method of the invention provides numerous advantages.

However, one significant advantage is the isolation of Zeaxanthin in a pure form in one fraction and a pure form of Cryptoxanthin in another fraction through the selective use of solvents.

[0029] To obtain the desired percentage of Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin, the composition of reaction mass should be in an appropriate ratio such as

30-50% weight percentage of oleoresin, 10-70% weight percentage of ethyl alcohol and 10-80% (preferably 10-20%) percentage of an aqueous alkali, such as sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, aromatic and aliphatic amines/other alkali, in a concentration of 10-20%. The ratio of ethyl alcohol and aqueous alkali is adjusted on the basis of color value of oleoresin.

[0030] For example, 1 part of the oleoresin is treated with 0.5 part of ethyl alcohol and 0.5 part of aqueous alkali. The preferred alkali is sodium hydroxide. The reaction mass is then agitated with a gentle agitator at room temperature for about 2 to 8 hours, preferably 3 hours. The course of the reaction is monitored by the TLC.

[0031] After completion of reaction as indicated by TLC, one part of the reaction mass is diluted with 4 parts of a mixture of alcohol and water, preferably an ethyl alcohol and water mixture in 1:1 ratio. The mixture is extracted with ethylacetate or toluene, but a preferred solvent is an ethylacetate toluene mixture. Further, more ethylacetate layer is washed to neutrality with de-ionized water in order to remove alkali and unwanted impurities. The ethylacetate layer will then contain selectively higher percentages of Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and lower percentages of Capsanthin, Capsorubin and Beta-Carotene.

[0032] The ethylacetate layer is then concentrated to 1 /3rd— 1 /4th volume where the crystallization of Zeaxanthin starts. At this stage, the crystallization mass is kept at a preferred brine temperature of 0-5 deg. C to complete the crystallization. Furthermore, this temperature permits maximum yield, however, the preferred temperature to obtain a pure Zeaxanthin in free form is 5 deg. C. The Zeaxanthin crystal may then be filtered through nutsch filter device. After filtration, the resulting Zeaxanthin crystal may be dried, preferably at 35-75 deg. C with high vacuum for preferably 10-48 hours, to remove the last trace of ethyl acetate.

[0033] The mother liquor residue (MLR) after the extraction Zeaxanthin, now contains only Cryptoxanthin and a very small percentage of beta-carotene (by HPLC analysis). This MLR may be mixed with 1-8 parts of food grade hexane, preferably 2 parts, and kept at 5 deg. C for preferably 10-12 hours and then filtered through a nutsch filter. After the filtration, the resulting cryptoxanthin crystals may be dried, preferably at 30-75 deg C under vacuum for preferably 10-48 hours, to remove the last traces of solvent. [0034] An alternative method of extracting the xanthophylls is to expose the reaction mass to supercritical carbon dioxide. After the reaction mass is exposed to the supercritical carbon dioxide for, preferably, 10 hours, the supercritical carbon dioxide is permitted to evaporate off to leave a secondary oleoresin. This secondary oleoresin is then diluted in an alcohol solution (preferably 70% alcohol) and passed through a column packed with an ion exchange resin. Suitable resins include Amberset 4200 (cl), Amberlite IRA 410, Amberlite IRA 900, Dowex 1x2-100, Doxex 22cl, Dowex Marathon A2, Dowex MSA1 , Dowex 550A, all of which are Rohm-Haas Dow products, preferably, the alcohol solution is passed through the resin at a rate of 20-50L per hour. Thereafter, the zeaxanthin is collected and a mother liquor residue is produced.

[0035] The crystal fractions obtained by this process contain 80-90% Zeaxanthin; 1-6% Capsorubin and 8-14% Capsanthin (called fraction A) and 70-90% Cryptoxanthin; 5-10% Beta-Carotene (called fraction B) by HPLC analysis.

[0036] The crystal obtained from fraction A and fraction B may then be mixed with each other and with suitable natural stabilizing agents or antioxidants to obtain the following compositions which are suitable as nutraceuticals: FORMULATION - 1 FORMULATION - II

Zeaxanthin 5 - 6 % Zeaxanthin 5 - 6%

Cryptoxanthin 2 - 2.5 % Cryptoxanthin 2 - 2.5%

Other Carotenoid 1 - 2 % Other Carotenoid 25 - 40%

However, each component of the above compositions (hereinafter referred to as ZeaMax-2C) may vary from 1-90%.

[0037] The present invention also provides a method of protecting Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other Carotenoids against direct and indirect physical, chemical and biological factors which contribute to the deterioration of carotenoids. This method protects red carotenoid pigments against most of the xenobiotic compounds and environmental elements. The totality of the protective action of the method is referred hereto as ZeaMax-2C. The present invention has unique process to prepare ZeaMax-2C to, provide Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids which are more stable chemically and physically, especially in their isolated form.

[0038] One important aspect of this invention is the method of combining Zeaxanthin/Cryptoxanthin with 0.001% to 10% by weight of at least one stabilizing compound such as tetrahydrocurcuminoids, curcuminoids, carnosic acid or Garcinol. These stabilizing compounds are preferably present in the following weight percentages: 0.01% tetrahydrocurcuminoids, 0.01 % curcuminoids and/or 0.01 % carnosic acid and 0.01 - 0.5% Garcinol. The first two stabilizing compounds are phenolic in nature and are well recognized as anti-oxidants which provide protection against free radicals and prevent the generation of free radicals. In addition, curcuminoids are especially known to absorb UV rays and to protect pharmaceutical preparations against physico- chemical deterioration. Curcuminoids have also been found to prevent a process called pyrolysis, which is a high temperature related deterioration of processed food and nutrients. In addition, curcuminoids are recognized for their anti-microbial properties in preventing the growth of bacteria and fungi. The tetrahydrocurcuminoids, which are derivatives of curcuminoids, are particularly effective in scavenging free radicals and complement the action of curcuminoids, which are primarily effective in preventing free radicals from occurring in biological systems.

[0039] Carnosic acid is compatible and complementary with both curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids. It is an anti-oxidant and antimicrobial compound with properties similar to those of curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids.

[0040] Garcinol, a yellow pigment, is a stable benzophenone, and is well known as a powerful antioxidant both in lipophyllic and hydrophyllic mediums. It is also a good scavenger of free radicals and preventer of lipid peroxidation. Additionally, Garcinol has a broad-spectrum anti-bacterial activity. [0041] Therefore, the present invention is directed towards a commercially viable process for producing Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids in desired ratios/percentages from Byadagi chili/Chappatta chili. The invention also encompasses a stabilized dosage composition of carotenoids from chili as well as with other naturally occurring anti-oxidants. EXAMPLES

Example 1 :

[0042] 1000 kgs chili (Byadagi/Chappatta) are powdered to a particle size of 20 mesh. The powder is then extracted in a extractor, with 10000 L of acetone (cold extraction) for 10 - 12 hours. The acetone extract is collected by percolation. The extraction procedure was repeated 5 to 6 times to ensure the complete extraction of color. The acetone extracts are combined and the acetone is distilled off in a vacuum film evaporator. After the complete removal of acetone approximately 100-120 kgs of oleoresin are obtained, having color value 60,000 to 1.5 Lakh. [0043] To ensure the complete removal of pungency, the oleoresin was washed with 2 volumes (800 liters) of aqueous alcohol 3-4 times. 1 part (100 Kgs) of chili oleoresin is mixed with 0.5 part (50 Kgs) of ethylalcohol and 0.5 part (50 Kgs) of aqueous alkali and stirred for about 4 hours at room temperature. Then reaction mass is diluted with 4 volumes (800 L) of a mixture of ethyl alcohol and water (preferably 1:1 ratio) and extracted with 2 volumes (1600 L) ethyl acetate and toluene mixture (1.5:0.5 ratio). [0044] This ethylacetate-toluene mixture is concentrated and kept in brine at preferably 5 deg. C for preferably 10-12 hours. After the time has elapsed, the Zeaxanthin crystals may then be filtered through a nutsch filter (Fraction A). Hexane is added to mother liquor and the mother liquor is again kept in brine at 5 deg. C after which the resulting Cryptoxanthin crystals may be filtered through a nutsch filter (Fraction B). Both sets of crystals may be dried in a vacuum oven at a preferred temperature of 30-35 deg. C for about 24 hours with high vacuum. An HPLC analysis of Fraction A showed that the purity of Zeaxanthin was 90% and that Fraction B also showed a purity of 90% of Cryptoxanthin. While both fractions contain other carotenoids in low percentages, the MLR of Fraction B shows high percentages of Capsorubin, Capsanthin and Beta-Carotene. Example 2: [0045] The Oleoresin preparation and the reaction mass of this example is the same as that of example 1 with only the following variation in the solvents used for extraction. Instead of using an ethylacetate/toluene mixture, the reaction mass was extracted with methylene dichloride (MDC). The MDC layer was then concentrated to 50-60 L. 5 L of hexane was then added to assist in the selective crystallization in brine at 5 deg. C for 10-12 hours. The Zeaxanthin crystals obtained were then filtered. The HPLC analysis showed a high percentage of Capsanthin, Capsorubin and a lower percentage of Zeaxanthin. The MLR was then mixed with methanol/alcohols to precipitate out the Cryptoxanthin and Beta-Carotene which was then filtered off. These crystal fractions contained a higher percentage of Capsanthin, Capsorubin and Beta-Carotene and a lower percentage of Zeaxanthin and Cryptoxanthin. [0046] Example 3: Preparation of composition of ZeaMax-2C for Nutraceutical supplements and its stability.

[0047] On the basis of above, said composition of ZeaMax-2C was mixed individually and with a mixture of tetrahydrocurcuminoids, curcuminoids, carnosic acid and Garcinol. These compositions were kept for stability studies at 40 deg. C at a 75% RH. At various time intervals, ZeaMax-2C compositions were analyzed by HPLC. The stability studies revealed that Zeamax-2C is stable up to 10 weeks at the above conditions.

Claims

We claim:
1. A method for isolating Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids from chili, said method comprising: a) obtaining a chili oleoresin; b) combining the oleoresin with a solvent and aqueous alkali to produce a reaction mass and agitating the reaction mass; c) monitoring the reaction mass to determine the end of the reaction; d) diluting the reaction mass to obtain a mixture; e) extracting the mixture with an extraction solvent which is ethylacetate, toluene, an ethylacetate toluene mixture, or methylene dichloride to form an Zeaxanthin layer; f) washing the Zeaxanthin layer with water; g) concentrating the Zeaxanthin layer to form a brine; h) keeping the brine at a temperature of 0-5 deg. C to crystallize Zeaxanthin contained within the brine; i) filtering the Zeaxanthin crystals from the brine to obtain Zeaxanthin crystals and a mother liquor residue. j) drying the Zeaxanthin crystals; k) mixing the mother liquor residue with food grade hexane to obtain a secondary brine;
I) keeping the secondary brine at a temperature of 0-5 deg. C; m) filtering the secondary brine to obtain Cryptoxanthin crystals formed during step I); and n) drying the Cryptoxanthin crystals.
2. The method of claim 1 , wherein the chili is at least one of the Byadagi and Chappatta varieties of chili.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the chili oleoresin is obtained by a) powdering the chili; b) extracting the powder with a solvent; c) collecting the extract; d) optionally repeating the extraction procedure; e) distilling the extract to obtain a pre-oleoresin; and f) washing the pre-oleoresin with a solvent to obtain a chili oleoresin.
4. The method of claim 3 in which the chili is powdered into a particle size of 20 mesh.
5. The method of claim 3 in which the solvent is acetone.
6. The method of claim 3 in which the collection of the extract is accomplished through percolation.
7. The method of claim 3 in which the acetone extract is distilled in a vacuum film evaporator.
8. The method of claim 3 in which the solvent is an alcohol.
9. The method of claim 8 in which the alcohol is an aqueous alcohol. 0. The method of claim 1 , wherein the treatment of the oleoresin of step b) with the solvent and the aqueous alkali is in the ratio of 1.0:0.5:0.5.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein the aqueous alkali is sodium hydroxide.
12. The method of claim 1 , wherein the agitation is performed for a period of 2-8 hours.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the agitation is performed for a period of 3 hours.
14. The method of claim 1 , wherein the monitoring is accomplished with TLC.
15. The method of claim 1 , wherein the dilution of the reaction mass is accomplished with a solution of alcohol and water.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein the alcohol is ethyl alcohol.
17. The method of claim 15, wherein the ratio of alcohol to water is 1.0:1.0 and the ratio of the solution to the reaction mass is 4.0:1.0.
18. The method of claim 1 , wherein the extraction solvent is an ethylacetate toluene mixture.
19. The method of claim 1 , wherein the water in step g) is de-ionized water.
20. The method of claim 1 , wherein the concentration is within the range of 1/3rd to 1/4th the original volume.
21. The method of claim 1 , wherein the temperature of the brine is kept at 5 deg. C.
22. The method of claim 1 , wherein the crystal is dried at 35-75 deg. C in a high vacuum for 10-48 hours.
23. The method of claim 1 , wherein the ratio of food grain hexane to mother liquor residue is 1.0-8.0:1.0.
24. The method of claim 23, wherein the wherein the ratio of food grain hexane to mother liquor residue is 2.0:1.0.
25. The method of claim 1 , wherein the secondary brine is kept at 5 deg. C.
26. The method of claim 25, wherein the secondary brine is kept at 5 deg. C for 10-12 hours.
27. The method of claim 1 , wherein the Cryptoxanthin crystals are dried at a temperature of 30-75 deg. C for 10-48 hours.
28. The method of claim 1 , further comprising: p) mixing the Cryptoxanthin and Zeaxanthin crystals obtained in the method of claim 1 with 0.001-10.0 wt. % of at least one natural stabilizing agent to obtain stabilized nutraceuticals with specific and known weight percentages of carotenoids.
29. The method of claim 28, wherein the natural stabilizing agents are at least one of tetracurcuminoids, curcuminoids, carnosic acid, and Garcinol.
30. A composition comprising Zeaxanthin in the amount of 5.0-6.0 wt. %, Cryptoxanthin in the amount of 2.0-2.5 wt. %, and other carotenoids in the amount of 1.0-2.0 wt. %.
31. A composition comprising Zeaxanthin in the amount of 5.0-6.0 wt. %, Cryptoxanthin in the amount of 2.0-2.5 wt. %, and other carotenoids in the amount of 25.0-40.0 wt. %.
32. A method for isolating Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids from chili, said method comprising: a) obtaining a chili oleoresin; b) combining the oleoresin with a solvent and aqueous alkali to produce a reaction mass and agitating the reaction mass; c) monitoring the reaction mass to determine the end of the reaction; d) diluting the reaction mass to obtain a mixture; e) extracting the mixture with an extraction solvent which is ethylacetate, toluene, an ethylacetate toluene mixture, or methylene dichloride to form an Zeaxanthin layer; f) washing the Zeaxanthin layer with water; g) concentrating the Zeaxanthin layer to form a brine; h) keeping the brine at a temperature of 0-5 deg. C to crystallize Zeaxanthin contained within the brine; i) filtering the Zeaxanthin crystals from the brine to obtain Zeaxanthin crystals and a mother liquor residue. j) drying the Zeaxanthin crystals;
33. A method for isolating Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids from chili, said method comprising: a) obtaining a chili oleoresin; b) combining the oleoresin with a solvent and aqueous alkali to produce a reaction mass and agitating the reaction mass; c) monitoring the reaction mass to determine the end of the reaction; d) diluting the reaction mass to obtain a mixture; e) treating the mixture with supercritical carbon dioxide; f) allowing the supercritical carbon dioxide to evaporate to leave a secondary oleoresin; g) passing an alcohol solution of the secondary oleoresin through in column packed with an ion exchange resin; and h) collecting the zeaxanthin crystals from the alcohol solution to leave a mother liquor residue. i) filtering the Zeaxanthin crystals from the brine to obtain Zeaxanthin crystals and a mother liquor residue. j) drying the Zeaxanthin crystals; k) mixing the mother liquor residue with food grade hexane to obtain a secondary brine;
I) keeping the secondary brine at a temperature of 0-5 deg. C; m) filtering the secondary brine to obtain Cryptoxanthin crystals formed during step I); and n) drying the Cryptoxanthin crystals.
34. The process of claim 33, wherein the mixture is treated with supercritical carbon dioxide for 10 hours.
35. The process of claim 33, wherein the alcohol solution is a 70% alcohol solution.
36. A method for isolating Zeaxanthin, Cryptoxanthin and other carotenoids from chili, said method comprising: a) obtaining a chili oleoresin; b) combining the oleoresin with a solvent and aqueous alkali to produce a reaction mass and agitating the reaction mass; c) monitoring the reaction mass to determine the end of the reaction; d) diluting the reaction mass to obtain a mixture; e) treating the mixture with supercritical carbon dioxide; f) allowing the supercritical carbon dioxide to evaporate to leave a secondary oleoresin; g) passing an alcohol solution of the secondary oleoresin through in column packed with an ion exchange resin; and h) collecting the zeaxanthin crystals from the alcohol solution to leave a mother liquor residue.
37. The process of claim 36, wherein the mixture is treated with supercritical carbon dioxide for 10 hours.
38. The process of claim 36, wherein the alcohol solution is a 70% alcohol solution.
PCT/US2002/002424 2001-01-30 2002-01-30 Process of obtaining high purity of zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin & other carotenoids from byadagi chili/chappatta chili & carotenoid composition WO2002060865A1 (en)

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US8097762B2 (en) 2004-10-26 2012-01-17 University Of Maryland, College Park Process for the preparation of β- and α-cryptoxanthin
US8592662B2 (en) 2005-02-11 2013-11-26 Kalamazoo Holdings, Inc. Capsicum variety exhibiting a hyper-accumulation of zeaxanthin and products derived therefrom
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EP2329815A1 (en) * 2005-02-11 2011-06-08 Kalamazoo Holdings, Inc. A capsicum variety exhibiting a hyper-accumulation of zeaxanthin and products derived therefrom
US8716533B2 (en) 2009-05-29 2014-05-06 Kalamazoo Holdings, Inc. Methods of saponifying xanthophyll esters and isolating xanthophylls
WO2011135519A1 (en) * 2010-04-29 2011-11-03 Synthite Industries Ltd. A capsicum annuum extract and process thereof
US8247615B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2012-08-21 Kalamazoo Holdings, Inc. Process of converting esterified xanthophylls from Capsicum to non-esterified xanthophylls in high yields and purities
US20110282083A1 (en) * 2010-05-14 2011-11-17 Kalamazoo Holdings, Inc. Process of converting esterified xanthophylls from capsicum to non-esterified xanthophlls in high yields and purities
WO2014115037A3 (en) * 2013-01-24 2014-12-31 Omniactive Health Technologies Ltd. Beta-cryptoxanthin from plant source and a process for its preparation
US9771323B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-09-26 Omniactive Health Technologies Limited Beta-cryptoxanthin from plant source and a process for its preparation
WO2014186680A1 (en) * 2013-05-16 2014-11-20 University Of Maryland, College Park Process for simultaneous extraction and separation of esterified and unesterified monohydroxycarotenoids
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