WO2002037543A2 - Method and apparatus for cleaning a deposition chamber - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for cleaning a deposition chamber Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2002037543A2
WO2002037543A2 PCT/US2001/048051 US0148051W WO0237543A2 WO 2002037543 A2 WO2002037543 A2 WO 2002037543A2 US 0148051 W US0148051 W US 0148051W WO 0237543 A2 WO0237543 A2 WO 0237543A2
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
deposition chamber
target
substrate
cleaning cycle
time period
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2001/048051
Other languages
French (fr)
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WO2002037543A3 (en
Inventor
Ingo Wilke
Hoa T. Kieu
Walter Schoenleber
Original Assignee
Applied Materials, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US70269700A priority Critical
Priority to US09/702,697 priority
Application filed by Applied Materials, Inc. filed Critical Applied Materials, Inc.
Publication of WO2002037543A2 publication Critical patent/WO2002037543A2/en
Publication of WO2002037543A3 publication Critical patent/WO2002037543A3/en

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Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C23COATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; CHEMICAL SURFACE TREATMENT; DIFFUSION TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL; INHIBITING CORROSION OF METALLIC MATERIAL OR INCRUSTATION IN GENERAL
    • C23CCOATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL BY DIFFUSION INTO THE SURFACE, BY CHEMICAL CONVERSION OR SUBSTITUTION; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL
    • C23C14/00Coating by vacuum evaporation, by sputtering or by ion implantation of the coating forming material
    • C23C14/22Coating by vacuum evaporation, by sputtering or by ion implantation of the coating forming material characterised by the process of coating
    • C23C14/56Apparatus specially adapted for continuous coating; Arrangements for maintaining the vacuum, e.g. vacuum locks
    • C23C14/564Means for minimising impurities in the coating chamber such as dust, moisture, residual gases
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C23COATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; CHEMICAL SURFACE TREATMENT; DIFFUSION TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL; INHIBITING CORROSION OF METALLIC MATERIAL OR INCRUSTATION IN GENERAL
    • C23CCOATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL BY DIFFUSION INTO THE SURFACE, BY CHEMICAL CONVERSION OR SUBSTITUTION; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL
    • C23C14/00Coating by vacuum evaporation, by sputtering or by ion implantation of the coating forming material
    • C23C14/22Coating by vacuum evaporation, by sputtering or by ion implantation of the coating forming material characterised by the process of coating
    • C23C14/34Sputtering

Abstract

A method is provided that includes sputtering a target located within a deposition chamber for a first time period to deposit a flux of target material on a production substrate located within the deposition chamber. The method further includes removing the production substrate from the deposition chamber, and performing a cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber. The cleaning cycle may include (1) placing a non-production object into the deposition chamber; either (2i) sputtering the target for a second time period, which is of shorter duration that the first time period, to deposit a flux of target material on the non-production object; or (2ii) simply flowing a gas into the deposition chamber for a second time period which is of shorter duration than the first time period; and (3) evacuating the deposition chamber. The cleaning cycle may be repeated one or more times. Apparatus are provided for performing the above-described method.

Description

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CLEANING A DEPOSITION CHAMBER

FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the fabrication of semiconductor devices. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods and apparatus for cleaning a deposition chamber.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Sputter deposition is a method for depositing a material layer on a semiconductor substrate . A typical sputter deposition apparatus includes a deposition chamber having a target and a substrate support pedestal . The target comprises a material that is to be deposited on a substrate positioned on the substrate support pedestal. The target is typically affixed to the top of the deposition chamber, and is electrically isolated from the deposition chamber walls. A voltage source is provided that can maintain the target at a negative voltage with respect to the deposition chamber walls, creating a voltage differential therebetween. When a gas (e.g., argon) is introduced to the deposition chamber, generating the negative voltage between the target and the deposition chamber walls excites the gas within the deposition chamber into a plasma of gas ions (i.e., plasma ions) . Plasma ions are generated and directed to the target by the negative voltage differential where the plasma ions strike the target and transfer momentum to target atoms. ' This momentum transfer causes target atoms to be ejected (i.e., to be sputtered) from the target. The sputtered target atoms deposit on the substrate positioned on the substrate support pedestal, thereby forming a thin film on the substrate. A portion of the sputtered target atoms scatter and deposit on other surfaces within the deposition chamber (e.g., on chamber walls, on process kit parts, etc.) . The sputtered target atoms which do not deposit on the substrate are referred to herein as "sputtered particles".

Sputtered particles tend to flake or crumble from the surfaces within the deposition chamber as the deposition chamber thermally cycles, particularly when a significant amount of material has accumulated on the surfaces . Such flaked or crumbled sputtered particles may settle on and contaminate a substrate positioned on the substrate support pedestal .

A number of conventional techniques exist for reducing contamination due to sputtered particles. For example, to reduce flaking and crumbling of sputtered particles, removable "process kit parts" may be placed within a deposition chamber so that the sputtered particles collect on the surfaces of the process kit parts rather than on the surfaces of the deposition chamber. In this manner, the process kit parts may be periodically removed from the deposition chamber and cleaned (e.g., to remove the sputtered particles before sufficient sputtered particle material is deposited for flaking or crumbling to occur) . Although periodic cleaning of process kit parts does reduce substrate contamination, the chamber downtime required for process kit part cleaning/replacement decreases substrate throughput and increases the cost of each wafer processed in the chamber. Another technique for reducing the crumbling and flaking of sputtered particles is to periodically deposit a "pasting" layer within the deposition chamber (e.g., a titanium layer within a titanium nitride chamber) . The pasting layer coats sputtered particles and holds the particles in place, thereby reducing crumbling and flaking of the sputtered particles and substrate contamination associated therewith. As with periodic cleaning of process kit parts, deposition of a pasting layer does reduce substrate contamination. However, the chamber downtime associated with deposition of a pasting layer also increases processing costs. Further, after either process kit part cleaning or pasting layer deposition, one or more "production" deposition sequences (e.g., deposition sequences that employ the same processing parameters used during the production processing of a substrate) typically must be performed within the deposition chamber to return the chamber to its production processing state (e.g., the state of the chamber during normal production processing) . These additional production deposition sequences or "conditioning" sequences, further increase chamber downtime and substrate processing costs.

Accordingly, a need exists in the semiconductor fabrication field for methods and apparatus that reduce substrate contamination and that require less chamber downtime than that required for process kit part cleaning or pasting layer deposition.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides methods and apparatus that may rapidly reduce substrate contamination without requiring process kit part cleaning or pasting layer deposition. Accordingly, through use of the present invention, chamber throughput may be increased and substrate processing costs may be reduced. In accordance with the invention, a method is provided that includes sputtering a target located within a deposition chamber for a first time period to deposit a flux of target material on a production substrate located within the deposition chamber. As used herein, a "production substrate" is a substrate that is intended for eventual sale, commercial use, etc. The method further includes removing the production substrate from the deposition chamber, and performing a cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber. The cleaning cycle includes (1) placing a non-production object (e.g., an object on which a semiconductor device is not to be formed) into the deposition chamber; either (2i) flowing a gas into the deposition chamber and sputtering the target for a second time period, which is of shorter duration than the first time period, to deposit a flux of target material on the non-production object; or (2ii) simply flowing a gas into the deposition chamber for a second time period which is of shorter duration than the first time period; and (3) evacuating the deposition chamber. The cleaning cycle may be repeated one or more times and in one aspect may be repeated three times. Apparatuses are also provided for performing the above-described method. Other features and advantages of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, the appended claims and the accompanying drawings .

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGS. 1A and IB are diagrammatic side views of a deposition chamber configured in accordance with the present invention wherein a shutter disk is shown in a closed position (FIG. 1A) and in an opened position (FIG. IB) ;

FIG. 2 is a flowchart of a first inventive process for reducing flaking and crumbling due to sputtered particles within the deposition chamber of FIGS. 1A and IB; and FIG. 3 is a flowchart of an inventive cleaning process for reducing flaking and crumbling due to sputtered particles within the deposition chamber of FIGS. 1A and IB.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIGS . 1A and IB are diagrammatic side views of a deposition chamber 11 configured in accordance with the present invention wherein a shutter disk is shown in a closed position (FIG. 1A) and in an open position (FIG. IB) . With reference to FIGS. 1A and IB the deposition chamber 11 generally includes a chamber enclosure wall 13 having an inlet 14 coupled to first and second gas lines 15a-b. The first and second gas lines 15a-b are coupled to a processing gas source 17a and to a carrier gas source 17b, respectively, and an exhaust outlet 19 is coupled to an exhaust pump 21. A substrate support 23 is disposed in the lower portion of the deposition chamber 11, and a target 27 (e.g., an aluminum nitride deposition or a titanium target for titanium nitride deposition) is mounted to an upper surface of the deposition chamber 11. An AC power supply 29 is operatively coupled to the substrate support 23 so that an AC power signal emitted from the AC power supply 29 may couple through the substrate support 23 to a substrate 31 (FIG. IB) positioned thereon. A clamp ring 33 is operatively coupled to the substrate support 23 so as to press the substrate 31 (FIG. IB) uniformly against the substrate support 23. A shutter assembly (not shown) is rotatably mounted within the deposition chamber 11 which selectively positions a shutter disk 35 between the target 27 and the substrate support 23 (i.e., placing the shutter disk 35 in a closed position) as shown in FIG. 1A. Thus, when the shutter disk 35 is in the closed position, deposition material is prevented from depositing on surfaces below the shutter disk 35. Preferably the shutter disk 35 is positioned between the clamp ring 33 and the substrate support 23 when the shutter disk 35 is in the closed position (as shown in FIG. 1A) .

The target 27 is electrically isolated from the chamber enclosure wall 13 by an insulation member 37. Any sputtered particles, which accumulate on the insulation member 37 during deposition (described below) , may cause an electrical short circuit between the chamber enclosure wall 13 and the target 27 (e.g., preventing the deposition chamber 11 from functioning) . Therefore, a process kit part (e.g., a shield 39) is positioned between the target 27 and the insulation member 37 to prevent sputtered particles from accumulating on the insulation member 37. The shield 39 also prevents sputtered particles from accumulating on the upper portion of the chamber enclosure wall 13 as sputtered particles may crumble therefrom and contaminate a substrate positioned on the substrate support 23.

The chamber enclosure wall 13 is preferably grounded so that a negative voltage potential may be maintained between the target 27 and the grounded enclosure wall 13 via a DC power supply 41. A controller 43 is operatively coupled to the DC power supply 41, to the gas lines 15a, 15b via first and second flow controllers 45a, 45b (e.g., first and second mass flow controllers) to the exhaust outlet 19 via a throttle valve 47 and to the AC power supply 29.

In operation, to deposit either aluminum nitride or titanium nitride within the deposition chamber 11, nitrogen (e.g., a processing gas) and a carrier gas (typically a non-reactive species such as Ar) are supplied by the processing gas source 17a and by the carrier gas source 17b, and are flowed into the deposition chamber 11 through the gas lines 15a-b, respectively, and through the inlet 14 at flow rates regulated by the controller 43. The nitrogen flow rate is selected so that the nitrogen reacts with the target material forming a nitride layer (e.g., an aluminum nitride layer for an aluminum target or a titanium nitride layer for a titanium target) thereon. The controller 43 also regulates the pressure of the deposition chamber by throttling the rate at which gas is pumped through the exhaust outlet 19 (e.g., via the throttle valve 47) . Accordingly, although a constant chamber pressure is maintained during deposition, a continuous supply of fresh processing gas is supplied to the deposition chamber 11.

The D.C. power supply 41 (e.g., via a command from the controller 43) applies a negative voltage to the target 27 with respect to the chamber enclosure wall 13 so as to excite the processing gas/carrier gas within the chamber 11 into a plasma state (e.g., thereby generating a plasma within the chamber 11) . Ions from the plasma (e.g., argon ions) bombard the target 27, causing atoms of the nitrided target layer to sputter therefrom. The sputtered atoms travel along linear trajectories from the target 27 and deposit on the substrate 31 (FIG. IB) .

A portion of the sputtered target atoms scatter and deposit on other surfaces within the deposition chamber 11 (e.g.,, on the chamber enclosure wall 13, on the shield 39, etc.) . As stated previously, the sputtered target atoms which do not deposit on the substrate are referred to as sputtered particles, and sputtered particles may flake or crumble from the various surfaces within the deposition chamber 11 as the deposition chamber 11 thermally cycles. Such flaked or crumbled particles may settle on and contaminate a substrate positioned on the substrate support 23. Conventional methods for avoiding the flaking and the crumbling of sputtered particles include the use of replaceable process kit parts and the deposition of pasting layers. However, as previously described, both of these techniques decrease substrate throughput and increase substrate processing costs.

FIG. 2 is a flowchart of a first inventive process 200 for reducing flaking and crumbling of sputtered particles without requiring the removal of process kit parts or the deposition of a pasting layer. In one embodiment of the invention, the controller 43 contains computer program code executable by the controller 43 for controlling the deposition chamber 11 in accordance with the first process 200. While the first process 200 is described with regard to an aluminum-nitride deposition process that employs an aluminum target and argon and nitrogen gases, it will be understood that other deposition processes (e.g., a titanium nitride deposition process) may similarly benefit from the invention. Referring to FIG. 2, in step 201, a first production substrate (not shown) is placed into the deposition chamber 11 (e.g., by placing the substrate on the substrate support 23) . In step 202, the controller 43 directs the deposition chamber 11 to deposit an aluminum- nitride layer on the first production substrate for a first time period (e.g., approximately forty minutes) as previously described (e.g., by introducing nitrogen and argon into the deposition chamber 11, by biasing the target 27 via the D.C. power supply 41, etc.) Following aluminum-nitride deposition, the deposition chamber 11 is evacuated by pumping the argon gas and nitrogen gas through the exhaust outlet 19 and by closing the first and the second flow controllers 45a, 45b so as to prevent gases from flowing into the deposition chamber 11 (step 203) . In step 204, the first production substrate is removed from the deposition chamber 11 (e.g., via a wafer handler not shown) . In step 205, the controller 43 determines if a predetermined number of production substrates have been processed within the deposition chamber 11. (Typically, for example, 1-10 substrates each have a 2.5μm layer deposited thereon before chamber cleaning) . If a predetermined number of production substrates have been processed within the deposition chamber 11, in step 206 the controller 43 executes an inventive cleaning process 300 as described below with reference to FIG. 3; otherwise, the process 200 returns to step 201 wherein another production substrate (not shown) is placed into the deposition chamber 11 to allow an aluminum- nitride layer to be deposited thereon.

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of an inventive cleaning process 300 for reducing flaking and crumbling of sputtered particles. With reference to FIG. 3, assuming a predetermined number of production substrates have been processed within the deposition chamber 11 (step 205) , in step 301 a non-production object (e.g., either the shutter disk 33 or a dummy substrate (not shown) ) is placed between the target 27 and the substrate support 23. Thereafter, in step 302, the controller 43 directs the deposition chamber 11 either i) to deposit an aluminum-nitride layer on the shutter disk 33 or on the dummy substrate, for a second time period (e.g., 60 seconds for a forty minute production substrate deposition process (step 202)), preferably using the same processing parameters as those employed during the production deposition process (step 202) ; or ii) to simply flow gas into the deposition chamber for the second time period. The duration of the second time period (step 302) is shorter than the duration of the first time period (step 202) . For example, a second time period of 30-90 seconds has proven sufficient; although further testing may show that shorter time periods also are sufficient. In step 303, the deposition chamber 11 is evacuated

(e.g., to a pressure of approximately lxlO"6 Torr.) by pumping the argon gas and nitrogen gas through the exhaust outlet 19 and by closing the first and the second flow controllers 45a, 45b so as to prevent gases from flowing into the deposition chamber 11. Then, in step 304, the controller 43 determines whether an inventive "cleaning cycle" that includes, for example, depositing an aluminum-nitride layer for the second time period or flowing gas to the deposition chamber for the second time period (step 302) followed by evacuating (or "pumping out") the chamber 11 (step 303) has been performed a pre-determined number of times. In at least one embodiment, the inventive cleaning cycle is performed at least three times, although the inventive cleaning cycle may be performed any number of times (e.g., once, twice, four times, etc.) . In general, the deposition step 302 may be performed on the same or on a different dummy substrate or shutter disk when the inventive cleaning cycle is performed multiple times.

If the inventive cleaning cycle has not been performed a predetermined number of times, the process 300 returns to step 302 to deposit another aluminum-nitride layer; otherwise, if a pre-determined number of aluminum- nitride layers have been deposited on the shutter disk 33 or on the dummy substrate (not shown) , the process 300 proceeds to step 305. In step 305, the process 300 returns to production processing (step 201 in FIG. 2) of another production substrate.

As compared to process kit part replacement and/or to pasting layer deposition, the inventive process 300 of FIG. 3 may take a relatively short duration of time to reduce substrate contamination (due to sputtered particles) to an acceptable level, as shown by the experimental results described below. Also, production substrates processed in the deposition chamber 11 following the inventive cleaning process 300 may exhibit the same deposited film characteristics as do subsequently processed production substrates (i.e., the "first wafer effect" may be eliminated) , thereby eliminating the -need for the conditioning sequence required following the deposition of a pasting layer. Accordingly, the inventive cleaning process 300 may reduce substrate contamination due to sputtered particles, without significantly increasing substrate processing costs and/or throughput. The inventive cleaning process 300 was performed during the following experiment wherein, during a production deposition process, a pulsed D.C. power signal was applied to the target 27 via the DC power supply 41. Specifically, the power signal applied to the target 27 was a 7 kilowatt, 50- 300 Khz positive D.C. pulse train having a 10-30 volts pulse magnitude and a 0.5 msec to 5 msec duration depending on frequency. The deposition chamber pressure was maintained between 2-10 milli-torr during deposition. The flow rate of nitrogen was 30-100 seem, and the flow rate of argon was 5-50 seem. The total thickness of aluminum-nitride deposited on each substrate was lμm, and each deposition process took approximately 7 minutes .

During the experiment, after processing a first set of twenty-five production substrates, the inventive cleaning process 300 was performed for a first time. Specifically, the deposition chamber 11 was employed to deposit an aluminum-nitride layer (e.g., having a thickness of 1500 Angstroms) on a first, second and third dummy substrate (i.e., three separate deposition processes were performed). Following each deposition process of the cleaning process 300, the deposition chamber was evacuated (step 303) to a pressure of about lxlO""6 Torr. Table 1 shows the number of additional particles measured in the film formed on the substrate following each deposition process/cleaning cycle of the inventive cleaning process 300. Note the second row represents the number of additional particles measured on a dummy substrate put through the cleaning cycle with gas flow on but with DC power off (i.e., without deposition) . These modified non deposition cleaning cycles were performed after each deposition cleaning cycle and demonstrate the contamination level attributable to the plasma itself.

TABLE 1

No. of Particles > 0.3μm

Figure imgf000014_0001

After processing a second set of twenty-five production wafers, the inventive cleaning process 300 was performed for a second time. In the second performance of the inventive cleaning process 300, the deposition chamber 11 was employed to deposit an aluminum-nitride layer (e.g., having a thickness of 1500 Angstroms) on a first, second and third dummy substrate. Following each deposition process of the cleaning process 300, the deposition chamber 11 was evacuated (step 303) to a pressure of about lxlO"6 Torr.

Table 2 shows the number of additional particles measured in the film formed on the substrate following each deposition process/cleaning cycle of the inventive cleaning process 300. Note the second row represents the number of additional particles measured on a dummy substrate put through the cleaning cycle with the gas flow on, but with DC power off (i.e., without deposition). These modified non deposition cleaning cycles were performed after each deposition cleaning cycle and demonstrate the contamination level attributable to the plasma itself.

TABLE 2 No. of Particles > 0.3μm

Figure imgf000015_0001

The above experiment shows a significant reduction in substrate contamination after running the inventive cleaning process 300. Further, the experiment shows a reduction in substrate contamination following each deposition of an aluminum-nitride layer during each cleaning process . Accordingly, in at least one embodiment of the invention, three or more deposition processes are performed per cleaning process 300. However, it will be understood that the configuration of the deposition chamber 11 and the specific process parameters described above are merely exemplary. The foregoing description discloses only the preferred embodiments of the invention, modifications of the above disclosed apparatus and method which fall within the scope of the invention will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. For instance, although the deposition chamber 11 is configured to deposit aluminum- nitride, the deposition chamber 11 may be configured to deposit other materials (while still employing the inventive cleaning process) . Further, the present invention may be employed with other deposition chambers such as a high- density plasma deposition chamber.

Accordingly, while the present invention has been disclosed in connection with the preferred embodiments thereof, it should be understood that there may be other embodiments which fall within the spirit and scope of the invention, as defined by the following claims.

Claims

THE INVENTIO CLAIMED IS :
1. A method comprising: sputtering a target located within a deposition chamber for a first time period using a first set of processing parameters to deposit a flux of target material on a production substrate disposed on a substrate support located within the deposition chamber; removing the production s'ubstrate from the deposition chamber; and after removal of the production substrate from the deposition chamber, performing a cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber comprising: positioning a non-production object between the target and substrate support; sputtering the target for a second time period, which is of shorter duration than the first time period, using the first set of processing parameters to deposit a flux of target material on the non-production object ; and evacuating the deposition chamber.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the non- production object comprises a dummy substrate.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the non- production object comprises a shutter disk.
4. The method of claim 1 further comprising performing the cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber more than once .
5. The method of claim 4 wherein performing the cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber more than once comprises performing the cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber at least three times.
6. An apparatus comprising: a deposition chamber having a target and a substrate support ; and a controller having a program adapted to: sputter the target for a first time period using a first set of processing parameters to deposit a flux of target material on a substrate positioned on the substrate support of the deposition chamber; and after the substrate has been removed from the deposition chamber, perform a cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber comprising: sputtering the target for a second time period which is of shorter duration than the first time period using the first set of processing parameters to deposit a flux of target material on a non-production object disposed between the target and the substrate support; and evacuating the deposition chamber.
7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the non- production object comprises a dummy substrate.
8. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the non- production object comprises a shutter disk.
9. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the program is further adapted to perform the cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber more than once.
10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein the program is adapted to perform the cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber at least three times.
11. A method comprising: sputtering a target located within a deposition chamber for a first time period to deposit a flux of target material on a production substrate located within the deposition chamber; removing the production substrate from the deposition chamber; and performing a cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber without sputtering the target during the cleaning cycle and prior to loading a subsequent production substrate into the deposition chamber, the cleaning cycle comprising: flowing a gas into the deposition chamber for a second time period which is shorter than the first time period; and evacuating the deposition chamber.
12. The method of claim 11 further comprising resuming production processing.
13. The method of claim, 12 wherein the cleaning cycle is repeated a number of times prior to resuming production processing.
14. The method of claim 13 wherein the cleaning cycle is repeated at least three times.
15. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein the gas comprises an inert gas.
16. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the inert gas comprises argon.
17. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein the gas comprises a processing gas.
18. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein the processing gas comprises nitrogen.
19. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein flowing the gas into the deposition chamber comprises flowing the gas into the deposition chamber at a flow rate of about 30 seem.
20. An apparatus comprising: a deposition chamber having a target; and a controller having a program adapted to: sputter the target for a first time period to deposit a flux of target material on a substrate positioned within the deposition chamber; and after removal of the substrate from the deposition chamber, perform a cleaning cycle within the deposition chamber without sputtering the target during the cleaning cycle and before a subsequent production substrate is loaded into the deposition chamber, the cleaning cycle comprising: flowing a gas into the deposition chamber for a second time period which is shorter than the first time period; and evacuating the deposition chamber.
PCT/US2001/048051 2000-10-31 2001-10-30 Method and apparatus for cleaning a deposition chamber WO2002037543A2 (en)

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Citations (5)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0441368A1 (en) * 1990-02-09 1991-08-14 Applied Materials Inc. Method and device for removing excess material from a sputtering chamber
US5380414A (en) * 1993-06-11 1995-01-10 Applied Materials, Inc. Shield and collimator pasting deposition chamber with a wafer support periodically used as an acceptor
US5784799A (en) * 1990-08-29 1998-07-28 Hitachi, Ltd. Vacuum processing apparatus for substate wafers
EP0869199A1 (en) * 1997-03-31 1998-10-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Chamber design with isolation valve to preserve vacuum during maintenance
EP0884401A1 (en) * 1997-06-11 1998-12-16 Applied Materials, Inc. Method and system for coating the inside of a processing chamber

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH0892764A (en) * 1994-09-22 1996-04-09 Nec Kyushu Ltd Sputtering device

Patent Citations (5)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0441368A1 (en) * 1990-02-09 1991-08-14 Applied Materials Inc. Method and device for removing excess material from a sputtering chamber
US5784799A (en) * 1990-08-29 1998-07-28 Hitachi, Ltd. Vacuum processing apparatus for substate wafers
US5380414A (en) * 1993-06-11 1995-01-10 Applied Materials, Inc. Shield and collimator pasting deposition chamber with a wafer support periodically used as an acceptor
EP0869199A1 (en) * 1997-03-31 1998-10-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Chamber design with isolation valve to preserve vacuum during maintenance
EP0884401A1 (en) * 1997-06-11 1998-12-16 Applied Materials, Inc. Method and system for coating the inside of a processing chamber

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 1996, no. 08, 30 August 1996 (1996-08-30) & JP 08 092764 A (NEC KYUSHU LTD), 9 April 1996 (1996-04-09) *

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