WO2001098736A1 - Gas meter and method for detecting a consumed amount of gas - Google Patents

Gas meter and method for detecting a consumed amount of gas

Info

Publication number
WO2001098736A1
WO2001098736A1 PCT/IB2001/001069 IB0101069W WO0198736A1 WO 2001098736 A1 WO2001098736 A1 WO 2001098736A1 IB 0101069 W IB0101069 W IB 0101069W WO 0198736 A1 WO0198736 A1 WO 0198736A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
gas
flow
mass
part
sensor
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/IB2001/001069
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Felix Mayer
Andreas Martin HÄBERLI
Vanha Ralph Steiner
Urs Martin Rothacher
Original Assignee
Sensirion Ag
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/68Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using thermal effects
    • G01F1/696Circuits therefor, e.g. constant-current flow meters
    • G01F1/698Feedback or rebalancing circuits, e.g. self heated constant temperature flowmeters
    • G01F1/699Feedback or rebalancing circuits, e.g. self heated constant temperature flowmeters by control of a separate heating or cooling element
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/68Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using thermal effects
    • G01F1/684Structural arrangements; Mounting of elements, e.g. in relation to fluid flow
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/68Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using thermal effects
    • G01F1/684Structural arrangements; Mounting of elements, e.g. in relation to fluid flow
    • G01F1/6845Micromachined devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/68Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using thermal effects
    • G01F1/684Structural arrangements; Mounting of elements, e.g. in relation to fluid flow
    • G01F1/6847Structural arrangements; Mounting of elements, e.g. in relation to fluid flow where sensing or heating elements are not disturbing the fluid flow, e.g. elements mounted outside the flow duct
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/68Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using thermal effects
    • G01F1/696Circuits therefor, e.g. constant-current flow meters
    • G01F1/6965Circuits therefor, e.g. constant-current flow meters comprising means to store calibration data for flow signal calculation or correction
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F15/00Details of, or accessories for, apparatus of the preceding groups insofar as such details or appliances are not adapted to particular types of such apparatus
    • G01F15/001Means for regulating or setting the meter for a predetermined quantity
    • G01F15/003Means for regulating or setting the meter for a predetermined quantity using electromagnetic, electric or electronic means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F5/00Measuring a proportion of the volume flow

Abstract

The invention relates to a gas meter for the purpose of calculating the charges, which is adapted to measure the mass flow of the gas. Said gas meter comprises a mass flow detector (4), a control (5) and a display (6). The inventive gas meter may further comprises a card reader (7) and a valve (8). The mass flow detector is based on a sensor element that is integrated on a semiconductor chip together with a digital and analogous evaluation unit. Since it is the mass flow and not the flow speed or the volume of the consumed gas that is measured, the value obtained is independent of the pressure and is substantially based on the calorific value of the gas.

Description

Gas meter and method for determining a consumed

amount of gas

REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority of the Swiss patent application 1252/00, filed on 23 June 2000, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

background

The invention relates to a gas meter and a method for determining a consumed amount of gas according to the preamble of the independent claims.

Gas meters are devices that allow the gas consumption of a consumer is measured so that the gas consumed may be provided to the consumer charged. Conventional volumetric gas meters have the disadvantage that their values ​​are dependent on pressure and temperature. This leads to an unfair calculation of gas costs.

Summary of the Invention

This raises the task of a gas meter and a method of the type mentioned initially determine the most accurate consumption data to permit a more equitable calculation of gas costs.

Claim the invention this object is solved by the mass flow of the gas is determined and integrated over time. Thus, so not the volume but the bulk of the gas consumed is determined. Since the mass corresponds to the calorific value of the gas, this allows a more equitable billing.

Preferably, the gas meter has an integrated mass flow sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate having a diaphragm and arranged thereon sample components.

For very high accuracy at low cost an analog part and a digital part are on the same semiconductor substrate tegriert domestic still. In the analog part of the signals are pre-processed, that is reinforced for example, and then digitized. In the digital part, the digitized data is linearized. Because the parts are all integrated on a common semiconductor substrate, there is a reduction in manufacturing cost. thanks to the linearization nevertheless possible to achieve a high accuracy, even over a large range of gas flow.

To make the mass flow sensor as robust as possible, a tensile passivation layer can be applied approximately through the membrane. Such a passivation layer is able to put the membrane under a tensile overall sa tstress. This sagging, which for example would cause a reduction in the mechanical stability, is prevented.

Brief Description of Drawings

Further embodiments, advantages and applications fertilize the invention emerge from the dependent claims and from the following description with reference to FIGS. In which:

Fig. 1 is a block diagram of a erfindungsge- MAESSEN gas meter, Fig. 2 is a schematic representation of a possible implementation of the mass flow detector. Fig. 3 is a mass flow detector with linear response,

Fig. 4 is a section through the sensor element, Fig. 5 is a plan view of a semiconductor module with the sensor element and electronic circuits,

Fig. 6 is a block diagram of the device according to

FIGS. 5 and

Fig. 7 is a block diagram of the controller.

Ways of carrying out the invention

Overview:

Fig. 1 shows a block diagram of an execution tion of the invention in the form of a gas meter 1, as, for example, can be used to determine the gas cost in a household.

The gas meter has a main channel having an input line 2 and an output line 3 for the gas to be measured. For measuring the quantity of gas, a mass flow detector 4 is provided, that a sensor, with which the mass of gas flowing through per unit of time is determined. A controller 5 analyzes the results of the mass flow detector 4 on a display 6 and, for example, operates a smart card reader 7. Further, it can control a closing valve. 8 A power supply 9 feeds all the components, preferably from a battery.

In the following, the parts of the gas meter 1 will be described in detail. It should be noted that the application of some of these parts is not limited to a gas meter. For example, the explained in the following mass flow detector or the sensor element may be used in a variety of applications.

Mass flow detector:

The mass flow detector 4 measures either the mass rate, ie the mass per unit of time or an inte- gral mass rate, ie the total mass. Instead of the mass or mass flow rate of the respective Big can be determined per unit flow area of ​​the gas pipe and then be converted. Fig. 2 schematically shows the construction of the mass flow detector. In the following, the mean mass flow pv is understood as "mass flow" where p is the density and v is the velocity of the gas. If the entire mass flow to be determined through the main channel 2, 3, as is p.vjj to integrate in a known manner, wherein VJJ is the mean flow velocity in the main channel.

In the present embodiment, the main passage, a bypass 10 is provided which is cut in parallel with an exhaust 11 of the main passage 2, 3 runs, with an input 12 and an output 13. In the bypass 10 is a sensor element 14 is provided.

At least in a region 15 between the mouths of the bypass 10, a gray ones shown, imputed in Fig. 2 area is provided, in which the flow resistance of the gas is increased in comparison to the rest of the main channel in order to increase the pressure drop Dp between the mouths.

Preferably, a measuring arrangement disposed in the sensor element 14, which for this purpose has a heating member and symmetrically with two temperature sensors. A preferred embodiment of this arrangement will be described below.

The temperatures at the temperature sensors of such a sensor element are dependent on the product of the flow velocity vg in the bypass 10 and the density p of the gas. The output signal S of the sensor element is a function f of the mass flow pv ß, where Vg denotes the gas velocity at the location of the sensor element 14 in the bypass 4, ie

S = s (pv B) (1) By means of suitable linearization proportional to the mass flow signal may be generated, so that

S = kpv B, (2)

where k is a constant.

The current flowing through the bypass gas 10 produces a pressure difference Ap between the mouths of the conduits 12 and 13. The pressure difference Ap depends on the gas velocity v B in the bypass 10, that is

Dp = f B (v B), (3)

where the function f B describes this dependency.

On the other hand, this pressure difference is vpj also on the flow rate in the main channel dependent, ie

Dp = f H (v H). (4)

where the function f H describes the dependence of the pressure drop of the flow velocity in the main duct.

The functions f and B FJJ depend on the geometry of the main channel and the bypass. In laminar flow conditions are f B and FJJ linear functions. In turbulent flow conditions or dynamic pressure f B and FJJ also from higher powers of the respective speed can, in particular depend on the square of the velocity.

From equation (3) and (4) yields:

v B = f B -l (f H (v H)) = F (v H) (5)

The properties of the mass flow detector can be f and FJJ optimized by appropriate choice of the function F or functions. Fig. 3 shows an embodiment of a mass flow detector with linear response. In the main channel, a linear flow resistance is arranged 15 ', so that Ap is proportional to jj. The flow resistance can be made for example from a plurality of parallel, narrow channels. The bypass also comprises a linear flow resistance, so that v = VJJ ° applies.

Sensor element: Fig. 4 shows the structure of a sensor element

14, with which the mass flow pv B of a gas can be measured.

The general principle of operation of such a device is described in detail in "Scaling of Thermal CMOS Gas Flow Micro Sensors: Experiment and Simulation". F. Mayer et al, in Proc IEEE Micro Electro mechanization cal system (IEEE, 1996), pp llβff.. described.

The sensor element 14 is disposed on a semiconductor substrate 21 of monocrystalline silicon has been etched out in which an opening 22nd The term "opening" means both a simple recess in the semiconductor substrate 21, and an extending completely through the semiconductor substrate 21 opening. The opening or recess 22 is 23 covered from a dielectric bran by a thin membrane. On the diaphragm 23 24 is arranged a resistive heating of three resistors. symmetrically to the heater 24, two thermocouples 25, 26, which serve as temperature sensors. Strictly speaking, these are thermo- mosäulen consisting of a plurality of series-connected thermocouples. in connection with this description and the claims both a single element as well as a thermopile is meant by the term thermocouple. thermocouples have resistive against

Temperature sensors the advantage that they have virtually no drift and are relatively insensitive to bending of the membrane 23rd

The thermocouples 25, 26 and the heater 24 are thus to the flow direction 27 that the gas is first the first thermocouple 25, then the heater 24 and After all sweeps the second thermocouple 26th

A typical size of the membrane 23 is, for example 300 X 500 microns. 2

The sensor element 14, and particularly the area of ​​the diaphragm 23 is provided with a passivation layer 28 covers. This example may be made of silicon oxide, silicon nitride or a polymer, in particular polyimide, exist. The passivation layer 28 prevents diffusion of unwanted molecules, such as water, in the integrated on the semiconductor substrate 21 components.

The passivation layer 28 has, in addition to also perform a mechanical function. For this purpose, it is designed tensil, with a Tensilität at the operating temperature of preferably more than 100 MPa. So it is subjected to tensile stress so that it keeps tightening the membrane 23 and thus stable. Thanks to this stress compensation, the membrane 23 is still working properly even with a pressure difference of more than 3 bar. The Tensilität the passivation layer 23 may by known methods be controlled by suitable choice of the production parameters, see for example Dominik Jaeggi, "Thermal convertes by CMOS Technology", dissertation at the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich No. 11567, 1996 As already mentioned, with a be found in the sensor element 14 of FIG. 4, the mass flow of the gas. For this purpose, the temperatures are measured by the thermocouples 25, 26 which depend from the product of the flow velocity v B and the density p of the gas gen.

The sensor element 14, that is, the heater 24 is operated in pulsed mode, for example, with a pulse length between 5 and 50 ms. Preferably, however, no time delay between the heating pulse and the thermocouple signals is measured, since this only depends on the flow rate and not by the mass flow. Rather, the temperature signals of the two thermocouples 25, 26 are compared, for example, by determining the difference of the signals or the quotient of the signals. These Grosse depends primarily on the mass flow.

The pulsed operation of heating has the advantage that the power consumption is reduced.

The sensor element 14, thanks to its structure mechanically robust and can be mounted in any position.

On the semiconductor substrate 21 on egg ne evaluation circuit and driver circuits for heating 24 may be integrated. A possible structure of all of these parts on a common substrate is illustrated in FIG. 5, and a corresponding block diagram in FIG. 6. The framed components zusammenge- on the semiconductor substrate 21 are divided into three groups, and include a sensor part 30, an analog part 31 and a digital part 32. the sensor part 30 includes the sensor element as described above 14. it extends over the whole width of the semiconductor substrate 21. Since it comes into contact with the gas to be measured are arranged no circuit elements in the sensor part. The analog part 31 mainly includes analog circuit blocks of the digital section 32 mainly digital circuit blocks. The three groups can be arranged depending on the individual semiconductor substrates, however, the arrangement on a common substrate is preferred for reasons of cost and due to the lower susceptibility to interference.

The circuits are implemented in CMOS technology. interfere with the smallest gate lengths of the transis- used, in particular of the digital switching transistors are preferably in the range of 0.2 to 0.8 μ, and in any case below 1.0 microns. Thanks to the high integration density, it is possible to accommodate all components on a semiconductor substrate 21 having a surface of for example 15 m 2.

The whole shown in Fig. 5 and 6 block can be equal to 5.5 volts is supplied with a voltage less, preferably 3 volts.

For connecting the power supply and for communication with external components 32 are arrival schlusspads 39 are provided on the semiconductor substrate 21 in the region of the digital part.

The functions of the analog part 31 and the digital section 32 will be described in more detail below. Here is only briefly mentioned that the analog part 31 is used for analog Aufbearbeitung the signals-in sensor ents 14 and converting into digitized data. In the digital section 32, a linearization of the digital data takes place. During l generates the digital portion of the clock signals of the individual components, and it has a memory in which calibration and operating parameters and / or linearization coefficients can be stored. Preferably, the linearization coefficients are stored in an EEPROM.

The geometry of the arrangement of the components on the semiconductor substrate, a reduction of interference is achieved. The analog part 31 is between the

Sensor element 14 and the digital part 32 is arranged so that the weak sensor signals are influenced as little as possible of the switching signals of the digital part.

Further, the sensor element is arranged at one end of the semiconductor substrate so that the remaining parts of the semiconductor substrate can not come into contact with the gas to be measured.

As seen from Fig. 5, the sensor element 14 is arranged substantially symmetrical to a medium- sized longitudinal axis 37 of the semiconductor device. In particular, the heater 24 is symmetrical to this axis, so that thermally induced stresses in the sub- strat remain low. Further, the analog part 31 has two differentially operated channels for evaluating the measuring signals. So that these channels will be influenced by the temperature gradient, which is generated from the heater 24 in the substrate 21 in the same way, the components are arranged in areas of the same temperature as possible.

The operation of the analog part 31 will be explained.

As shown in Fig. 6, the analog part comprises a heater controller 50, a part referred to as MUX / amplifier 51 for selecting the signals to be processed and its preamplification, and an A / D converter 52.

The heating control 50 serves the Te - to keep temperature, current or power of the heating constant. In a simple embodiment, the heater can also be connected directly to the (external) supply voltage.

Further, the analog part 31 includes a temperature sensor 40 to A / D converter 40a for measuring the ambient and / or substrate emperature. This temperature may affect the signals of the thermocouples 25, 26th It is therefore linked to the data of the temperature sensors 25, 26 to reduce the dependence of the final result from the environmental and / or substrate temperature.

The tempera sensor 40 may also be in the sensor part 30, and in particular the diaphragm 23 may be disposed.

The signals from the analog part 31 to the digital part 32 and those of the digital section 32 to the analog part 31 is buffered. For this purpose, a buffer 64 is provided for each signal. Through the use of buffers 64, the transmission of high frequency noise from the digital part 32 is reduced in the analog part 31st The analog part 31 thus fulfills various

Objects and comprises at least 100 transistors. Controller:

The control portion 5 of the device is shown in Fig. 7. It includes the microcontroller 73 and an EEPROM 72, where it accesses the latter for example via the digital part 32 of the mass flow detector. 4 Also, the digital section 32 can access the EEPROM so that inter alia the linearization coefficients can be stored there for the linearization of the measuring signals. The microcontroller 73 may for example be a microprocessor with integrated ROM. He accesses the EEPROM 72 to store accumulated charges there. Further, the microcontroller controls 73 to be displayed on the optional display data 6 and the optional card reader. 7

It may also be a radio interface mode 76 is provided, through which the microcontroller 73 may, for example, via a cellular telephone network to communicate, for example, by means of GSM with a central 84th Thus, the gas meter can forward such as gas consumption automatically to the central 84th It is also conceivable that the control center transmits 84 a standard rate, which is according to the gas consumption to calculate, by radio to the gas meter.

Instead of or in addition to the radio interface 76, another interface may be provided 77th It may be a wired or wireless interface, which for example can be used for a local reading of the gas meter.

The microcontroller 73 also controls the VEN til. 8

The control portion may further include an electronic clock 78th This can be used for example to process time-dependent tariff rates.

The control section reads the instantaneous mass flow in the bypass 10, as determined by the mass flow detector 4 via the interface 71 of the digital section 32 and integrates this value over time. He also expects the mass flow in the bypass 10 to the mass flow in the main channel 2; 3. At regular intervals, eg every time a certain amount consumed of gas, or if gas was consumed for a certain fees amount, it stores the corresponding intermediate value in the EEPROM 72, so that an error or omission of the power supply no data loss leads ,

It is also possible to monitor the supply voltage. Once this begins to drop, the last intermediate value is not written into the EEPROM. In this case it must be ensured by an appropriate buffer that, when a sudden voltage drop enough time to back up data remains. Thus, since the control portion 5 integrates the mass flow of the gas consumed over time, calculate the mass of the gas consumed. From this mass a corresponding fee is charged, which either can also be done in the control section 5 or externally. The control portion 5 shows (or a corresponding charge) as the value on the display 6 on the consumed amount of gas. This value can be encrypted so that the risk of manipulation is lower.

Is a reading device 7 is provided, the user can insert a value card 80 in this device. This card contains a non-volatile memory 82 with a credit for a given mass of gas. The microcontroller 73 opens the valve only when such a value card is inserted into the card reader 7 80, and performs the credit in the memory 82 in accordance with the consumed mass of gas to. It may, for example, subtract and then hold the valve open until a corresponding amount of gas was consumed a fee or amount unit from the value in the memory 82 after insertion of the card. Then, it subtracts a next fees or unit from the value in the memory 82, etc. Once such a subtraction is not possible, the valve 8 is closed.

Is a radio interface 76 is provided, so the costs of gas and the consumed gas mass can be transmitted over the radio interface 76 a central 84th

The digital section 32 may operate independently from the microcontroller 73, that is, it can perform the calibration and linearization of the measurement data without the help of microcontroller toddlers 73rd The microcontroller 73 needs only the results from the digital section 32 poll. This makes it possible to operate only intermittently and / or at a reduced clock speed microcontroller 73rd The power consumption of the gas meter is reduced. Outside the can disorders that are generated by the microcontroller 73, hardly get up in the analog part 31st

Arranged on the semiconductor substrate 21 components need not be permanently in operation. They can only be periodically einge- switched by the microcontroller 73, for example, to perform measurements at regular intervals. This leads to a reduction in electricity consumption. For example, measurements can be carried out every 2 seconds.

The microcontroller 73 can also determine the accuracy of the measurements ness, by specifying the number of performed by the digital part 32 averages or the pulse length of the heating pulses. To reduce power consumption, a high accuracy measurement can eg be performed first, and then lower accuracy measurements, show until the latter that the mass flow has apparently changed. Then again a high accuracy measurement to be performed.

Arranged on the semiconductor substrate components can operate in continuous operation or in intermittent operation, with the corresponding operating mode is selected by the microcontroller 73 and controlled by the digital section 32nd In the intermittent operation, the following steps are executed upon activation of the semiconductor chip by the microcontroller 73 from:

A) The heater and the measuring electronics are switched on.

B) After step A is ready, the digital eil 32 until the heater temperature stabilizes. Then he first performs an offset correction and then a measurement. The data is output. C) Then, the measurement electronics and the

off heating and the semiconductor chip waits for the next activation by the microcontroller.

In continuous operation, the measurement cycles are carried out without interruption, wherein in each measurement cycle takes place first, an offset correction, and then a measurement.

As is clear from the above, the invention relates to various aspects in the field of semiconductor and sensor technology, particularly gas charge meter. However, it is to be emphasized that in particular described the sensor element or the

Semiconductor device with sensor panel, analog part and digital part can be used as building blocks for other applications.

While in the present application forthcoming ferred embodiments of the invention are described, it is distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto and may be embodied in other ways within the scope of the following claims.

Claims

claims
1. Gas meter characterized by a Massenflusdetektor (4) for measuring the mass flow of a through a main channel (2, 3) flowing the gas and further including means (5) for integrating the mass flow over time.
2. A gas meter according to claim 1 wherein it's worth a non-volatile memory (72) for storing intermediate having the integrated mass flow.
3. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it comprises a card reader (7) for value cards and a valve (8) for the interruption of the main channel (2, 3).
4. Gas meter according to claim 3, wherein it is designed to track in accordance with a consumed gas mass a value memory (82) in a card reader (7) inserted value card (80) and upon exhaustion of the value memory (82) the valve (8) to close - SEN.
5. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, comprising a radio interface (76) for wireless transmission of a consumed gas mass to a control center and / or gas delivery rates from the central unit to the gas meter.
6. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it comprises a sensor element (14), an analog part (31) to the analog preprocessing of the signals of the sensor element (14) and for generating digitized data and a digital part (32) for linearizing the digitized data having.
7. Gas meter according to claim 6, wherein the sensor element (14) of the analog part (31) and the digital part (32) jointly on a semiconductor substrate (21) are inte- grated.
8. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it comprises a microcontroller (73) for integrating the mass flow.
9. Gas meter according to claim 8, wherein the digi valley portion (32) is operable independently of the microcontroller (73).
10. Gas meter according to one of claims 8 or 9, wherein configured to reduce the power consumption of the microcontroller (73) to the gate Massenflussdetek- periodically switched on and off.
11. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it the mass flow detector (4) comprises a main channel (2, 3) for the gas, and wherein a bypass (10) parallel to the main channel (2, 3).
12. A gas meter according to claim 11, wherein the bypass (10) with orifices (12 λ, 13) opens into the main channel, wherein in the main passage between the mouths of a linear flow resistor (15 ') is arranged.
13. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it is designed for displaying an encrypted gas consumption on a display (6).
14. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it comprises an electronic clock (78), and in particular wherein it is configured to process time-dependent tariff rates.
15. Gas meter according to one of the preceding claims, wherein it comprises a mass flow sensor with a semiconductor substrate (21) and a sensor element (14), wherein the sensor element (14) arranged one in the semiconductor substrate (21) through an opening (22) membrane ( 23), extending over the heating membrane (24) and on both sides of the heater (placed 24) temperature sensors (25, 26).
16. A gas meter according to claim 15, wherein an analog part (31) is integrated to the analog preprocessing of the signals of the temperature sensors and for generating digitized data on the semiconductor substrate and that on the semiconductor substrate is a digital part (32) for line arisieren is integrated of the digitized data ,
17. A gas meter according to claim 16, wherein at least the analog part (31) and the digital part (32) are configured as CMOS circuits with a minimum gate length of less than 1 .mu.m.
18. Gas meter according to one of claims 16 to
17, wherein it comprises a sensor (40) for measuring a substrate temperature and / or an ambient temperature, wherein the digital part (32) is designed, the substrate or ambient temperature with the digitized data of the temperature sensors (25, 26) to link a reduce temperature dependence of the digitized data.
19. Gas meter according to one of claims 15 -
18, wherein a tensile passivation layer (28) for tightening the membrane (23) is disposed over the membrane.
20. Gas meter according to claim 19, wherein the passivation layer (28) has a Tensilität of at least 100 MPa.
21. A method for determining an amount of gas consumed for the purpose of charging, characterized by the steps of measuring the mass flow of the consumed gas and
Integrating the mass flow over time to calculate a fee from the so-determined mass.
22. The method of claim 21, wherein the mass flow is measured by a part of the amount of gas is passed over a Massenflusdetektor having a heater (24), wherein before and after the heating, the temperature of the gas is measured.
PCT/IB2001/001069 2000-06-23 2001-06-14 Gas meter and method for detecting a consumed amount of gas WO2001098736A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CH1252/00 2000-06-23
CH12522000 2000-06-23

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
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Country Status (2)

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DE (1) DE10129300A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2001098736A1 (en)

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US6708573B1 (en) * 2002-09-12 2004-03-23 Air Products And Chemicals, Inc. Process for filling compressed gas fuel dispensers which utilizes volume and density calculations
US6779395B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2004-08-24 Sensirion Ag Device for measuring the flow of a gas or a liquid in a bypass
EP1499860A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2005-01-26 Heetronix Mass flow meter with chip-type sensors
EP1512948A1 (en) * 2003-09-03 2005-03-09 Abb Research Ltd. Gas flow sensor with flow diagnostic
EP1698864A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2006-09-06 Hitachi, Ltd. Thermal flowmeter of fluid
US7188519B2 (en) 2002-11-27 2007-03-13 Sensirion Ag Device and method for measuring the flow and at least one material parameter of a fluid
EP1971030A1 (en) 2007-03-15 2008-09-17 Sensirion Holding AG Noise reduction for switched capacitor assemblies
EP2175246A1 (en) 2008-10-09 2010-04-14 Sensirion AG A method for measuring a fluid composition parameter by means of a flow sensor
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