WO2001071397A1 - Multi-user retro reflector data input - Google Patents

Multi-user retro reflector data input Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2001071397A1
WO2001071397A1 PCT/US2000/007538 US0007538W WO0171397A1 WO 2001071397 A1 WO2001071397 A1 WO 2001071397A1 US 0007538 W US0007538 W US 0007538W WO 0171397 A1 WO0171397 A1 WO 0171397A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
retro
sequent
imager
person
light
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2000/007538
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Leonard Reiffel
Original Assignee
Leonard Reiffel
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Leonard Reiffel filed Critical Leonard Reiffel
Priority to PCT/US2000/007538 priority Critical patent/WO2001071397A1/en
Priority claimed from US10/203,735 external-priority patent/US7137711B1/en
Publication of WO2001071397A1 publication Critical patent/WO2001071397A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/03Arrangements for converting the position or the displacement of a member into a coded form
    • G06F3/0304Detection arrangements using opto-electronic means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B5/00Optical elements other than lenses
    • G02B5/12Reflex reflectors
    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B5/00Optical elements other than lenses
    • G02B5/12Reflex reflectors
    • G02B5/122Reflex reflectors cube corner, trihedral or triple reflector type
    • G02B5/124Reflex reflectors cube corner, trihedral or triple reflector type plural reflecting elements forming part of a unitary plate or sheet

Abstract

The apparatus uses retro-reflected light, having a fixed component (41) and a variable component (37) varied by a person, from a retro reflector (31) connected to a person to input data (37A) to an information system (13) and does this for each of several persons in the same time interval.

Description

TITLE

Multi-user Retro Reflector Data Input

BACKGROUND

The invention uses retro-reflected light having a fixed component and a

variable component varied by a person, from a retro reflector connected to a

person to input data to an mformation system and does this for each of several

persons in the same time interval.

Limits of data input via retro-reflected light - for example by Honey in U.

S. Patent 5,912,700 and by Stuart in U. S. Patent 4,998,441 - are surmounted by

the discovery shown here.

SUMMARY

Light retro-reflected by a retro reflector connected to a person has a fixed

component and a variable component and is detected by an imager which inputs

data to an mformation system.

Other forms and objects of the invention will be comprehended in the

drawings and description, which will make further equivalent forms and objects

obvious hereafter to persons skilled in the art. DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows two users inputting data to an information system.

FIG. 2 shows light retro-reflected from a retro reflector in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 shows light retro-reflected from a sequent retro reflector in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 shows a retro reflector on a card.

FIG. 5 shows a finger acting as a retro reflector and retro reflector parts

on a cylinder.

DESCRIPTION

The data input apparatus is used with an information system indicated by

the display device 13 in FIG. 1. The data input apparatus comprises an imager

indicated by a lens 11, a light source indicated by a ring light 12, and a retro

reflector indicated by a retro-reflecting disc 31 on a hand portion of a person.

Though the retro reflector is on the person in the example of FIG. 1, the

retro reflector can be connected to the person in various ways such as by being

held by the person, by being on gear worn by the person, or by being on a device

- such as an aircraft - transporting the person. The meaning of "connected to a

person" here is distinct from connection by a signal.

Throughout use for data input, the retro reflector remains connected to the

person. This is distinct from the case where retro-reflecting material is attached

to an object - such as a thrown ball - which moves independently of the person. Ideal retro-reflecting objects retro-reflect all incident light back coaxially

along the path of the incident light. Thus, an imager adjacent to the light source

will detect retro-reflected light - which is light from the light source retro-

reflected by the retro reflector to the imager - with a high signal to noise ratio

between the retro-reflected light and any other light detected by the imager. The

signal to noise ratio becomes greater and smaller as retro-reflecting objects are

more and less ideal.

"Adjacent" here means that the retro-reflected light is within the field of

view of the imager. A light beam from the source and the retro-reflected light

beam incident on the imager can be made precisely coaxial by using beam

splitting devices, and this also is included in the meaning of "adjacent" here.

"Detect" here means that the imager locates the retro reflected light

relative to the imager field of view - for example, as exposing specific pixels of

a charge coupled device.

The retro-reflected light has a fixed component indicated for example by

41 in FIG. 2 which depicts retro-reflected light seen by the imager. The retro-

reflected light also has a variable component which is varied by the person.

One example of the variable component is indicated by the path 37 along

which the person moves the retro reflector. Another example of the variable

component is indicated by a second retro reflector part 35 being first positioned to be seen 45 by the unager and later being positioned to be not visible to the

imager.

A multiplicity of distinct variations of the variable component -

comprising data - can be generated by the person varying positions of a retro

reflector and varying configurations of more than one retro reflector part. This

meaning of a variable component is distinct from the case where a person moves

a bar-coded object so that an imager can read the fixed bar code.

When, in a time interval, the imager detects the variable component, the

imager inputs a signal to the information system.

In the example depicted in FIG. 1 a variable component corresponds to

the series of positions making up the path 37, and the sequent signal comprises

data identifying the series of positions along the path 37 in the time interval.

Also in the example depicted in FIG. 1 a variable component is a start

configuration of the retro reflector 31 and the second retro reflector part 35 at

the start of the path and is a stop configuration with the second retro reflector

part obscured at the end of the path. The start configuration could be mapped by

the imager as a start signal causing the information system to start 51 a trace

37A corresponding to the path, and the stop configuration could be mapped by

the imager as a stop signal causing the information system to stop 52 the trace

corresponding to the path. Start and stop signals to start the trace and to stop the trace could also be

input by other means such as key strokes, mouse clicks, and speech.

The information system need not visually display the trace, as the trace

could be data used or stored by the information system. The trace could be in

three spatial dimensions, and in time, in data used or stored by the information

system. A second imager with light source, and more, could be used to help

generate three dimensional data. Also, a wand-like retro reflector with two distal

points separated by a known distance can be used to facilitate three dimensional

data.

When, in the time interval, the imager detects the fixed component, 41 for

example, the imager inputs an identity signal to the information system.

In the example depicted in FIG. 1 there is also a sequent retro reflector 61

connected to a sequent person, and there is sequent retro-reflected light with a

sequent fixed component 71 depicted in FIG. 3.

When, in the time interval, the imager detects the sequent fixed

component 71 the imager inputs a sequent identity signal to the information

system. The fixed components 41 and 71 are distinct, and thus the sequent

identity signal is distinct from the identity signal.

The sequent retro-reflected light also has a sequent variable component

varied by the sequent person. One example of the sequent variable component is

indicated by the path 67 along which the sequent person moves the sequent retro reflector 61. Another example of the sequent variable component is indicated by

a sequent second retro reflector part 65 being first positioned to be seen 75 by

the imager and later being positioned to be not visible to the imager.

When, in the time interval, the imager detects the sequent variable

component, the imager inputs a sequent signal to the information system.

In the example depicted in FIG. 1 a sequent variable component

corresponds to a series of positions making up the sequent path 67, and the

sequent signal comprises data identifying the series of positions along the

sequent path 67 in the time interval. The sequent signal can cause the

information to trace a path 67A.

The retro reflector and the sequent retro reflector function

interchangeably. The contents of the fixed component and the sequent fixed

component are distinct. The contents of the variable component and the sequent

variable component are varied by distinct persons and can be distinct.

An imager can distinguish retro-reflected light - 45 and 41 for example -

retro-reflected by a person from retro-reflected light - 75 and 71 for example -

retro-reflected by a sequent person because of the distinct fixed components and

because distances between retro-reflected light retro-reflected by one person - 45

and 41 for example - are smaller than distances between retro-reflected light

retro-reflected light not retro-reflected from by one person - 45 and 75 for

example. While 71 is shown to have bar code like configurations, other properties -

such as shape and color - can also be used alone and in combinations to

comprise fixed components.

In FIG. 1 the retro reflector is shown as a retro-reflecting disc attached to

finger tips. Retro-reflecting objects can be attached to each of the fingers and to

other portions of a hand such as knuckles and to other portions of the body.

Various commercial retro reflecting materials - utilizing micro spheres and

embossments for example - produce very high signal to noise ratios and can be

put on hand portions in various ways - such as with adhesive, with rings, and

with thimble-like devices .

A retro reflector on a card 87 which can be held by a person is depicted in

FIG. 4. A variable component is produced when the person obscures - with

fingers, for example - one or more of retro-reflecting parts 81, 82, and 83. A

fixed component comprises a set of retro-reflecting parts 85.

A retro reflector can be attached to a persons gear - head gear for example

- so that positions of the person can be imaged from above to identify the person

and trace the positions. An information system can attach an identifying label to

a displayed image of the person. When many persons are so imaged, only

selected traces can be displayed and can be color coded. Paths of players in a

sporting event can be traced. WO 01 II X 397 PCT/US00/07538

A retro reflector can be attached to a first aircraft transporting a person so

that a light source and imager on a second aircraft can detect the presence and

motion of the first aircraft.

In as much as a finger tip reflects light from the light source back to the

imager with a signal to noise ratio greater than one, the finger tip - 31 A depicted

in FIG. 5 for example - can be used in place of the retro reflector 31 though a

poor signal to noise ratio will burden the imager. While finger tip properties -

such as color - can provide the fixed component, this would further burden an

imager. A fixed component - such as the retro-reflecting stripes 85A around a

cylinder shown in FIG. 5 - burdens the imager less.

The signal to noise ratio provided by a retro reflector can be increased.

For example, a retro reflector can reflect a first electromagnetic radiation

spectrum portion greater than other electromagnetic radiation spectrum portions,

and the imager can be more sensitive to the first electromagnetic radiation

spectrum portion than to other electromagnetic radiation spectrum portions.

Also, the light source can be modulated at a first frequency and the imager

can be more sensitive to light modulated at the first frequency than to light

modulated at other frequencies. With a modulated light source the distance

between a retro reflector and the imager can be determined by time of flight

measurement. A scanner can be added. The scanner can be an imager scanner scanning

the imager over a light source illuminated; can be a light scanner scanning the

light source over an imager viewed solid angle; and can be a combined scanner

scanning the imager and the light source together over a solid angle.

Combinations of all the several signal to noise ratio improvement methods can

be used.

Information processing capacity needed to detect the retro reflectors and

generate inputted data can be incorporated in the imager itself so that the imager

can input data to the information system in forms similar to foπns provided by

keystrokes and mouse devices. Information processing capacity of the

information system can be used to detect retro reflectors and generate inputted

data, in which case the information system is part of the imager while it is

helping generate input data.

Variations of the variable component - such as range and speed of motion

and relative configurations and motions of retro reflector parts - can be defined

to execute members of a roster of signal components similarly to defining

keystroke combinations.

The apparatus can be utilized interactively. For example, in response to a

query communicated by the information system, a plurality of persons can input

responses. Also, for each of a plurality of persons navigating a territory, the

information system can communicate to each of the persons a person specific path from the location of each of the persons to a part of the territory sought by

each of the persons.

The data processor can locate the retro reflector relative to a target object.

The target object position can be determined by another retro reflector data input

apparatus. The target object could be a game animal and this would enable

realistic bloodless hunting. The target object could be another person and this

would enable bloodless combat training and sport.

Other equivalent forms for the imager, the light source, the retro reflector,

the fixed component, the variable component, the identity signal, and the signal;

and other equivalent ways of using a retro reflector to input data to an

information system will be obvious hereafter to persons skilled in the art.

Therefore this invention is not limited to the particular examples shown and

described here.

Claims

CLAIMSWhat is claimed is:
1. Data input apparatus used with an information system, the data input
apparatus comprising:
an imager;
a light source adjacent to the imager;
a retro reflector, the retro reflector being connected to a person;
retro-reflected light, the retro reflected light being light from the light
source which is retro-reflected by the retro reflector to the imager,
the retro-reflected light having a fixed component, and the retro-
reflected light having a variable component varied by the person;
an identity signal, the identity signal being input to the information
system by the imager when the fixed component is detected by the
imager in a time interval; and
a signal, the signal being input to the information system by the imager
when the variable component is detected by the imager in the time
interval.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising:
a sequent retro reflector, the sequent retro reflector being connected to a
sequent person;
sequent retro-reflected light, the sequent retro reflected light being light
from the light source which is retro-reflected by the sequent retro
reflector to the imager, the sequent retro-reflected light having a
sequent fixed component, and the sequent retro-reflected light
having a sequent variable component varied by the sequent person;
a sequent identity signal, the sequent identity signal being input to the
information system by the imager when the sequent fixed
component is detected by the imager in the time interval;
a sequent signal, the sequent signal being input to the information system
by the imager when the sequent variable component is detected by
the imager in the time interval.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the retro reflector reflects a first
electromagnetic radiation spectrum portion greater than other electromagnetic
radiation spectrum portions and the imager is more sensitive to the first
electromagnetic radiation spectrum portion than to the other electromagnetic
radiation spectrum portions.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the light source is modulated at a first
frequency and the imager is more sensitive to light modulated at the first
frequency than to light modulated at other frequencies.
5. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a scanner chosen from the
group consisting of:
an imager scanner scanning the imager over a light source illuminated
solid angle;
a light scanner scanning the light source over an imager viewed solid
angle; and
a combined scanner scanning the imager and the light source together
over a solid angle.
6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the retro reflector is on a hand
portion of the person.
7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the retro reflector is on an object held
by the person.
8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the retro reflector is on gear worn by
the person.
9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the retro reflector is on a vehicle
transporting the person.
10. Data input apparatus used with an information system, the data input
apparatus comprising:
an imager;
a light source adjacent to the imager;
a retro reflector, the retro reflector being connected to a person;
retro-reflected light, the retro reflected light being light from the light
source which is retro-reflected by the retro reflector to the imager,
the retro-reflected light having a fixed component, and the retro-
reflected light having a variable component varied by the person;
an identity signal, the identity signal being input to the information
system by the imager when the fixed component is detected by the
imager in a time interval;
a signal, the signal being input to the information system by the imager
when the variable component is detected by the imager in the time
interval;
a sequent retro reflector, the sequent retro reflector being connected to a
sequent person;
sequent retro-reflected light, the sequent retro reflected light being light
from the light source which is retro-reflected by the sequent retro
reflector to the imager, the sequent retro-reflected light having a sequent fixed component, and the sequent retro-reflected light
having a sequent variable component varied by the sequent person;
a sequent identity signal, the sequent identity signal being input to the
information system by the imager when the sequent fixed
component is detected by the imager in the time interval; and
a sequent signal, the sequent signal being input to the information system
by the imager when the sequent variable component is detected by
the imager in the time interval.
PCT/US2000/007538 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input WO2001071397A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/US2000/007538 WO2001071397A1 (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input

Applications Claiming Priority (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CN 00819353 CN1237354C (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input
JP2001569530A JP2003528382A (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Data input by retroreflector for multiuser
KR1020027012409A KR20020092393A (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi user retro reflector data input
EP00919515A EP1275017A4 (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input
BR0017178-6A BR0017178A (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 retrorefletora input multiple users
AU4018900A AU4018900A (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input
PCT/US2000/007538 WO2001071397A1 (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input
US10/203,735 US7137711B1 (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2001071397A1 true WO2001071397A1 (en) 2001-09-27

Family

ID=21741177

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2000/007538 WO2001071397A1 (en) 2000-03-21 2000-03-21 Multi-user retro reflector data input

Country Status (7)

Country Link
EP (1) EP1275017A4 (en)
JP (1) JP2003528382A (en)
KR (1) KR20020092393A (en)
CN (1) CN1237354C (en)
AU (1) AU4018900A (en)
BR (1) BR0017178A (en)
WO (1) WO2001071397A1 (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6945460B2 (en) 2000-12-15 2005-09-20 Leonard Reiffel Imaged coded data source transducer product
US7000840B2 (en) 2000-05-03 2006-02-21 Leonard Reiffel Dual mode data imaging product
US7034803B1 (en) 2000-08-18 2006-04-25 Leonard Reiffel Cursor display privacy product
EP1501007A3 (en) * 2003-07-23 2006-05-31 Bose Corporation System and method for accepting a user control input
JPWO2005003945A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2006-08-17 新世代株式会社 The information processing apparatus, an information processing system, the operation thereof, an information processing method, information processing program, and game system
EP1698964A1 (en) * 2003-11-25 2006-09-06 Kenji Nishi Information input unit, storing unit, information input device, and information processing device
US7137711B1 (en) 2000-03-21 2006-11-21 Leonard Reiffel Multi-user retro reflector data input
US7161581B2 (en) 2000-08-18 2007-01-09 Leonard Reiffel Annotating imaged data product
US7415352B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2008-08-19 Bose Corporation Displaying vehicle information
EP2039403A2 (en) * 2002-10-30 2009-03-25 Nike International Ltd. Targets for use with interactive activity devices
EP2298423A3 (en) * 2002-10-30 2011-06-29 Nike International, Ltd. Clothes with tracking marks for computer games
US8956228B2 (en) 1999-12-03 2015-02-17 Nike, Inc. Game pod
US10282742B2 (en) 1999-12-03 2019-05-07 Nike, Inc. Interactive use and athletic performance monitoring and reward method, system, and computer program product

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JP2007152080A (en) * 2005-06-16 2007-06-21 Shinsedai Kk Input device, virtual experience method, and entertainment system
JP2010086367A (en) * 2008-10-01 2010-04-15 Sony Corp Positional information inputting device, positional information inputting method, program, information processing system, and electronic equipment

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10282742B2 (en) 1999-12-03 2019-05-07 Nike, Inc. Interactive use and athletic performance monitoring and reward method, system, and computer program product
US8956228B2 (en) 1999-12-03 2015-02-17 Nike, Inc. Game pod
US10304072B2 (en) 1999-12-03 2019-05-28 Nike, Inc. Interactive use and athletic performance monitoring and reward method, system, and computer program product
US7137711B1 (en) 2000-03-21 2006-11-21 Leonard Reiffel Multi-user retro reflector data input
US7000840B2 (en) 2000-05-03 2006-02-21 Leonard Reiffel Dual mode data imaging product
US7034803B1 (en) 2000-08-18 2006-04-25 Leonard Reiffel Cursor display privacy product
US7161581B2 (en) 2000-08-18 2007-01-09 Leonard Reiffel Annotating imaged data product
US6945460B2 (en) 2000-12-15 2005-09-20 Leonard Reiffel Imaged coded data source transducer product
EP2039403B1 (en) * 2002-10-30 2016-08-24 NIKE Innovate C.V. Clothes with concealable motion capture markers for computer games
EP2039403A2 (en) * 2002-10-30 2009-03-25 Nike International Ltd. Targets for use with interactive activity devices
US10238959B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2019-03-26 Nike, Inc. Interactive gaming apparel for interactive gaming
EP2163286A3 (en) * 2002-10-30 2011-06-29 Nike International Ltd. Clothes with tracking marks for computer games
US10058774B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2018-08-28 Nike, Inc. Sigils for use with apparel
US8206219B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2012-06-26 Nike, Inc. Interactive gaming apparel for interactive gaming
US9597598B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2017-03-21 Nike, Inc. Sigils for use with apparel
US9517406B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2016-12-13 Nike, Inc. Interactive gaming apparel for interactive gaming
US9162142B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2015-10-20 Nike, Inc. Sigils for use with apparel
EP2298423A3 (en) * 2002-10-30 2011-06-29 Nike International, Ltd. Clothes with tracking marks for computer games
JPWO2005003945A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2006-08-17 新世代株式会社 The information processing apparatus, an information processing system, the operation thereof, an information processing method, information processing program, and game system
JP5130504B2 (en) * 2003-07-02 2013-01-30 新世代株式会社 The information processing apparatus, information processing method, program, and storage medium
EP1501007A3 (en) * 2003-07-23 2006-05-31 Bose Corporation System and method for accepting a user control input
EP1698964A1 (en) * 2003-11-25 2006-09-06 Kenji Nishi Information input unit, storing unit, information input device, and information processing device
EP1698964A4 (en) * 2003-11-25 2010-03-31 Kenji Nishi Information input unit, storing unit, information input device, and information processing device
US7415352B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2008-08-19 Bose Corporation Displaying vehicle information

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN1451100A (en) 2003-10-22
CN1237354C (en) 2006-01-18
KR20020092393A (en) 2002-12-11
BR0017178A (en) 2003-01-14
EP1275017A4 (en) 2008-01-23
JP2003528382A (en) 2003-09-24
EP1275017A1 (en) 2003-01-15
AU4018900A (en) 2001-10-03

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