WO2001033988A1 - Online screen calibration and measuring method - Google Patents

Online screen calibration and measuring method Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2001033988A1
WO2001033988A1 PCT/US2000/029512 US0029512W WO0133988A1 WO 2001033988 A1 WO2001033988 A1 WO 2001033988A1 US 0029512 W US0029512 W US 0029512W WO 0133988 A1 WO0133988 A1 WO 0133988A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
screen
method
step
number
displayed
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2000/029512
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Daryl G. Powell
Lanier M. Davenport
Carol Espinosa
Original Assignee
International Gluv Corporation
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US43425199A priority Critical
Priority to US09/434,251 priority
Priority to US56731100A priority
Priority to US09/567,311 priority
Priority to US09/592,004 priority
Priority to US59200400A priority
Application filed by International Gluv Corporation filed Critical International Gluv Corporation
Publication of WO2001033988A1 publication Critical patent/WO2001033988A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/04Appliances for making gloves; Measuring devices for glove-making
    • A41D19/046Measuring devices for glove-making
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/103Detecting, measuring or recording devices for testing the shape, pattern, colour, size or movement of the body or parts thereof, for diagnostic purposes
    • A61B5/107Measuring physical dimensions, e.g. size of the entire body or parts thereof
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01BMEASURING LENGTH, THICKNESS OR SIMILAR LINEAR DIMENSIONS; MEASURING ANGLES; MEASURING AREAS; MEASURING IRREGULARITIES OF SURFACES OR CONTOURS
    • G01B11/00Measuring arrangements characterised by the use of optical means
    • G01B11/02Measuring arrangements characterised by the use of optical means for measuring length, width or thickness
    • G01B11/024Measuring arrangements characterised by the use of optical means for measuring length, width or thickness by means of diode-array scanning
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/68Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient
    • A61B5/6801Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient specially adapted to be attached to or worn on the body surface
    • A61B5/6813Specially adapted to be attached to a specific body part
    • A61B5/6825Hand

Abstract

An on-line method for measuring dimensions including using a computer screen (252). The measurement method features a calibration technique which provides for the display of an indicator (254) on the computer screen which is compared to an object (250), preferably a coin, which has known dimensions. By moving portions of an indicator to correspond to at least one known dimension of the object along at least one axis, the number of pixels between two portions of the indicator may be divided into the length of the known dimension to calculate a calibration rule. The calibration rule may be utilized to convert the number of pixels between two other locations on the screen into a length, such as may be utilized for the measuring of a human hand for fitting with a glove.

Description

ONLINE SCREEN CALIBRATION AND MEASURING METHOD REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of copending U.S. Patent Application

Nos. 09/434,251 filed November 5, 1999, 09/567,311 filed May 8, 2000, and

09/592,004 filed June 12, 2000.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to an on-line method for calibrating, measuring and

recording certain measurements utilizing a monitor, such as a computer screen, and an

on-line program to determine certain dimensions of a person's hand for fitting with and ordering a glove.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART

Regularly sized gloves do not typically accommodate a user having an

unconventionally sized hand, including a hand which is exceptionally well-developed due to long practice of an art, craft or sport, or a hand which is deformed. Known hand

measuring scales correlate hand size to ready made gloves sizes, and do not often

measure the dimensions necessary to provide a well-fitting glove or custom fitting

glove for the particular hand measured.

A number of devices have been developed for taking measurements of a

person's hand. By utilizing these measurements, one of a variety of glove sizes may be

selected. In this manner, a glove manufacturer can best provide a custom fit or a

correctly fitted glove of a known size for a particular customer. These prior art devices must be physically located at the same location as the potential customer in order to

measure that individual's hand measurements. Examples of these prior art devices

include Tepley, U.S. Pat. No. 4,897,924 and Mays, U.S. Pat. No. 5,170,570.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Consequently it is an object of the present invention to provide a calibration

and measurement method and system which does not require a mechanical measuring

apparatus.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for measuring

utilizing the Internet.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for obtaining

particular measurements of an individual's hand using an on-line visual aid for

obtaining an accurate glove size fit.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a calibration technique for

a computer's screen to assist in accurate measurement of an object, such as a hand.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide a method for

utilizing particular measurements of an individual's hand on-line using the Internet and

for recommending a particular glove size for that individual's hand, and for ordering

the glove.

Accordingly, the present invention provides a method of measuring, specifically hand measurement and glove size determination utilizing at least one

computer, and preferably connected to download a program through the Internet. A

screen view is provided which gives the customer the opportunity to measure the customer's hand. If the customer does not know the screen size of his or her particular

computer monitor, the program may display screens to assist the user in determining the particular screen size. The customer may then input the screen size into the

program and perform a screen calibration routine to assist in precise measurement

using the screen. The calibration routine may ensure that the user's computer screen

provides an accurate measuring device.

The screen calibration routine preferably comprises the customer placing an

object of known horizontal and vertical dimensions, such as a coin, printed image or

other object of know dimensions, proximate to the computer screen. The object may

be compared with indicators, such as pointers, lines or other image, such as an image

of a displayed coin. If the pointers, lines or image (collectively, hereinafter denoted

"indicators") do not correspond to the object, then the customer may adjust the

dimensions, or positions on the screen of the indicators to have the indicators

correspond with the object. This routine, if used, calibrates the screen to assist in the

accurate measurement of the individual ' s hand.

The individual may then select male or female and right or left hand. The

program will then preferably display a displayed hand for the appropriate sex and ask

the user if instructions are desired. A fmger measurement routine begins wherein the

user places the user's hand against the screen utilizing an indicator to fix a particular

portion of the user's hand relative to the display. Trajectory lines may be illustrated on

the screen which extend along displayed fingers and may be utilized to assist the user in matching their hand with a displayed hand. Beginning with each finger, a fmger length cap marker is displayed on the screen which may be adjusted to the ends of each

fmger. This procedure assists in measuring the length of each fmger.

Next, the location where the fingers meet between the fingers is measured.

This is referred to as V depth measurement. Trajectory lines on the screen may appear between the fingers and the user may move a visually displayed marker on the screen

such as V depth marker in order to locate the V depth: the juncture where two fingers

meet. This process may be repeated for each juncture. After determining the finger

length positions and the V depth positions, as well as palm length and width, the

program uses at least some of this information to select a standard size or existing glove or it may be used by a manufacturer to create a custom fitting glove. Utilizing

this glove size or measurements, the customer may order gloves and can provide

information including payment information, mailing address, and the like in order to

submit the order via Internet or otherwise.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The particular features and advantages of the invention as well as other objects

will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the

accompanying drawings in which:

Figs, la, lb, lc and Id comprise a composite flow chart diagram illustrating the

operation of the system and the method of measuring an individual's hand,

determining a glove size, and ordering a glove in accordance with the present

invention; Fig. 2 is a screen snapshot of the finger measurement page in accordance with

the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a screen snapshot of the V measurement page in accordance with the

principles of the present invention;

Fig. 4 is a screen snapshot of the width assessment page in accordance with the

principles of the present invention;

Fig. 5 is a front elevational view of a computer screen illustrating a user

beginning the process of calibration by comparing an object to an indicator on the

computer screen;

Fig. 6A is a screen snapshot of a first embodiment of a calibration method with

a coin illustrated in phantom;

Fig. 6B is a screen snapshot of a second embodiment of a calibration method with a coin illustrated in phantom;

Fig. 6C is a screen snapshot of a third embodiment of a calibration method with

a coin illustrated in phantom; and

Figure 7 is a flow chart diagram illustrating the preferred calibration method. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The hand measurement system and method of the invention is preferably

utilized to record critical dimensions of a hand for use in selecting an appropriate glove

size or in making custom-fitting gloves. The measurements are typically not related to traditional glove sizes but are typically related to dimensions of certain portions of the

hand which are necessary in making gloves which fit the hand properly. Persons in certain professions where gloves are needed, such as professional golfers, often find it

difficult or impossible to obtain a glove which fits the hand properly. Such persons

who make constant use of certain muscles of the hand which become especially well-

developed may also find it difficult to obtain regular gloves, such as dress gloves or

driving gloves, which are comfortable to wear. The system and method of the

invention is useful for measuring all shapes and sizes of hands for sizing custom- fitted

gloves.

Referring to Figs, la, lb, lc and Id, a flow chart diagram is presented illustrating the operation of the system and the method of measuring an individual's

hand, determining a glove size, and ordering a glove in accordance with the preferred

embodiment of the present invention. A potential customer will begin the process by

preferably logging onto the webpage of a glove selling enterprise at step 10.

Alternatively, a computer in a glove selling establishment, or elsewhere, may be used

independently of a network. Nevertheless, a customer will obtain access to the

program via a computer at step 10.

Although the customer may browse the webpage as indicated at 10 or otherwise

look at other features of the webpage, the potential customer may have the opportunity

to purchase a glove at 12. If the potential customer elects not to purchase a glove at

this time, the program may allow the potential customer to return to the webpage for

browsing at 14. If the potential customer elects to purchase a glove, the program

provides the potential customer with the opportunity to measure the customer's hand as indicated at 16. If the customer elects to not have his or her hand measured, the

program allows the customer to enter a particular glove desired or otherwise provide

measurements of his particular hand to the computer at box 18. If a particular glove is

requested by the user, the program may allow the user to enter ordering information at

418. If a particular set of hand measurements are known, the program may calculate a

particular glove size at 416 and then proceed into obtaining the ordering information

from the customer at 418.

If the customer elects to have his or her hand measured at 16, the program

needs to know the particular computer screen, or monitor resolution and size. If the

screen resolution and size is not known at 20, the computer may assist the user in

determining the resolution and screen size at 22. In order to determine the screen size

and resolution in the preferred embodiment, a set of instructions will appear in order to

assist the customer in navigating through the settings of his or her computer to

determine a particular screen size and resolution. In a Microsoft Windows (TM)

computer environment, the start button may be selected followed by selections for

settings and display which will provide the screen size and resolution for that particular

computer. Other environments may provide other methods of accessing the screen

properties. Common screen sizes include 15" and 17" monitors; common resolutions

are 640 x 480, 800 x 600 and 1024 x 768. It is also possible that other screen sizes and resolutions may also be utilized. The user may then select the screen size and

resolution at 24 and begin the screen calibration subprocess at 26. The screen calibration subprocess is illustrated at 26-36. The calibration

subprocess at step 26 shown in Fig. 1 A includes the step of printing at least one and

preferably two lines, a horizontal and a vertical line, on the user's printer at 28. The

printed lines will have a known length. With this printout, the customer may then

compare the printout to one or two similar lines displayed on the screen at 30.

Although the printed lines are a known length, the displayed line length may not be exactly known by the program at this time. The inputted screen size may assist in

providing an estimate of the number of pixels per inch, or twips displayed, however,

the monitor size as well as screen resolution will likely have a profound effect on the

number of twips displayed on the user's screen. The program will know the number of

twips displayed, but will not necessarily know the length of the displayed lines. As hereinafter noted, the preferred embodiment uses Microsoft Visual Basic and

Microsoft Visual Basic ActiveX.

At 32, the user determines whether or not the printed lines and the displayed

lines correspond. If the displayed lines and the printed lines do not correspond, the

user may utilize the vertical and horizontal controls on their monitor to adjust the

length of the lines appearing on the screen at 24. In the programming sense, the

lengthening or shortening of the displayed line will change the number of twips

displayed. Once the lines correspond, the screen calibration step is complete as

indicated at 36. The program will then know the number of twips which constitute a given measurement. This will allow the program to utilize the screen as a measuring

tool. Other screen calibration techniques may also be utilized.

Although the calibration routine may be performed on liquid crystal display

(LCD) screens, such as those commonly found on laptop-type computers, these screens

are typically pre-calibrated screens and no horizontal or vertical adjustment will be necessary, if even possible. LCD screens typically do not operate in the "projector"

style. They are generally precalibrated to a particular resolution.

One way to think of calibration process is to think of a projector and a screen.

The adjustment of the screen relative to the light source affects the image displayed on

the screen. Many monitors have cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) that display an image on

the monitor screen like a projector projecting an image on a screen. The use of

horizontal and vertical controls on the monitor to adjust the displayed images on the

monitor screen.

The preferred screen calibration techniques of the present invention are

illustrated in Figs. 5-7. Figure 5 illustrates a user beginning the screen calibration

process by comparing an object, preferably coin 250, to the screen 252 of a monitor

256. Three embodiments of indicators 254 are illustrated on the screen 252. Of

course, only one embodiment need be present to utilize the preferred screen calibration

technique.

Each of these embodiments has been found to satisfactorily function as an

indicator 254. Of course, other indicators 254 could also be utilized. The three indicators 254 illustrated are pointers 262, lines 260, and displayed image 264. Each

of these embodiments are illustrated in more detail in Figs. 6A-6C. The preferred

method of calibration is illustrated in flow chart form in Fig. 7.

Fig. 6A illustrates the preferred embodiment wherein pointers 262 function as

the indicators 254. Pointers 262 may be utilized to indicate at least one, and preferably

two or more dimensions (such as length and width) related to an object, such as coin

250 (shown in phantom). Calibrating both length and width has been found helpful as

most screen sizes employ a different number of pixels in the vertical and horizontal

directions. Although the pointers 262 are illustrated as being substantially along axes,

such as horizontal and vertical lines of the screen 252, the pointers 262 could also be

angled relative to lines of latitude and longitude along the screen 252.

The pointers 262 may, or may not, have arrow heads 288 to assist a user in

placing the pointers 262 proximate to a specific boundary of an object, such as the

periphery, or edge, of a coin 250. The individual pointers 262 are identified as 298-

304. The first and second pointers 298, 300 may be moved utilizing vertical

adjustments 290, 292 for the screen. The adjustment controls, such as vertical

adjustments are often found at the bottom portion of a monitor, below the screen.

However, the monitor manufacturer could locate these adjustments anywhere they

desired. Of course, a variety of other techniques known in the art could also be

utilized to move any of the pointers 262. A depression on vertical adjustment 290 moves at least one of first and second

pointers 298, 300 away from one another along a first axis 299. A mouse depression

on vertical adjustment 292 moves at least one of first and second pointers 298, 300

toward one another along the first axis 299.

By moving at least one of first or second pointers 298, 300, the user may

correspond the pointers 298, 300 to a portion of the object, or coin 250. For first and

second pointers 298, 300 in the preferred embodiment, the pointers will correspond to

the height of the coin 250. For other objects, other portions of the object may be

utilized in conjunction with the pointers 262. Of course, one of the pointers 298, 300

may be stationary, or both may move.

The third and fourth pointers 302, 304 may be utilized in a similar fashion as

the first and second pointers 298, 300. These pointers 302, 304 may be utilized to

determine the width of an object as shown in Fig. 6 A. Depressions on horizontal

adjustments 294, 296 may be utilized to move at least one of the pointers 302, 304

towards or away from one another as described above for the first and second pointers

298, 300 and horizontal adjustments 290, 292 except that movement occurs along

second axis 303 instead of first axis 299. Once again the pointers 302, 304 may be

moved to correspond with a particular location on an object such as the width.

A coin 250 is the preferred object to utilize with the calibration system and

method. Coins 250 are an object of known dimensions which most people have

readily available, such as in their pocket, in a container, or in a pocket book. Option selections 306 maybe utilized to select a particular coin 250, i.e., a quarter, a dime, a

nickel, etc. in the United States. Furthermore, coins 250 of other countries may also be

utilized. The software would only need to be programmed with the physical dimension

to be calibrated with the indicators 254. Other objects, such as a currency note (i.e., a

one dollar bill), ruler, or other objects of known dimensions may also be utilized with

the calibration method as taught herein. Since most coins are round, the user need not

worry about the orientation of the coin 250 relative to the screen 252 when conducting

the calibration process.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in Fig. 6B. Instead of

pointers 262, lines 260, are utilized to correspond to particular locations on the coin

250, or other object. First and second lines 308, 310 may be moved in a similar

fashion as the pointers 298, 300, with depressions on vertical adjustments 290, 292, or

in any other acceptable manner. The lines 308, 310 may be moved to correspond with

the height, or in this case, the diameter of the coin 250 along the vertical axis. Since

the diameter of a coin may be known and provided to the software running the

calibration routine, the coin may function as a calibration tool to perform the

calibration routine. The first and second lines 308, 310 are shown as being too close

together in Fig. 5B and would need to be moved outwardly, such as by depressing

vertical adjustment 290 to correspond the lines 308, 310 to the coin edge. Third and

fourth lines 312, 314 are illustrated as being too far from one another and would

preferably be moved toward one another with one or more depressions on horizontal adjustment 294. Vertical adjustment 296 could be utilized to move third and fourth

lines 312, 314 away from one another.

A further embodiment is illustrated in Fig. 6C. In this embodiment, a displayed

image 264 is utilized as the indicator 254. The displayed image 254 may be as simple

as a geometric shape, an outline of the object to be utilized as the calibration tool, such

as the coin 250, or it may by a "jpg" image of the object or other representation.

Additionally, although two sets of vertical and horizontal adjustments 290, 292 and

294, 296 are illustrated in Fig. 5C, it may be possible for some objects, such as round

objects or square displays, that only one set of adjustments (one to enlarge and another

to reduce) may suffice. Nevertheless, preferably vertical adjustments 290, 292 may be

utilized to increase (or decrease) the height of the displayed image 264, while vertical

adjustments 294, 296 may be utilized to increase, or decrease, the width of the

displayed image 264 to correspond with a calibration tool, such as coin 250. A

presently preferred displayed image is a square surrounding an image of a coin. The

square has been found helpful in lining up the image of the coin with an actual coin

since the sides of the square coincide with four points on the coin's circumference.

The method of calibration is illustrated in flow chart form in Fig. 7. At step

270, the user begins the screen calibration subroutine. This subroutine is preferably

substituted in Figs. 1A-1C for steps 26-36. Step 270 begins the process. At step 272,

the indicators 254, whether it be pointers 262, lines 260, a displayed image 264, or other indicators, are displayed. It is possible that a combination of indicator types may

be utilized as well.

After displaying the appropriate indicator(s), the user is preferably prompted at

step 274 to place the object, or calibration tool, such as coin 250, proximate to the

screen 252 such as is illustrated in Fig. 5. With the coin 250 placed proximate, or

even up against the screen 252, the user may then perform step 276 by comparing a

location, or dimension, such as the height of the coin 250 to the appropriate indicator,

such as pointers 298, 300. If the indicator(s), such as first and second pointers 298,

300 do not correspond, then the user may adjust the indicator(s) 254, such as through

mouse depressions on adjustments 290, 292.

Once the indicator(s) 254 corresponds with the coin 250, through comparison

at step 274 and a determination at step 276 after adjustments at step 278, if necessary,

then the indicator(s) 254 may be compared to the coin 250 at step 284 to determine if

the width of the indicator(s) 254 corresponds with the coin 250. A determination is

made at step 280. If the width of the indicator(s) 254 does not correspond to the coin

250, then the user may adjust the indicator(s) 254 at step 282, and then compare again

at step 284. The process may be repeated until the indicator(s) 254 corresponds with

the coin 250.

Once the indicator(s) 254 correspond to the coin 250, then the program may

update, or record, the position of the indicator(s) 254 based on the movement, if any,

of the indicator(s) 254 at step 286. Since the program knows the initial separation in terms of coordinates, pixels, or twips, of portions of the indicator 254 from other

portions (such as the number of twips between the lines 260, like first and second lines

308, 310, or the number of twips between the pointers 262, such as between

corresponding ends of first and second pointer 298, 300, etc....), the program may add

or subtract the number of twips moved during the calibration routine and assign a length to a number of pixels, a twips per inch value or a calibration rule which is

utilized to assign a length measurement to the screen measured value of a particular

object, such as a person's hand.

In the preferred calibration process, a length and a width of a particular object

are compared to different points of the indicator(s) 254. For the pointer-type indicator

262, first and second points may correspond to the tips of arrow heads 288 of the first

and second pointers 298, 300. The distance between the first pointer 298 and the

second pointer 300 along the first axis 299 when aligned with the object is the known

length along that dimension of the object. Accordingly, the number of twips may be

determined between the first and second pointers 298, 300. A calibration rule may be

calculated by dividing the number of twips between the first and second pointers 298,

300 by the known distance of the object. This process may then be repeated for the

second, and possibly subsequent, dimensions.

Once the calibration rule, or rules, are determined, then the measuring program

may relatively accurately measure length by determining the number of twips between

two markers, or locations, and multiplying by the inverse of the calibration rule. Alternatively, the number of twips could be divided by the calibration rule to arrive at

a length of measure.

If the second dimension to be measured is substantially perpendicular to the

first dimension, then vector components of the measured lengths may be utilized.

More specifically, an object of an unknown dimension is to be measured between two

markers. The markers are moved to correspond to the ends of the object. The position of the markers may be determined by the program. The distance between the markers

along the first axis may be determined as a first vector. The distance between the

markers along the second axis may then be determined as a second vector. Using the

pythagarean theorem, the square root of the square of the sum of the square of the first

vector and the square of the second vector is the distance between the two markers. Of

course, other geometric principles could be utilized to conduct relatively accurate

measurements. This will complete the calibration subroutine at step 287.

Next, the potential customer will preferably be asked whether or not the

measurement to be taken is of a male or a female hand as indicated at 38. This step

may not be required, but it has been found helpful to assist in accurately fitting gloves

due to differences between the hands of many men and women. Next, at 40 and 42,

the potential customer is asked whether or not to measure the right or left hand.

Depending on the particular hand and sex entered by the customer, at 44, the program

displays on the computer screen a hand opposite in configuration to the selected hand

to allow the customer's hand to correspond to the displayed hand (i.e., a displayed left hand will correspond to a customer's right hand). A displayed hand may be obtained

by taking a picture of an individual's hand with a digital camera and saving as a ".gif '

or" ".jpg" file or other type of file which may be displayed on the screen.

The right hand of a male person is illustrated in Fig. 2. A left hand of the

potential customer will correspond to this displayed right hand image or the screen. It

is anticipated the left hand would be the hand to be measured of the potential customer

in Fig. 2. Alternatively, a male's left hand or a female's right or left hand could be

displayed at this point in time. Alternatively, instructions could be provided before

providing the view of Fig. 2. If instructions are desired as represented at 46,

instructions may be provided as indicated at 48. Otherwise, the finger measurement

process may begin as illustrated in step 50.

An individual begins the hand measurement process of placing his or her hand

on the computer's monitor screen as provided as indicated at 52. A reference mark

such as indicator 94, illustrated in Fig. 2, may be displayed on the screen and may be

utilized by the user to position his or her hand relative to this fixed position on the

screen. Although the indicator 94 is illustrated at the juncture of the index and middle

finger, any appropriate reference mark relative to a person's hand could be utilized.

The program may display a reference mark by changing the color of selected

coordinates on the screen to create the mark. Additionally, a hand 220 may be

displayed on the screen to assist in proper hand placement. Beginning with one fmger, that finger will be compared in length with the length of a finger cap marker shown on

the screen at step 54.

The display of a fmger cap marker on the screen may be accomplished in a

variety of ways and through a variety of programming techniques. Recently, the use of

ActiveX files may be utilized in conjunction with a programming language, such as

VBScript, in order to download the program through the Internet onto a potential

customer's computer where the program will run. Using this technology or other programming techniques, a fmger cap marker may be programmed to be displayed by

selecting an X and a Y coordinate for two points and defining a line between those two

points. Once this line is defined, the line color may be changed by changing the color

attribute of the line. The first finger marker 98 is illustrated as having a first line 208

which moves substantially along a trajectory line 104 as will be explained in further

detail herein. At the ends of the first line are two bracket lines 210. The lines

illustrated have been chosen because they are relatively easy to display, however other

finger cap marker designs could also be utilized as desired.

Proceeding in this manner, the first fmger 96 may be compared to a first fmger

cap marker or curser 98 as indicated in Fig. lb at 54. The first fmger marker 98 is

shown as below the end of the first fmger 96 in the screen snapshot of Fig. 2. If a

person's first finger 96 exactly overlayed the displayed first finger 96 on the screen, the

marker 98 would need to be moved to correspond with the tip of the customer's fmger

for this digit. If the first fmger 96 does not correspond to the first finger cap marker 98 as

illustrated, the first finger cap marker 98 may be moved as shown at 62. It is also

possible that the speed of the movement of the marker 98 may be adjusted if selected

at 58. If the speed is selected to be adjusted at 58 the marker speed is adjusted at 60 by

activating the slower command button 100 or the faster command button 102, shown

in the display in Fig. 2. The first finger cap marker 98 may be moved by utilizing

mouse depressions on arrows 106 and 108. The measurement may be recorded in

pinky box 110.

A first finger trajectory line 104 is provided on the screen as illustrated on Fig.

2, and the first finger cap marker 98 moves substantially along the trajectory line 104.

The endpoints of the trajectory line 104 are programmed into the program, and a line

therebetween is defined whereby the program may determine any of the points along

the trajectory line 104.

The program receives the mouse depressions to effect movement of the cap

marker 98. In order to move the cap marker 98, the end points of the cap marker first

line 208 are preferably moved relative to the trajectory line 104. It is preferred that the

first line is centered on the trajectory line 104 which can be done utilizing an integer

function of the average of the X coordinates of the endpoints of the first line. This

midpoint of the first line 208 may then be made to correspond to a point on the

trajectory line 104. The bracket lines 210 have end points which may correspond to

the endpoints of the first line 208 and these bracket lines 210 may be moved the same incremental distance as the first line 208 so that all parts of the cap marker 98 move

the same distance for a given incremental change. The incremental movement may be

a scroll increment or a value assigned for each depression of the arrow keys 106, 108.

In the preferred embodiment, the cap marker 98 is moved upon instructions

through the input device, such as a mouse. Upon receiving this movement command,

the line color of the cap marker 98 is changed to correspond to the background colors.

Accordingly, the cap marker 98 appears to disappear. The incremental scroll amount

of the change in position is added to a point along the cap marker, such as the midpoint

of the first line, and the cap marker is redrawn through coloration at a new location

reflecting the change in scroll amount. The scroll amount can be changed by selecting

a new marker speed: a larger scroll amount will result in an apparently faster moving

line. It is likely that computer programmers skilled in the art will know a multitude of

other ways of moving the cap marker as well.

With the cap marker stationary, the program may determine the location of a

particular point such as the midpoint of the first line in order to provide a measurement

of the fmger length. Since the program knows the coordinates on the screen of the

marker and the reference mark as well as the twips per inch of the screen via the

calibration step, the computer may record relative fmger positions. The measuring of

the other fingers may be programmed in a manner similar to the programming of the

first fmger 96. Next, the user's ring finger 112 will be compared to a ring finger cap marker

114. The ring finger marker 114 is illustrated in the correct position relative to a fmger

112 in Fig. 2. If the ring fmger 112 does not correspond to the ring finger cap marker

114, the ring fmger cap marker 114 may be moved at step 62. It is also possible that

the speed of the movement of the marker 114 may be adjusted at step 58. If the speed

is desired to be adjusted at step 58 the marker speed is adjusted at step 60 by clicking

the slower command button 100 or the faster command button 102. A ring fmger

trajectory line 116 is provided on Fig. 2 such that the ring finger cap marker 114

moves substantially along the trajectory line 116. The ring finger cap marker 114 may

be moved by utilizing mouse depressions on movement arrows 118 and 120. The

measurement may be recorded in ring finger box 122.

Next, the user's middle finger 124 will be compared to a middle finger cap

marker 126. The middle fmger marker 126 is illustrated in the correct position relative

to a fmger 124 in Fig. 2. If the middle fmger 124 does not correspond to the middle

finger cap marker 126, the middle finger cap marker 126 may be moved at step 62. It

is also possible that the speed of the movement of the marker 126 may be adjusted at

step 58. If the speed is desired to be adjusted at step 58 the marker speed is adjusted at

step 60 by clicking the slower command button 100 or the faster command button 102.

A middle finger trajectory line 132 is provided on Fig. 2 such that the middle finger

cap marker 126 moves substantially along the trajectory line 132. The middle finger cap marker 126 may be moved by utilizing mouse depressions on arrow keys 128 and

130. The measurement may be recorded in middle finger box 134.

Next, the index or pointing fmger 136 will be compared to an index finger cap

marker 138. The index finger marker 138 is illustrated in the correct position relative

to a fmger 136 in Fig. 2. If the index finger 136 does not correspond to the index

fmger cap marker 138, the index finger cap marker 138 may be moved at step 62. It is

also possible that the speed of the movement of the marker 138 maybe adjusted at step

58. If the speed is desired to be adjusted at step 58 the marker speed is adjusted at step

60 by clicking the slower command button 100 or the faster command button 102. An

index fmger trajectory line 144 is provided on Fig. 2 such that the index fmger cap

marker 138 moves substantially along the trajectory line 144. The index finger cap

marker 138 may be moved by utilizing mouse depressions on movement arrows 140

and 142. The measurement may be recorded in index finger box 146.

Next, the user's thumb 148 will be compared to a thumb cap marker 150. The

term "fmger" is broad enough to encompass a "thumb." The thumb marker 150 is

illustrated in the correct position relative to the thumb 148 in Fig. 2. If the thumb 148

does not correspond to the thumb marker 150, the thumb cap marker 150 may be

moved at step 62. It is also possible that the speed of the movement of the marker 150

may be adjusted at step 58. If the speed is desired to be adjusted at step 58 the marker

speed is adjusted at step 60 by clicking the slower command button 100 or the faster

command button 102. A thumb trajectory line 156 is provided on Fig. 2 such that the thumb cap marker 150 moves substantially along the trajectory line 156. The thumb

cap marker 150 may be moved by utilizing mouse depressions on arrow keys 152 and

154. The measurement may be recorded in thumb box 158.

Of course, the order of measuring the fingers 96, 112, 124, 136 and 148 maybe

selected by the customer or otherwise provided. Moreover, it is to be understood that

the steps as noted above relate to the flow chart and are actually separate distinct steps. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the fmger length measurements of the fingers may

need to be made relative to another portion of the customer's hand other than the

reference mark 94. For instance, one measurement which is helpful in fitting gloves is

the length of the middle finger 124 as measured from the tip of the finger to the base of

the palm.

Trajectory line 214 and palm end marker 222 may be used in a similar manner

as trajectory lines 104, 116, 132, 144, and 156 and finger end cap markers 98, 114,

126, 138 and 150 to locate the base of a customer's palm. Palm marker 222 may be

adjusted similar to the adjustment of finger end markers 98, 114, 126, 138 and 150

using movement arrows 24, 226. When the palm marker 222 is aligned with the base

of a potential customer's palm, more information will be available to the glove

supplier in order to provide a better fitting glove. Although the technique illustrated to

locate the position of the customer's bottom of their palm is similar to the technique utilized to measure the location of the tips of the fingers, other techniques could also

be utilized for locating these positions. Fig. 2 also shows an option box 160. Within the option box 160 are the options

of choosing whether to measure the fingers 162: the procedure followed in steps 50

through 66. Alternatively, the hand measurement procedure 164 may be selected

which includes the steps 68 through 84. Furthermore, the width measurement

procedure 165 may be selected which includes the steps 300 through 322.

Additionally, the selection of whether to proceed at a slower rate 100 or a faster rate

102 is provided. The slower and faster buttons 100, 102 may be utilized to adjust the

speed of the marker provided at step 60. Other methods for adjusting the speed at step

60 may also be utilized.

Fig. 3 is a second screen snapshot of a displayed hand 220. The option box 160

may be provided with similar selections as are provided in Fig. 2. In this illustration,

fingers 96, 112, 124, 136 and 148 are illustrated. In the spaces between the fingers are

V's or joining portions, i.e., fmger junctures. Trajectory lines 170, 172, 174 and 176

may be utilized to locate the particular points known as V depths. The trajectory lines

170, 172, 174 and 176 may be programmed having preselected, fixed endpoints. The

V depth markers 178-182 are two lines which meet at a V. These lines each have two

endpoints, however, other markers could have other configurations. The point of the V

can be tied to the trajectory line utilizing simple equations and movement of the V can

be affected utilizing the scroll increments similar to the movement of the finger cap

markers. In the preferred embodiment, the reference indicator 94 is maintained at the V depth location between the index and middle fingers. Alternatively, this location

may have a V depth indicator similar to the other V depths.

To locate the V depths, the hand option 164 on the option box 160 may be

selected. Other methods may be utilized to begin the V depth measurement at step 68.

With the hand maintained on the screen or placed upon the screen with the indicator

94 appropriately placed as is illustrated by step 70, the consumer may compare the V

indicator between two fingers, such as the pinky and the ring fmger 96, 112 to

determine whether or not the V indicator 178 corresponds with the V depth of that

consumer's hand. If these V's do not correspond in step 74, the consumer may elect at

step 76 to adjust the speed of the movement by adjusting speed at step 78 using slower

or faster command buttons 100, 102 on the option box 160 or may simply adjust the

location of the V indicator at step 80 by using control buttons 184, 186, the slower or

faster command buttons being used depending on the amount of adjustment necessary.

The measurement of the V depth may be displayed in first box 188.

The V depth indicator 178 is not shown in the correct position in Fig. 3 for

properly measuring the V depth between the pinky and the ring fingers 96, 112. In this

illustration, the V depth indicator 178 should be moved with the control button 186 in

the downward direction until the point of the V intersects the point of the V between

fingers 96 and 112 similar to the position of the V depth indicator 180 between the

middle and index fingers 124, 126. Between the ring finger 112 and middle fmger 124 is located trajectory line

172. On trajectory line 172 is located the V depth indicator 180. In Fig. 3, the V depth

indicator 180 is located in the correct position relative to the middle finger 124 and

index fmger 136. This V depth indicator may be moved utilizing controls 190 and

192, and the measurement may be displayed in box 194.

Since the V depth between the index finger and the middle finger is the

presently preferred position of the reference marker 94, there is no V depth indicator

between these two fingers. It may be possible that a V depth indicator is desired at this

location and the trajectory line 174 may be utilized for this purpose. Additionally,

movement controls 196, 198 may be utilized to move a V depth indicator if it were

utilized. The third box 200 may be utilized to display the second V depth.

Between the index finger 136 and thumb 148 is located trajectory line 176. On

trajectory line 176 is located the V depth indicator 182. In Fig. 3, the V depth indicator

182 is located in the correct position relative to the index finger 136 and the thumb

148. This V depth indicator may be moved utilizing controls 202 and 204, and the

measurement may be displayed in box 206.

Once any particular V depth indicator is properly located relative to the

potential customer's hand, the next V indicator may be compared and/or adjusted at

step 82. Finally, the V depth process ends at step 84.

Illustrated in Fig. 4 are width markers 212 and 216 along a trajectory line 218.

The potential customer may utilize movement arrows 228 and 230 to adjust the first width marker 216 to correspond with a left exterior surface portion of the customer's

hand. The exterior surface portion may also be characterized as an edge or periphery

of the hand. The edge or periphery of the hand also includes any portion of a fmger

and/or wrist. Movement arrows 232 and 234 may be utilized to move the second

width marker 212 to correspond with another exterior surface portion of the customer's

hand. The distance between the first and second markers 212, 216 will then

substantially correspond to a width of the customer's hand which may be provided to

the glove provider and/or displayed in box 213. Furthermore, other widths, such as

the width of the wrist or finger could also be provided or any other measurement using

the methods taught herein.

Fig. Id illustrates the method of measuring the width beginning at step 400.

The potential customer preferably maintains his or her hand on the screen with the

indicator appropriately placed at step 402. Next, at least one width indicator is

compared with a location on the customer's hand at step 404. The customer then

views the screen to determine whether or not the width marker 212,216 corresponds to

an edge of the hand at step 406. If a width marker does correspond to the hand at step

406, then the process may be repeated for each particular width measured by the

program at step 413. If just one width is measured, then the width measurement

process ends at step 414. Otherwise, the width measurement process is repeated again

at step 404 as indicated. If the width marker does not correspond to a location on the hand at step 406,

then the width indicator may be adjusted at step 412. Of course, the width indicator

speed may be adjusted in a similar manner as the V indicator speed described above.

Specifically, if the width indicators is desired to be adjusted at step 408, it is adjusted

at step 410. The width indicator may be adjusted at a different speed at 412, if

necessary. The potential customer may continually compare the width indicator 412,

416 with a location on the customer's hand at step 404 until the width indicator 412,

416 corresponds to the portion on the hand and, each width which is measured may be

processed accordingly. Finally, the width measurement process may end at step 414.

At the end of the width measurement process at step 414, the program may

utilize some or all of these measurements, as well as possibly other measurements, to

determine a particular glove size or record the measurements for an existing glove or a

custom fitting glove in step 416. Next, an ordering screen will be presented to the

customer so that the customer may enter relevant information such as name, address,

credit card information, quantity, etc., at step 418. After entering the ordering

information, the customer may submit the order at step 420 to a server hosting the

webpage or otherwise submit the order to the glove merchandiser. At this point, the

program may return the customer to the webpage for further browsing at step 422 or

otherwise end the ordering process.

The program of the preferred embodiment has been written in the VBScript

language, i.e., Visual Basic, uses ActiveX controls, and may be utilized with the Microsoft Internet Explorer (TM) programs. At this date, the Netscape Navigator (TM)

Internet browser does not support ActiveX type applications, however, it is believed

that subsequent developments in the Netscape Navigator <TM) program will likely allow similar programs to be run utilizing this web navigation program as well. The

Explorer type programs support the ActiveX controls which are typically identifiable

by the ".ocx" at the end of the file names. These type programming controls have been

found effective at increasing the speed of some applications. Using this technology, a potential customer may download the hand measurement program from a server to the

local machine and have that hand measuring program stored on the potential

customer's computer for immediate use, as well as future use. The ActiveX controls

are particularly attractive in that they are portable computer language models that

support a variety of programming languages including C, Fox, and VB programming

languages. Nevertheless, this type of program could be run potentially on any type computer system through any language.

Numerous alternations of the structure herein disclosed will suggest themselves

to those skilled in the art. However, it is to be understood that the present disclosure

relates to the preferred embodiment of the invention which is for purposes of illustration only and not to be construed as a limitation of the invention. All such

modifications which do not depart from the spirit of the invention are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A method for obtaining dimensions of a human hand having a plurality of
fingers and a thumb utilizing a computer having a memory portion and linked
to a monitor, comprising the steps of:
energizing the computer;
determining a screen size and resolution of the monitor;
recording the screen size and resolution of the monitor in the memory portion of the computer;
displaying a reference mark on the screen of the monitor;
positioning the hand on the screen of the monitor relative to the reference mark;
displaying at least one displayed marker on the screen;
locating said at least one displayed marker on the screen at a first edge of the
human hand;
recording the position of said at least one displayed marker in the memory
portion of the computer; and
utilizing the recorded position of said at least one marker and the recorded
screen size and resolution to provide at least one measurement for use in sizing a glove.
2. The method of claim 1 further comprising the steps of: displaying at least one juncture marker on the screen;
positioning said at least one juncture marker on the screen at at least one of the
junctures formed between pairs of adjacent fingers; and
recording the position of said at least one juncture marker in the memory of the
computer.
3. The method of claim 1 further including the step of calibrating the screen after
selecting the screen size.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein the locating of the displayed marker at a first
edge of the hand is utilized to determine a width of the hand.
5. The method of claim 1 further including the step of ordering a glove utilizing
the recorded position of the markers.
6. The method of claim 1 further including the step of logging on to the Internet
prior to displaying the reference mark on the screen.
7. The method of claim 6 further including the step of sending the recorded
position of the markers to a remote location via the Internet.
8. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of displaying a trajectory
line on the screen along at least a location relative to the displayed mark
wherein the trajectory line extends through the displayed mark
9. The method of claim 8 wherein the at lest one displayed mark comprises a first
and second displayed mark; and further comprising the step of displaying the
displayed mark along said trajectory line.
10. The method of claim 9 further comprising the step of locating said second
displayed marker at a second edge of the human hand.
11. The method of claim 10 further comprising the step of determining the distance
represented between the first and second displayed numbers.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein the distance between the first and second
markers corresponds to a width.
13. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of selecting a right or a left
hand prior to displaying the reference mark on the screen.
14. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of selecting the sex of the human hand prior to displaying the reference mark on the screen.
15. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of displaying a model hand
in conjunction with the reference mark on the screen.
16. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of positioning markers on the screen at the ends of a plurality of fingers.
17. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of positioning markers on
the screen at a plurality of the junctures formed between pairs of adjacent
fingers.
18. A method for obtaining dimensions of a human hand having a plurality of fingers and a thumb utilizing a computer having a memory portion and linked to a computer screen comprising the steps of:
selecting a screen size of the computer screen;
recording the screen size on the memory portion of the computer;
calibrating the screen size; selecting a hand to be measured;
displaying a model hand and a reference mark on the screen based upon the
selected hand;
positioning the human hand on a surface of the computer screen by placing the
human hand at an appropriate location relative to the reference mark; displaying a plurality of displayed markers on the screen;
positioning displayed markers on the screen at edges of the hand; and
recording the position said displayed markers in the memory portion of the
computer.
19. The method of claim 18 wherein the positioning of the markers is performed by
utilizing an input device for the computer to move the markers relative to the human's hand.
20. The method of claim 18 further comprising the step of connecting with a
website, prior to selecting the screen size of the computer screen.
21. The method of claim 18 further comprising the step of calculating a glove size
based on the position of at least one of said markers.
22. The method of claim 21 further comprising the step of ordering a glove based
upon the recorded position of each of said markers and the recorded screen
size.
23. A method for obtaining dimensions of a human extremity utilizing a computer
having a memory portion and linked to a monitor, comprising steps of: energizing the computer;
displaying a reference mark on the screen of the monitor;
positioning the human extremity proximate to the screen of the monitor relative to the reference mark;
displaying at least one marker on the screen;
positioning the displayed marker on the screen at an edge of at least one portion
of the human extremity;
recording the position of said end marker in the memory portion of the
computer; and utilizing the recorded position of said end marker to provide measurements for
a covering for the extremity.
24. The method of claim 23 wherein the human extremity is a hand, and further
comprising the steps of determimng a screen size and resolution of the monitor
and utilizing the screen size and resolution to provide measurements for the
covering.
25. A method for calibrating a monitor for measuring, comprising the steps of:
a) placing a three dimensional object having a first known dimension proximate to an indicator displayed on a screen of the monitor, said
indicator having at least a first and a second point, said first point
movable relative to said second point;
b) comparing the object to the first and second points of the indicator;
c) corresponding the indicator to have the first and second points substantially coincide with the first known dimension of the object;
d) determining the number of twips between the first and second points
along a first axis; and
e) calculating a first calibration rule wherein the number of twips per unit
measurement is established by mathematically comparing the number of
twips obtained in step (d) to the first known dimension of the object.
26. The method of claim 25 wherein mathematically comparing the number of
twips obtained in step (d) to the first known dimension of the object comprises
dividing the number of twips obtained in step (d) by the first known dimension of the
object.
27. The method of claim 25 further comprising the steps of:
a) measuring a distance by providing two displayed locations on the screen;b)
moving at least one of said two displayed locations relative to the other of said
two displayed locations;
c) determining the number of twips between the first and second displayed
locations; and
d) comparing the number of number of twips obtained in step (c) to the first calibration rule to determine a length between the two locations.
28. The method of claim 27 wherein the moving of the two locations occurs
substantially in a direction parallel to said first axis.
29. The method of claim 27 further comprising a first vector wherein said first
length corresponds to a length component of said first vector.
30. The method of claim 25 wherein said second point is movable toward and away from said first point.
31. The method of claim 25 wherein the known dimension is a height of the object.
32. The method of claim 25 further comprising the steps of:
determining a screen size and a resolution of the monitor; and recording the screen size and resolution of the monitor in a memory portion of
a computer.
33. The method of claim 25 wherein the object is substantially circular.
34. The method of claim 25 wherein said object is a coin.
35. The method of claim 25 wherein said object further comprises a second known
dimension and wherein the indicator further comprises third and fourth points,
said third point movable relative to said fourth point, further comprising the
steps of: a) comparing the object to the third and fourth points of the indicator;
b) corresponding the indicator to have the third and fourth points
substantially coincide with the second known dimension of the object;
c) determining the number of twips between the third and fourth points along a second axis; and
d) calculating a second calibration rule wherein the number of twips per
unit measurement is established by mathematically comparing the number of twips obtained in step (c) to the second known dimension of
the object.
36. The method of claim 35 wherein mathematically comparing the number of
twips obtained in step (d) to the second known dimension of the object
comprises dividing the number of twips obtained in step (d) by the second
known dimension of the object.
37. The method of claim 36 further comprising the steps of:
a) measuring a distance by providing two displayed locations on the
screen;
b) moving at least one of said two displayed locations relative to the other
of said two displayed locations;
c) determining the number of twips between the first and second displayed
locations; and
d) multiplying the number of number of twips obtained in step (c) by the inverse of the second calibration rule to determine a second length
between the two locations.
38. The method of claim 37 wherein the moving of the two locations occurs
substantially in a direction parallel to said second axis.
39. The method of claim 37 further comprising a second vector wherein said
second length coπesponds to a length component of said second vector.
40. A method for calibrating a monitor for measuring, comprising the steps of:
a) placing a three dimensional object having first and second known
dimensions proximate to an indicator displayed on a screen of the
monitor, said indicator having at least first, second, third and fourth
points, said first point movable relative to said second point, said third point movable relative to said fourth point, and said first axis
substantially parallel to said second axis;
b) comparing the object to the first and second points of the indicator;
c) corresponding the first and second points of the indicator to
substantially coincide with the first known dimension of the object;
d) determining the number of twips between the first and second points
along a first axis;
e) calculating a first calibration rule wherein the number of twips per unit
measurement is established by mathematically comparing the number of
twips obtained in step (d) to the first known dimension of the object;
f) comparing the object to the third and fourth points of the indicator;
g) corresponding the third and fourth points of the indicator to
substantially coincide with the second known dimension of the object; h) determining the number of twips between the third and fourth points along a second axis; and
i) calculating a second calibration rule wherein the number of twips per
unit measurement is established by mathematically comparing the
number of twips obtained in step (h) to the second known dimension of
the object.
41. The method of claim 40 wherein mathematically comparing the number of
twips obtained in step (d) to the first known dimension of the object comprises
dividing the number of twips obtained in step (d) by the first known dimension
of the object, and mathematically comparing the number of twips obtained in
step (h) to the second known dimension of the object comprises dividing the
number of twips obtained in step (h) by the second known dimension of the
object.
42. The method of claim 41 further comprising the steps of:
a) measuring a distance by providing two displayed locations on the
screen;
b) moving at least one of said two displayed locations relative to the other of said two displayed locations;
c) determining the number of twips between the first and second displayed
locations along the first axis; d) determining the number of twips between the first and second displayed
locations along the second axis; e) dividing the number of number of twips obtained in step (c) by the the
first calibration rule to determine a length between the two locations
along the first axis to obtain a first vector;
f) dividing the number of number of twips obtained in step (d) by the
second calibration rule to determine a length between the two locations
along the second axis to obtain a second vector; and g) determining a length between the first and second locations by taking
the square root of the sum of the first vector squared and second vector
squared.
43. The method of claim 41 wherein the object is a coin.
44. The method of claim 42 wherein the two displayed locations are utilized to
measure a dimension of a human hand.
PCT/US2000/029512 1999-11-05 2000-10-26 Online screen calibration and measuring method WO2001033988A1 (en)

Priority Applications (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US43425199A true 1999-11-05 1999-11-05
US09/434,251 1999-11-05
US56731100A true 2000-05-08 2000-05-08
US09/567,311 2000-05-08
US59200400A true 2000-06-12 2000-06-12
US09/592,004 2000-06-12

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP20000973887 EP1235492A1 (en) 1999-11-05 2000-10-26 Online screen calibration and measuring method
CA 2389929 CA2389929A1 (en) 1999-11-05 2000-10-26 Online screen calibration and measuring method
JP2001536006A JP2003514133A (en) 1999-11-05 2000-10-26 Online screen calibration and measurement methods
AU12336/01A AU1233601A (en) 1999-11-05 2000-10-26 Online screen calibration and measuring method

Publications (1)

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CN103885583A (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-25 托比伊科技公司 Device And Method Of Hardware Calibration Of Eye Tracker

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US5539677A (en) * 1993-10-22 1996-07-23 Smith; Stephen M. Method and apparatus for measuring foot sizes
EP0932139A2 (en) * 1998-01-23 1999-07-28 GE Marquette Medical Services, Inc. System for and method of calibrating a computer monitor

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US4745472A (en) * 1981-03-30 1988-05-17 Applied Genetics International, Inc. Animal measuring system
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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2012094190A1 (en) * 2011-01-07 2012-07-12 3M Innovative Properties Company Application to measure display size
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CN103885583A (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-25 托比伊科技公司 Device And Method Of Hardware Calibration Of Eye Tracker
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CN103885583B (en) * 2012-12-21 2018-07-10 托比公司 An eye-tracking hardware calibration apparatus and method of

Also Published As

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JP2003514133A (en) 2003-04-15
AU1233601A (en) 2001-06-06
EP1235492A1 (en) 2002-09-04

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