WO2001015959A1 - Apparatus and method for electric power assisted steering - Google Patents

Apparatus and method for electric power assisted steering Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2001015959A1
WO2001015959A1 PCT/US2000/023960 US0023960W WO0115959A1 WO 2001015959 A1 WO2001015959 A1 WO 2001015959A1 US 0023960 W US0023960 W US 0023960W WO 0115959 A1 WO0115959 A1 WO 0115959A1
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WO
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
steering
pulley
mechanism
belt
driving
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2000/023960
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
William F. Feriend
Dennis C. Eckhardt
Suat A. Ozsoylu
David W. Graber
Original Assignee
Delphi Technologies, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62DMOTOR VEHICLES; TRAILERS
    • B62D5/00Power-assisted or power-driven steering
    • B62D5/04Power-assisted or power-driven steering electrical, e.g. using an electric servo-motor connected to, or forming part of, the steering gear
    • B62D5/0421Electric motor acting on or near steering gear
    • B62D5/0424Electric motor acting on or near steering gear the axes of motor and final driven element of steering gear, e.g. rack, being parallel
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62DMOTOR VEHICLES; TRAILERS
    • B62D5/00Power-assisted or power-driven steering
    • B62D5/04Power-assisted or power-driven steering electrical, e.g. using an electric servo-motor connected to, or forming part of, the steering gear
    • B62D5/043Power-assisted or power-driven steering electrical, e.g. using an electric servo-motor connected to, or forming part of, the steering gear characterised by clutch means between driving element, e.g. motor, and driven element, e.g. steering column or steering gear

Abstract

A steering system for use in a vehicle having an electric motor (38) for providing a driving force to a steering rack (30). The motor (38) uses a belt pulley system which will slip when a force exceeding a predetermined load value is encountered. The predetermined load value is determined by the belt tension which is necessary to drive the pulleys of the belt pulley system.

Description

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ELECTRIC POWER ASSISTED STEERING

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to electric assist steering systems for vehicles.

BACKGROUND

In order to improve the fuel efficiency of an automobile, the power steering pump which continuously circulates a hydraulic fluid is replaced by an electrical motor that is actuated in response to the manipulation of the steering system.

Accordingly, the vehicles engine is no longer providing a driving force to the power steering pump. This results in a lower overall load upon the engine which will improve fuel efficiency.

An electric motor is used to provide a steering assisting force in response to manipulation of the steering system. One such motor is a brushless DC motor which is mechanically coupled to the steering column in order to provide the assisting force.

However, when the steering system is subjected to sudden and large external forces that are not encountered under normal driving conditions, current electric assist steering systems may suffer from overstress. In addition, when the electric power assist system is not engaged, and these forces are encountered, the system provides no resistance to the force, and damage may occur to the system.

Such forces may be caused, for instance, by the vehicle experiencing sudden large force loads, caused by the vehicle hitting a large hole in the road or the curbside, or having the steering system hitting the system stop. In the case of the steering system hitting the system stop (i.e. the end limits of travel for the rack), this usually happens when a service mechanic turns the tire/wheel assembly by hand, which causes the system to travel faster than the system can do under operating conditions.

During such an event, a tie rod housing will make contact with a stop portion of the rack housing, and since the wheel is being rotated faster than the system, the resultant inertial force will be carried on through to the steering assist mechanism.

If the components of an electric assist steering system are not protected from these large, transient forces, then they must be designed to be stronger to withstand the forces. However, such stronger designs will add additional weight and costs to the system.

In addition, current electric assist steering systems utilize a mechanical linkage as a gear reduction between the electric assist motor and the steering rack. Such mechanical linkages are subject to objectionable noise and are less resistant to excessive shock forces to the system.

Accordingly, there is a need for an electric steering system which is capable of withstanding excessive shock forces.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A steering system for a vehicle having a steering wheel for manipulation by a vehicle operator, the steering wheel is coupled to a steering mechanism for transmitting a steering operation of the steering wheel to vary the angular configuration of a pair of wheels of said vehicle. A steering assist mechanism provides an assisting force to the steering mechanism, and the steering assist mechanism is activated in response to the steering operation of the steering wheel.

The system is provided with a load displacement system that is operatively coupled to the steering assist mechanism. The load displacement system allows transient loads of the steering mechanism to be displaced. DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 is an illustration of a steering system for a vehicle;

Figure 2 is a schematic representation of a steering assist mechanism, constructed in accordance with the present invention; Figure 3 is a view along the lines 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view of a steering assist mechanism constructed in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 5 is a graphical representation of slip as a function of load; and

Figure 6 is a graphical representation of the operating range of the electrically driven assist mechanism of the steering system depicted in Figures 1-5, versus preset tensioning range and size of external forces encountered by the system.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to Figures 1-4, a steering system 10 for use in a motor vehicle 12 (not shown) is illustrated. Steering system 10 allows the operator of motor vehicle 12 to control the direction of motor vehicle 12 through the manipulation of steering system 10.

A steering column 14 provides mechanical manipulation of the automobiles wheels in order to control the direction of motor vehicle 12. Steering column 14 includes a hand wheel 16. Hand wheel 16 is positioned so that a user can apply a rotational force to steering column 14. An upper steering column shaft 18 is secured to hand wheel 14 at one end and a universal joint 20 at the other. Universal joint 20 couples upper steering column shaft 18 to a lower steering column shaft 22. Lower steering column shaft 22 is secured to universal joint at one end and a gear housing 24 at the other. Gear housing 24 includes a pinion gear 26 (Figure 2). Pinion gear 26 of gear housing 24 is positioned to make contact with a matching toothed portion 28 of a rack 30. Pinion gear 26 has helical teeth that are meshingly engaged with straight-cut teeth of rack portion 28. The pinion gear in combination with the straight-cut gear teeth of the rack, form a rack and pinion gear set. The rack is coupled to the vehicle's steerable wheels with steering linkage in a known manner. Tie rods (only one shown) 32 are secured to rack 30 at one end and knuckles 34 (only one shown) at the other.

As a rotational force is applied to steering column 14, through the manipulation of hand wheel 16 or other applied force, the pinion gear of gear housing 24 is accordingly rotated. The movement of the pinion gear causes the movement of rack 30 in the direction of arrow 36, which in turn manipulates tie rods 32 and knuckles 34 in order to reposition wheels 36 (only one shown) of motor vehicle 12. Accordingly, when the steering wheel 12 is turned, the rack and pinion gear set converts the rotary motion of the steering wheel into the linear motion of the rack.

In order to assist the user-applied force to steering system, an electric motor 38 is energized to provide power assist to the movement of the rack so as to aid in the rotation of the vehicle steering wheel by the vehicle operator.

Electric motor 38 provides a torque force to a pulley 40 via a motor shaft 42. The rotation force of pulley 40 is transferred to a belt 44. Pulley 40 is constructed to have a pair of retaining walls 41 along the outer periphery of the driving surface of pulley 40. The retaining walls help to prevent belt 44 from slipping completely off pulley 40. Alternatively, pulley 40 can be configured to have no retaining walls.

Accordingly, and as a torque force is applied to belt 44, rack 24 is moved in one of the directions of arrows 36. Of course, the direction of movement of rack 30 corresponds to the rotational direction of pulley 40. Belt 44 has an outer surface 46 and an inner engagement surface 48. The configuration belt 44 and the position of motor 38 allows inner engagement surface 48 of belt 44 to wrap around and frictionally engage pulley 40 and pulley 62.

In an exemplary embodiment, belt 44 is non-positively driven by a friction engagement between pulley 40 and engagement surface 48. In an exemplary embodiment, belt 44 has a width within a range of 25-30 mm, preferably 27mm and an overall length of 15.25 inches or 390 mm. Of course, and in accordance with the present invention, the length and width of belt 44 may be greater than or less than the aforementioned values.

Engagement surface 48 and the corresponding engagement surface of pulley 40 is generally smooth in order to allow steering system 10 to accommodate excessive forces as will be discussed in more detail below.

In an exemplary embodiment, belt 44 is constructed out of neoprene rubber. Of course, and as applications may require, belt 44 may be constructed out of other materials, including, but not limited to rubber, or nylon, etc.

Electric motor 38 is actuated by a controller 52 which receives inputs from a torque sensor 54 and a rotational position sensor 56. Sensor 56 provides a steer angle signal to controller 52.

In addition, and as the rotor of motor 38 turns, rotor position signals of each phase are generated within motor 38 and inputted into controller 52 through a bus 58.

Controller 52 also receives an input in the form of a vehicle speed signal. Accordingly, and in response to the following inputs: vehicle velocity input; operator torque input (sensor 54); steering pinion gear angle (sensor 56); and rotor position signals (bus 58), controller 52 determines the desired motor phase currents and provides such currents through a bus 60.

Pulley 40 is rotated by drive shaft 42 of motor 38. A second pulley 62 is fixedly secured to a nut 64 of a ball screw device for converting the rotary force of belt 44 into a linear force. Pulleys 40 and 62 are constructed out of a lightweight material such as aluminum. This allows the overall mass of steering system to be reduced in order to improve manufacturing costs as well as vehicle fuel efficiency. In addition, pulley 62 also has a smooth engagement surface.

System 10 is configured so that the force required to drive the belt and pulley system in order to provide an assisting force to the steering system is much less than transient loads encountered by the system.

Thus, the friction engagement of engagement surface 48 and pulleys 40 and 62 will be overcome by a force sufficiently larger than the frictional engagement of surface 48 and pulleys 40 and 62.

Nut 64 has an inner surface 66 with teeth which are meshingly engaged with helically-cut teeth 68 of the ball screw device.

Accordingly, and as nut 64 is rotated, rack 30 is linearly actuated by the ball screw device.

Prior systems have used timing belts with a notched inner surface for fixedly engaging a complementary surface of the pulleys. These systems are incapable of providing a means for accommodating excessive forces as contemplated in accordance with the present invention as there will be no slippage between the belt and pulley system.

During vehicle operation, steering system 10 may be subject to large transient forces communicated thereto from external sources. Such forces may reach as high as 500%-600% of the normal working loads acting upon system 10. In particular, and when a vehicle is suspended so that its road wheels 36 are no longer making contact with the ground or any other surface, the road wheels may be easily pivoted about their steering axis by an individual such as a mechanic. This rotation of the wheels may cause the steering system to reach its stopping point at a speed much greater than a normal steering operation, such as manipulation of hand wheel 16 until the limit defined by the system stop is reached. Typically such an event is encountered while the vehicle is suspended for service and/or maintenance.

In order to accommodate these excessive forces, the tension of belt 44 is adjusted to a predetermined value, i.e., a preset tension, whereby the belt 44 will be frictionally driven by the rotation of pulley 40 and accordingly, drive pulley 62.

Normal working loads on the belt 44 may be, for example, approximately setting belt 44 with a tension of 200 newtons. Of course, and as applications may require, the necessary tension of belt 44 may be of a value lesser or greater than 200 newtons. Such a tension is necessary in order to facilitate the movement of pulley 62 and pulley 40 through the frictional engagement of the smooth surfaces of belt 44 and pulleys 40 and 62. In an exemplary embodiment, the presetting of the tension in belt 44 may be performed by presetting the tension in the belt to a predetermined percentage above the normal working loads acting upon the belt. For example, the tension of belt 44 may be set at two times the necessary load i.e. 400 newtons.

Referring in particular to Figure 6, the excessive forces encountered by the system are of a value that is much higher than the necessary preset tension, including the percentage over the preset tension of belt 44 that the belt is allowed to slip when the aforesaid forces exceed the predetermined value. This slippage is facilitated by the smoothness of the inner surface of belt 44 as well as the smoothness of pulleys 40 and 62. Accordingly, the deleterious effects of excessive forces on the system is lessened by allowing the forces to be diminished through this slippage of belt 44. Thus, the inertial forces of shock loads to the system are dispersed through the load displacement system of the present invention.

Referring back now to Figures 1-4, motor 38 is fixedly secured to an outer housing or rack housing 70 which is configured to surround rack 30 such that rack 30 may be slidably received within housing 70 to move in the directions indicated by arrows 36. In addition, the ball screw mechanism is also encased within outer casing 70 and a pulley belt housing 72.

Referring now to Figure 4, a pair of tie rod housings 74 are secured to the ends of rack 30. In addition, and in order to facilitate the steering of the vehicle's wheels, tie rods 32 are secured to tie rod housings 74. Tie rods housings 74 are configured to have a stop portion 76 which makes contact with a stop portion 78 of a rack housing 70 when the steering system is manipulated to a limit whereby one of the tie rod housings 74 makes contact with stop portion 78 of rack housing 70 (illustrated by the dashed lines in Figure 4). Of course, if the system is manipulated so that the tie rod housing 74, illustrated in phantom lines in Figure 4, moves away from the housing, the rack will move until the other tie rod housing makes contact with the other stop portion of the rack housing.

As discussed herein, and when the vehicle is suspended so that its road wheels are no longer making contact with a surface, the system is easily manipulated in a direction until one of the tie rod housings makes contact with the stop portion of the rack housing. Since this is achieved in such a manner that allows the rack to move at a speed much greater than being achieved by the steering system, the rack will move until the tie rod housing slams into the stop portion of the rack housing. Once this occurs, the inertial force of such a movement is carried on through to portions of the steering assist mechanism. For example, a service mechanic may rotate the road wheels of a vehicle in order to access a grease fitting, thereby causing the system to slam against its stop.

Accordingly, and if the system is not designed to withstand such an excessive force, the inertial force may cause damage to the system. For example, shaft 44 of motor 38 may snap due to the inertia of the slamming force generated by tie rod 74 slamming into housing 70. Since the outer peripheral surface of pulleys 40 and 62 is smooth, and the inner engagement surface 48 of belt 44 is also smooth, the torque forces, created by excessive forces encountered by the steering system and which may be transferred to shaft 42, are dissipated without damaging the system. This is due to the forces overcoming the frictional engagement between inner surface 48 and pulley 40. Thus, the torque forces about shaft 42 are dispersed through the slippage of belt 44 with respect to pulley 40.

In order to provide the necessary drive ratio for the steering system mechanism, pulley 62 is approximately three times the size of pulley 40. This allows pulley 40 to be driven by an electric motor with a smaller size and overall mass than would be required of a motor necessary to drive a pulley having a substantially similar diameter to pulley 62. Accordingly, and since the size of motor 38 is reduced according to the force necessary to drive pulley 40 and pulley 62, the overall mass of steering system 10 is reduced in addition to the electrical draw of motor 38. This provides an overall packaging advantage wherein the size of motor 38 in system 10 is conveniently packaged with a system that occupies less space. Of course, the size and ratios of pulleys 40 and 62 may vary.

Accordingly, it is anticipated that belt 44 is more likely to slip about pulley 40 as opposed to pulley 62 when the system encounters excessive forces. However, it is anticipated that in accordance with the present invention, belt 44 can be configured to slip along both surfaces of pulleys 40 and 62.

In addition, and as an alternative, steering system 10 can be configured to allow belt 44 to only slide with respect to pulley 40. Such a configuration may be obtained by providing a larger coefficient of friction between inner engagement surface 48 and the driving surface of pulley 62. This can be achieved by configuring pulley 62 to have a rougher surface as compared to the surface of pulley 40. It will be appreciated that the amount of slip is a function (usually nonlinear) of the load applied to the belt 44 as shown in Figure 5.

While the invention has been described with reference to a preferred embodiment, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the invention without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiment disclosed as the best mode contemplated for carrying out this invention, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims

1. A steering system for a vehicle, comprising: a) a steering wheel being positioned for manipulation by a vehicle operator; b) a steering mechanism for transmitting a steering operation of said steering wheel to vary the angular configuration of a pair of wheels of said vehicle; c) a steering assist mechanism for providing an assisting force to said steering mechanism, said steering assist mechanism being activated in response to said steering operation of said steering wheel; and d) a load displacement system being operatively coupled to said steering assist mechanism, said load displacement system allowing transient loads of said steering mechanism to be displaced.
2. A steering system as in claim 1, wherein said steering assist mechanism comprises: i) an electric motor for providing a rotational force to a first pulley having a driving surface; ii) a second pulley having a driving surface; iii) an actuating device being drivingly connected to said second pulley, said actuating device being configured, dimensioned and positioned to convert a rotational force of said second pulley into a linear force, said linear force manipulating said steering mechanism; and iv) a drive belt having an outer surface and an inner engagement surface, said inner engagement surface having a planar configuration, said drive belt being configured and dimensioned to frictionally engage said driving surfaces of said first pulley and said second pulley.
3. A steering mechanism as in claim 2, wherein said driving surfaces of said first pulley and said second pulley are smooth.
4. A steering mechanism as in claim 2, wherein said first pulley has a radius of curvature smaller than the radius of curvature of said second pulley.
5. A steering mechanism as in claim 2, wherein said actuating device is a ball-screw mechanism comprising: a nut having an inner threaded surface being configured and dimensioned to meshingly engage a threaded screw portion of said steering mechanism.
6. A steering system as in claim 5, wherein said actuating device is configured and dimensioned for movement between a range defined by a first position and a second position, said first and second positions defining limits of travel for said pair of wheels.
7. A steering mechanism as in claim 6, wherein said belt has a tension greater than a tension required for frictional driving of said second pulley by said belt and said first pulley.
8. A steering mechanism as in claim 2, wherein said belt has a tension greater than a tension required for frictional driving of said second pulley by said belt and said first pulley.
9. A steering mechanism as in claim 8, wherein said tension is overcome by transient loads to said steering system and said belt slips along the driving surface of said first pulley.
10. A steering system as in claim 1 , wherein said load displacement system is a belt configured and dimensioned to transfer a driving force from a first pulley to a second pulley, said first pulley being operatively connected to a motor and said second pulley being operatively connected to said steering assist mechanism.
11. A steering system as in claim 2, wherein said actuating device is configured and dimensioned for movement between a range defined by a first position and a second position, said first and second positions defining limits of travel for said pair of wheels.
12. A steering system for a vehicle, comprising: a) a steering wheel being positioned for rotation by a vehicle operator; b) a steering mechanism for varying the angular configuration of a pair of wheels of said vehicle by transmitting the rotational movement of said steering wheel to said steering mechanism, said steering mechanism varying the position of said pair of wheels in response to the rotation of said steering wheel; c) a steering assist mechanism for providing an assisting force to said steering mechanism, said steering assist mechanism being activated in response to the rotation of said steering wheel; d) an electric motor for providing a rotational force to a first pulley having a driving surface; e) a second pulley having a driving surface; f) an actuating device being drivingly connected to said second pulley, said actuating device being configured, dimensioned and positioned to convert a rotational force of said second pulley into a linear force, said linear force manipulating said steering mechanism; and g) a drive belt having an outer surface and an inner engagement surface, said inner engagement surface having a planar configuration, said drive belt being configured and dimensioned to frictionally engage said driving surfaces of said first pulley and said second pulley, and said driving belt having a preset tension whereby said preset tension of said driving belt is overcome by excessive forces encountered by said steering system.
13. A steering system as in claim 12, wherein said preset tension is less than or equal to 200 newtons.
14. A steering system as in claim 12, wherein said belt, said first pulley and said second pulley provide a load displacement system allowing transient loads of said steering system to be displaced.
15. A method of steering a vehicle, comprising: a) rotating a steering wheel being positioned for rotation by a vehicle operator; b) varying the angular configuration of a pair of wheels of said vehicle by transmitting the rotational movement of said steering wheel to a steering mechanism, said steering mechanism varying the position of said pair of wheels in response to the rotation of said steering wheel; c) providing an assisting force to said steering mechanism by a steering assist mechanism, said steering assist mechanism being activated in response to the rotation of said steering wheel; d) providing a rotational force to a first pulley having a driving surface, said first pulley frictionally engaging a drive belt for driving second pulley having a driving surface; f) driving an actuating device being drivingly connected to said second pulley, said actuating device being configured, dimensioned and positioned to convert a rotational force of said second pulley into a linear force, said linear force manipulating said steering mechanism; and g) positioning and tensioning said drive belt to frictionally engage said driving surfaces of said first pulley and said second pulley and said driving belt having a preset tension, whereby said preset tension of said driving belt is overcome by excessive forces encountered by said steering system.
16. A steering mechanism as in claim 3, wherein said first pulley and said second pulley are aluminum.
17. A steering mechanism as in claim 1, wherein said drive belt is constructed out of neoprene rubber.
18. A steering mechanism as in claim 2, wherein said drive belt is constructed out of neoprene rubber.
19. A steering mechanism as in claim 2, wherein said electric motor is fixedly secured to a housing of said steering mechanism, said housing being configured and dimensioned to slidably receive a rack of said steering mechanism, said rack being configured and dimensioned to travel within a range defined by a stopping portion of said rack and a stopping portion of said housing.
PCT/US2000/023960 1999-09-01 2000-08-31 Apparatus and method for electric power assisted steering WO2001015959A1 (en)

Priority Applications (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15196699 true 1999-09-01 1999-09-01
US60/151,966 1999-09-01
US15979799 true 1999-10-15 1999-10-15
US60/159,797 1999-10-15
US65086900 true 2000-08-30 2000-08-30
US09/650,869 2000-08-30

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1266817A2 (en) * 2001-06-15 2002-12-18 NSK Ltd., Electric power steering apparatus
FR2835230A1 (en) * 2002-01-29 2003-08-01 Koyo Seiko Co Electrical power assisted steering for motor vehicle has electric motor and reduction gear with belt drive to rack and pinion
WO2004020868A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-11 Trw Automotive U.S. Llc Belt tensioner for electric power steering unit
US6938722B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2005-09-06 Gates Unitta Asia Company Electric power steering apparatus
EP1621444A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2006-02-01 NSK Ltd. Belt speed reducer for electric power steering device and electric power steering device
US7591204B2 (en) 2003-05-06 2009-09-22 Nsk Ltd. Belt speed reducing apparatus for electric power steering apparatus and electric power steering apparatus
DE112004000149B4 (en) * 2003-01-16 2018-01-04 Trw Automotive Gmbh Steering assist drive

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US4223254A (en) * 1976-09-23 1980-09-16 Cam Gears Limited Power assisted gear systems
US4686433A (en) * 1984-11-02 1987-08-11 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Motor-driven power booster
US4825972A (en) * 1986-02-25 1989-05-02 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Steering system for vehicles
US5732791A (en) * 1995-11-30 1998-03-31 Trw Inc. Steering apparatus

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US4223254A (en) * 1976-09-23 1980-09-16 Cam Gears Limited Power assisted gear systems
US4686433A (en) * 1984-11-02 1987-08-11 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Motor-driven power booster
US4825972A (en) * 1986-02-25 1989-05-02 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Steering system for vehicles
US5732791A (en) * 1995-11-30 1998-03-31 Trw Inc. Steering apparatus

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6860360B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2005-03-01 Nsk Ltd. Electric power steering apparatus
EP1266817A3 (en) * 2001-06-15 2003-02-26 NSK Ltd., Electric power steering apparatus
EP1266817A2 (en) * 2001-06-15 2002-12-18 NSK Ltd., Electric power steering apparatus
US6662897B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2003-12-16 Nsk Ltd. Electric power steering apparatus
US6915874B2 (en) 2001-06-15 2005-07-12 Nsk Ltd. Electric power steering apparatus
US7490696B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2009-02-17 Jtekt Corporation Electric power steering apparatus
US7360624B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2008-04-22 Jtekt Corporation Electric power steering apparatus
US6938722B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2005-09-06 Gates Unitta Asia Company Electric power steering apparatus
DE10304189B4 (en) * 2002-01-29 2013-09-12 Gates Unitta Asia Co. Electric power steering apparatus
FR2835230A1 (en) * 2002-01-29 2003-08-01 Koyo Seiko Co Electrical power assisted steering for motor vehicle has electric motor and reduction gear with belt drive to rack and pinion
US7191866B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2007-03-20 Koyo Seiko Co., Ltd. Electric power steering apparatus
US7237647B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2007-07-03 Jtekt Corporation Electric power steering apparatus
US7413052B2 (en) 2002-01-29 2008-08-19 Jtekt Corporation Electric power steering apparatus
US6960145B2 (en) 2002-08-30 2005-11-01 Trw, Inc. Belt tensioner for electric power steering unit
WO2004020868A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-11 Trw Automotive U.S. Llc Belt tensioner for electric power steering unit
DE112004000149B4 (en) * 2003-01-16 2018-01-04 Trw Automotive Gmbh Steering assist drive
US7591204B2 (en) 2003-05-06 2009-09-22 Nsk Ltd. Belt speed reducing apparatus for electric power steering apparatus and electric power steering apparatus
EP1621444A4 (en) * 2003-05-06 2007-11-07 Nsk Ltd Belt speed reducer for electric power steering device and electric power steering device
EP1621444A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2006-02-01 NSK Ltd. Belt speed reducer for electric power steering device and electric power steering device

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