WO2000070779A1 - Combined-use assembly of mobile telephone and audio - Google Patents

Combined-use assembly of mobile telephone and audio

Info

Publication number
WO2000070779A1
WO2000070779A1 PCT/KR2000/000343 KR0000343W WO0070779A1 WO 2000070779 A1 WO2000070779 A1 WO 2000070779A1 KR 0000343 W KR0000343 W KR 0000343W WO 0070779 A1 WO0070779 A1 WO 0070779A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
call
audio
mobile
telephone
apparatus
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/KR2000/000343
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Ki-Chang Lee
Original Assignee
Lee Ki Chang
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/60Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges including speech amplifiers
    • H04M1/6033Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges including speech amplifiers for providing handsfree use or a loudspeaker mode in telephone sets
    • H04M1/6041Portable telephones adapted for handsfree use
    • H04M1/6058Portable telephones adapted for handsfree use involving the use of a headset accessory device connected to the portable telephone
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B1/00Details of transmission systems, not covered by a single one of groups H04B3/00 - H04B13/00; Details of transmission systems not characterised by the medium used for transmission
    • H04B1/06Receivers
    • H04B1/16Circuits
    • H04B1/20Circuits for coupling gramophone pick-up, recorder output, or microphone to receiver, e.g. for Hi-Fi systems or audio/video combinations
    • H04B1/207Circuits for coupling gramophone pick-up, recorder output, or microphone to receiver, e.g. for Hi-Fi systems or audio/video combinations with an audio or audio/video bus for signal distribution
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B1/00Details of transmission systems, not covered by a single one of groups H04B3/00 - H04B13/00; Details of transmission systems not characterised by the medium used for transmission
    • H04B1/38Transceivers, i.e. devices in which transmitter and receiver form a structural unit and in which at least one part is used for functions of transmitting and receiving
    • H04B1/3827Portable transceivers
    • H04B1/3877Arrangements for enabling portable transceivers to be used in a fixed position, e.g. cradles or boosters
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M19/00Current supply arrangements for telephone systems
    • H04M19/02Current supply arrangements for telephone systems providing ringing current or supervisory tones, e.g. dialling tone, busy tone
    • H04M19/04Current supply arrangements for telephone systems providing ringing current or supervisory tones, e.g. dialling tone, busy tone ringing-current generated at substation
    • H04M19/041Encoding the ringing signal, i.e. providing distinctive or selective ringing capability
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality
    • H04M1/72558With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality for playing back music files
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W76/00Connection management
    • H04W76/10Connection setup
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices

Abstract

A stereo hands-free earphone-microphone phoneset assembly and control electronics for the simultaneous use of a mobile telephone and audio apparatus by the same phoneset. A manual version article requires the user to recognize the incoming call physically by means of vibration, flashing, or beeper sound and to flip the PHONE/AUDIO selection switch and TALK/END switch. A semi-automatic version provides alert sound tone to earphones to easily inform of incoming calls for manual change-over of two switches. An automatic version performs electronic automatic change-over between mobile telephone and audio apparatus by the use of an incoming call sensor signal as well as sending an alert tone to earphones. The call sensor can be either one of an RF, optical, sound sensor or direct connector signal. Additionally, the stereo hands-free phoneset is inserted to and the automatic version controller is embedded inside a mobile telephone terminal unit, which has PHONESET jack and an EXTERNAL AUDIO jack outside of its housing. This enables very comfortable use of both mobile communication and accompanying audio listening without any physical operation.

Description

COMBINED-USE ASSEMBLY OF MOBILE TELEPHONE AND AUDIO

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to a dual purpose phoneset(microphone plus speaker) assembly for the combined use of mobile telephone and audio apparatus, which combines an audio stereo earphones or headphones function and a mobile telephone hands-free phoneset(earphone plus microphone) function and can be selectively used either for telephones such as a mobile telephone, cordless telephone, walkie-talkie and other regular telephones, etc. or for audio apparatus such as a walkman, CD player, cassette recorder, MP3 player, FM/AM radio, and the like.

BACKGROUND ART

Most audio apparatus such as cassette recorders, CD players, MP3 players, walkman, portable FM/AM radio receivers, handy televisions, computer sound cards, etc. are very frequently used for daily life, and employ a stereo earphone or headphone unit. Also, mobile telephones such as cellulars, PCSs, IMT-2000s and radio sets such as walkie-talkies, cordless telephones, wireless transceivers, CB radios, etc. are popularly used nowadays and very frequently employ a hands-free phoneset composed of an earphone and a microphone to protect the head from being exposed to radio frequency emission as well as facilitating control of the mobile telephone or radio set. Sometimes, people carry both an audio apparatus for their entertainment and a mobile telephone for communication. When it comes to this situation, there are two inconveniences in having two kinds of phonesets. That is, taking off the audio stereo earphones and wearing the hands-free mobile telephone phoneset to take a phone call or to make a call. It is the same case at home when receiving a telephone call while enjoying the audio apparatus.

DISCLOSURE OF INVENTION

This invention removes the two-fold inconvenience of purchasing/keeping and the operational complexities of using separate and different phonesets for both a mobile telephone and audio apparatus. This invention uses the same phoneset for dual usage by combining two kinds of phonesets in one unit. It includes a PHONE/AUDIO selection switch(manual change-over version only), a TALK/END button, an optional VOLUME control, plugs for audio apparatus and mobile telephone. In addition, a call sensing circuitry is employed to catch a call ring signal which could be easily missed aurally while listening loud music. The call sensor detects either responding radio frequency signals, or call indication signals from the data interface connector, or a flashing lamp indication from the mobile telephone optically or a call alarm sound audibly and stops the music and sounds a beeping tone to the earphones or headphones.

Thus, using this item, the user does not need to take off the audio earphones or headphones and to put on a hands-free phoneset to take a phone call or vice versa, and can handle the change-over of the two pieces of equipments (apparatus) instantaneously, manually or automatically, with ease. Additionally, the person who possesses both apparatus does not need to purchase two phonesets and carry them around.

This invention also proposes a mobile telephone terminal which embeds an automatic change-over controller circuit inside and an EXTERNAL AUDIO jack on the outside. In this case, the equipment allows a person to hear a neighboring audio apparatus and provides an automatic PHONE/AUDIO change-over function.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 depicts the shape of the application of the present invention, where the invented article is actually used together with a mobile telephone and a kind of audio apparatus.

FIG. 2 shows the shapes of the invented article.

FIG. 3 is a circuit diagram of the first embodiment, a simplified type(call it a non- sensing type) of the present invention of which the changeover of the mobile telephone and audio apparatus is initiated by the operator's physical perception of an incoming call.

FIG. 4 is a circuit diagram of the second embodiment, an advanced type(call it a sensing type) of the present invention which detects an incoming call electronically, stops the music from the audio apparatus in use and gives the user a beeper tone in the earphones or speakers for the changeover of the mobile telephone and audio apparatus.

FIG. 5 is a diagram of the third embodiment, an automated change-over version of the circuit implemented in FIG. 4.

The four figures of FIG. 6, FIG. 7, FIG. 8 and FIG. 9 are examples of the call sensor unit circuit diagram or external shape which is used for the second embodiment, a call sensing, advanced type article of FIG. 4 or automatic change-over version of FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 is an RF sensing unit circuit diagram which detects an incoming call by sensing radio frequency waves generated soon after an incoming call as a response to the call.

FIG. 7 is an optical sensing unit circuit diagram which optically detects the flashing or lighting of the incoming call indicator lamp(LED).

FIG. 8 is an another sensor shape which uses the incoming call contact of the mobile telephone data connector directly. FIG. 9 is a ring sound sensing unit circuit diagram which detects the mobile telephone incoming call alarm ring sound.

FIG. 10 is an example of a mobile telephone terminal equipment's housing having an "EXTERNAL AUDIO" jack an outside of the housing and automatic change-over circuitry inside to easily listen to an adjacent audio apparatus by the same hands-free stereo earphones put into the mobile telephone EARPHONE jack.

FIG. 11 is a detailed internal diagram of an automatic phone/audio change-over circuit implemented in FIG. 10.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

This invention intends to make a common phoneset by combining the conventional stereo earphones or headphone for an audio apparatus and a hands-free ear-microphone for mobile telephone. It includes a PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2 and TALK END switch SW3 on the controller 1 or 1-1, and when receiving a mobile telephone call while listening to an audio apparatus such as a radio, CD player or cassette recorder, the user can easily receive the phone call using the same phoneset by moving the PHONE/ AUDIO selection switch SW2 toward the PHONE position and pushing the TALK/END button switch SW3 once. As the mobile telephone call is finished, the user just needs to move the PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2 toward the AUDIO position to the audio again. This process makes very convenient change-over of the two apparatus and does not require two kinds of phonesets to carry and use alternately.

The detailed descriptions of the attached drawings are as follows; FIG. 1 shows the overall application of a manual version of the invented item, where the controller 1 is equipped with regular stereo earphones or headphones 4 and a hands-free microphone 5 and is connected to a mobile telephone 2 and to an audio apparatus 3 through plugs P2 and PI respectively. The controller 1 has, on the housing, a PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2, a TALK/END button switch SW3, an optional VOLUME control 6 and a call indicator LED1 and LED2. It also has, through electric cords, a plug PI for the connection to an audio apparatus, a plug P2 for the connection to a mobile telephone or a radio set and, through the plug P2, also has an incoming call sensor 7 or 7-1. Some parts in the drawing such as LED1, LED2 or SW2 can be omitted in a simplified version or automated version of the invented item. The actual operation is as follows; When a mobile phone call comes in while listening to music from the audio apparatus 3, the incoming call sensor 7 or 7-1 detects the phone call and generates a beeping sound as an audible alarm signal and sends it to the earphones 4 and also flashes the call indicators LED1 and LED2 alternately as a visual alarm. Thus, the user becomes aware of the incoming phone call and just pushes the PHONE/ AUDIO selection swtch SW2 to the PHONE position and pushes the TALK/END button switch SW3 once. Now the user is ready to take a phone call. Once the user takes the call, the beeper tone alarm and the flashing of LED's stops and the earphones 4 and the microphone 5 will be connected to the mobile telephone electronically.

When it comes to finishing the call, the user only needs to push the PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2 toward the AUDIO position (pushing the TALK/END button switch SW3 is optional at this time and it is only necessary for ending the mobile call immediately). This enables one to listen to music from the audio apparatus. In this way, the present invention works as a dual-purpose stereo hands-free phoneset assembly for simultaneous use as a mobile telephone and audio apparatus.

FIG. 2 shows the shape of the controller 1 that is equipped with stereo earphones 4 and hands-free microphone 5 and controls every function. This controller 1 is an incoming call non- sensing type controller and the controller 1-1 in FIG. 1 is an incoming call sensing type controller. Here, the item 7 is an actual sensor that detects the incoming call signal from the mobile telephone 2 either electronically by radio wave, optically by LED, electrically by connection to an interface connector or audibly by call beeper sound, and is connected to the controller 1-1 through the mobile telephone plug P2 and the attached cord. The audio apparatus 3 is connected to the controller 1 or 1-1 through the audio plug PI.

FIG. 3 is a circuit diagram of a controller 1, a simplified version, an incoming call non-sensing type which does not sense the mobile telephone incoming calls at all. In the circuit, the PHONE/ AUDIO selection switch SW2 connects selectively the two earphones 4 from the mobile telephone to the audio apparatus and vice versa through two volume controls VR1 and VR2. The TALK END switch SW3 is provided to short the ground and microphone terminal instantly so that the mobile telephone terminal is enabled or disabled to communicate with the third party. The volume control is an optional device to control the level of the phone or audio apparatus. In this version, the user should recognize the incoming telephone calls physically by himself or herself either by means of audible alarms, vibrations or visual alarms.

FIG. 4 is an example of a circuit diagram of a controller 1-1, an advanced version, an incoming call sensing type which senses the mobile telephone incoming calls. The controller 1-1 cuts off the music from the audio apparatus, generating a beeping tone signal and sending it to the earphones or headphones to alert the user that a call has come. The detailed operational descriptions of the circuit diagram are as follows; The circuit composed of IC1, IC2, Rl, R2 and C2 is a digital pulse oscillator which generates 2 to 3 rectangular waves per second. Since the output of IC2 is fed back by C2, Rl and R2 to the inputs of IC1 and IC2 respectively, the rectangular oscillation continues as long as the upper input of IC1 goes to HIGH. The output of IC2 is connected to the input of inverter IC3. Because the outputs of IC2 and IC3 are all times of opposite polarity, LED1 and LED2 flashes alternately though R3 and R4, the current limiting resistors. And also the inverters IC5, IC6 and NAND gate IC7 compose another feed back oscillator whose frequency is determined by the value of the capacitor C4. In this case, the frequency is adjusted approximately to a 1 to 2 KHz audio tone. Incidentally, to the upper input of IC7 come the rectangular waves generated by the IC1 and IC2. Therefore, the tone signal of 1 to 2 KHz generated by IC5, IC6, IC7 and C4 is heard intermittently at the low rate of the frequency decided by IC1, IC2, Rl, R2 and C2.

The four integrated circuit devices IC9, IC10, IC11 and IC12 are all 'transmission gates' or 'analog switches' which directly connect input terminal signals to the output terminals when the control voltage is HIGH, while the inputs and corresponding outputs are isolated at LOW control voltage. PI is a plug connecting to the audio apparatus jack and P2 is a plug connecting to a hands-free ear-microphone jack in the mobile telephone unit. P3 is a plug connecting to a jack from the incoming call sensor. Switch SW2 is a selection switch which connects the ear-microphone set 4 selectively either to the audio apparatus or to the mobile telephone. Jl is a connecting jack which accepts the earphone set 4 and microphone 5. Switch SW3 is TALK/END button switch to initiate the mobile telephone communication, or to end the communication promptly. The switch SW1 is the power switch which cuts off the DC battery power when not in use. Thus, in order to operate this system, the user connects the hands-free ear- microphone to jack Jl, plug the PI and P2 to the audio apparatus and mobile telephone jacks respectively and turns on the switch SW1. When there is no phone call, the circuit operations are as follows;

If there is no mobile telephone call, the user must use the audio apparatus 3 by positioning the PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2 to the AUDIO position, to the lower side of the switch schematic. The wire coming from the audio plug PI is composed of three strands, that is left audio(L), right audio(R) and ground(G). The L and R audio signal is applied to the inputs of analog switch IC11 and IC12. At this moment, the control voltage of IC11 and IC12 must be HIGH because the sensor 7 does not provide any HIGH signal on the CALL terminal and thus no input trigger signal of the mono-stable (one-shot) multi -vibrator IC13 causes LOW Q output of IC13. This LOW is inverted by IC8 to HIGH voltage, which activates the analog switch ICU and IC12 and enables the inputs to conduct (jump) to outputs. Therefore, the L and R audio is passed through IC11 and IC12, the lower contacts of PHONE/ AUDIO selection switch SW2, and the L and R terminals of jack Jl and is finally applied to the stereo earphone set 4 inserted to the jack Jl. In absence of a call signal on the sensor plug P3, the Q output of IC13 is LOW and is directly applied to the control inputs of IC9 and IC10. With LOW control input, the two analog switches IC9 and IC10 are cut off and the 1 to 2KHz beeping audio tone connected to the inputs of IC9 and IC10 can not go through to earphones 4. Since this LOW call signal output from the Q terminal of IC13 is also applied to the input of IC4 as well as the upper input of IC1, the rectangular oscillator composed of IC1 and IC2 stops oscillation.

On the other hand, once the mobile telephone call comes in, the sensor 7 is to send a HIGH trigger signal through the plug P3 CALL terminal and capacitor C8 to the input of mono-stable multi -vibrator IC13, which generates a HIGH pulse of constant duration of about 10 seconds or less at the Q output terminal. For this duration, the input of IC8 becomes HIGH and the output becomes inverted to LOW, and thus the control input of ICU and IC12 becomes LOW and is immediately isolated and, thus, the music from the audio apparatus 3 can not be transmitted to earphones 4. At the same time, the constant duration positive pulse output of the IC13 is also applied to IC1 upper input and IC9 and IC10 control inputs, which starts the rectangular oscillation and the beeping tone applied to the inputs of IC9 and IC10 can be transmitted to output terminals. Consequently, the 1 to 2KHz beeping tone can be heard at the earphones 4 as an incoming call alert signal through coupling capacitors C5 and C6 and jack Jl. As the alert tone is heard at the earphones 4, the user will push the PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2 toward the PHONE position and also push the TALK/END button switch SW3 one time, which grounds the microphone terminal for a moment making the mobile telephone to respond to the call. During the phone conversation, the received audio is transferred from A terminal of mobile telephone plug P2 through SW2 upper contacts, L and R terminal of jack Jl and to the earphones 4, while the user's voice from the microphone 5 is transferred through microphone terminal of jack Jl directly to M terminal of mobile telephone plug P2. Capacitors Cl and C3 are decoupling capacitors. Here, a unique design is added with IC4. The light emitting diodes LEDl and LED2 were designed to alternately flash when having a incoming call to give the user a visual indication of a call. If there is no incoming call, the upper input of IC1 is sustained LOW and the rectangular oscillator composed of IC1, IC2, Rl, R2 and C2 does not work. At this time, the output of IC2 becomes LOW and LEDl turns off. However, the output of IC3 is sustained to be HIGH and this causing LED2 to be turned on continuously in the absence of a incoming call if its cathode is grounded. The IC4 prohibits LED2 from turning on without incoming calls by inverting the call indication positive pulse. With a call signal, the LED2 cathode becomes LOW which means that cathode is grounded and current can flow through LED2 when IC3 output is HIGH. On the contrary, without a call signal, the output of IC4 is HIGH which gives reverse bias or same voltage between the anode and cathode of LED2. In accordance with the LOW or HIGH output of IC3 and the LED2 will never light up. Thus, with a phone call, the two LED's will flash but without a phone call, the two LED's will never flash or light up.

FIG. 5 shows an automated PHONE/AUDIO change-over system circuitry. It omits the use of manual change-over switch SW2 in FIG. 4 and employs two one-shot timers IC19, IC20 and a RS flip-flop IC21. The IC's IC14 through IC18 are all analog switches, which have almost the same function as in FIG. 4. IC14 switches the tone oscillator 8, IC15 and IC16 switch the audio apparatus 3 outputs and IC17 and IC18 switch the mobile telephone 2 audio output. When the sensor detects an incoming call, it has a positive pulse at it's CALL output which is applied to R(Reset) input of RS flip-flop IC21 and to the trigger input of non-retriggerable one-shot multi -vibrator IC19, where a certain duration (approximately 7 seconds as an example) pulse is generated. This fixed length pulse activates the analog switch IC14 and the beeping alert tone will be heard at both earphones 4 through IC17 and IC18 because the reset input of RS flip-flop IC21 makes the inverse-Q output terminal HIGH. The IC20, a succeeding negative edge triggering one-shot timer generates a shortd.e. 0.5 second) positive pulse at it's output at the same time as the IC19 output pulse falling edge. This short pulse is applied to a transistor driver Q5, and relay RL1 is used as a TALK/END switch in FIG. 4. Here, the relay RL1 20 can be a mechanical relay or a photo-coupled solid-state relay to save battery current. The RS flip-flop IC21 actually selects to conduct IC15, IC16 or IC17, IC18 and connects audio apparatus 3 or mobile telephone 2 to earphone sets 4. The CALL END signal coming from the mobile telephone circuit sets the RS flip-flop IC21 and makes the Q output terminal HIGH, which activates IC15 and IC16. The sensor 7(7-1) output pulse resets the RS flip-flop IC21 and makes inverted-Q output terminal HIGH and activates IC17 and IC18. This means the RS flip-flop IC21 alternately selects the audio apparatus and the mobile telephone. The switch SW4 acts as a manual TALK switch to promptly respond to the incoming call and the switch SW5 immediately stops the mobile phone communication and selects audio apparatus. As explained so far, FIG. 5 is a 'no-touch' full automatic change-over controller circuit. FIG. 6 is a circuit diagram of a radio frequency (RF) detecting sensor assembly. The operation of the circuit is as follows; the mobile telephone is automatically responding to an incoming call with a short radio frequency wave. The sensor picks up this transmitting RF response signal at antenna ANT. The resonator RSI and the band pass filter FL1 are adjusted to cellular (800MHz band) or PCS (1.7GHz band) hand terminal transmission frequency so that the RF level induced from the antenna ANT comes in to resonator RSI and, through coupling capacitor CIO, to band pass filter FL1. The resonator RSI is a parallelled tuning circuit having maximum impedance and the band pass filter FL1 is a series tuning circuit having minimum impedance so that only the exact mobile telephone frequency is selected and applied to the capacitor Cll. The other frequencies are shunted, by-passed and attenuated by RSI and FL1. The circuit composed of Cll, Dl, D2, C12 and R8 is a voltage doubled detector or rectifier, full- wave rectifies the output RF signal from the band pass filter FL1 and sends the rectified DC voltage to the base of transistor Ql. During the negative half cycle of FL1 output voltage, the current flows through Dl and Cll and charges capacitor Cll at the polarity of right hand side positive(+) and left hand side negative(-). Next, during the positive half cycle of FL1 output voltage, the positive output voltage is added to the charged voltage on Cll at the previous cycle. Thus the doubled voltage flows from Cll to D2 and R8 paralleled with C12 which reduces RF and makes DC voltage. This DC voltage is present only when the mobile telephone call comes in or during communication and is supplied to the base of transistor Ql. The two transistors Ql and Q2 are darlington- connected to get high current gain. The emitter current of transistor Ql flows into the base of transistor Q2 and is amplified again. The transistor Q2 works as a switching circuit, that is, the collector is grounded to LOW at positive input or is open to HIGH at no input. When an RF level is present, the transistors Ql and Q2 are saturated and the collector current flows to resistor R10, RF sensing indicator LED3, transistor Q2 and to ground, and thus, the collector voltage which is also the input of inverter IC22 becomes LOW and the output becomes HIGH and this signal is RF sensing output voltage used for the CALL trigger signal of controller 1-1 of FIG. 4 and FIG. 5. This radio frequency (RF) detecting sensor assembly has a three-terminal jack for connection with controller 1-1, which consists of VCC-the battery power, CALL-the sensor trigger signal and GND-the ground. FIG. 7 is an example circuit diagram of an optical sensing unit which detects the flashing or lighting of the incoming call indicator lamp(LED) or LCD display back light optically and the detailed circuit operation is as follows; Q3 is a NPN transistor while Q4 is a PNP transistor and the CdS is a photosensitive resister which has very high resistance of several Mega Ohms in the dark, and small resistance (several tens of Kilo Ohms) in the light. When CdS does not detect any light, it will show very high resistance compared with resister Rll, and the NPN transistor Q3 is cut off since the base bias voltage of Q3 becomes very low. Accordingly, the HIGH voltage of the Q3 collector is applied to the base of PNP transistor Q4 through R13. The HIGH level of Q4 base voltage cuts off the transistor Q4 and the collector voltage of Q4 is zero which means the CALL signal is LOW. However, if the mobile telephone call signal comes in, the CdS will detect the illumination of the lamp, LED or LCD back light, and will give low resistance similar to the resistor RU. Then, the base bias voltage of transistor Q3 will be quite high, the transistor Q3 will conduct and the collector voltage of Q3 will approach zero. Now, the zero voltage of the Q3 collector makes the PNP transistor Q4 to conduct and the emitter current will flow to resistor R14 and LED4. Therefore, The LED lights on and the CALL signal which is the same as the collector voltage of transistor Q4 will be HIGH. This signal goes to controller 1-1 to inform of the incoming call. Here, the resistor R13 limits the base current of transistor Q4 when transistor Q3 conducts saturated.

FIG. 8 is a physical constitution of direct incoming call sensor 7-2 which picks up the signal from the incoming call contact of the mobile telephone data connector. The connector connects the five functional contacts of GND, MIC, CALL, EARPHONE and VCC, whose functions are ground, microphone, incoming call, earphone audio and battery voltage respectively, to the controller 1-1. And in this case, the plug P2 is not required for communication anymore.

FIG. 9 is an example of a sound sensing incoming call sensor used for FIG. 4 or FIG. 5. XI is a compact type condenser microphone which detects the beeper sound which is coming from the mobile telephone terminal equipment when receiving an incoming call. The detected sound is amplified by a common -emitter amplifier Q6 and then applied to an input of a Schmitt-trigger IC23. The Schmitt-trigger IC23 gives a HIGH logic output when the amplifier Q6 drives above the upper threshold level. Thus, the circuit determines whether there is a CALL or not.

FIG.10 proposes a unique mobile telephone terminal apparatus that has an EXTERNAL AUDIO jack on the housing and an automatic PHONE/AUDIO change-over switching circuit inside the housing. By this configuration, the mobile terminal equipment can accept an adjacent audio apparatus conveniently by an audio cord and is enabled to hear the audio signal by the same stereo earphones, which are also used as an hands-free earphone-microphone of a mobile telephone. J2 is for the stereo ear-microphone and Jl is for the external audio apparatus connection. This specific design allows convenient mobile telephone and audio apparatus use by single earphone-microphone. While listening to the audio apparatus, the earphones will be automatically switched to mobile telephone audio after an alert tone if an incoming call comes in at any moment.

FIG. 11 shows the detailed circuit which perform the above functions in FIG. 10. The circuit is very similar to the circuits of FIG. 4 and FIG. 5. The IC32 through IC36 and R15, R16, C13 and C14 compose an intermittently sounding oscillator as explained in detail in FIG. 4. The IC28/IC29 and IC30/IC31 are two pairs of analog switches which alternately select either the audio apparatus or the mobile telephone receive audio signal. The one-shot timers IC25, IC26, RS flip-flop IC27, transistor driver Q7 and relay RL2 carry out the same functions as explained in FIG. 5 above. The diodes D3 and D4 prohibit the collision between the incoming call signal and the talk start signal coming from the mobile telephone terminal internal circuit 11. Item 10 is an external audio apparatus and item 9 is a stereo earphone-microphone phoneset which is commonly used for both purposes.

By the use of this invention, the user, While listening to music-such as a cassette plyer, CD player, MP-3 player, walkman, radio/TV broadcasting receiver or computer sound card, does not need to take off the hearing device to take a call from a mobile telephone, cordless telephone or any radio transceiver, and also does not need to pick up the telephone unit by hand. The user, with the same hands -free ear-microphone to listen to the music, etc., only needs to change over the PHONE/AUDIO selection switch and push the TALK/END button switch once. Now, the user is ready to handle the call or shut it off. This invention solves all complexities and inconveniences of the change-over process of the audio apparatus and the mobile telephone. It is also economical in that it employs a single phoneset for a dual-purpose instead of having two or more phonesets and gives an easy way to administer it. It can be used for any mobile telephone such as a cellular, PCS, PHS, cordless telephone or any radio set, or any brand. It can also accomodate any audio apparatus such as a walkman, CD, MP-3, cassette, TV audio or computer sound card, etc.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS :
1. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller for the simultaneous use of a mobile telephone and an audio apparatus, comprising: a stereo hands-free phoneset comprising: stereo earphones or headphones! and a microphone; and a controller comprising: a PHONE/AUDIO selection switch; a TALK/END switch; an optional volume control; a mobile telephone connecting plug; and an audio apparatus connecting plug.
2. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 1, wherein said mobile telephone connecting plug includes a mobile telephone incoming call sensor and said call sensor detects incoming calls, generates an alert sound tone and send the sound tone to said earphones or headphones to acknowledge an incoming phone call.
3. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 2, wherein said incoming call sensor is formed of an RF(radio frequency) detecting sensor.
4. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 2, wherein said incoming call sensor is formed of an optical sensor detecting the illumination or flashing light of an LED or LCD backlight.
5. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 2, wherein said incoming call sensor is formed of a data interface connector inserted to a mobile telephone, picking up an incoming call digital logic signal.
6. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 2, wherein said incoming call sensor is formed of a sound sensor detecting a mobile telephone buzzer beep sound.
7. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 2, wherein said PHONE/AUDIO selection switch SW2 is omitted. Instead, the change-over between mobile telephone and audio apparatus is performed automatically by means of a semiconductor analog switch(transmission gate) IC's controlled by the incoming call sensor signal.
8. A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset assembly with controller according to claim 7, wherein said controller is installed inside of a mobile telephone terminal unit and said terminal unit has a stereo hands-free PHONESET jack and an EXTERNAL AUDIO jack outside of its body to accept said stereo hands-free phoneset assembly and said audio apparatus, respectively.
PCT/KR2000/000343 1999-05-14 2000-04-12 Combined-use assembly of mobile telephone and audio WO2000070779A1 (en)

Priority Applications (10)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
KR1999/8312U 1999-05-14
KR2019990008312 1999-05-14
KR1999/30849U 1999-12-31
KR19990030849 1999-12-31
KR2000/4724U 2000-02-21
KR20000004724U KR200202123Y1 (en) 1999-12-31 2000-02-21 A dual-purpose, stereo hands-free phoneset and change-over controller for simultaneous use of mobile telephone and audio apparatus
KR2000/7389U 2000-03-15
KR20000007389U KR200214822Y1 (en) 2000-03-15 A mobile telephone terminal set capable of listening to external audio apparatus by stereo hands-free earphone-mic
KR20000009108U KR200200142Y1 (en) 2000-03-30 2000-03-30 A mobile telephone incoming call sensor
KR2000/9108U 2000-03-30

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2000070779A1 true true WO2000070779A1 (en) 2000-11-23

Family

ID=27532299

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/KR2000/000343 WO2000070779A1 (en) 1999-05-14 2000-04-12 Combined-use assembly of mobile telephone and audio

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2000070779A1 (en)

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE10034322A1 (en) * 2000-07-12 2002-01-31 Siemens Ag Hi-Fi headphones with mobile phone
WO2002049226A1 (en) * 2000-12-14 2002-06-20 Patentfabriken Ab An adapter for connecting a speaker and a microphone to an electric device
GB2382750A (en) * 2001-12-01 2003-06-04 E Lead Electronic Co Ltd Common hands free device for multiple communications devices.
EP1342633A2 (en) * 2002-03-08 2003-09-10 Ntn Corporation Rotation detecting device and anti-skid braking system using the same
FR2838909A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2003-10-24 France Telecom Portable telecommunications terminal having external container/calculator/electrical circuit and closed electrical circuit series set with push opening switch starting calculator.
GB2352136B (en) * 1999-07-05 2004-05-12 Sagem Improved mobile telephone
FR2848039A1 (en) * 2002-12-02 2004-06-04 Ats Accessoires Telecom Servic Microphone and loud speaker assembly for mobile phone, has key to simultaneously close interrupters of microphone and loud speaker circuits, where closing of interrupters does not disturb calls originated from respective circuits
FR2858743A1 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-02-11 Cotron Corp Adapter for connecting an earphone-microphone set stereo of a mobile phone has a stereo system
GB2435736A (en) * 2006-03-02 2007-09-05 Armour Home Electronics Sound reproduction device
EP1887768A1 (en) 2006-08-09 2008-02-13 Vodafone Holding GmbH Connector and method for managing the connection
EP1976246A1 (en) * 2007-03-29 2008-10-01 Research In Motion Limited Multi-button control headset for a mobile communication device
EP1768371A3 (en) * 2005-09-23 2009-02-25 High Tech Computer Corp. Method for arbitrating audio signal output
WO2009077005A1 (en) * 2007-12-17 2009-06-25 Vodafone Holding Gmbh Connector for connecting a rendering device to at least one output device and method for managing output
WO2009077004A1 (en) * 2007-12-17 2009-06-25 Vodafone Holding Gmbh Connector for connecting at least one output device to a rendering device and method for managing the connection
WO2009077006A1 (en) * 2007-12-17 2009-06-25 Vodafone Holding Gmbh Connector for connecting at least one output device to a rendering device and method for managing connections
US7983722B2 (en) 2007-03-29 2011-07-19 Research In Motion Limited Headset with multi-button control for a mobile communication device
US8014824B2 (en) 2002-04-09 2011-09-06 Skullcandy, Inc. Article of manufacture integrated with music and telephonic communication devices
US20120105740A1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2012-05-03 Oakley, Inc. Eyewear with detachable adjustable electronics module
CN101426158B (en) 2007-10-31 2012-06-13 鸿富锦精密工业(深圳)有限公司 Audio switching device having volume regulating function
US8876285B2 (en) 2006-12-14 2014-11-04 Oakley, Inc. Wearable high resolution audio visual interface
US8923524B2 (en) 2012-01-01 2014-12-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Ultra-compact headset
US20150199919A1 (en) * 2014-01-13 2015-07-16 Barbara Ander Alarm Monitoring System
US9451068B2 (en) 2001-06-21 2016-09-20 Oakley, Inc. Eyeglasses with electronic components
US9720260B2 (en) 2013-06-12 2017-08-01 Oakley, Inc. Modular heads-up display system
US9720258B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-01 Oakley, Inc. Electronic ornamentation for eyewear

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH01120159A (en) * 1987-11-02 1989-05-12 Nec Corp Portable telephone system
JPH0951369A (en) * 1995-08-09 1997-02-18 Sony Corp Telephony set with earphone/microphone set
KR19980019933U (en) * 1996-10-08 1998-07-15 김광호 A mobile phone having a function to integrally Walkman
KR19980045086U (en) * 1996-12-27 1998-09-25 양재신 Phone to the receiving device using the audio system
JPH10276250A (en) * 1997-03-27 1998-10-13 Sony Corp Portable terminal equipment
KR19980082038A (en) * 1998-08-14 1998-11-25 양형태 BTE Ear

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR100286431B1 (en) * 1998-08-14 2001-01-12 양형태 Ear hanging type ear phone

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH01120159A (en) * 1987-11-02 1989-05-12 Nec Corp Portable telephone system
JPH0951369A (en) * 1995-08-09 1997-02-18 Sony Corp Telephony set with earphone/microphone set
KR19980019933U (en) * 1996-10-08 1998-07-15 김광호 A mobile phone having a function to integrally Walkman
KR19980045086U (en) * 1996-12-27 1998-09-25 양재신 Phone to the receiving device using the audio system
JPH10276250A (en) * 1997-03-27 1998-10-13 Sony Corp Portable terminal equipment
KR19980082038A (en) * 1998-08-14 1998-11-25 양형태 BTE Ear

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2352136B (en) * 1999-07-05 2004-05-12 Sagem Improved mobile telephone
US20120105740A1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2012-05-03 Oakley, Inc. Eyewear with detachable adjustable electronics module
US9619201B2 (en) 2000-06-02 2017-04-11 Oakley, Inc. Eyewear with detachable adjustable electronics module
DE10034322A1 (en) * 2000-07-12 2002-01-31 Siemens Ag Hi-Fi headphones with mobile phone
WO2002049226A1 (en) * 2000-12-14 2002-06-20 Patentfabriken Ab An adapter for connecting a speaker and a microphone to an electric device
US9451068B2 (en) 2001-06-21 2016-09-20 Oakley, Inc. Eyeglasses with electronic components
GB2382750A (en) * 2001-12-01 2003-06-04 E Lead Electronic Co Ltd Common hands free device for multiple communications devices.
GB2382750B (en) * 2001-12-01 2004-01-07 E Lead Electronic Co Ltd Hand free device commonly shared by multiple communication devices
US7741838B2 (en) 2002-03-08 2010-06-22 Ntn Corporation Rotation detecting device and anti-skid braking system using the same
EP1342633A2 (en) * 2002-03-08 2003-09-10 Ntn Corporation Rotation detecting device and anti-skid braking system using the same
EP1342633A3 (en) * 2002-03-08 2004-01-21 Ntn Corporation Rotation detecting device and anti-skid braking system using the same
US7341321B2 (en) 2002-03-08 2008-03-11 Ntn Corporation Rotation detecting device and anti-skid braking system using the same
US8014824B2 (en) 2002-04-09 2011-09-06 Skullcandy, Inc. Article of manufacture integrated with music and telephonic communication devices
FR2838909A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2003-10-24 France Telecom Portable telecommunications terminal having external container/calculator/electrical circuit and closed electrical circuit series set with push opening switch starting calculator.
FR2848039A1 (en) * 2002-12-02 2004-06-04 Ats Accessoires Telecom Servic Microphone and loud speaker assembly for mobile phone, has key to simultaneously close interrupters of microphone and loud speaker circuits, where closing of interrupters does not disturb calls originated from respective circuits
EP1427113A1 (en) * 2002-12-02 2004-06-09 ATS Accessoires Telecom Services Earphone and microphone set for use with a mobile telephone
FR2858743A1 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-02-11 Cotron Corp Adapter for connecting an earphone-microphone set stereo of a mobile phone has a stereo system
EP1768371A3 (en) * 2005-09-23 2009-02-25 High Tech Computer Corp. Method for arbitrating audio signal output
GB2435736A (en) * 2006-03-02 2007-09-05 Armour Home Electronics Sound reproduction device
GB2435736B (en) * 2006-03-02 2008-11-12 Armour Home Electronics Sound reproduction device
EP1887768A1 (en) 2006-08-09 2008-02-13 Vodafone Holding GmbH Connector and method for managing the connection
US9720240B2 (en) 2006-12-14 2017-08-01 Oakley, Inc. Wearable high resolution audio visual interface
US8876285B2 (en) 2006-12-14 2014-11-04 Oakley, Inc. Wearable high resolution audio visual interface
US9494807B2 (en) 2006-12-14 2016-11-15 Oakley, Inc. Wearable high resolution audio visual interface
US7983722B2 (en) 2007-03-29 2011-07-19 Research In Motion Limited Headset with multi-button control for a mobile communication device
US20110263303A1 (en) * 2007-03-29 2011-10-27 Research In Motion Limited Multi-button control headset for a mobile communication device
US8548538B2 (en) 2007-03-29 2013-10-01 Research In Motion Limited Multi-button control headset for a mobile communication device
US8812064B2 (en) 2007-03-29 2014-08-19 Blackberry Limited Multi-button control headset for a mobile communication device
EP1976246A1 (en) * 2007-03-29 2008-10-01 Research In Motion Limited Multi-button control headset for a mobile communication device
CN101426158B (en) 2007-10-31 2012-06-13 鸿富锦精密工业(深圳)有限公司 Audio switching device having volume regulating function
US8838172B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2014-09-16 Jeroen De Weerd Connector for connecting at least one output device to a rendering device and method for managing connections
WO2009077005A1 (en) * 2007-12-17 2009-06-25 Vodafone Holding Gmbh Connector for connecting a rendering device to at least one output device and method for managing output
WO2009077004A1 (en) * 2007-12-17 2009-06-25 Vodafone Holding Gmbh Connector for connecting at least one output device to a rendering device and method for managing the connection
WO2009077006A1 (en) * 2007-12-17 2009-06-25 Vodafone Holding Gmbh Connector for connecting at least one output device to a rendering device and method for managing connections
US8923524B2 (en) 2012-01-01 2014-12-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Ultra-compact headset
US9720258B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-01 Oakley, Inc. Electronic ornamentation for eyewear
US9720260B2 (en) 2013-06-12 2017-08-01 Oakley, Inc. Modular heads-up display system
US20150199919A1 (en) * 2014-01-13 2015-07-16 Barbara Ander Alarm Monitoring System
US9852656B2 (en) * 2014-01-13 2017-12-26 Barbara Ander Alarm monitoring system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5315645A (en) Communication apparatus utilizing digital optical signals
US7187948B2 (en) Personal portable integrator for music player and mobile phone
US5588041A (en) Cellular speakerphone and method of operation thereof
US5487182A (en) Hands-free module
US6148213A (en) Method and apparatus for accessing a telephone answering device from a cordless telephone portable unit
US4881259A (en) Answering machine with cordless telephone
US4882745A (en) Cordless headset telephone
US5138651A (en) Cordless loud speaking telephone
US4332981A (en) Cordless telephone
US6321080B1 (en) Conference telephone utilizing base and handset transducers
US6061435A (en) Cordless telephone system having a handset with non-telephone functionality
US6104808A (en) Portable communication device with speakerphone operation
US6006115A (en) Wireless headphones for entertainment and telephonic communication
US5881370A (en) Communication apparatus with an automatically configured multimode talk switch and method of operation
US5991637A (en) Integrated passive and active communications system
US5596638A (en) Headset for hands-free wireless telephone
US5943627A (en) Mobile cellular phone
US6658267B1 (en) Interoperable am/fm headset wireless telephone device
US4669108A (en) Wireless hands-free conference telephone system
US5867794A (en) Audio-output for a portable radio telephone utilizing a vehicle's AM/FM radio
US5329577A (en) Telephone having touch sensor for responding to a call
US5572575A (en) Cordless telephone system having speaker phone function
US5113428A (en) Cordless telephone headset
US7983722B2 (en) Headset with multi-button control for a mobile communication device
US20030125075A1 (en) Desktop stand and mobile phone

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE

AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AT AU BR CA CH CN DE DK ES FI GB ID IL JP KR MX NO NZ PT RU SE SG US

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: JP