WO1999013929A1 - Non-contact gas dispenser and apparatus for use therewith - Google Patents

Non-contact gas dispenser and apparatus for use therewith Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1999013929A1
WO1999013929A1 PCT/US1998/018986 US9818986W WO9913929A1 WO 1999013929 A1 WO1999013929 A1 WO 1999013929A1 US 9818986 W US9818986 W US 9818986W WO 9913929 A1 WO9913929 A1 WO 9913929A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
gas
non
oxygen
dispenser
contact
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1998/018986
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Combs Norman R. Mc
Mark R. Mizerkiewicz
Original Assignee
Airsep Corporation
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62BDEVICES, APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR LIFE-SAVING
    • A62B18/00Breathing masks or helmets, e.g. affording protection against chemical agents or for use at high altitudes or incorporating a pump or compressor for reducing the inhalation effort
    • A62B18/003Breathing masks or helmets, e.g. affording protection against chemical agents or for use at high altitudes or incorporating a pump or compressor for reducing the inhalation effort having means for creating a fresh air curtain
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0666Nasal cannulas or tubing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0666Nasal cannulas or tubing
    • A61M16/0672Nasal cannula assemblies for oxygen therapy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0683Holding devices therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/10Preparation of respiratory gases or vapours
    • A61M16/1005Preparation of respiratory gases or vapours with O2 features or with parameter measurement
    • A61M16/101Preparation of respiratory gases or vapours with O2 features or with parameter measurement using an oxygen concentrator
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/10Preparation of respiratory gases or vapours
    • A61M16/105Filters
    • A61M16/1055Filters bacterial
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/10Preparation of respiratory gases or vapours
    • A61M16/105Filters
    • A61M16/106Filters in a path
    • A61M16/107Filters in a path in the inspiratory path

Abstract

A non-contact gas dispenser (200) comprising a headset apparatus (202), a gas source (210), a conduit (208) for directing the desired gas to a region proximate to the user's nose, and mouth. The gas source preferably is a pressure swing adsorption apparatus (Fig. 9) that allows the user to select at least two predetermined settings of product gas, each setting having a distinct concentration, and flow rate different from the other settings.

Description

NON-CONTACT GAS DISPENSER AND APPARATUS FOR USE

THEREWITH

FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a non-contact gas dispenser for directing a desired inhalable gaseous mixture to a region proximate to a user's nose and mouth and to a gas concentrator apparatus with which the user may select one of at least two settings to deliver the gaseous mixture at distinct but different concentrations and flow rates. This application is a continuation- in-part of Application No.08/876,749, filed June 16, 1997 by Norman R. McCombs for Pressure Swing Adsorption Apparatus, and further claims the priority dates of

Provisional Application No. 60/058,806, filed September 15, 1997, for Non- Contact Gas Dispenser and No. 60/058,807, filed September 15, 1997, for Setting Concentration and Flow Rate in a Pressure Swing Adsorption Apparatus. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Typically, a desired gas, such as one that is highly concentrated with oxygen generated from a pressure swing adsorption apparatus, or is substantially pure oxygen supplied from a gas canister, is applied to a user by either a mask, a nose or oral cannula, or an oxygen tent. The highly concentrated oxygen gas usually is applied by these means at flow rates up to about 5 litres per minute. Higher flow rates by such applications can irritate the user, and typically will require controlled conditions and/or professional monitoring.

As most uses of such oxygen concentrated gases have been for medical

purposes, the conditions for those purposes can be readily controlled. However, there also are non-medical uses which are not monitored or the equipment not preset by skilled professionals. Because both efficiency and comfort are needed for those applications, masks and cannulas may not be desirable, and oxygen tents are too confining. As one example of non-medical uses, oxygen bars have been opening to sell to occasional customers, concentrated oxygen obtained from a pressure swing adsorption apparatus or a gas canister or supply tank. Others may use such oxygen enhancing apparatus during normal exercise routines such as aerobics or weight lifting. Apparently, the consumers believe inhaling concentrated oxygen is beneficial to their well being. That well being, however, may, because of potential injury to air passage tissue, be damaged if non-monitored customers use a highly concentrated oxygen with a mask or nasal cannula. Non-monitored high oxygen concentrations may also lead to oxygen toxicity. With the use of cannulas, significant air passage blockage can occur, with the average inhaled oxygen concentration being different for users with different nostril sizes and intensities of breathing. Exhaled air is less likely to be dissipated when using masks or tents, thus causing exhaled air to be re-inhaled and a change in the humidity of the overall air inhaled. Moreover masks and nasal cannulas are designed to be used once by one person; reuse at oxygen bars or health facilities may cause viruses or other diseases to be transmitted to unsuspecting second users. On the other hand, disposing of a nasal cannula and mask after a one-time use is costly, and

environmentally may need to be disposed of as medical waste.

Therefore, we have developed a non-contact gas dispenser that is reusable for various, primarily non-medical users of concentrated oxygen. We also have provided an oxygen concentrator, adapted from known medical-use concentrators for use for these purposes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention comprises a non-contact gas dispenser having a head set apparatus, a gas source and a conduit to direct the desired gas from the gas source to the head set and to a region defining the "inspirational area" proximate to the user's nose and mouth. The head set apparatus comprises a gas delivery nozzle and flexible headband with an arm extending from the headband to support the nozzle at a predetermined position within a preferred range near but not in direct contact with the user's mouth, nose or other body tissue.

Moreover, to control the oxygen concentration flow rate within a safe range in non-medically monitored conditions, we provide a pressure swing adsorption apparatus ("PSA") to fractionate air and produce a mixture with a higher but safe concentration of oxygen and having pre-set valve means allowing the user to select among at least two settings for the oxygen enriched gas, each setting having a distinct concentration and flow rate different from the other setting(s).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 illustrates a non-contact gas dispenser according to our invention, as may be worn by a user of our invention;

FIG. 2 is a further view of the non-contact gas dispenser of Figure 1;

FIG. 3 is an alternative embodiment of a non-contact gas dispenser of our invention; FIGS. 4a through 4g are enlarged views of Figure 2, taken along lines of

4-4, and illustrating various embodiments for the gas delivery nozzles of the dispenser;

FIGS. 5a and 5b illustrate the distribution of the gaseous mixture in the intended inspirational area for inhalation by the user;

FIG. 6a through 6e illustrate certain possible nozzle combinations and shapes;

FIGS. 7a through 7c are partial enlarged side views of the head set apparatus showing additional alternative embodiments; FIG. 8 is a graph illustrating desirable oxygen concentration/ nozzle distance parameters according to the invention;

FIG. 9 is a schematic of a pressure swing adsorption apparatus ("PSA") suitable for the present invention; and

FIG. 10 illustrates an alternate delivery configuration for the PSA of FIG.

9.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

Turning now to the drawings and considering first FIG. 1, there is shown an embodiment, generally indicated as 200, of a non-contact gas dispenser in accordance with the present invention. The gas dispenser 200 comprises a head set 202, a gas source 210 producing or storing a desired gas, and a conduit 208 to deliver the desired gas from source 210 to head set 202. Head set 202 comprises an arcuate flexible band 204 extending from one side of a user's head 212 to the

other side to support a gas delivery arm 206 to which one end of conduit 208 is attached. Arm 206 extends, as shown, from the band 204 toward the user's mouth and nose to direct the desired gas from conduit 208 to a region proximate to the nose and mouth, defined herein as the inspirational area, shown by dotted lines

205, containing the volume of air from which air is inhaled by nose and mouth.

As is known for making audio head sets, band 204 may be made from any suitable compliant, resilient or elastic material such as a plastic or metal material which may or may not be coated or fabric covered. As shown in Figures 1 and 3, band 204 may also, but need not, comprise one or more earphones 214 at its ends. Earphone(s) 214, which can be any type of conventional earphone, foam or liquid/air padded or formed fitted, or replaceable earbuds, may then be connected by known means to an optional sound device 218, such as a radio or other sound source to provide entertainment and/or user instructions timed to the desired gas settings, activities during use, and the use periods. It can thus be seen that a head set according to our invention is useable with many other such devices, including CD players, telephones, televisions, tape cassette recorders and computers. Turning to Figure 1, arm 206 is designed not to contact its user during operation. To accomplish this, arm 206 is preset to be a predetermined distance (L) from the user's head 212. At that predetermined distance (L) from the user's head 212, arm 206 can supply the desired gas, in this case an oxygen enriched gas having a preset concentration and flow rate, to the user's inspirational area 205 without nose or throat irritation.

Figures 4a through 4g illustrate various embodiments by which the desired gas can be directed to the user's nose and mouth. In Figures 4a, 4d and 4e, conduit 208 is attached to the outer surface of arm 206 facing the user's head. The gas is then directed through conduit 208 to the user's nose and mouth through a nozzle 222 comprising either a single aperture at the terminal end of conduit

208, as shown in Figure 4e, or multiple apertures formed in the wall and/or end of conduit 208, as shown in Figures 4a and 4d. In these embodiments, conduit 208 may either be permanently affixed to arm 206 or removeably attached by tube retaining loops 207 or the like as shown in Fig. 4e. Using a nozzle 222 with multiple apertures, the end of conduit 208 may also function as a valve by positioning a slidable cover 209 (shown as dotted lines in Fig. 4a) to vary the number of open apertures through which the gas will pass.

Alternatively, the delivery end of conduit 208 may also be contained within arm 206, as shown in Figures 4b and 4f. In these embodiments, the delivery end of conduit 208 is either fixed or detachably held (by a friction fit or the like) in a longitudinally formed hole 223 in arm 206, through which the gas is delivered by nozzle 222 formed by one or more openings in arm 206 in fluid connection with conduit 208 and hole 223. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, as shown in Figure 4c, conduit 208 is connected near the non-dispensing end of arm 206 at band 204 by a detachable connector 229 such as a quick release connector or a threaded joint. The desired gas proceeds through conduit 208 into a central passageway 226 in arm 206 until it is directed to the user's nose and mouth through nozzle openings 222, located on the other or gas dispensing end of arm 206.

Conduit 208 can be made of any type suitable material for delivering oxygen, for example, flexible plastic or rubber tubing or articulated hose, that allows the desired gas to be delivered while still permitting the user to move during operation of dispenser 200. Similarly, arm 206 is manufactured from durable rigid or semi-rigid material, such as plastic or metal. Arm 206 may also contain a voice transmitter

220, as illustrated in Figures 4a, 4b and 4c, to be used for a radio, telephone, tape-cassette recorder player, computer or other similar voice activated instruments and medical sensors. A transmitter, schematically shown at 220, receives the user's voice through one of the arm's audio openings 221.

As shown in Figures 5a and 5b, there is illustrated the distribution in one plane of a normal gaseous mixture, as it exits a nozzle represented by a single circular opening 222 of, e.g., about 1/8" diameter and flow rate of about 5 litres per minute (Figure 5a) and of a pair of circular orifices 222 of similar diameter each and flow rate (Figure 5b). Assuming the gaseous mixture has a ninety percent concentration of oxygen at its source, lines 01, 02 and 03 represent decreasing concentration of oxygens when mixed with the ambient air, of, e.g. , 50%, 35% and 25% . In both Figures 5a and 5b, line x-x represents the

inspirational area 205 of the user if the nozzle is positioned directly in the vertical frontal plane extending outwardly from the nose and mouth, and line y-y if the nozzle is placed to one side, e.g., 45° to the right or left of the vertical plane, but directed toward the center point of the inspirational area 205. The distance of nozzle 222 from the plane of the mouth and nose is shown as L in both Figures 5 a

and 5b.

In order to achieve a particular desired distribution pattern for the gaseous

mixture, the nozzle openings 222 may be modified, as shown for example in Figures 6a through 6e. In Figure 6a, a pair of nozzle openings 222 may be positioned vertically. If a pear shaped cross-sectional pattern of the gas mixture at the inspiration area 205 is desired, one of the openings 222 may be larger than the other. Figure 6b illustrates three openings 222 but with the two end openings directing the mixture laterally outwardly and the center opening angled upwardly towards the nose area, whereas Figure 6c shows the three openings 222 in a triangular pattern. On the other hand, the nozzle may comprise a single opening

222 other than circular in shape, to vary the distribution pattern, as for example the inverse T opening 222 shown in Figure 6d or the triangular opening 222 in

Figure 6e.

In the alternative embodiments illustrated in Figures 7a, 7b and 7c, the distance L between the end of arm 208 and the user's nose and mouth is made adjustable by either the material of arm 208, the structure of arm 208, or both. For example, if arm 208 is made of semi-rigid compliant material, the user may bend the arm to adjust the position of the nozzle end of arm 208. The structure of arm 208 may also include a telescoping portion 230 to adjust the length of arm 208, as shown in its "closed" position in Figure 7a and in its "opened" position in

Figure 7b. Arm 208 may also be detachably held by retaining means 232, such as a clamp, to earphone 214, as shown in Figures 7b and 7c, or to band 204 as shown in Figure 7a. Retaining means 232 may then hold arm 208 at its pre-set distance L and may also permit limited rotation and sliding within the retaining means to adjust the position of arm 208 within the preferred range to be described.

To determine the preferred range for the distance L, a graph such as the one shown in Figure 8 may be used to plot the concentration of the oxygen mixture as it is diffused from the nozzle end shown as L=O through a distance L, as measured in centimeters, to an asymptotic curve as the mixture dissipates sufficiently to reach atmospheric concentration of about 21 % oxygen. If the desired oxygen concentration is about 32%, then it can be seen that the distance L is preferably about 2 cm for a 5 litres per minute (1pm) mixture from a source providing about 90% oxygen. If, on the other hand, a lower concentration of 25% is desired, the oxygen supply is changed to the lower source concentration of 50% to achieve the 25% level without adjusting the nozzle position. Alternatively, the concentration and flow rate can be kept constant, but the nozzle moved to a closed position, as shown in Figure 7a, of about 5 cm from the inspirational area. We have determined a preferred range for operation of non-contact dispensing apparatus as described to be a range for L from about 2 cm to about 8 cm, with the flow rate ranging from about 3 1pm to about 15 1pm, a pressure of the source from about 7 psig to about 9 psig, and with a source concentration from about 50% oxygen to about 95% oxygen, in order to achieve a preferred range in the inspirational area from about 25 % to about 40% oxygen. Gas source 210 may be any apparatus that provides a desired gas. One such gas source 210 may be a canister or supply tank containing compressed gas, preferably an oxygen enriched gas at a predetermined concentration. Gas source 210 according to our invention may also consist of a pressure swing adsorption apparatus ("PSA") as illustrated in Figure 6. Such an apparatus is designed for fractionating at least one component or constituent from a gaseous mixture by

pressure swing adsorption, such as those disclosed in commonly assigned U.S. Patents 4,802,899 and 5,531,807 and U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 08/876,749 by Norman R. McCombs (filed June 16, 1997), the entire disclosures of which are incorporated by reference herein. With reference to Figure 9, and as more fully explained in Serial No.

08/876,749, ambient air is supplied to source 210 through an assembly of working components 30. The components 30 initially receive a feed gas stream (ambient air) in an input 22 of an intake resonator 58 to decrease the noise for the intake of the ambient air feed stream. The feed stream continues through resonator outlet

23 and is moved through piping 106 and 107, by means of a pump or compressor assembly 24, to a valve block 64, and alternatively to first and second adsorbers 62, 60 through feed valves 116 and 118 and piping 128, 130 respectively.

When the feed stream alternatively enters inlets 82a, 82b of adsorbers 62, 60 in a co-current direction, the respective adsorber fractionates the feed stream into the desired concentration of product gas, which then proceeds through the outlet 84a, 84b of the corresponding adsorber 62, 60 into the product manifold 66.

While in the product manifold 66, the product gas is controllably directed in three directions. The first direction is through T-connection 140 or 142 and piping 138 to a product equalization valve 136. The second direction is through

T-connection 140 or 142 and piping 148 to the corresponding purge orifice 144, 146. The third direction is through T-connections 140, 160 or 142, 162 and piping 158 in a second purge loop 156 and through a concentration valve 93. If the applicable purge orifice 144 or 146 is open and concentration valve 93 is closed, the concentration of the product gas will be high. When the applicable purge orifice 144, 146 and concentration valve 93 are both open, the orifice and valve 93 independently control the concentration of the product gas.

As described more fully in the co-pending application, the orifice and valve

93 control the position of a mass transfer zone and water zone of the adsorbers 60, 62 and the concentration range of the product gas. A portion of the product gas proceeds through purge orifices 144, 146, and T-connections 150, 142, and the product gas proceeding through valve 93 and T-connections 162, 142 are counter-currently directed from the outlet 84b, 84a and to the inlet 82b, 80b of the other adsorber 60, 62 to purge adsorbed gases. The counter-current product gas and purged gases then proceed through piping 130 or 128 to valve block 64, in particular waste valve 122 or 120 and waste silencer 126. The balance of the product gas proceeding through the applicable purge orifice 144, 146, which is the usable portion of the produced gas, is directed through T-connection 150 to flow control assembly 68.

Within the flow control assembly 68 are a mixing tank 154, a test block component 169, a pressure regulator 170, a conventional flow controller valve 92, check valves 190a, 190b, a conventional bacteria filter 198, and outlet connector 100. Mixing tank 154 receives the product gas through piping 152 and T- connection 150 to average the product gas to the desired concentration. Once through mixing tank 154, the product gas is pushed through piping 167 and monitored by pressure regulator 170 until it reaches the flow controller valve 93. The product gas flow rate is independently controlled by the flow controller valve 92 to proceed through piping 172 and various check valves 190 to outlet connector

100.

When the adsorber 62, 60 through which gas flowing in the co-current direction is saturated, the process is reversed to cause that adsorber to be purged by delivering product gas in the counter current direction and the feed stream delivered to the other adsorber in the co-current direction. The above-process and the ability to control the desired concentration of oxygen and flow rate of the product gas are more fully described in co-pending application serial no.

08/876,749.

Each of the above-identified PSA's generates a product gas having concentrations and flow rates that usually are adjusted by a technician resetting at least two or more valves and/or switches. As will be described, the present invention provides a new and improved PSA that allows a non-trained user to change the setting of the product gas between a limited number but at least two product gas settings in which the product gas has distinct concentrations and flow rates that are predetermined for the intended uses.

For this purpose, we have provided a setting valve 199 in the delivery piping 172 at the exit end. Thus, the resulting product gas from check valves 190, which has a predetermined flow rate and concentration, is then directed to setting valve 199, which is designed to allow the user to select one of at least two settings for the product gas. Each setting of product gas has a distinct concentration and flow rate. To attain the desired settings, setting valve 199 may comprise a multiple outlet port valve that has a distinct orifice or orifice size for each setting. The various orifice sizes allow the user to rapidly change the setting of the product gas to a predetermined concentration and flow rate without altering any other valves of the apparatus. Setting valve 199 may be a three-way manual or solenoid operated valve to alter the product gas, for example, from a 5 litre/minute product gas to a 10 litre/minute product gas. The product gas flow rate can range from about 4 litres/ minute to about 15 litres/minute. To maintain stability of the mass transfer zone as described in application

08/876,749, setting valve 199 preferably is linked mechanically or electronically, by conventional means, to concentration valve 93 to simultaneously adjust valve 93 as setting valve 199 is reset. In addition, the valve 199 may be reset by computer controlled function, as for example in coordination with a user exercise routine having differing degrees of user exertion during the routine.

Product gas is then directed from setting valve 199 to the outlet connector 100, which dispenses the product gas at the selected settings to the user through conduit 208. In one embodiment of the present invention, outlet connecter 100 is a single outlet, or as shown in Figure 10, outlet connector 100 may comprise separate outlets 100a, 100b for each setting. Although the present description is described for the production of a desired concentration of oxygen product gas from ambient air, it is apparent that skilled practitioners could use this delivery system and pressure swing adsorption apparatus for other gases as well. It will be understood that numerous modifications and substitutions may be made to the described embodiments without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.

Claims

We claim:
1. A non-contact gas dispenser to be worn by a user for inhalation of gas from a source of gas through the nose and/or mouth of the user, the dispenser comprising a conduit connected at one end to the source of gas and comprising at its other end a nozzle to dispense the gas to an inspirational area for inhalation by the user; and means for supporting the nozzle in a position proximate to but not in contact with the user's nose or mouth.
2. The gas dispenser of Claim 1 , wherein the means for supporting the nozzle comprises a head set having an arcuate, flexible band extending from one side of the user's head to the other side, and an arm extending from said band toward and at a predetermined distance from the user's nose and mouth, wherein the conduit at its nozzle end is attached to the arm.
3. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 2 wherein the arm defines
(a) an opening to detachably retain the nozzle end of the conduit, and (b) at least one aperture in fluid connection with the nozzle and through which the gas is
delivered to the user.
4. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 2 wherein the
predetermined distance is in the range from about 2 cm to about 8 cm.
5. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 1 wherein the arm defines a passageway in fluid connection with the conduit to deliver the gas to the user through the passageway.
6. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 5 and further comprising connector means for detachably connecting the conduit to the arm.
7. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 1 wherein said supporting means further comprises electrical means for receiving and/or transmitting audio and/ or electronic signals.
8. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 7 wherein the electrical means comprises at least one earphone.
9. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 8 wherein the electrical means comprises a microphone mounted on the arm.
10. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 1 wherein the gas is dispensed at a flow rate from about 3 1pm to about 15 1pm and at a concentration of oxygen from about 25 % to about 40% in the inspirational area.
11. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 1 wherein the desired gas is an oxygen enriched gaseous mixture and the gas source is a pressurized canister of the desired gas.
12. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 1 wherein the desired gas is an oxygen enriched gaseous mixture and the gas source is a pressure swing
adsorption apparatus.
13. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 12 wherein said pressure swing adsorption apparatus comprises means for fractionating at least one constituent from a gaseous mixture of two or more constituent gases to increase the concentration of one of the constituent gases to produce a product gas, means for delivering the product gas to the conduit at a flow rate, means for changing the concentration and flow rate to at least two different settings of substantially a fixed concentration and a fixed flow rate each, the concentrations and flow rates of the settings being different from each other, and means for selecting either one of the two settings to deliver the product gas at the fixed concentration and flow rate for that setting.
14. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 13 wherein the selecting means comprises a valve having at least two orifice sizes.
15. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 13 wherein said product gas is dispensed at a flow rate for each setting of within a range from about 3 to 15 litres per minute.
16. The non-contact gas dispenser of Claim 13 wherein the product gas comprises a mixture including oxygen and the mixture delivered at each setting has an oxygen concentration to dispense the gas to be delivered to the inspirational area in the range from about 25% to about 40% oxygen.
17. A method of selecting the predetermined distance in the gas dispenser of Claim 2, comprising the steps of selecting a gas source containing oxygen within a range from about 50% oxygen to about 95 % oxygen, delivering the oxygen to be dispensed from the nozzle at a flow rate from about 3 1pm to about 15 1pm, moving the nozzle in increments in a direction toward or away from a point comprising the center of the inspirational area, measuring the concentration of oxygen at the point for each increment of movement, selecting the increment at which the concentration of oxygen is from about 25 % to about 40%, and measuring the distance between the nozzle and the point at the selected increment.
PCT/US1998/018986 1997-09-15 1998-09-14 Non-contact gas dispenser and apparatus for use therewith WO1999013929A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US5880797 true 1997-09-15 1997-09-15
US5880697 true 1997-09-15 1997-09-15
US60/058,807 1997-09-15
US60/058,806 1997-09-15

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP51800899A JP2001506173A (en) 1997-09-15 1998-09-14 Non-contact gas supply device and apparatus for use therewith
EP19980946956 EP0941136A4 (en) 1997-09-15 1998-09-14 Non-contact gas dispenser and apparatus for use therewith
CA 2271854 CA2271854A1 (en) 1997-09-15 1998-09-14 Non-contact gas dispenser and apparatus for use therewith

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1999013929A1 true true WO1999013929A1 (en) 1999-03-25

Family

ID=26738045

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1998/018986 WO1999013929A1 (en) 1997-09-15 1998-09-14 Non-contact gas dispenser and apparatus for use therewith

Country Status (5)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0941136A4 (en)
JP (1) JP2001506173A (en)
KR (1) KR20000068969A (en)
CA (1) CA2271854A1 (en)
WO (1) WO1999013929A1 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2797770A1 (en) * 1999-08-30 2001-03-02 Air Liquide oxygen therapy equipment with respiratory assistance device without nasal tube
WO2001087394A3 (en) * 2000-05-17 2002-05-02 Southmedic Inc Patient oxygen delivery system
WO2002056966A1 (en) * 2001-01-19 2002-07-25 Luca Florindo De Individual portable air purifier
US6450166B1 (en) 2000-05-17 2002-09-17 Southmedic Incorporated Patient oxygen delivery system
US6595207B1 (en) 2000-09-11 2003-07-22 Southmedic Incorporated Oxygen diffuser for patient oxygen delivery system
FR2867390A1 (en) 2004-03-09 2005-09-16 Philippe Perez Air distributor for sportsman, has telescopic part, adjusting system and air distribution adjusting device, and flexible tubes and bend that are maintained on headband fixed with locking thumb wheel to hold conduit and ear-flap
WO2007028877A2 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-03-15 Philippe Perez Portable gas dispensing device
GB2501368A (en) * 2012-04-21 2013-10-23 Smiths Medical Int Ltd Apparatus for stimulating the trigeminal nerve

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2834467B1 (en) 2002-01-08 2004-10-01 Taema Valve has used demand oxygen therapy
JP4922813B2 (en) * 2007-04-20 2012-04-25 帝人ファーマ株式会社 Inhalation gas supply equipment
KR200447726Y1 (en) * 2009-03-03 2010-02-12 석경재 Apparatus for rhinitis curing

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4409978A (en) * 1980-06-16 1983-10-18 Portable Air Supply Systems, Corp. Portable, self-contained breathing apparatus
US4428372A (en) * 1980-07-31 1984-01-31 Linde Aktiengesellschaft Process and apparatus for providing breathing gas
US4593688A (en) * 1984-05-30 1986-06-10 Payton Hugh W Apparatus for the delivery of oxygen or the like
US4802899A (en) 1987-09-21 1989-02-07 Airsep Corporation Pressure swing adsorption apparatus
US5138722A (en) * 1991-07-02 1992-08-18 David Clark Company Inc. Headset ear seal
US5531807A (en) 1994-11-30 1996-07-02 Airsep Corporation Apparatus and method for supplying oxygen to passengers on board aircraft

Family Cites Families (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1968348A (en) * 1932-07-27 1934-07-31 Placide Henry Nozzle
US3683907A (en) * 1970-07-20 1972-08-15 Mine Safety Appliances Co Fresh air respirator
CA1297298C (en) * 1986-09-22 1992-03-17 Akira Kato Oxygen enriching apparatus with means for regulating oxygen concentration of oxygen enriched gas
US5353605A (en) * 1992-10-28 1994-10-11 Coolight Research & Development Ltd. Personal air cooling device
GB2300814B (en) * 1995-05-18 1999-08-04 Omeresan Dediare Portable personal air conditioning device
US5664733A (en) * 1995-09-01 1997-09-09 Lott; W. Gerald Fluid mixing nozzle and method

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4409978A (en) * 1980-06-16 1983-10-18 Portable Air Supply Systems, Corp. Portable, self-contained breathing apparatus
US4428372A (en) * 1980-07-31 1984-01-31 Linde Aktiengesellschaft Process and apparatus for providing breathing gas
US4593688A (en) * 1984-05-30 1986-06-10 Payton Hugh W Apparatus for the delivery of oxygen or the like
US4802899A (en) 1987-09-21 1989-02-07 Airsep Corporation Pressure swing adsorption apparatus
US5138722A (en) * 1991-07-02 1992-08-18 David Clark Company Inc. Headset ear seal
US5531807A (en) 1994-11-30 1996-07-02 Airsep Corporation Apparatus and method for supplying oxygen to passengers on board aircraft

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
See also references of EP0941136A4 *

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1082972A3 (en) * 1999-08-30 2001-12-12 Air Liquide Sante (International) Oxygenotherapy equipment having a respiratory assistance device without a nasal tube
FR2797770A1 (en) * 1999-08-30 2001-03-02 Air Liquide oxygen therapy equipment with respiratory assistance device without nasal tube
US6439235B1 (en) 1999-08-30 2002-08-27 L'air Liquide, Societe Anonyme A Directoire Et Conseil De Surveillance Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges Claude Oxygen therapy equipment with a device for respiratory assistance without a nose tube
US6450166B1 (en) 2000-05-17 2002-09-17 Southmedic Incorporated Patient oxygen delivery system
WO2001087394A3 (en) * 2000-05-17 2002-05-02 Southmedic Inc Patient oxygen delivery system
US6595207B1 (en) 2000-09-11 2003-07-22 Southmedic Incorporated Oxygen diffuser for patient oxygen delivery system
WO2002056966A1 (en) * 2001-01-19 2002-07-25 Luca Florindo De Individual portable air purifier
FR2867390A1 (en) 2004-03-09 2005-09-16 Philippe Perez Air distributor for sportsman, has telescopic part, adjusting system and air distribution adjusting device, and flexible tubes and bend that are maintained on headband fixed with locking thumb wheel to hold conduit and ear-flap
WO2005097018A1 (en) 2004-03-09 2005-10-20 Philippe Perez Small respiratory device for distributing pressurised air to a respiratory tract
WO2007028877A2 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-03-15 Philippe Perez Portable gas dispensing device
FR2890568A1 (en) 2005-09-09 2007-03-16 Philippe Perez A portable device for gas distribution
WO2007028877A3 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-05-03 Philippe Perez Portable gas dispensing device
GB2501368A (en) * 2012-04-21 2013-10-23 Smiths Medical Int Ltd Apparatus for stimulating the trigeminal nerve

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA2271854A1 (en) 1999-03-25 application
EP0941136A4 (en) 2001-09-12 application
EP0941136A1 (en) 1999-09-15 application
KR20000068969A (en) 2000-11-25 application
JP2001506173A (en) 2001-05-15 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3537448A (en) Therapeutic intermittent positive pressure respirator
US3182659A (en) Oxygen and inhalant mask
US6807967B2 (en) Ventilation interface for sleep apnea therapy
US4226233A (en) Respirators
US7059328B2 (en) Ventilation interface for sleep apnea therapy
US6718969B1 (en) Medication dosage inhaler system
US6631721B1 (en) Nebulizer mouthpiece and accessories
US3990442A (en) Respiratory treatment device
US7159587B2 (en) Respiratory mask having gas washout vent and gas washout vent assembly for respiratory mask
US6478026B1 (en) Nasal ventilation interface
US4210155A (en) Inspirational inhalation spirometer apparatus
US6247470B1 (en) Oxygen delivery, oxygen detection, carbon dioxide monitoring (ODODAC) apparatus and method
US6997177B2 (en) Ventilation interface for sleep apnea therapy
US20070295335A1 (en) Disposable anesthesia face mask
US6866041B2 (en) Oxygen concentrating aroma mixing breathable air delivery apparatus and method
US20080051674A1 (en) Respiratory Therapy System Including a Nasal Cannula Assembly
US5850833A (en) Apparatus for hypoxic training and therapy
US4266540A (en) Nasal oxygen therapy mask
US4648395A (en) Synchronized feed type oxygen concentrator for use in an open breathing system
US5758638A (en) Indicator for a medicament inhaler
US5924419A (en) Apparatus for passive hypoxic training and therapy
US5113857A (en) Breathing gas delivery system and holding clip member therefor
US20100252037A1 (en) Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation with gas delivery nozzles within nasal pillows
US20110125052A1 (en) Respiratory therapy system including a nasal cannula assembly
US20110214676A1 (en) Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with an entrainment port and/or pressure feature

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY CA CH CN CU CZ DE DK EE ES FI GB GE GH GM HU ID IL IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MD MG MK MN MW MX NO NZ PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TR TT UA UG UZ VN YU ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW SD SZ UG ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 1019997004206

Country of ref document: KR

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 2271854

Country of ref document: CA

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: JP

Ref document number: 1999 518008

Kind code of ref document: A

Format of ref document f/p: F

WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 1998946956

Country of ref document: EP

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
WWP Wipo information: published in national office

Ref document number: 1998946956

Country of ref document: EP

REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642

WWP Wipo information: published in national office

Ref document number: 1019997004206

Country of ref document: KR

WWW Wipo information: withdrawn in national office

Ref document number: 1998946956

Country of ref document: EP

WWR Wipo information: refused in national office

Ref document number: 1019997004206

Country of ref document: KR