WO1997010396A1 - Thermoplastic floor planks - Google Patents

Thermoplastic floor planks Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1997010396A1
WO1997010396A1 PCT/EP1995/003564 EP9503564W WO9710396A1 WO 1997010396 A1 WO1997010396 A1 WO 1997010396A1 EP 9503564 W EP9503564 W EP 9503564W WO 9710396 A1 WO9710396 A1 WO 9710396A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
thermoplastic
plank
side
floor
reinforcing member
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/EP1995/003564
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Herbert Bongartz
Marcel C. A. H. Neven
Original Assignee
Dow Europe S.A.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Dow Europe S.A. filed Critical Dow Europe S.A.
Priority to PCT/EP1995/003564 priority Critical patent/WO1997010396A1/en
Publication of WO1997010396A1 publication Critical patent/WO1997010396A1/en

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Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/10Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements of other materials, e.g. fibrous or chipped materials, organic plastics, magnesite tiles, hardboard, or with a top layer of other materials
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D90/00Component parts, details or accessories for large containers
    • B65D90/02Wall construction
    • B65D90/023Modular panels
    • B65D90/026Parallel slats
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/02Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials
    • E04C2/10Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials of wood, fibres, chips, vegetable stems, or the like; of plastics; of foamed products
    • E04C2/20Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials of wood, fibres, chips, vegetable stems, or the like; of plastics; of foamed products of plastics
    • E04C2/22Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials of wood, fibres, chips, vegetable stems, or the like; of plastics; of foamed products of plastics reinforced
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2203/00Specially structured or shaped covering, lining or flooring elements not otherwise provided for
    • E04F2203/04Specially structured or shaped covering, lining or flooring elements not otherwise provided for comprising a plurality of internal elongated cavities arranged in substantially parallel rows

Abstract

A floor plank (1) made of an extruded thermoplastic material comprising a plurality of hollow cells (2) extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the floor plank (1) and a reinforcing member (3) securely positioned within at least one of the hollow cells (2) so that the reinforcing member (3) can neither rotate within nor slip out of the at least one of the hollow cells (2). The thermoplastic plank (1) can have integral locking means, such as a flange (4A) and a corresponding flange (4B), extending along the length of the thermoplastic plank (1) on both side edges for locking adjacent thermoplastic planks together side-by-side to form a floor.

Description

THERMOPLASTIC FLOOR PLANKS

The present invention relates to a thermoplastic floor plank particularly useful for sea/land cargo container floors, truck and van floors, ship and boat decking, railway wagon floors, and platforms as well as a floors constructed with such plastic planks.

Container industry uses floor planks predominantly made of tropical hardwoods. Plywood made from tropical hardwoods such as apitong and keruing has been widely accepted by the container industry as the best material for container floors. Although tropical hardwood is most commonly used in container flooring applications, it has disadvantages in that it is expensive, is ecologically unfriendly due to the deforestations caused by excessive logging, is heavy and requires strict hygiene observance.

For these reasons and particularly due to rise in tropical wood prices brought up by severe restrictions imposed by relevant governments on logging tropical hardwoods and environmental pressures to replace tropical hardwoods by more environmental friendly materials ("green floors"), the container industry is forced to look for alternative materials to tropical hardwoods for container flooring applications. However, the move away from hardwoods has proved difficult. Various materials are being considered by the container industry as possible replacement materials for tropical hardwoods but it is still unclear which, if any, alternative material will be favored by the container industry.

5 Softwoods such as Finnish and Scandinavian birch plywood, as long as its price is comparable to the price of tropical hardwoods, are considered by the industry as possible alternate flooring material. However, even though softwood is finding place in the container flooring market, it is unclear whether the softwood capacity exists to serve the mass market. Moreover, the use of softwoods is connected with the use of wood preservative materials which are often toxic and are undesirable in containers transporting food articles due to the risk of contaminating the transported food articles.

Rubberwood, properly treated and processed, is another possible tropical hardwoods replacement material considered by the container industry.. Although, rubberwood is a plantation wood, is environmental friendly and has been proven to be good replacement for 20 apitong, the container industry is reluctant to accept 100 percent rubberwood floors. Moreover, it remains to be seen whether sufficient quantities of rubberwood can be grown to satisfy the demands of the container box building industry.

c Bamboo is another possible tropical hardwoods replacement material considered by the container industry. No availability problems are associated with bamboo since it grows in 3-5 years, depending on the climatic conditions. Bamboo flooring can generate sufficient strength to compare it with tropical hardwood flooring. Bamboo flooring biggest

30 problem appears to be its weight and the fact that bamboo floor cannot be nailed down.

Although the search for viable alternatives to tropical hardwoods as container flooring materials has concentrated on the aforementioned alternative wood sources, other alternative materials such as plastic-coated laminated softwoods, metal/wood combinations, and totally non-wood materials such as, metal/plastic combinations, metals (e.g., aluminum), plastics and waste textile materials have been considered but are believed as unlikely to be viable for years to come.

It has been reported that Dong Yang Chemicals, a South Korean company, and Envirodek, a U.K. company, have under development an all plastic flooring material (see, e.g., Cargo Systems September 1994, p. 37-39 and Cargo Systems August 1994, p. 55, respectively). However, there is no indication as yet of any use of such materials in commercial transportation container flooring applications.

French Patent No. 1 ,522,503 teaches that a matrix of foamed thermoplastic/thermoset material can be reinforced with wooden sticks, plastic extrudates, light metal tubes, reinforced plastic profiles and other reinforcing materials. The reinforcing materials may be linked to each other to form a continuous network (horizontally or at an angle) but it is essential that they also must adhere to the polymer matrix which makes separation and recycling very difficult.

French Patent No. 2,579,926 teaches the increasing use of thermoplastic profiles having hollow cell structure as products replacing wood or metal (e.g., for window, door, garage doors, fencing and other applications) since they do not rot, are corrosion resistant and can be colored in the mass. It further teaches that thermoplastic profiles can be reinforced. The reinforcement can be done by increasing the thickness

(this increases the use of material) of the profile or by providing a metal or wooden internal reinforcement (this results in the profiles weight and cost increase). It is also suggested to increase the elastic modulus of the thermoplastic profiles by incorporation of glass or other mineral fibers and fillers, thereby providing a composite material. However, the resultant products are expensive and difficult to convert to finished profiles by usual extrusion methods. The document also teaches that extruded thermoplastic profile may be reinforced and stiffened by including a reinforcing element designed to be anchored in the set thermoplastic profile. The adhesion between thermoplastic profile and reinforcing element may be obtained using surface undercuts, perforation through the body of the thermoplastic profile, the use of adhesive, or heat sealing the reinforcing element to the thermoplastic profile. This type of reinforcing elements attachment to the thermoplastic profiles make separation and recycling very difficult tasks.

Planks of various configuration made of a plastic material for use in flooring, decking and scaffolding applications are known. See, for example, Japanese Utility Model Publication No. 125172; Japanese Patent Publication Nos. 1217/77 and 21154/80; U.S. Patent No.4,349,297; U.S. Patent No.4,496,029; U.S. Patent No. 5,009,045; and U.S. Patent No. 0 5,412,915.

However, none of the known plastic planks has been accepted by the transportation industry for use in flooring applications such as cargo container floors, and truck and van floors for various reasons. It is 5 evident that the container industry does not as yet have a viable alternative to tropical hardwood for flooring applications. The search for a viable alternative materials to tropical hardwoods for flooring applications is, therefore, continuing.

0 The present invention concerns an improved floor plank of extruded thermoplastic material which is light, easy to manufacture, has an improved flexural strength and rigidity, is hygienic, easy to maintain and recycle. The thermoplastic floor plank of this invention is particularly suitable for sea/land cargo container floors, truck and van floors, railway 5 wagon floors and platforms.

In one aspect, the present invention concerns a floor plank made of a thermoplastic material comprising plurality of hollow cells extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the floor n plank and a reinforcing member securely positioned within at least one of the hollow cells.

In another aspect, the present invention concerns floors, decks, and platforms constructed with the thermoplastic planks of this invention. We have now surprisingly discovered that a plank made of a thermoplastic material having plurality hollow cells extending in a side- by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank and including a reinforcing member securely positioned inside at least one of the hollow cells so that the reinforcing member can neither rotate within nor slip out of the at least one of the hollow cells has improved properties due to the unexpected combination of high flexural strength and rigidity, long term performance and economical use of material. It is not essential that the reinforcing member be physically attached or adhered to the walls of the at least one of the hollow cells to be securely positioned inside the at least one of the hollow cells. However, if the reinforcing member is securely positioned inside the at least one of the hollow cells in such manner, it shall not be physically attached or adhered to more than one point of the wall of the at least one of the hollow cells to minimize or prevent failure under cyclical loads due to stress concentrations. If physically attached or adhered to the wall of the at least one of the hollow cells, it is preferred that the reinforcing member be physically attached or adhered to the wall of the at least one of the hollow cells at the end of the reinforcing member. Easy installation and separation of the reinforcing member from the thermoplastic plank due to the fact that it is not physically attached or adhered to more than one point of the wall of the at least one of the hollow cells ofthe thermoplastic plank is an additional advantage of this invention.

The embodiments of the present invention shown in the drawings and described herein in detail are to be considered an exemplification of the invention, and are not intended to limit the present invention to the embodiments illustrated. It should be noted that dimensional relationships between members of the illustrated embodiment may vary in practice or may have been varied in the illustrations to emphasize certain features of the invention.

Figs. 1 to 6 show a partial perspective view of different embodiments of the thermoplastic plank 1 of the present invention. Figs. 7 to 9 show a partial perspective view of different embodiments of the floor 5 assembled from two or more thermoplastic planks 1.

Figs. 10A to 10D show different embodiments of the reinforcing member 3 useful in the present invention.

The thermoplastic plank 1 illustrated in Fig. 1 has plurality of rectangular hollow closed cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1 and the l-shaped 10 reinforcing member 3 securely positioned within some of the hollow closed cells 2 so that it can neither rotate within nor slip out of the hollow cell 2.

The thermoplastic plank 1 illustrated in Fig. 2 has plurality of 15 triangular hollow closed cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1 and the T-shaped reinforcing member 3 securely positioned within some ofthe hollow closed cells 2 so that it can neither rotate within nor slip out of the hollow cell 2.

20

The thermoplastic plank 1 illustrated in Fig. 3 has plurality of square hollow closed cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1 and the square-shaped reinforcing member 3 securely positioned within some of the hollow

25 closed cells 2 so that it can neither rotate within nor slip out of the hollow cell 2.

The thermoplastic plank 1 illustrated in Fig.4 has plurality of rectangular hollow open cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1 and the l-shaped reinforcing member 3 securely positioned within some of the hollow open cells 2 so that it can neither rotate within nor slip out of the hollow open cell. The thermoplastic plank 1 illustrated in Fig. 5 has plurality of rectangular hollow closed cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1 , the l-shaped reinforcing member 3 securely positioned within some of the hollow closed cells 2 so that it can neither rotate within nor slip out of the hollow cell, and integral locking means 4A.4B extending along the length of the thermoplastic plank 1 on both side edges for locking adjacent thermoplastic planks 1 together side-by-side to form a floor.

The thermoplastic plank 1 illustrated in Fig. 6 has plurality of

10 rectangular hollow closed cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1 , the l-shaped reinforcing member 3 securely positioned within some of the hollow closed cells 2 so that it can neither rotate within nor slip out of the hollow cell, and , c integral locking means 4C,4D extending along the length of the thermoplastic plank 1 on both side edges for locking adjacent thermoplastic planks 1 together side-by-side to form a floor.

Fig. 7 illustrates a floor 5 of the present invention comprising 2n three thermoplastic planks 1 assembled together in a side-by-side longitudinal contact.

Fig. 8 illustrates two thermoplastic planks 1 of this invention assembled together in a side-by-side longitudinal contact by the flange 25 4A / corresponding flange 4B connecting means to form partially assembled floor 5 of the present invention.

Fig. 9 illustrates two thermoplastic planks 1 of this invention assembled together in a side-by-side longitudinal contact by the tongue _n 4C / mating groove 4D connecting means to form partially assembled floor 5 of the present invention.

The thermoplastic plank illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 is made of an extruded thermoplastic material, preferably reinforced with a filler such as calcium carbonate, talc, glass fibers, silicates, wood flour or any other suitable material. There are plurality of hollow cells 2 extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the thermoplastic plank 1. The hollow closed or open cells 2 can have various shapes such as, for example, rectangular, triangular and square shape as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. The number and size of hollow cells 2 can be varied depending on the width of the thermoplastic plank 1 and the intended use ofthe thermoplastic plank. The hollow cells 2 can be close or open type cells. When open cells are used in the thermoplastic plank 1, the cells are opened at the bottom surface, i.e. , the side opposite the load bearing , β surface, of the thermoplastic plank 1 because the load bearing surface of the thermoplastic plank 1 must be solid and substantially flat, as illustrated in Fig.4.

The reinforcing member 3, illustrated in Figs. 10A to 10D, . ,. made of a suitable material is securely positioned within at least one of the hollow cells 2. The reinforcing member 3 can easily be inserted into or removed from the hollow cell but can neither rotate within nor accidentally slip out of the hollow cell 2.

If desired, the thermoplastic plank 1 can have integral locking means extending along the length of the thermoplastic plank 1 on both side edges for locking adjacent thermoplastic planks together side-by- side to form an assembled plastic floor. Locking means can be any suitable locking means known to a skilled person but it is preferred that

25 the locking means comprises a flange 4A formed on one side edge of the thermoplastic plank 1 and a corresponding flange 4B on the other side edge of the thermoplastic plank 1 (illustrated in Fig. 5) or a tongue 4C formed on one side edge of the thermoplastic plank 1 and a mating groove 4D on the other side edge of the thermoplastic plank 1

30 (illustrated in Fig. 6). Each of the flange 4A and the corresponding flange 4B as well as the tongue 4C and the mating groove 4D of one thermoplastic plank 1 mate with the corresponding elements on adjacent flooring thermoplastic planks 1. Thermoplastic materials suitable for the manufacture of the thermoplastic plank 1 as well as the extrusion techniques are well known in the art. Suitable thermoplastic materials include, for example,polyolefins and blends thereof, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, polymethyl methacrylate and copolymers of methyl methacrylate with acrylic acid and alkyl acrylates, polyoxymethylenes, polycarbonates, polyamides and polyesters which are preferably of a high molecular weight. Suitable polyolefins include polyethylene, polypropylene homopolymers and copolymers, and blends thereof. Polyethylenes such

1 Q as high density polyethylene, ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, low density polyethylene, linear low density polyethylene are preferred thermoplastic materials. High density polyethylene and blends thereof particularly the one manufactured by the metallocene catalyst technology is preferred thermoplastic material. Suitable thermoplastic

15 materials and their preparation is described in U.S. Patent Nos. 3,616,018, 3,183,283, 3,392,213, 3,914,342 and 4,937,299; European Patent No. 0'129'368; Belgian Patent No. 533,362; and International Patent Publication Nos. WO 93/1 1940, WO 94/09060 and WO 94/171 12. Preferably, thermoplastic materials are reinforced with a filler such as, for

20 example, calcium carbonate, talc, glass fibers, silicates, mica, and wood flour.

The thermoplastic plank 1 of this invention is typically 2 m to 12 m, preferably 6 m to 12 m, long, 20 mm to 40 mm, preferably 25 mm to 35 mm high, and 100 mm to 300 mm, preferably 100 mm to 200 mm, wide and is produced by extrusion. It should, however, be appreciated that these dimensions can vary to suit the particular floor construction and proper plank dimensions will be readily determined by the skilled artisan ~ _ without undue experimentation. The width/height ratio of the thermoplastic plank 1 is typically greater than 2: 1. The thermoplastic plank 1 shall have substantially constant height and the load bearing surface of the thermoplastic plank 1 shall basically be a solid flat surface.

A reinforcing member of any shape known to a skilled person can be used as the reinforcing member 3 in the present invention. The number and shape of the reinforcing members 3 used in the thermoplastic plank 1 will depend on the intended use of the plank and will readily be known to a skilled person. Some suitable reinforcing members 3 are illustrated in Figs. 10A to 10D. The l-shaped reinforcing member is the preferred reinforcing member 3. The reinforcing member 3 can conveniently be made of any known suitable material such as, for example, a fiber reinforced plastic material, an aluminum alloy, steel and magnesium alloy. Suitable fiber reinforced plastic materials are those which have significantly (more than a factor of 10) higher Young's Modulus than a thermoplastic material used for the manufacture of the thermoplastic plank 1. Fiber reinforced plastic materials suitable for the manufacture of the reinforcing member 3 used in the present invention are well known to a skilled person. These materials include fiber reinforced polyester resins and thermoplastic materials mentioned hereinabove reinforced with a fiber. The dimensions of the reinforcing member 3 are such that it fits snugly inside the hollow cell 2 without the need to be fastened to the walls thereof with a separate fastening means but , if desired, it can be fastened to no more than one point to the wall of the hollow cell 2, preferably at either end of the reinforcing member 3. A skilled person can easily determine proper dimensions ofthe reinforcing member 3. The reinforcing member 3 has no sharp edges to minimize the risk of cutting into the walls of the hollow cell 2.

Two or more thermoplastic planks 1 can be assembled together in a side-by-side longitudinal contact into the floor 5 of the present invention as illustrated in Figs. 7 to 9. The assembled floor 5 of the present invention can be fastened to a floor supporting structure of a sea/air cargo container, truck, van, ship, railway wagon and the like by a suitable fastening means, such as screws and clips. When fastening the floor planks 1 to the floor supporting structure, it should be taken care that the fastening means do not go through or are attached to the reinforcing members 3.

The thermoplastic plank 1 is particularly suitable for transportation container floors and represents a clear improvement over planks conventionally used by the transportation industry in flooring applications due to its unique structure and unexpected combination of improved flexural strength and rigidity, long term performance, recyclability of materials, and light weight. Moreover, cargo container floors constructed of thermoplastic planks 1 are resistant to corrosion and chemicals, are hygienic and easy to maintain.

It should be understood that the present invention may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the spirit and scope of the invention, and all such modifications as would be obvious to those skilled in the art are included within the scope of the following claims.

Claims

PATENT CLAIMS:
1 . A floor plank made of a thermoplastic material comprising plurality of hollow cells extending in a side-by-side arrangement lengthwise through the floor plank and a reinforcing member securely positioned within at least one of the hollow cells.
2. A floor plank of Claim 1 wherein each of said hollow cells is rectangular in shape.
10
3. A floor plank of Claim 2 wherein each of said hollow cells is a closed type cell.
4. A floor plank of Claim 2 wherein each of said hollow cells is an j^ c open type cell.
5. A floor plank of any one of Claims 1 to 4 wherein said reinforcing member is an l-shaped member.
6. A floor plank of Claim 5 wherein said l-shaped reinforcing
20 member is is made of a fiber reinforced plastic material.
7. A floor plank of any one of Claims 1 to 6 further comprising integral locking means extending along the length of the thermoplastic plank on both side edges.
25
8. A floor plank of Claim 5 wherein said integral locking means is a tongue formed on one side edge of the thermoplastic plank and a mating groove formed on the other side edge of the thermoplastic plank.
9. A floor plank of Claim 5 wherein said integral locking means is a flange formed on one side edge of the thermoplastic plank and a corresponding flange formed on the other side edge of the thermoplastic plank.
10. A floor comprising two or more thermoplastic planks of any one of Claims 1 to 9 assembled together in a side-by-side longitudinal contact.
PCT/EP1995/003564 1995-09-11 1995-09-11 Thermoplastic floor planks WO1997010396A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/EP1995/003564 WO1997010396A1 (en) 1995-09-11 1995-09-11 Thermoplastic floor planks

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/EP1995/003564 WO1997010396A1 (en) 1995-09-11 1995-09-11 Thermoplastic floor planks

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1997010396A1 true WO1997010396A1 (en) 1997-03-20

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0892121A1 (en) * 1996-01-31 1999-01-20 Jean Paul Tisserand Method for realizing rigid hollow structures of polycarbonate or PVC and utilization of the method for fabricating shelters or receptacles
DE10342357A1 (en) * 2003-07-23 2005-02-17 Peter Kellner Compound plate comprises a natural stone layer glued to a single carrier element incorporating parallel hollow spaces separated from one another by bridge pieces
US7419717B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2008-09-02 Mannington Mills, Inc. Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same
GB2463229A (en) * 2007-09-05 2010-03-10 Terence Hoyland Machine for inserting reinforcing profiles into hollow sections of a manufactured plank
EP2184145A1 (en) 2008-11-06 2010-05-12 Novo-Tech GmbH & Co. KG Transport base
US7763345B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2010-07-27 Mannington Mills, Inc. Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same
DE202010011076U1 (en) 2009-08-10 2010-10-28 Werzalit Gmbh + Co. Kg Form-stabilized profile element with stiffening element
EP2527559A1 (en) * 2011-05-24 2012-11-28 Novo-Tech GmbH & Co. KG Panel and method for manufacturing a panel
JP2015168947A (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-28 積水化学工業株式会社 artificial wood
US9222267B2 (en) 2006-01-12 2015-12-29 Valinge Innovation Ab Set of floorboards having a resilient groove
US9249581B2 (en) 2009-09-04 2016-02-02 Valinge Innovation Ab Resilient floor
US9359773B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2016-06-07 Columbia Insurance Company Non-vinyl resilient flooring product and methods of making same
US9604677B2 (en) 2014-06-13 2017-03-28 Altec Industries, Inc. Truck body assembly and methods of making and using same
US10059084B2 (en) 2014-07-16 2018-08-28 Valinge Innovation Ab Method to produce a thermoplastic wear resistant foil
US10259204B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2019-04-16 Columbia Insurance Company Resilient flooring product and methods of making same
US10486399B2 (en) 2015-04-22 2019-11-26 Valinge Innovation Ab Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same

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US3194708A (en) * 1959-11-07 1965-07-13 Houilleres Bassin Du Nord Production of light structural members
FR1443906A (en) * 1965-01-11 1966-07-01 Improvements in plastic roof sheeting and similar applications
CH434654A (en) * 1964-07-15 1967-04-30 Rohpappen Fabrik Worms Zweigni Reinforced foam sheet
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GB1393577A (en) * 1972-10-31 1975-05-07 Kuroda S Architectural elements
AT375436B (en) * 1978-09-22 1984-08-10 Schmidt Josef Means for stiffening components made of plastic or the like.
EP0341729A2 (en) * 1988-05-11 1989-11-15 GRAAFF Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung Double-panel floor for large containers
WO1992014892A1 (en) * 1991-02-18 1992-09-03 Arostegui Echeverria Jesus Form decking in a single piece of composite material
DE4110828A1 (en) * 1991-04-04 1992-10-08 Hiendl Heribert Constructional plastics web panel with 2 parallel sections - has longitudinal and/or transverse reinforcement lengths of profiled material
WO1993001371A1 (en) * 1991-07-08 1993-01-21 Plastedil S.A. Modular panel of expanded synthetic material provided with staggered longitudinal 't'-shaped channels, receiving 't'-shaped wooden posts useful for erecting walls

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1048009B (en) * 1954-03-30 1958-12-31 Russell Reinforced Plastics Co Component of layered materials and from such elements composite component
US3194708A (en) * 1959-11-07 1965-07-13 Houilleres Bassin Du Nord Production of light structural members
DE1434120A1 (en) * 1960-07-13 1968-11-28 Thiel Alfons W Device for covering spaces, full hotbeds like. consisting of a stiffened plastic
CH434654A (en) * 1964-07-15 1967-04-30 Rohpappen Fabrik Worms Zweigni Reinforced foam sheet
FR1443906A (en) * 1965-01-11 1966-07-01 Improvements in plastic roof sheeting and similar applications
GB1393577A (en) * 1972-10-31 1975-05-07 Kuroda S Architectural elements
AT375436B (en) * 1978-09-22 1984-08-10 Schmidt Josef Means for stiffening components made of plastic or the like.
EP0341729A2 (en) * 1988-05-11 1989-11-15 GRAAFF Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung Double-panel floor for large containers
WO1992014892A1 (en) * 1991-02-18 1992-09-03 Arostegui Echeverria Jesus Form decking in a single piece of composite material
DE4110828A1 (en) * 1991-04-04 1992-10-08 Hiendl Heribert Constructional plastics web panel with 2 parallel sections - has longitudinal and/or transverse reinforcement lengths of profiled material
WO1993001371A1 (en) * 1991-07-08 1993-01-21 Plastedil S.A. Modular panel of expanded synthetic material provided with staggered longitudinal 't'-shaped channels, receiving 't'-shaped wooden posts useful for erecting walls

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0892121A1 (en) * 1996-01-31 1999-01-20 Jean Paul Tisserand Method for realizing rigid hollow structures of polycarbonate or PVC and utilization of the method for fabricating shelters or receptacles
US7763345B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2010-07-27 Mannington Mills, Inc. Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same
US7419717B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2008-09-02 Mannington Mills, Inc. Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same
US8021741B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2011-09-20 Mannington Mills, Inc. Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same
US8834992B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2014-09-16 Valinge Innovation Ab Thermoplastic planks and methods for making the same
DE10342357A1 (en) * 2003-07-23 2005-02-17 Peter Kellner Compound plate comprises a natural stone layer glued to a single carrier element incorporating parallel hollow spaces separated from one another by bridge pieces
US9765530B2 (en) 2006-01-12 2017-09-19 Valinge Innovation Ab Floorboards comprising a decorative edge part in a resilient surface layer
US9222267B2 (en) 2006-01-12 2015-12-29 Valinge Innovation Ab Set of floorboards having a resilient groove
US10450760B2 (en) 2006-01-12 2019-10-22 Valinge Innovation Ab Floorboards comprising a decorative edge part in a resilient surface layer
GB2463229B (en) * 2007-09-05 2011-07-06 Terence Hoyland An automated machine for inserting strengthening profiles within hollow sections
GB2463229A (en) * 2007-09-05 2010-03-10 Terence Hoyland Machine for inserting reinforcing profiles into hollow sections of a manufactured plank
EP2184145A1 (en) 2008-11-06 2010-05-12 Novo-Tech GmbH & Co. KG Transport base
DE202010011076U1 (en) 2009-08-10 2010-10-28 Werzalit Gmbh + Co. Kg Form-stabilized profile element with stiffening element
DE202010011075U1 (en) 2009-08-10 2010-11-25 Werzalit Gmbh + Co. Kg Form-stabilized profile element with preformed stiffening element
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