WO1997007700A2 - A sports boot - Google Patents

A sports boot Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1997007700A2
WO1997007700A2 PCT/GB1996/002052 GB9602052W WO9707700A2 WO 1997007700 A2 WO1997007700 A2 WO 1997007700A2 GB 9602052 W GB9602052 W GB 9602052W WO 9707700 A2 WO9707700 A2 WO 9707700A2
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
layer
shock
sole portion
absorbing
material
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/GB1996/002052
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO1997007700A3 (en )
Inventor
Mark Kershaw
Original Assignee
Umbro Europe Limited
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/187Resiliency achieved by the features of the material, e.g. foam, non liquid materials

Abstract

Footwear, particularly sports boots, are provided with increased shock-absorbing capacity but without increasing the height of the users foot from the ground. A portion of shock absorbing material is provided in the recess in the insole layer to give the necessary depth of cushioning, but with the insole layer surrounding it to give the necessary rigidity to the footwear.

Description

A SPORTS BOOT

This invention relates to a sports boot of the type which incorporates shock-absorbing material to reduce shock or impact forces being transferred to a wearer's foot or leg. The sports boot of the invention is particularly, though not exclusively, suitable for use in playing football, rugby, hockey and the like as well as offering footwear suitable for other sport activities.

It is known to provide a layer of shock-absorbing material between the upper of a shoe or boot and the sole in order to absorb impact. The shock-absorbing layer is formed from a material which is adapted to partially absorb the impact between a wearer's foot and the ground. This shock-absorbing layer may comprise a foam type material or, in the case training shoes, a pneumatic insert. It is common to find some sort of shock-absorbing layer in most high quality training shoes.

The introduction of shock-absorbing material in sports boots, shoes and footwear, particularly those including studs or spikes, does, however, present problems. Any such additional layer or pneumatic chamber increases the thickness of the shoe between the users foot and the ground. However, it is important for a players foot not to be raised too far above the surface of the ground as raising the foot can impair grip and stability, as well as making the wearer more prone to injuries, for example, sprained ankles or knee injuries. Introducing a layer of shock-absorbing material into a football boot or other sports shoe can raise a wearer's foot by at least about a further 5mm above ground level. Persons skilled in the art have attempted to produce a satisfactory design where the shock-absorbing qualities are good and the foot is not raised above the ground too far, but these have not succeeded.

The sports boot of the invention seeks to overcome the problems aεsociated with known techniques for providing shock-absorbing material in a sports boot. An improved construction of boot is provided with a shock-absorbing material which does not significantly raise a wearer's foot above ground level. According to one aspect of the invention there is provided a sports boot which comprises an upper adapted to fit around a wearer's foot in use and a sole secured to the upper, said sole comprising an outsole layer, an insole layer and at least one sole portion of shock-absorbing material, wherein said at least one sole portion is provided in the insole layer.

The sports boot of the invention has the advantage that portions of shock-absorbing material are provided in the plane of the insole layer. This means that shock-absorbing material replaces some of the insole material of a traditional layer construction of sports boot, or other sports shoe. An increased, thick layer of shock-absorbing material can, therefore, be provided without significantly raising a wearer's foot above ground level. Hence the sports boot or shoe of the invention has superior shock-absorbing qualities compared with a traditional sports boot of the same sole thicknesε. Furthermore, as the sports boot does not significantly raise a wearer's foot above ground level the risk of injury is reduced.

The degree of shock absorbency of the material can be measured, and preferably the material εelected to form the shock-absorbing sole portion is of such a constitution that, when measured for shock absorbency, it gives a numerical indication in the range 0.1 up to 15% of the body maεε of the wearer of the boot.

Preferably the sports boot is provided with or is adapted to receive projecting elements for the outside of its sole. Studs or spikes may be provided. The projections maybe plugged or screwed into complementary recesεes provided in the outsole of the boot.

Preferably the inεole layer is formed of a relatively εtiff material. In this way the desired rigidity for the boot is maintained.

A further advantage for the boot is that the shock-absorbing material forming the sole portion may be less dense than the insole material, therefore, as some insole material is replaced with shock-absorbing material the weight of the boot can be reduced.

Another problem with conventional constructions of training shoe, which incorporate a shock absorbing layer over a large part of the sole, is that the number of surfaceε which must be bonded together is increased. This increases the cost of manufacturing the shoe and also increases the risk of the shoe failing during use by the extra layer shearing or tearing. The risk of failure in a studded or spiked sports shoe is substantially increased due to the higher and more localised stresses transferred to the shoe by virtue of the shoe or boot's enhanced grip with the ground.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention the insole layer includes at least one recess which is filled by the at least one shock-absorbing sole portion. The recess may be provided at a region of the sole which, in use, is subjected to impact", and preferably the higheεt impact levels, for example regions which are compresεed by the ball or heel of a wearer's foot. This has the advantage that maximum shock-abεorbing protection can be provided at areaε which are subject to high impact during use.

The insole layer may have two or more apertureε. Preferably, the insole layer has two apertures, one being located in the front portion of the boot and the other being located in the heel portion of the boot, and with both being filled by a shock- abεorbing material. Theεe correspond to the two regionε which are most likely to be subjected to impact during use ie. at the ball and heel of the foot.

A further aperture may be provided intermediate of the two apertures to provide protection from impact to the arch of a wearer's foot in use. Thiε provideε a comfortable construction of sports boot with excellent shock-absorbing qualities. The at least one sole portion of shock-absorbing material may be removable. Removable shock-absorbing sole portionε have the advantage that sole portions may be interchanged with other sole portions having different shock-absorbing or stiffness characteristics. For example, a wearer can customise his sports boot by selecting a sole portion which produces a sportε boot with the desired shock-absorbing and stiffness characteristics. Different wearer's may differ in the degree of shock absorbency, stiffness or softness desired. A further advantage is that these characteristics could be changed according to the type of playing or sports surface, for example, natural grass or turf, artificial surfaces (e.g. Astroturf) , or redgra; or according to the particular playing conditionε at the time of play, for example, a softer more shock abεorbent εole portion for dry and hard conditions; or a less εhock absorbent and stiffer sole portion for wet and soft εurfaceε. Therefore, the εports boot of the invention is very adaptable and allows a wearer to compensate for the particular surface on which the sportε boot will be uεed.

Alternatively, the εhock-abεorbing sole portion or portions may be an integral part of the insole layer. The shock-abεorbing sole portions may be co-extruded with the insole layer. Integrally formed sole portions provide optimum strength and durability. Different materials may be used for the εole portion and the insole layer to provide the different properties.

Generally, the sole portion may be provided with a lip of εhock absorbent material extending outwards from the sole portion and arranged to cover the edges of the recess or aperture in the insole layer. The shock-abεorbing material may extend radially away from the axiε of the aperture in the inεole layer over the inner surface of the insole layer. Unsightly or uneven joints between the insole layer and the sole portion are covered. Furthermore, εhock-absorbing material in this conεtruction would overlie any jointε between the εole portion and the inεole layer, thereby reducing the risk of blistering or bruising during use. The sole portion may comprise a layer of shock-absorbing material extending over the upper/inner εurface of the inεole layer with, preferably thicker εole portionε of εhock-absorbing material being provided in the insole layer. The sole portion separates the whole surface of the insole layer from an insock or a wearer's foot in such a construction. Shock-absorbing material in this construction present a smooth continuous surface which provides a shock-absorbing cushion for the whole surface of the sole.

The sole portion may comprise a sole portion layer of shock-absorbing material extending over the upper surface of the insole layer over an area which is susceptible to particularly high impact. For example, the sole portion may extend over the whole of the heel portion of the insole layer. Thiε area tendε to be susceptible to higher levels of impact during use aε the heel iε often the firεt area of the foot to make contact with the ground.

Preferably, the εole portion layer iε tapered towardε the toe of the boot. The heel of a wearer's foot experiences the highest impact forces during use and less impact is experienced at the front of the boot. Material and weight savings can be achieved with a tapered sole construction without noticeably reducing the shock-abεorbing qualitieε of the εports boot.

The shock-absorbing sole portion and / or sole portion layer may be internally visible. The aesthetic appearance of sportε bootε and shoes are very important qualities of the product. An internally visible shock-absorber indicates to a potential customer the shock-absorbing qualities of the boot.

The upper may be secured to the sole intermediate of the insole and outsole. This construction is used to enhance the strength of the securement, and produces a more durable boot.

The upper may be secured to the insole by stitching, or by a combination of stitching and adhesive bonding.

Preferably, the inεole layer comprises a stiff material. The shock-absorbing material may have poor stiffness and rigidity and cannot normally by itself provide adequate protection from, for example, the studs or spikes of a sports boot from pushing through the outsole layer causing raised regions on the internal surface of the boot or shoe during use. Although the outsole layer is strong, the weight of a wearer bearing down on the boot causes the sole to flex. This produces raised regionε at the studs and these can cause discomfort, and are sites at which the risk of blistering or bruising of a foot is increased.

The insole layer may include a border of stiff material which iε adapted to overlie one or more studs or stud sockets provided on the outsole layer. The border provides protection from the studs causing raised regions in the sole.

Preferably, the outsole layer comprises a stiff material and may be stiffened with one or more ribs extending along the length of the boot. The ribs maybe formed integrally with the outsole layer or alternatively as an additional component inserted therein or fastened there to. It is important that a sports boot is comfortable yet provides adequate support to a wearer's foot and an appropriate degree of stiffness.

The shock-absorbing material may comprise a foam material. An example of a preferred εhock-abεorbing material is a closed cell foam material. Closed cell foams are non absorbent and the pockets of air trapped in the material provide further shock-absorbing protection.

Preferably, the shock-absorbing material has a thickness in the range 2mm to 4mm.

One or more shock-absorbing sole portions in the insole layer may be connected to one another by a lip portion extending over the inner εurface of the inεole layer. In thiε way a one piece conεtruction for the εhock-absorbing sole portions can be provided.

The shock adsorbing εole portionε may be attached or mounted on a socklining element of flexible material. The sockliner maybe defined by the extending lip portion or alternatively the sole portions maybe connected to one another by a textile sockliner. Thus conventional levels of cushioning may be provided at many locations, with enhanced cuεhioning only where actually needed. The minium thickneεε and maximum εtiffneεε due to the continued presence of the insole layer at most locations can thus be provided.

According to another aspect of the invention there is provided a method of manufacturing a sports boot which comprises: forming at least one shock-absorbing sole portion; forming an insole layer; εecuring an upper to the inεole layer; inserting the at least one shock-absorbing sole portion into at least one recesε provided in the inεole layer to form an insole assembly.

Generally, the method further includes the step of securing the insole assembly to an outsole layer. The upper maybe secured to the insole asεembly between a portion of the insole layer and a portion of the outsole layer. The outsole layer may be adapted to accept a plurality of detachable studε or εpikeε.

Preferably, at leaεt one aperture iε provided in the inεole layer, said at least one aperture adapted to accept the at least one shock-absorbing sole portion.

Embodimentε of the present invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 iε a plan view of a known traditional insole for a sports boot;

Figure 2 is a front cross-sectional view of an embodiment of sports boot according to the invention showing detail of the sole at the toe or front portion of the boot;

Figure 3 is a cross-sectional view of the sports boot of Figure 2 showing detail of the conεtruction of the heel portion of the boot;

Figure 4 iε a plan view of an insole assembly with shock-absorbing sole portions being provided in apertures provided in the insole layer;

Figure 5 is a croεε-sectional view on line BB of the asεembly εhown in Figure 4 ;

Figures 6a to c are views of a shock-abεorbing insert used to reduce impact at the heel region of the sports boot;

Figureε 7a and b illuεtrate a further embodiment of a εhock absorbing insert;

Figure 8 illustrateε a εtill further embodiment of the invention; and

Figure 9 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the embodiment of Figure 8 during insertion.

Referring to the drawings in detail, Figure 1 depicts a known insole for a εportε εhoe, generally indicated by reference numeral 1, which compriεes a generally uniform thickness of semi-stiff material to which is secured an upper and an outsole. The insole 1 has a toe region 2 and a heel region 3.

Figure 2 is a cross-sectional view of the front end of a sports boot 4, according to the invention, which comprises an upper 5 secured intermediate of an insole layer 6 and outεole layer 7 by adhesive, or stitching, or both by stitching and adhesive. Typical range of thickness of the insole layer 6 iε between 3mm to 7mm, and of the outεole layer 7 between 2mm to 18mm. Thiε sandwich construction provides a robust construction of boot which is resistant to bond splitting or separating. The upper 5 comprises leather or a synthetic material.

The insole layer 6 has two apertures 8 (only one of which is shown in this figure) one in the ball of the foot region and one in the heel region of the boot 4. These regionε of the uεerε foot are particularly prone to εhock or impact in uεe. A shock-absorbing εole portion 9 is located in the aperture 8 and bonded to the insole layer 6 and outsole layer 7.

However, the εhock-abεorbing sole portion 9 can be pushed into the aperture 8 without the use of an adheεive to allow εhock-abεorbing εole portionε to be replaced or interchanged. Thiε enables a wearer to alter or customise a sports boot according to desired qualities of shock absorbency and stiffneεε, perhapε for playing on different types of playing surface, for example, natural turf or grass, artificial grass surfaceε (eg.Aεtroturf) , redgra; or according to the condition of the surface at the time of play. For example, a more shock-abεorbent sole portion for dry and hard ground, or a lesε εhock-absorbent sole portion for wet and soft ground may be employed.

The sole portion 9 has a flange or lip 10 extending outwards from the upper surface of the sole portion 9 which helps to protect a wearer's foot from the relatively sharp and hard edge 11 of the insole layer 6. Furthermore, the lip 10 extends the area over which shock-absorbing protection exists. The shock-absorbing material is thickest at regions where the risk of shock or impact is highest, for example, at the ball of the foot and heel and reduceε sideways away from this. The sole portion material comprises a closed cell foam which may have a lower density than the inεole layer material thereby producing a lighter boot. Closed cell foams do not absorb water or moisture during use. The sports boot may thus be lighter and have improved shock-absorbing qualities over known sports shoes incorporating a conventional sole construction.

The insole layer 6 can taper towards the toe to reduce weight further.

Aε shown in both Figures 2 and 3 the insole layer 6 is arranged to overlie the position of εtud εocketε, studs 12 or spikes in the outsole layer 7. The relatively stiff insole layer material provides protection from studε puεhing through the outsole layer 7 and causing raised regions which would be uncomfortable and likely to cause blistering or bruiεing of a wearer's foot in use. The shock-abεorbing εole portions 9 have a maximum thickness of about 5mm to 8mm (preferably in the range 2mm to 4mm) and a thicknesε of about 2mm to 3mm in the lip 10 region.

The preferred materialε used for the insole layer 6, the outsole layer 7, and the (εhock-abεorbing) εole portionε 9 are set out below:

1. Insole materials - texon fibre board, composite GRP (glass fibre reinforced plastics) /carbon fibre/polypropylene;

2. Outsole materials - pebax nylon, PU, and rubber;

3. Shock absorbing-materialε - EVA foam, PU foam, compreεεed EVA, sorbothane, encapsulated hydraulic fluids, hexalite, plasticiser (super bore) , and encapsulated air units.

An insock 13 is fitted to the boot to provide further comfort and a better fit. The shock-abεorbing sole portions 9 can be coloured so as to indicate to a potential purchaser the shock absorbing qualities of the boot.

Figure 3 is a similar crosε-εectional view to that shown in

SUBSTITUTESHEET(RULE2$ Figure 2 but εhowε detail of the sole portion 14 and aperture located at the heel of the boot 4. The shock-abεorbing portion 14 also haε a lip 15 extending outwardε from its upper edge. The lip is tapered 16 to reduce the presence of an edge which might cause blistering or bruising.

Figure 4 is a plan view from above of an alternative insole layer 20 fitted with shock absorbing sole portions 21, 22 located at the ball of the foot and heel regionε respectively.

A cross-sectional view of the sole asεembly iε εhown in Figure 5 on which iε indicated three apertureε 23, 24, 25 in the inεole layer 20 into which εhock-absorbing material of the sole portion is provided. Protrusionε are moulded onto the εole portions 21, 22 which protrusionε are adapted to locate in the apertures 23, 24, 25 in the insole layer 20. The apertures and protrusions can be shaped to enεure that the εole portionε 21, 22 are located in the apertureε in the correct orientation.

Figureε 6a to c εhow detail of a biomechanical heel wedge insert or shock-abεorbing sole portion 30 fitted to an insole layer 20. The inεole layer 20 iε alεo fitted with a εhock-absorbing sole portion 21 located at the ball of the foot to reduce shock or impact being transmitted to a wearer's foot. The insole layer 20 is provided with apertures 23, 24, 25 into which shock-absorbing material of the sole portionε 21, 30 iε provided to give the desired depth. The shock-absorbing sole portion 30 is thicker than the shock-absorbing material provided in sole portion 21 in order to cope with higher levels of impact or shock which are more likely to occur in the heel region. The extenεion of the εhock abεorbing material into the aperture 25 once again provideε a high level of shock absorbency with minimum thickneεs.

The shock-absorbing sole portion 30 is provided with a ramped surface 32 to provide a smooth transition from the shock-absorbing heel portion to the surface of the insole layer 20. Figure 6b iε a plan view of the inεole layer εhown in Figure 6a. The shock-absorbing sole portion 30 extends over the whole surface of the heel region of insole layer 20.

Figure 6c is an isometric view of shock-absorbing sole portion 30 which is provided on inεole layer 20 shown in Figure 6a. The protrusion 33 is adapted to locate in aperture 25 provided in insole layer 20. The shock-absorbing sole portion 30 located at the heel region of the insole can be provided with a surface 34 which is not parallel to the surface of the insole layer 20. For example, the εurface 34 may be tilted horizontally but about 1 to 10°, a preferred angle of tilt surface 34 is about 3°. The greater thicknesε of the heel εole portion 30 helps to minimise calf muscles and achilles tendon strainε. Tilting of the εurface 34 increaεes shock-absorbency performance at the field under footstrike.

As illustrated in Figure 7a in perspective, and Figure 7b in side view, the shock-abεorbing sole portion can be provided " as a circular disk portion 50 with a tapered edge 52 to blend in with the surrounding insole layer. The increased depth of shock adsorbing sole portion 54 is provided by a further circular projecting disk.

The shock-abεorbing εole portions may be provided as discrete units as illustrated in Figure 7 or alternatively they may be provided on a sockliner element 60 as illustrated in Figure 8. In this embodiment the increased thickness of the shock-absorbing sole portionε is provided by projectionε 62 from a generally flat sockliner corresponding in profile to the inside base surface of the boot. Thus some shock-abεorbing capacity iε provided all over the boot with increased shock-absorbence where it is needed moεt.

Aε εhown in Figure 9 the inεole layer 70 of the boot can be provided with suitable recesses 7a corresponding to the shock- abεorbing εole portions 62. In this way the sockliner 60 and

SUBSTITUTE SHEET (RULE 26| shock-abεorbing εole portionε 62 are accurately and securely located within the boot. Adhesiveε may be used to increase the resilience to undesired movement.

The sockliner 60 and shock-absorbing sole portions 62 maybe provided as an integral member of the same material as shown in Figure 9. Alternatively different shock absorbing materials may be employed for the sole portions 62. The system may involve a conventional material sockliner 60 with stitched in or adhered shock absorbing εole portionε 62 of the type illustrated in Figure 7 to give an appearance correεponding to Figure 8.

Claims

CLAIMS :
1. A sports boot which comprises an upper adapted to fit around a wearer's foot in use and a sole secured to the upper, said sole comprising an outsole layer, an insole layer and at least one sole portion of shock-abεorbing material, wherein said at least one sole portion is provided in the insole layer.
2. A sports boot according to claim 1, in which the sports boot is provided with or iε adapted to receive projecting elements for the outside of its εole.
3. A εportε boot according to claim 1 or claim 2, in which the insole layer includes at least one recesε which iε filled by the at least one shock-absorbing sole portion.
4. A sports boot according to claim 3, in which the recess is provided at a region of the sole which, in use, is subjected to the highest impact levels, preferably at the ball or heel' of a wearer's foot.
5. A sports boot according to any preceding claim in which the at least one sole portion of shock-absorbing material is removable.
6. A sports boot according to any of claims 1 to 4 in which the shock-absorbing sole portion or portions is an integral part of the insole layer.
7. A sportε boot according to any preceding claim in which the sole portion is provided with a lip of shock absorbent material extending outwardε from the sole portion and arranged to cover the edges of a recess or aperture in the insole layer.
8. A sports boot according to any preceding claim in which the sole portion comprises a layer of shock-absorbing material extending over the upper/inner surface of the inεole layer with a thicker sole portion of εhock-abεorbing material being provided in the inεole layer.
9. A εports boot according to claim 8 in which the sole portion layer is tapered towards the toe of the boot.
10. A sports boot according to any preceding claim in which the shock-absorbing sole portion and/or εole portion layer are internally viεible.
11. A εports boot according to any preceding claim in which the insole layer includes a border of stiff material which is adapted to overlie one or more studs or stud sockets provided on the outsole layer.
12. A sports boot according to any preceding claim in which the shock-abεorbing material is a closed cell foam material.
13. A εportε boot according to any preceding claim in which the εhock-abεorbing material haε a maximum thickneεε of about 15mm and preferably 8mm.
14. A sports boot according to any preceding claim in which the shock-absorbing sole portion compriseε a circular portion inεerted in the inεole layer and a lip portion extending over the inner εurface of the inεole layer.
15. A εportε boot according to claim 14 in which the edge of the lip portion iε tapered.
16. A method of manufacturing a εportε boot which compriεeε: forming at leaεt one shock-absorbing sole portion; forming an inεole layer; securing an upper to the insole layer; inserting the at least one shock-abεorbing sole portion into at least one recess provided in the insole layer to form an insole assembly.
PCT/GB1996/002052 1995-08-31 1996-08-23 A sports boot WO1997007700A3 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9517774.7 1995-08-31
GB9517774A GB9517774D0 (en) 1995-08-31 1995-08-31 A sports boot
GB9525986.7 1995-12-19
GB9525986A GB9525986D0 (en) 1995-08-31 1995-12-19 A sports boot

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1997007700A2 true true WO1997007700A2 (en) 1997-03-06
WO1997007700A3 true WO1997007700A3 (en) 1997-05-22

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000072714A1 (en) * 1999-05-28 2000-12-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Cushioning system for golf shoes
US9918519B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2018-03-20 Nike, Inc. Medial rotational traction element arrangement for an article of footwear
US9968162B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2018-05-15 Nike, Inc. Cut step traction element arrangement for an article of footwear

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9173450B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2015-11-03 Nike, Inc. Medial rotational traction element arrangement for an article of footwear

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1133656B (en) * 1959-03-11 1962-07-19 Lupos Schuhfabrik Hubert Lenna Cushioned sole and this equipped footwear
US4316332A (en) * 1979-04-23 1982-02-23 Comfort Products, Inc. Athletic shoe construction having shock absorbing elements
FR2522482A1 (en) * 1982-01-15 1983-09-09 Adidas Chaussures Intermediate shoe sole layer with zones of differing hardness - for enhanced cushioning beneath main pressure points of foot
EP0111084A1 (en) * 1982-12-11 1984-06-20 Adidas Ag Sports shoe with a shock absorbing heel
DE8709735U1 (en) * 1987-07-15 1987-10-08 Forsell S.E., Aubonne, Ch
DE9110925U1 (en) * 1991-09-03 1991-11-28 Dr. Ing. Funck Gmbh & Co Kg, 8000 Muenchen, De

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1133656B (en) * 1959-03-11 1962-07-19 Lupos Schuhfabrik Hubert Lenna Cushioned sole and this equipped footwear
US4316332A (en) * 1979-04-23 1982-02-23 Comfort Products, Inc. Athletic shoe construction having shock absorbing elements
FR2522482A1 (en) * 1982-01-15 1983-09-09 Adidas Chaussures Intermediate shoe sole layer with zones of differing hardness - for enhanced cushioning beneath main pressure points of foot
EP0111084A1 (en) * 1982-12-11 1984-06-20 Adidas Ag Sports shoe with a shock absorbing heel
DE8709735U1 (en) * 1987-07-15 1987-10-08 Forsell S.E., Aubonne, Ch
DE9110925U1 (en) * 1991-09-03 1991-11-28 Dr. Ing. Funck Gmbh & Co Kg, 8000 Muenchen, De

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000072714A1 (en) * 1999-05-28 2000-12-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Cushioning system for golf shoes
GB2353692A (en) * 1999-05-28 2001-03-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Cushioning system for golf shoes
GB2353692B (en) * 1999-05-28 2002-12-31 Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc Cushioning system for golf shoes
US9918519B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2018-03-20 Nike, Inc. Medial rotational traction element arrangement for an article of footwear
US9968162B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2018-05-15 Nike, Inc. Cut step traction element arrangement for an article of footwear

Also Published As

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