WO1996037270A2 - Connection system for sports footwear - Google Patents

Connection system for sports footwear

Info

Publication number
WO1996037270A2
WO1996037270A2 PCT/CA1996/000333 CA9600333W WO1996037270A2 WO 1996037270 A2 WO1996037270 A2 WO 1996037270A2 CA 9600333 W CA9600333 W CA 9600333W WO 1996037270 A2 WO1996037270 A2 WO 1996037270A2
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
base
ski
heel
binding
counter
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/CA1996/000333
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO1996037270A3 (en )
Inventor
David M. Macphail
Original Assignee
Macpod Enterprises Ltd.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C9/00Ski bindings
    • A63C9/005Ski bindings adjustable in length or height

Abstract

An adjustment system (3000) for a ski binding (4000) comprises a base (3100) for mounting on a ski (9000) and a binding mounting base (3300) for attachment to a ski binding (4000). The base (3100) and the ski binding mounting base (3300) are adjustably attached to each other for selective adjustment of a ski binding (4000) transversely of a ski (9000). A footwear device is also provided which comprises an elongate base (2100) for supporting the foot (2001) of a user thereon and the heel counter (2300) on the base (2100) for contact with the foot (2001) of a user posterior to the posterior aspect of the heel of the foot. The heel counter (2300) is rotatable relative to the base about an axis (2350) substantially perpendicular to the base (2100) for changing the orientation of the heel counter (2300) relative to the longitudinal axis of the base (2100) and including means for securing the heel counter (2300) in a select position relative to the base (2100).

Description

CONNECTION SYSTEM FOR SPORTS FOOTWEAR

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a connection system for sports footwear, such as skis.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Activities such as alpine snow skiing involve the attachment of structures to the lower limb system that serve to modify its form and characteristics, in particular, those of the feet. Typically, such structures are made up of an assembly created by ski boots, ski bindings and skis. Such an assembly acts to alter the processes by which the lower limbs interact with external mediums. In the case of alpine snow skiing, the snow surface acts as a medium that provides a ground reaction force in opposition to a resultant force applied by the skier.

Fundamental to processes by which the human system supports itself in erect postures and propels itself in ambulation is the ability to align resultant and ground reaction forces in opposition to each other. In the maintenance of erect postures, this facility enables muscular processes which act to cancel moments acting about the axes of the ankle/foot complex in inversion/eversion and dorsi/plantarflexion. In mitigating the effect of stress applied to the body this process is important in dissipating ground reaction forces.

The arrangement of equipment that resides between the human system and the snow surface acts to alter the relationship of resultant and ground reaction forces in several ways. Restraint applied to the ankle/foot complex by structures of a ski boot can present significant interference to coordinated multi- axial joint articulation and thus limit the range within which resultant and ground reaction forces can be aligned.

Even in the absence of such interference, limits exist as to the degree by which the mechanics of the lower limbs can be altered by affixing devices such as skis to them. In this respect, the relation of the edge of an edged snow ski to the head of the first metatarsal is important. The amount by which the foot is elevated above the point at which the ski edge contacts the snow surface is also important. These two factors are interrelated in terms of the ground reaction.

If the position in which the foot of a user is fixed on the long axis of a ski is such that the edge of a ski lies sufficiently medial of the center of the head of the first metatarsal, processes responsible for balancing moments acting about the long axis of the foot are negated when the ski is edged. In such a relationship, resultant and ground reaction forces can no longer be aligned with the result that unbalanced moments will be caused to act about the long axis of the foot. Unbalanced moments acting about the long axis of the foot will be converted through the processes of its sub-talar joint into axial moments acting about the long axis of the tibia. Such moments will attempt to rotate the tibia about its joint with the femur. When an inversion moment acts about the outside ski in a turn, a valgus load will be transferred to the knee of the skier by the shaft of the boot exerting a lateral force on the leg in conjunction with a lateral axial rotation of the tibia. Resisting moments of this nature requires substantial muscular effort. In situations where muscular intervention is insufficient, injury may result to the processes of the lower limbs.

A ski edge located laterally of the head of the first metatarsal can also be deleterious to the user because it can require increased muscular effort to balance moments of inversion/eversion. This is especially true if the foot is significantly elevated above the contact surface of the ski edge.

In consideration of the aforementioned problems and the significant variations that exist in the width of the underfoot portion of snow skis, it is advantageous to the user to be able to alter the relationship of key aspects of the long axis of the foot in relation to its position on the long axis of a ski edge once the position of the foot secured within a ski boot has been established on the ski.

Ski bindings are known by which ski boots can be firmly fixed to a ski in a manner that allows their position to be adjusted along the long axis of the ski after they have been mounted to the ski. Bindings of this type are known in which either the heel or toe pieces or both such elements can be adjusted in the aforementioned manner. Bindings are also known in which the heel and toe pieces are connected in a manner that allows them to be repositioned as a unit on the long axis of the ski while maintaining their relationship with each other.

Plates are known that are secured to the ski with ski bindings in turn being mounted on such plates. In the case of both plates and bindings it is known that in wide skis it is advantageous to the user to offset such devices towards the outer aspect of the long axis of the ski. Despite these multitude means of adjustment, ski bindings and binding plates are not known which provide for the means to adjust their position across the long axis of the ski.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the invention there is provided an adjustment system for a ski binding, comprising a base for mounting on a ski; and a binding mounting base for attachment to a ski binding; wherein the base and the binding mounting base are adjustably attached to each other for selective adjustment of a ski binding transversely of a ski.

The binding mounting base may comprise a pair of members for respect of attachment to the heel piece and the toe piece of a ski binding.

The base may comprise a pair of members which are adjustably attached to the binding mounting base members respectively.

Also according to the invention there is provided a footwear device comprising an elongate base for supporting the foot of a user thereon; and a heel counter on the base for contact with the foot of a user posterior to the posterior aspect of the heel of the foot, wherein the heel counter is rotatable relative to the base about an axis substantially perpendicular to the base for changing the orientation of the heel counter relative to the longitudinal axis of the base and including means for securing the heel counter in a selected position relative to the base. Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the description of a preferred embodiment of the invention below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 shows a plan view of a portion of a snow ski with known art in ski bindings mounted to a transverse adjustment device.

Figure 2 shows a plan view of the binding mounting base of the transverse adjustment device shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 shows a plan view of the two bases of the transverse adjustment device shown in Figure 1.

Figure 4 shows a plan view of the transverse adjustment device shown in Figure 1 wherein only one base is utilized.

Figure 5 shows a side elevation of a portion of a snow ski with known art in ski bindings mounted to a transverse adjustment device comprised of two elements with the binding base of the device incorporated into the known art ski binding.

Figure 6 shows a plan view of the device shown in Figure 5 with the transverse adjustment device adjusted to locate the known art in ski bindings to the center position on the ski.

Figure 7 shows the same view as Figure 6 except that the transverse adjustment device has been adjusted to locate the known art in ski bindings toward the outer aspect of the ski. Figure 8A shows a plan view of the bases for the transverse adjustment device mounted to a known art ski.

Figure 8B shows a plan view of a known art binding with the mounting bases of the transverse adjustment device incorporated into it.

Figure 9 shows a plan view of a rigid base with heel and side counters mounted.

Figure 10 shows a plan view of a rigid base with heel counter and a side counter mounted.

Figure 11A shows a plan view of a rigid base for the right foot of a user with a side counter and a rotatable heel counter mounted.

Figure 11B shows a plan view of the rotatable heel counter indicating its rotation potential.

Figure 11C shows a plan view of a rigid base for the left foot of a user with a side counter and a rotatable heel counter mounted.

Figure 12 shows a plan view of a rigid base with rotatable heel counter and a side counter mounted where the heel counter can be adjusted on the long axis of the rigid base.

Figure 13 shows a medial elevation of a rigid base for the right foot of a user with a side counter and a rotatable heel counter mounted and indicating the fore/aft adjustment potential. Figure 14 shows a rigid base with the rotatable heel counter moved forward on the rigid base and rotated compared to its position on the rigid base in Figure 12.

Figure 15 shows the underside of the rigid base with the slot for the T-nut that fixes the position of the rotatable heel counter on the rigid base.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Figure 1 shows a transverse adjustment device generally shown at 3000 mounted to a ski 9000. Only the portion of the ski 9000 is shown where a ski binding would be mounted. Transverse adjustment device 3000 is comprised of at least one base 3100 and a binding mounting base 3300. In Figure 1, two bases, 3100 and 3200 are shown mounted to ski 9000. A ski binding of known art mounted to binding mounting base 3300 of transverse adjustment device 3000 is generally shown at 4000. The known art binding incorporates the means to adjust its position fore and aft on the ski and typically comprises of heel piece 4100 and a toe piece 4200 although bindings are known which fix the ski boot to a ski with only one component.

At least one mounting screw 4110 (typical) and one mounting screw 4210 (typical) secures heel piece 4100 and toe piece 4200 individually to binding mounting base 3300 according to the requirements of the binding art used. Binding mounting base 3300 is fitted with at least 1 transverse slot 3350. In Figure 1, two slots are shown at 3350 and 3360. Mounting screws 3310 (typical) are inserted through slots 3350 and 3360 and threaded into threaded receiving holes 3120 and 3220 (hidden) in bases 3100 and 3200. Removing tension exerted on binding mounting base 3300 by mounting screws 3310 allows binding mounting base 3300 to be moved transversely across bases 3100 and 3200 each of which are fixed to ski 9000. An arrow indicates the directions of adjustment possible. Guides 3150 and 3250 extend vertically above bases 3100 and 3200 so as to embrace the ends of binding base 3300 in manner that assists in the maintenance of longitudinal alignment during transverse adjustment. Once the desired position is obtained within the adjustment range afforded by slots 3350 and 3360, screws 3310 are tensioned so as to fix the transverse position of binding base 3300 on bases 3100 and 3200 and thus establish the transverse position of the foot of a user secured within a ski boot or other means in relation to the ski 9000.

Figure 2 shows binding mounting base 3300 with slots 3350 and 3360. Threaded holes are shown at 4211 and 4111 which receive mounting screws 4110 and 4210.

Figure 3 shows ski 9000 with bases 3100 and 3200 mounted to ski 9000 with screws 3210 and 3110. Threaded holes 3120 and 3220 are in bases 3100 and 3200 to receive mounting screws 3310.

Figure 4 shows ski 9000 with a single base 3100 on which binding mounting base 3300 is secured.

Figure 5 shows a side elevation in which transverse adjustment device 3000 is comprised of two elements mounted to ski 9000. The heel piece 4100 of the known art binding is mounted to binding mounting base 3400 which, in turn is secured to base 3100 by screws 3410 inserted through slots 3460 in binding mounting base 3400 and threaded into receiving holes 3120 in base 3100. The toe piece 4200 of the known art binding is mounted to binding mounting base 3300 which, in turn, is secured to base 3200 by screws 3310 inserted through slots 3360 in binding mounting base 3300 and threaded into receiving holes 3220 in base 3200. Binding mounting bases 3400 and 3300 are shown incorporated into the bases of binding heel piece 4100 and binding toe piece 4200 although it is also anticipated that known art bindings could also be mounted directly to binding mounting bases 3100 and 3200.

Figure 6 shows the arrangement shown in Figure

47 but in plan view. Arrows indicate the direction in which binding mounting bases 3300 and 3400 can be adjusted relative to the ski 9000.

Figure 7 shows the same view as Figure 48 but with the position of binding heel piece 4100 and binding toe piece 4200 on the long axis of ski 9000 adjusted and fixed off centre so as to be located closer to one of the edges of ski 9000.

Figure 8A shows bases 3100 and 3200 mounted to ski 9000 although they could also be integrated with the construction of the ski itself. Base 3100 has saw tooth guides 3470 at its fore and aft aspects which intermesh with the saw tooth guides 3370 on binding heel piece mounting base 3400 shown in Figure 8B.

Base 3200 has a saw tooth guide 3370 on only one end which intermesh with the saw tooth guides 3370 on binding toe piece 3300 shown in Figure 8B. Saw tooth guides are known in known art bindings where they permit adjustment to be made in incremental steps and ensure movement does not occur between the two intermeshed elements. Saw toothed guides 3370 on bases 3100 and 3200 ensure the position of binding mounting bases 3300 and 3400 remain fixed once screws 3310 and 3410 are tensioned.

Figure 9 shows a plan view of rigid base 2100 of a footwear device, such as a ski boot, with a medial forefoot counter 2201 and heel counter 2300 mounted for the right foot 2001 of a user. The rigid base 2100 is shown schematically as a rectangular member but in practice it may be shaped in the form of the base of a shoe. Heel counter 2300 is shown comprised of posterior counter 2301 posterolateral counter 2302 and posterior medial counter 2303. Medial hindfoot counter 2203 and lateral hindfoot counter 2204 also form part of heel counter 2300.

Heel counter 2300 is open on its medial aspect to allow for the medial rotation of the heel bone of a user that occurs when moving from monopedal to bipedal stance. Insofar as the two hindfoot counters, they should be configured so as to not interfere with the medial of lateral rotation of the heel bone. Thus, it is of less consequence if the angle is open rather than closed.

Figure 10 shows heel counter 2300 incorporating the same elements as in Figure 9 but with base 2304 added. While the shape of heel counter 2300 is symmetrical, it is aligned off the X or long axis of rigid base 2300. In practical application this is disadvantageous since it would necessitate the use of separate left and right heel counters. This would add to the cost of producing footwear incorporating such a system and, is thus, undesirable.

Figure 11A shows the same view as Figure 10 but with heel counter 2300 fixed to rigid base 2100 with at least one screw 2350. Figure 11B shows the potential to rotate heel counter 2300 transversely across the x or long axis of rigid base 2100. Figure 11C shows the same heel counter as in Figure 11A except that heel counter 2300 has been rotated so as to reflect its position in Figure 11A in a manner that configures it for the left foot of a user and is mounted to rigid base 2100 with at least one screw 2350.

While being able to reverse the position of heel counter 2300 on left and right rigid bases is advantageous in itself, it is also advantageous to be able to rotate heel counter 2300 once it has been mounted to rigid base 2100 in order to adjust the hindfoot counters, in particular, the medial hindfoot counter for the individual foot of a user. It is also advantageous to be able to adjust the fore/aft position of heel counter 2300 on rigid base 2100.

Figure 12 shows heel counter 2300 fixed to rigid base 2100 with screw 2350 which extends through slot 2370 in rigid base 2100 where it is threaded into T- nut 2380 (not shown) . By loosening the tension on screw 2370 heel counter 2300 can be both rotated transversely and its fore/aft position adjusted on rigid base 2100.

Once the desired position is obtained it can be fixed by tensioning screw 2370 against T-nut 2380.

Figure 13 shows the elements of Figure 12 in medial elevation showing slot 2370 in rigid base 2100, screw 2350, T-nut 2380 and recess 2390 for the head of T- nut 2380.

Figure 14 shows the same elements as in Figure 12 but with heel counter 2300 advanced on the long axis of rigid base 2100 and rotated medially so as to illustrate the manner in which it can be adjusted.

Figure 15 shows the underside of rigid base 2100 with side counter 2201 and heel counter 2300 shown as dashed lines. T-nut 2380 runs in recess 2390 and extends up through slot 2370 to connect with screw 2350.

While only preferred embodiments of the invention have been described herein in detail, the invention is not limited thereby and modifications can be made within the scope of the attached claims.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. An adjustment system (3000) for a ski binding, comprising:
a base (3100) for mounting on a ski (9000) ; and
a binding mounting base (3300) for attachment to a ski binding (4000) ;
wherein the base (3100) and the binding mounting base (3300) are adjustably attached to each other for selective adjustment of a ski binding (4000) transversely of a ski (9000) .
2. An adjustment system according to claim 1, wherein the binding mounting base (3300) comprises a pair of members (3300, 3400) for respective attachment to the toe piece (4200) and the heel piece (4100) of a ski binding (4000) .
3. An adjustment system according to claim 2, wherein the base (3100) comprises a pair of members (3100, 3200) which are adjustably attached to the binding mounting base members (3400, 3300) respectively.
4. An adjustment system according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the or each binding mounting base (3300, 3400) is provided with at least one transverse slot (3350) for receiving an attachment screw (3310) therethrough and the or each base is provided with a corresponding screw threaded hole (3120) for receiving the attachment screw (3310) , thereby providing for the adjustable attachment of the binding mounting base (3300, 3400) to the base (3200, 3400) .
5. An adjustment system according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the or each base (3100, 3200) is provided with a guide (3150, 3250) for guiding the or each binding mounting base (3300, 3400) for maintaining longitudinal alignment during the transverse adjustment.
6. An adjustment system according to any one of the preceding claims wherein the base and the mounting base are provided with intermeshing members (3370, 3470) for effecting the transverse adjustment in incremental steps.
7. An adjustment system according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the or each binding mounting base (3300, 3400) is incorporated in a ski binding (4200, 4100).
8. An adjustment system according to any one of the preceding claims wherein the or each base (3100,
3200) is integrated in a ski (9000) .
9. A footwear device comprising:
an elongate base (2100) for supporting the foot (2001) of a user thereon; and
a heel counter (2300) on the base (2100) for contact with the foot (2001) of a user posterior to the posterior aspect of the heel of the foot, wherein the heel counter (2300) is rotatable relative to the base about an axis (2350) substantially perpendicular to the base (2100) for changing the orientation of the heel counter (2300) relative to the longitudinal axis of the base (2100) and including means for securing the heel counter (2300) in a selected position relative to the base (2100) .
10. The footwear device according to claim 9, wherein the heel counter (2300) is rotatably mounted on the base (2100) by means of a first screw (2350) and said means for securing the heel counter in a selected position relative to the base, comprises a second screw (2350) .
11. The footwear device according to claim 9, wherein the heel counter (2300) is rotatably mounted to the base (2100) by means of a screw threaded member (2350) extending through an opening (2370) in the heel counter (2300) , screw thread means (2380) being provided on the base (2100) for engaging with the screw threaded member (2350) , and wherein said means for securing the heel counter (2300) in a selected position relative to the base comprises the screw threaded member (2350) which is screwed into the screw thread (2380) to secure the heel counter (2300) in a fixed position relative to the base (2100) by screw tension.
12. The footwear device according to claim 11, wherein the base (2100) is provided with a longitudinal slot (2370) therein, the screw threaded member (2380) being located in the slot (2370) to provide for longitudinal movement of the heel counter (2300) relative to the base (2100) in addition to being rotatable relative to the base (2100) when the screw tension is released.
PCT/CA1996/000333 1995-05-26 1996-05-27 Connection system for sports footwear WO1996037270A3 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US45191295 true 1995-05-26 1995-05-26
US08/451,912 1995-05-26

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1996037270A2 true true WO1996037270A2 (en) 1996-11-28
WO1996037270A3 true WO1996037270A3 (en) 1997-04-17

Family

ID=23794220

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/CA1996/000333 WO1996037270A3 (en) 1995-05-26 1996-05-27 Connection system for sports footwear

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO1996037270A3 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1998012103A1 (en) * 1996-09-20 1998-03-26 Terrance Fogarty Water ski binding systems
DE10037503A1 (en) * 2000-08-01 2002-02-21 Werner Dorsch Ski boot binding has an adjustment setting at the holder, to give positions for the boot across the ski width

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE95964C (en) *
FR1307982A (en) * 1961-09-16 1962-11-03 Improvement in safety stops for skis
FR1387319A (en) * 1963-12-20 1965-01-29 ski fixing device
US4141570A (en) * 1977-10-17 1979-02-27 Sudmeier James L Adjustable connection between ski and binding
DE3540428A1 (en) * 1985-05-22 1986-11-27 Anton Plenk Cross-country ski
EP0302309A2 (en) * 1987-08-03 1989-02-08 Marker Deutschland GmbH Toe iron for safety ski bindings
EP0337905A2 (en) * 1988-04-12 1989-10-18 Skis Rossignol S.A. Devices for fastening boots to skis
EP0707872A1 (en) * 1994-10-19 1996-04-24 TECNICA SpA Adjustable support plate for skibindings

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE95964C (en) *
FR1307982A (en) * 1961-09-16 1962-11-03 Improvement in safety stops for skis
FR1387319A (en) * 1963-12-20 1965-01-29 ski fixing device
US4141570A (en) * 1977-10-17 1979-02-27 Sudmeier James L Adjustable connection between ski and binding
DE3540428A1 (en) * 1985-05-22 1986-11-27 Anton Plenk Cross-country ski
EP0302309A2 (en) * 1987-08-03 1989-02-08 Marker Deutschland GmbH Toe iron for safety ski bindings
EP0337905A2 (en) * 1988-04-12 1989-10-18 Skis Rossignol S.A. Devices for fastening boots to skis
EP0707872A1 (en) * 1994-10-19 1996-04-24 TECNICA SpA Adjustable support plate for skibindings

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1998012103A1 (en) * 1996-09-20 1998-03-26 Terrance Fogarty Water ski binding systems
US6053522A (en) * 1996-09-20 2000-04-25 A Ski Company Water ski binding systems
DE10037503A1 (en) * 2000-08-01 2002-02-21 Werner Dorsch Ski boot binding has an adjustment setting at the holder, to give positions for the boot across the ski width
DE10037503C2 (en) * 2000-08-01 2002-10-17 Werner Dorsch On a sliding device anchored retaining device for a shoe

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
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