WO1996014813A1 - Incontinence management system - Google Patents

Incontinence management system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1996014813A1
WO1996014813A1 PCT/AU1994/000697 AU9400697W WO9614813A1 WO 1996014813 A1 WO1996014813 A1 WO 1996014813A1 AU 9400697 W AU9400697 W AU 9400697W WO 9614813 A1 WO9614813 A1 WO 9614813A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
monitoring system
signals
monitor
incontinence
patient
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/AU1994/000697
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Frederick Bergman
Original Assignee
C & M Investment Nominees Pty. Ltd.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to AUPL905893 priority Critical
Priority to AU63393/94A priority patent/AU690901B2/en
Application filed by C & M Investment Nominees Pty. Ltd. filed Critical C & M Investment Nominees Pty. Ltd.
Priority to PCT/AU1994/000697 priority patent/WO1996014813A1/en
Priority claimed from AU81352/94A external-priority patent/AU8135294A/en
Publication of WO1996014813A1 publication Critical patent/WO1996014813A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/20Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons for measuring urological functions restricted to the evaluation of the urinary system
    • A61B5/202Assessing bladder functions, e.g. incontinence assessment
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • A61B5/0015Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network characterised by features of the telemetry system
    • A61B5/002Monitoring the patient using a local or closed circuit, e.g. in a room or building
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/48Devices for preventing wetting or pollution of the bed

Abstract

A monitor for use in hospitals, nursing homes and the like, to receive and record signals, from a plurality of sensors (4), of urinary and/or faecal incontinence in a corresponding number of patients to show when attention is required and to indicate, in respect of each patient, such pattern or regularity of such condition as may assist in the perception of the needs of that patient and, therefore, in the management of the condition and the efficiency of running of the establishment as a whole. The sensors (4) when activated in the presence of moisture send respective signals to a receive station (20) via a booster station (26). The time and sensor number(s) are recorded by a processor (22) and/or printer (24). A second signal may be transmitted by the booster (26) to a page (28) for staffing assistance.

Description

INCONTINENCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

This Invention relates to an Incontinence monitoring system and Is particularly concerned with a system for the detection monitoring and management of urinary, faecal and other forms of Incontinence, In hospitals, nursing homes, geriatric Institutions, private homes, gardens and suchlike places where, unchecked, such conditions can give rise to discomfort or at least embarrassment for the patient, an unpleasant odour and environment for others In the vicinity, and considerable expenditure of human and financial resources due to the need for checking and, where necessary, changing and cleaning bed-linen and clothes.

Health regulations or recommendations may prescribe a maximum period e.g. 15 minutes for which a patient can be left In a wet state. In the past, In order to ensure both reasonable comfort for Incontlnents and compliance with prevailing regulations or normal practice It has generally been necessary for nursing staff manually to check every patient at least once in the prescribed period. Quite apart from the unpleasantness, for nursing staff, or skin contact with patients' urine or faeces, such a regimen can be a severe strain on staff resources and an often unnecessary interruption to patients1 sleep.

It is an object of the invention to alleviate one or more of the above disadvantages.

According to the present invention there is provided an incontinence monitoring system for use in a hospital, nursing home or suchlike location, the system comprising a plurality of sensors and a monitor to receive and record signals from the sensors, each sensor being adapted to be associated with a respective person and being responsive to urinary and/or faecal incontinence in that person, the monitor being capable of recording the time of onset of each incontinence condition and of indicating any regularity or pattern of incontinence in each said person. By detecting and recording, for a particular patient, any incontinence pattern rhythmicity or regularity, this can be used as a basis for predicting the likelihood of that patient being in a wet or dry state at a particular time, and preferably forestalling such an event to enable the patient to receive appropriate and timely attention such as "toileting" e.g. by commode or bedpan.

The monitor may include a processor and a receiver adapted to receive and discriminate between signals from the respective sensors.

Advantageously, the monitor includes display means for indicating said signals to an operator.

In a preferred embodiment the monitor includes a radio receiver and each sensor includes a transmitter adapted to emit a radio signal. The monitor may include a booster to boost the radio signals received thereby.

Advantageously, the monitor includes means for transmitting the signals or further signals responsive to the signals to one or more pager units.

Each sensor may comprise a flexible band comprising an insulating mounting for spaced conductor strips, the band being adapted to be located in a moisture-absorbent pad or garment to be worn by the patient so that at the onset of a wetting episode the moisture completes an electric circuit between said strips and triggers the signal to the monitor.

More generally, in one embodiment, a sensor/transmitter for each patient (or other person to be monitored) may include an e.m.f. source such as a battery for a signal transmitter and a sensor wired in circuit therewith and responsive to a condition the onset of which a warning is required.

The sensor may include two terminals between which is a moisture - receptive strip or pad of which the electrical conductivity is substantially zero in the normal or dry state but increases sharply when moistened by even a small amount of urine. The sensor therefore may act as a switch to pass voltage/current to the signal transmitter, which may be in the form of a small wireless transmitter, at the onset of, for example, urination.

The signal can be transmitted as or via a coded radio signal to a receiver which could be located in a nurses' station or central office. Associated with the receiver may be a microprocessor which interrogates the receiver (1) to determine or confirm that an alarm has been triggered and (2) to identify the relevant patient, with a computer (such as a standard 386 with e.g. a 40 megabyte hard disk) arranged to operate on a program specially dedicated to the purpose of recording data for each of up to e.g. 48 patients.

The sensor band may be a re-usable strip attached to a nappy or other moisture-absorbent pad suitably worn to detect the presence of urine. It may be secured using a piece of medical tape or placed in a pocket. Strips could be recovered by arrangement with a laundry service. If the garment to which it is attached is disposable, the strip could be recovered by a staff member for cleaning "in house".

In order that the invention may be better understood reference will now be made, by way of example only, to the accompanying drawings which are to be considered as part of this specification and read herewith. In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a diagram showing a practical embodiment of the invention in schematic form;

Figure 2 shows a detector band sensor and insertion tool for use with the invention as illustrated in Figure 1; and Figure 3 shows a moisture absorbent pad capable of receiving a sensor by the means shown in Figure 2.

The practical embodiment of the invention as shown in the drawings, including the operation thereof, will now be described.

Figure 1 shows a monitor for only six patients. This is merely for convenience of illustration. It is envisaged that a much larger number could be monitored by the one device.

A master station 20 receives signals, via a suitable antenna, from patient transmitters up to 250 metres distant. The station may have an associated personal computer ("PC") 22 or, for example, may be connected direct to a printer 24.

Each patient has a code. The station may be powered from 240V AC mains supply reduced to 12V with battery back-up (not shown) in case of mains failure. The battery may be "trickle-charged" in known manner. Setter buttons may be provided to record time, day, month, year and "re-set". If a personal computer is used, such controls may not be required if software allows for setting.

In lieu of or in addition to a PC monitor, a 3-4 digit Alpha numeric light emitting diode ("LED") (not shown) may display patient numbers and "low-battery" indication thereafter. Simultaneous "alerts" may be sorted out by arranging for the display to repeatedly "scroll" through alert numbers in succession, dropping off each number as the relevant patient is attended to. Where no PC is provided, the data may be recorded by the directly-connected printer.

The master station 20 is operated by connecting a printer 24 or PC 22, setting the date and time, and noting and acting upon "alerts" as they are recorded. Over a period of time, for example 1 or 2 weeks, any pattern or regularity of incontinence periods for a particular patient may be identified from the recorded information, either manually or using appropriate software, and the patient, or nursing staff, may be arranged to anticipate an oncoming period of incontinence. A booster, repeater and/or page unit 26 may be associated with the master station unit. It can be adjusted to receive one frequency e.g. 27 MHZ and boost the signal to the master station should circumstances so require. A different frequency e.g. 150 MHZ could be used to transmit a signal to a pager 28 to call a staff member for assistance. A booster may boost the signal to the pager. Antennas and suitable connectors may be installed for both or all relevant frequencies.

Figure 2 illustrates an elongate sensor or detector band 4 and an applicator tool 5 for inserting band 4 into a nappy- type moisture absorptive pad 6 (Figure 3) adapted to be worn by the patient. Band 4 may include a pair of spaced electrically conductive strips 7,8 of silver or other suitable material mounted on a length of polyester or other suitable insulating material. The top surface of each strip may be coated e.g. with carbon to prolong life of the strip. Strips 7, 8 are suitably positioned as to contact and to be conductively bridged and thereby short-circuited by wetting of the pad 6 into which the band ha3 been inserted, due care having been taken to ensure that the "conductive" side of the band i.e. the side to which strips 7, 8 are affixed, is in contact with the pad itself.

Band 4 has a forward end portion 9 receivable into spring clip 10 of tool 5. At the "rearward" end of band 4 is a connector element 11 whereby strips 7, 8 are placed in circuit with transmitter unit 12 (Figure 3).

The detector band (Figure 2) is fitted to the pad (Figure 3) as follows: the forward end portion 9 of a dry band 4 is inserted into spring clip 10 of the applicator tool. Pointed end 13 at the same end of the tool as clip 10 is used to puncture an eternal waterproof plastics or like lining 14 of pad 6 about 60 to 80 mm in from the edge as shown in Figure 3. The tool 5 with band 4 in train is then pushed inwards along the centre line of pad 6, just separating the lining from the absorbent material with the strips 7, 8 facing away from the lining and towards the absorbent material.

When the band is fully Inserted, connector 11 is held independently of the tool which is pushed further in so as to disengage band 4 from clip 10.

Tool 5 is then turned 180° about its longitudinal axis so that it can be withdrawn without the clip 6 catching the band. Band 4 now having been suitably located with conductive strips 7, 8 thereof facing the absorbent material of pad 6, tool 5 is withdrawn, leaving band 4 in place.

Transmitter 12 can be fitted to pad 6 using chrome clasps 16, as shown in Figure 3, with appropriate electrical connections to strips 7, 8 shown schematically at 17 via connector element 11.

The pad/transmitter assembly is now ready for fitting to the patient.

Rather than being inserted and attached to pads such as 6, a sensor band or unit could be incorporated into e.g. a disposable paper garment or an underblanket or mat such as by printing or stitching, with suitable means for connection to a separate transmitter.

The transmitter 12 should be as small as possible. An LED may show when it is activated and may stay on until band 4 is removed from a moisture zone thereby concluding an "episode".

The transmitter may be powered by a re-chargeable NiCd battery.

A low power battery signal may report to both master display and pager (Figure 1).

The transmitter may be operated as follows: open the transmitter unit 12; select a patient code number e.g. Mr Smith 007. (If a computer is used the patient code is keyed in); install the battery, close the transmitter unit, and attach unit 12 to pad 6 as already described with strips 7, 8 suitably connected.

When an "episode" occurs the transmitter LED illuminates and a signal is transmitted to the booster station 26. The booster repeats the signal, at frequency "B" (see Figure 1) to the master station 20 which displays "007" - for the duration of the episode. The printer 24 records "007" on a date/time basis as may the PC 22.

The booster 26 sends also a signal of frequency "A" to the pager 28 to alert the nurse. The signal identifies "007" alert, and optionally also the time and date, on the pager display. The nurse acknowledge the message on the pager. Only one signal need be sent to the pager.

The nurse attends to the patient, disconnects the transmitter and fits a new absorbent pad. The transmitter is re¬ connected ready for the next episode. The pager memory can now be cleared, because data of the episode will have been recorded by the master station printer and/or computer.

It will clear that especially in the case of bed-ridden patients, rather than by radio, signals could be sent through an electric wiring system from a transmitter at the bedside and only a sensor/pad component connected to the wiring need be attached to the patient.

In some cases signals could be sent by wire (as distinct from radio) through the same or similar system to that used e.g. with a nurse call button.

Also the invention can evidently be applied to the unconscious, semi conscious, paralyzed, part-paralyzed or confused, or any other patient who may be unable to initiate a signal.

Furthermore it will be clear that the invention, in its "radio" form, is applicable to patients who are free to move around and even outside a building. Appropriate circuitry may provide an indication of the wearer's location (distance and direction) relative to a datum point, including an alarm should the wearer stray beyond a prescribed boundary.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the invention described herein is susceptible to variations and modifications other than those specifically described. It is to be understood that the invention includes all such variations and modifications which fall within the its spirit and scope. The invention also includes all of the steps, features, compositions and compounds referred to or indicated in this specification, individually or collectively, and any and all combinations of any two or more of said steps or features. In particular it will be appreciated that a further aspect of the invention may be directed to all or any of the described features of the sensor, pad, mat and/or locating tool.

Claims

CLAIMS : -
1. An incontinence monitoring system for use in a hospital, nursing home or suchlike location, the system comprising a plurality of sensors and a monitor to receive and record signals from the sensors, each sensor being adapted to be associated with a respective person and being responsive to urinary and/or faecal incontinence in that person, the monitor being capable of recording the time of onset of each incontinence condition and of indicating any regularity or pattern of incontinence in each said person.
2. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the monitor includes a processor and a receiver adapted to receive and discriminate between signals from the respective sensors.
3. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the monitor includes display means for indicating said signals to an operator.
4. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 3 wherein the display means include an alpha numeric LED capable of displaying code indicia for each said person.
5. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the monitor includes a radio receiver and each sensor includes a transmitter adapted to emit a radio signal.
6. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 5 wherein the monitor includes a booster to boost the radio signals received thereby.
7. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the monitor includes means for transmitting the signals or further signals responsive to the signals to one or more pager units.
8. A monitoring system as claimed in claim 1 wherein each sensor is a flexible band comprising an insulating mounting for spaced conductor strips, the band being adapted to be located in a moisture-absorbent pad or garment to be worn by the patient so that at the onset of a wetting episode the moisture completes an electric circuit between said strips and triggers the signal to the monitor.
PCT/AU1994/000697 1993-05-28 1994-11-11 Incontinence management system WO1996014813A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AUPL905893 1993-05-28
AU63393/94A AU690901B2 (en) 1993-05-28 1994-05-27 Improvements in or relating to the prevention reduction or management of incontinence and other distressing dangerous or potentially dangerous conditions
PCT/AU1994/000697 WO1996014813A1 (en) 1993-05-28 1994-11-11 Incontinence management system

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU81352/94A AU8135294A (en) 1994-11-11 1994-11-11 Incontinence management system
PCT/AU1994/000697 WO1996014813A1 (en) 1993-05-28 1994-11-11 Incontinence management system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1996014813A1 true WO1996014813A1 (en) 1996-05-23

Family

ID=27155455

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/AU1994/000697 WO1996014813A1 (en) 1993-05-28 1994-11-11 Incontinence management system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO1996014813A1 (en)

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2116237A1 (en) * 1996-10-15 1998-07-01 Casares Casado Vicente Device for electronic control of nocturnal incontinence
ES2122924A1 (en) * 1996-12-27 1998-12-16 Feito Alvarez Francisco Device for instantaneous detection of urinary incontinence and that of other secretions, with radio- frequency alarm
WO2000000082A1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-01-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having proactive sensor
US6093869A (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-07-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a responsive system including a feedback control loop
WO2000056205A2 (en) * 1999-03-24 2000-09-28 Tmc Technology Medical Care Ag Computer-assisted patient monitoring system
US6149636A (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-11-21 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having proactive sensors
US6160198A (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-12-12 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a discontinuous responsive system
US6186991B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2001-02-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a responsive system including a mechanical actuator
WO2001000117A3 (en) * 1999-06-29 2002-01-24 Procter & Gamble Disposable article having sensor to detect impending elimination of bodily waste
US6359190B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-03-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Device for measuring the volume of a body cavity
US6372951B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-04-16 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having sensor to detect impending elimination of bodily waste
US6384296B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-05-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a responsive system including an electrical actuator
WO2004006761A1 (en) * 2002-07-12 2004-01-22 Fornix Medical Systems Holding B.V. Universal measuring device for medical application
WO2007130239A1 (en) * 2006-04-28 2007-11-15 Medtronic, Inc. External voiding sensor system
WO2008088430A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-07-24 Vigilan, Incorporated Sensors and systems for detecting environmental conditions or changes
EP2014267A1 (en) 2007-06-15 2009-01-14 Intensia NV Universal wet garment detector
US7522061B2 (en) 2006-04-28 2009-04-21 Medtronic, Inc. External voiding sensor system
DE102007054305A1 (en) * 2007-11-08 2009-05-28 Siemens Ag Sensor application with a carrier structure and a sensor band, carrier structure, sensor band and method for operating the Sonsorapplikation
US7977529B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2011-07-12 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty Ltd. Incontinence management system and diaper
US7976475B2 (en) 2003-09-12 2011-07-12 Laborie Medical Technologies, Inc. Method for preparation and use of a two part medical measurement device
AU2007201952B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2011-10-13 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty Ltd Incontinence management system and diaper
WO2013022742A1 (en) 2011-08-11 2013-02-14 3M Innovative Properties Company Wetness sensors
CN101472543B (en) 2006-05-02 2013-06-12 佛瑞德伯格曼保健有限公司 Moisture monitoring system
US8502684B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2013-08-06 Geoffrey J. Bunza Sensors and systems for detecting environmental conditions or changes
WO2014098691A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-26 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for determining the location of a fecal insult
US8978452B2 (en) 2011-08-11 2015-03-17 3M Innovative Properties Company Wetness sensor using RF circuit with frangible link
WO2015094064A1 (en) 2013-12-20 2015-06-25 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for monitoring excrement data
CN105283158A (en) * 2013-03-19 2016-01-27 Sca卫生用品公司 Method of securing conductive thread in an absorbent article
US9408757B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2016-08-09 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Tool for analysing liquid discharge data in an absorbent article, an absorbent article adapted for liquid discharge data collection and a control unit interacting with the absorbent article for collecting the liquid discharge data
US9585795B2 (en) 2011-12-23 2017-03-07 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method for detecting a liquid discharge to an absorbent article
US9654847B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2017-05-16 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Monitoring and displaying an absorption state of an absorbent article
US9904562B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2018-02-27 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Event-driven transitions in absorbent article management
US9927410B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2018-03-27 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for detecting urine and/or feces
US9956125B2 (en) 2011-12-29 2018-05-01 Sca Hygiene Products Absorbent article comprising a wetness detector
US10258512B2 (en) 2013-03-19 2019-04-16 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Electronics enclosure and receptacle
US10322035B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2019-06-18 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Connector receptacle with contact supports for moisture sensor
US10405787B2 (en) 2013-12-20 2019-09-10 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Method for monitoring excrement data
US10425301B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2019-09-24 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Data capture and management system

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2807538A1 (en) * 1978-02-22 1979-08-23 Hubert Ing Grad Schlenke Liq. presence detector for enuresis prevention - has sensor with transmitter on body in wireless communication with receiver with display
FR2529080A1 (en) * 1982-06-24 1983-12-30 Lernould Albert Urine detector for incontinent patient - uses radio transmission system for informing medical staff when urine makes contact with detector
WO1986004710A2 (en) * 1985-02-12 1986-08-14 Radakovic Svaetopluk Device for immediately detecting a urine flow in infants and small children
EP0270048A1 (en) * 1986-11-29 1988-06-08 Harry Prof. Dr. Stegat Uncontrolled urination warning signal generating device
US5074317A (en) * 1989-03-24 1991-12-24 Bondell James A System for treatment of enuresis
US5137033A (en) * 1991-07-15 1992-08-11 Norton John L Patient monitoring device

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2807538A1 (en) * 1978-02-22 1979-08-23 Hubert Ing Grad Schlenke Liq. presence detector for enuresis prevention - has sensor with transmitter on body in wireless communication with receiver with display
FR2529080A1 (en) * 1982-06-24 1983-12-30 Lernould Albert Urine detector for incontinent patient - uses radio transmission system for informing medical staff when urine makes contact with detector
WO1986004710A2 (en) * 1985-02-12 1986-08-14 Radakovic Svaetopluk Device for immediately detecting a urine flow in infants and small children
EP0270048A1 (en) * 1986-11-29 1988-06-08 Harry Prof. Dr. Stegat Uncontrolled urination warning signal generating device
US5074317A (en) * 1989-03-24 1991-12-24 Bondell James A System for treatment of enuresis
US5137033A (en) * 1991-07-15 1992-08-11 Norton John L Patient monitoring device

Cited By (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2116237A1 (en) * 1996-10-15 1998-07-01 Casares Casado Vicente Device for electronic control of nocturnal incontinence
ES2122924A1 (en) * 1996-12-27 1998-12-16 Feito Alvarez Francisco Device for instantaneous detection of urinary incontinence and that of other secretions, with radio- frequency alarm
US6160198A (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-12-12 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a discontinuous responsive system
US6093869A (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-07-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a responsive system including a feedback control loop
US6570053B2 (en) 1998-06-29 2003-05-27 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a proactive sensor
US6149636A (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-11-21 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having proactive sensors
WO2000000082A1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2000-01-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having proactive sensor
US6407308B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-06-18 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having sensor to detect impending elimination of bodily waste
US6186991B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2001-02-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a responsive system including a mechanical actuator
US6266557B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2001-07-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Biofeedback device for an incontinent person
US6384296B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-05-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having a responsive system including an electrical actuator
US6359190B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-03-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Device for measuring the volume of a body cavity
US6372951B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-04-16 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article having sensor to detect impending elimination of bodily waste
WO2000056205A3 (en) * 1999-03-24 2000-12-28 Christian Bader Computer-assisted patient monitoring system
WO2000056205A2 (en) * 1999-03-24 2000-09-28 Tmc Technology Medical Care Ag Computer-assisted patient monitoring system
WO2001000117A3 (en) * 1999-06-29 2002-01-24 Procter & Gamble Disposable article having sensor to detect impending elimination of bodily waste
WO2004006761A1 (en) * 2002-07-12 2004-01-22 Fornix Medical Systems Holding B.V. Universal measuring device for medical application
US8708927B2 (en) 2002-07-12 2014-04-29 Laborie Medical Technologies Canada Ulc Apparatus and method for medical measurement
US7959579B2 (en) 2002-07-12 2011-06-14 Laborie Medical Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for medical measurement
US7976475B2 (en) 2003-09-12 2011-07-12 Laborie Medical Technologies, Inc. Method for preparation and use of a two part medical measurement device
AU2007201952B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2011-10-13 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty Ltd Incontinence management system and diaper
US9107776B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2015-08-18 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty. Ltd. Incontinence management system and diaper
US20110263952A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2011-10-27 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty Ltd Incontinence management system and diaper
US7977529B2 (en) * 2004-11-03 2011-07-12 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty Ltd. Incontinence management system and diaper
AU2007201952C1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2014-02-06 Fred Bergman Healthcare Pty Ltd Incontinence management system and diaper
US7855653B2 (en) 2006-04-28 2010-12-21 Medtronic, Inc. External voiding sensor system
US7522061B2 (en) 2006-04-28 2009-04-21 Medtronic, Inc. External voiding sensor system
WO2007130239A1 (en) * 2006-04-28 2007-11-15 Medtronic, Inc. External voiding sensor system
US8072338B2 (en) 2006-04-28 2011-12-06 Medtronic, Inc. External voiding sensor system
CN101472543B (en) 2006-05-02 2013-06-12 佛瑞德伯格曼保健有限公司 Moisture monitoring system
US7812731B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2010-10-12 Vigilan, Incorporated Sensors and systems for detecting environmental conditions or changes
WO2008088430A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-07-24 Vigilan, Incorporated Sensors and systems for detecting environmental conditions or changes
US8502684B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2013-08-06 Geoffrey J. Bunza Sensors and systems for detecting environmental conditions or changes
EP2014267A1 (en) 2007-06-15 2009-01-14 Intensia NV Universal wet garment detector
JP2011503706A (en) * 2007-11-08 2011-01-27 シーメンス アクチエンゲゼルシヤフトSiemens Aktiengesellschaft Sensor application device using support structure and sensor strip, support structure, sensor strip, and operation method of sensor application device
DE102007054305A1 (en) * 2007-11-08 2009-05-28 Siemens Ag Sensor application with a carrier structure and a sensor band, carrier structure, sensor band and method for operating the Sonsorapplikation
US9408757B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2016-08-09 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Tool for analysing liquid discharge data in an absorbent article, an absorbent article adapted for liquid discharge data collection and a control unit interacting with the absorbent article for collecting the liquid discharge data
WO2013022742A1 (en) 2011-08-11 2013-02-14 3M Innovative Properties Company Wetness sensors
US8978452B2 (en) 2011-08-11 2015-03-17 3M Innovative Properties Company Wetness sensor using RF circuit with frangible link
US9681996B2 (en) 2011-08-11 2017-06-20 3M Innovative Properties Company Wetness sensors
US9782302B2 (en) 2011-08-11 2017-10-10 3M Innovative Properties Company Wetness sensor using RF circuit with frangible link
US9585795B2 (en) 2011-12-23 2017-03-07 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method for detecting a liquid discharge to an absorbent article
US9956125B2 (en) 2011-12-29 2018-05-01 Sca Hygiene Products Absorbent article comprising a wetness detector
US9933402B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2018-04-03 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for determining the location of a fecal insult
WO2014098691A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-26 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for determining the location of a fecal insult
US9927410B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2018-03-27 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for detecting urine and/or feces
US9668924B2 (en) 2013-03-19 2017-06-06 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method of securing conductive thread in an absorbent article
CN105283158A (en) * 2013-03-19 2016-01-27 Sca卫生用品公司 Method of securing conductive thread in an absorbent article
US10258512B2 (en) 2013-03-19 2019-04-16 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Electronics enclosure and receptacle
US9654847B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2017-05-16 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Monitoring and displaying an absorption state of an absorbent article
US9904562B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2018-02-27 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Event-driven transitions in absorbent article management
US10322035B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2019-06-18 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Connector receptacle with contact supports for moisture sensor
US10425301B2 (en) 2013-04-30 2019-09-24 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Data capture and management system
WO2015094064A1 (en) 2013-12-20 2015-06-25 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method and system for monitoring excrement data
US10405787B2 (en) 2013-12-20 2019-09-10 Essity Hygiene And Health Aktiebolag Method for monitoring excrement data

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6384728B1 (en) Personal care monitoring system
US10020075B2 (en) Systems and methods for monitoring and/or managing patient orientation using a dynamically adjusted relief period
US6171289B1 (en) Safety device for colostomy having a wetness detector and alarm
US5519380A (en) Personal monitoring system and method
CA2685889C (en) Moisture monitoring system
US4438771A (en) Passive contactless monitor for detecting cessation of cardiopulmonary
US5808554A (en) Moisture detecting liner for a diaper and a process for manufacture thereof
US6030351A (en) Pressure relief reminder and compliance system
US4474185A (en) Body movement detector
US20130237772A1 (en) Apparatus and system for monitoring
US6847301B1 (en) Patient position monitoring device
US6014346A (en) Medical timer/monitor and method of monitoring patient status
US4704108A (en) Water content sensing and informing system for a disposable diaper
CN101129101B (en) Flexible electronic device
US5459452A (en) Wet bed and patient wander alarm system with snap-on and magnet transmitter assembly
US6129686A (en) Patient position monitor
US6104295A (en) Electronic band tag and method of storing ID information therein
US6567680B2 (en) Disposable electro-cardiogram transmitter device and electrode node placement facilitator
US6285899B1 (en) Remotely interrogated biomedical sensor
US20030137425A1 (en) Wetness monitoring system
US4845323A (en) Flexible tactile switch
US4121573A (en) Wireless cardiac monitoring system and electrode-transmitter therefor
US20030212319A1 (en) Health monitoring garment
EP1404221B1 (en) Respiration monitoring equipment
US8421636B2 (en) Patient monitoring system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AM AT AU BB BG BR BY CA CH CN CZ DE DK EE ES FI GB GE HU JP KE KG KP KR KZ LK LR LT LU LV MD MG MN MW NL NO NZ PL PT RO RU SD SE SI SK TJ TT UA US UZ VN

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): KE MW SD SZ AT BE CH DE DK ES FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN ML MR NE SN TD TG

DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase