WO1994016426A1 - Reconfigurable joystick controller with multi-stage trigger - Google Patents

Reconfigurable joystick controller with multi-stage trigger Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1994016426A1
WO1994016426A1 PCT/US1994/000184 US9400184W WO9416426A1 WO 1994016426 A1 WO1994016426 A1 WO 1994016426A1 US 9400184 W US9400184 W US 9400184W WO 9416426 A1 WO9416426 A1 WO 9416426A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
controller
video game
reconfiguration
switch
input
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1994/000184
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Frank M. Bouton
Robert L. Carter
Clarence A. Hoffman
Eric K. Juve
Rodney W. Kimmel
Original Assignee
Thrustmaster, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US08/002,828 priority Critical
Priority to US08/002,828 priority patent/US5396267A/en
Priority to US7876393A priority
Priority to US08/078,763 priority
Application filed by Thrustmaster, Inc. filed Critical Thrustmaster, Inc.
Publication of WO1994016426A1 publication Critical patent/WO1994016426A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/22Setup operations, e.g. calibration, key configuration or button assignment
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/02Accessories
    • A63F13/06Accessories using player-operated means for controlling the position of a specific area display
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05GCONTROL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS INSOFAR AS CHARACTERISED BY MECHANICAL FEATURES ONLY
    • G05G9/00Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously
    • G05G9/02Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only
    • G05G9/04Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously
    • G05G9/047Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously the controlling member being movable by hand about orthogonal axes, e.g. joysticks
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/02Input arrangements using manually operated switches, e.g. using keyboards or dials
    • G06F3/023Arrangements for converting discrete items of information into a coded form, e.g. arrangements for interpreting keyboard generated codes as alphanumeric codes, operand codes or instruction codes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/03Arrangements for converting the position or the displacement of a member into a coded form
    • G06F3/033Pointing devices displaced or positioned by the user, e.g. mice, trackballs, pens or joysticks; Accessories therefor
    • G06F3/0334Foot operated pointing devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/03Arrangements for converting the position or the displacement of a member into a coded form
    • G06F3/033Pointing devices displaced or positioned by the user, e.g. mice, trackballs, pens or joysticks; Accessories therefor
    • G06F3/038Control and interface arrangements therefor, e.g. drivers or device-embedded control circuitry
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/23Input arrangements for video game devices for interfacing with the game device, e.g. specific interfaces between game controller and console
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/80Special adaptations for executing a specific game genre or game mode
    • A63F13/803Driving vehicles or craft, e.g. cars, airplanes, ships, robots or tanks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/10Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals
    • A63F2300/1018Calibration; Key and button assignment
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/10Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals
    • A63F2300/1025Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals details of the interface with the game device, e.g. USB version detection
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/10Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals
    • A63F2300/1062Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals being specially adapted to a type of game, e.g. steering wheel
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/80Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game specially adapted for executing a specific type of game
    • A63F2300/8017Driving on land or water; Flying
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05GCONTROL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS INSOFAR AS CHARACTERISED BY MECHANICAL FEATURES ONLY
    • G05G9/00Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously
    • G05G9/02Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only
    • G05G9/04Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously
    • G05G9/047Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously the controlling member being movable by hand about orthogonal axes, e.g. joysticks
    • G05G2009/0474Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously the controlling member being movable by hand about orthogonal axes, e.g. joysticks characterised by means converting mechanical movement into electric signals
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05GCONTROL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS INSOFAR AS CHARACTERISED BY MECHANICAL FEATURES ONLY
    • G05G9/00Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously
    • G05G9/02Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only
    • G05G9/04Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously
    • G05G9/047Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously the controlling member being movable by hand about orthogonal axes, e.g. joysticks
    • G05G2009/04774Manually-actuated control mechanisms provided with one single controlling member co-operating with two or more controlled members, e.g. selectively, simultaneously the controlling member being movable in different independent ways, movement in each individual way actuating one controlled member only in which movement in two or more ways can occur simultaneously the controlling member being movable by hand about orthogonal axes, e.g. joysticks with additional switches or sensors on the handle

Abstract

A video game/stimulator system in a personal computer (PC) (12) with game port (20) and keyboard port (18) includes a joystick (32) which includes a base and a joystick handle (44) pivotally mounted on the base for two-dimensional movement. The joystick controller (32) is connectable to both the game port (20) of the personal computer and to the keyboard port (18) via a second, throttle controller (30). The throttle (30) and joystick controller (32) inputs are reconfigurable to work with different video game/simulator programs by downloading a new set of keycodes from the personal computer (12) via the keyboard port (18) to a microcontroller (13) and nonvolatile memory (23) in the throttle controller (30). The throttle (30) and joystick controller (32) have variable inputs which can be input to the PC (12) in either analog of digital form. The digital inputs can be calibrated by changing their corresponding keycodes. A multi-stage trigger switch (300) is hingedly mounted on the joystick (32) for actuation by a user's index finger. The multi-stage trigger (300) has a default position, a first actuated position, and a second actuated position and can be configured to fire a weapon in the first position and control a camera in the second position during operation of the video game/simulator.

Description

Reconfigurable Joystick Controller with Multi-stage Trigger

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to controllers for video games and simulators implemented on a computer and more particularly to reconfiguring game controllers to correspond to a particular video game.

Conventionally, a personal computer (PC) is enabled to be controlled by external manual control devices by means of a game card, which provides an external game port into which control devices, such as a joystick, can be plugged. To provide widespread compatibility, which is essential to the ability to mass market a wide variety of video games and simulation programs, industry standards have been developed for game cards for personal computers such as those commonly referred to as IBM-compatibles. The universal adoption of these standards means that any external manual input device designed to control such computers and software must be compatible with the industry-standard game port. Any input device lacking such compatibility will not be able to be used with conventional personal computers equipped with standard game boards and will not be widely accepted.

The problem is that the industry standard game port provides only a limited number of inputs: four discrete signal inputs for receiving binary signals signifying "On" and Off' and four analog signal inputs for receiving variable voltage signals, such as output by a potentiometer, which are continuously variable over a limited range. The number of game boards that can be plugged into a conventional PC is also limited, to one. Consequently, the number of controllers supported by a standard game port, and the number of allowable functions communicated thereby, are severely restricted.

For example, a PC configured as a combat aviation video game/simulator as shown in FIG. 1 has a joystick controller and a foot- pedal rudder controller. The joystick conventionally has a handle pivotally coupled to a base for forward/rearward movement and left/right movement by the user. The handle is connected in the base to transducers, such as potentiometers, which are coupled to two of the analog inputs of the game port to input proportional signals to the PC microprocessor for controlling analog functions in the video game/simulation program. The handle also includes four discrete switches that are operable by the user's fingers to control discrete functions in the video game/simulation program. The joystick controller therefore consumes two of the analog inputs and all four of the discrete inputs. Attempting to circumvent these limitations, video game and simulator programmers have implemented many commands by programming function keys on the PC keyboard. This approach detracts from the realism of simulation, which is particularly important to flight simulation video games. Developers have strived to attain more realism by designing microprocessor-based input devices which output keycodes to the PC keyboard port emulating function keys on the PC keyboard. One example is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,852,031 to Brasington. The assignee of the present invention has also marketed a throttle controller that outputs keycodes to the PC keyboard port. These efforts have been successful but require a manufacturer to design the controller to transmit a unique keycode for each individual controller input function.

Each video game has its own set of keycodes that it recognizes, with each keycode effectuating a corresponding response within the video game. There is no standard set of keycodes throughout the video game industry. Efforts to convert the keycodes supplied by a video game input to those required by a pre-existing video game program typically require a terminate-and-stay-resident ("TSR") program running on the computer concurrently with the video game. TSRs consume valuable memory and can potentially conflict with existing programs.

Another method of providing compatibility with new or existing video games requires the manufacturer to supply an updated version of the controller firmware to the user, usually in the form of a programmable-read-only-memory ("PROM"). This technique has several disadvantages. The first is that there is additional expense to the manufacturer in providing the updated firmware, which is ultimately passed on to the user. The second disadvantage is that most video game users are either unqualified or unwilling to install the PROM into their game controller. Installing the PROM incorrectly can render the controller inoperable by damaging the PROM or other electronic components due to electrostatic-discharge (ESD). Moreover, many video game users are simply unwilling to disassemble their game controllers for fear of damaging the device. A related problem with video game controllers is a limitation on the number of inputs that can be supported by an individual controller. Currently, due in large part to the exponential growth in personal computer performance, video games can process many more inputs than can be supported on the one or two controllers that can be reasonably handled by an individual user. As a result, only a select few of the available video game inputs are actually used by the user.

The problem is exacerbated by real-time video games such as flight simulators where the user is required to supply the appropriate input in a timely manner or terminate the simulator, i.e., crash. The user in these real-time video games does not have time to change controllers or even to reposition the user's hands on the current controllers. For example, when engaging an adversary during simulated air combat, the user must be able to activate a camera to be begin recording the engagement. The user cannot take the time or the risk to reposition his hands for fear of losing sight of the adversary. Accordingly, a need remains for a way to add camera activation capability to a video game system which does not require the user to reposition the user's hands.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is, therefore, an object of the invention is to enable the user to reconfigure their video game controllers to match the users's individual preference for location of desired functions on the controller. Another object of the invention is to enable the user to reconfigure their video game controllers to match the user's video game/simulator of choice.

Another object is to enable the user to add camera activation capability to a video game system.

Another object is to enable the user to reconfigure the camera activation function to match a particular video game/simulator.

A further object of the invention is to eliminate the need for a terminate and stay resident ("TSR") program running on the computer for use with the video game controllers.

One aspect of the invention enables the individual switches and input devices of the game controllers to be reconfigured to match a target video game format. The video game/simulator system includes a personal computer (PC) running a video game program during a functional mode and a reconfiguration program during a reconfiguration mode. The video system can include several game controllers such as a joystick, a throttle controller, and a foot-pedal rudder controller. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the throttle controller includes microcontroller circuitry that acts as both a video game controller and a reconfiguration engine. In an alternative embodiment, the reconfiguration electronics are included in a joystick controller. The throttle controller, including the reconfiguration electronics, is coupled to a keyboard interface port to receive reconfiguration keycodes downloaded from the PC to the throttle controller during the reconfiguration mode. The throttle controller also allows the keyboard to operate in a conventional manner during the functional mode. Ajoystick is coupled to the throttle controller to receive joystick input signals therefrom. The throttle controller transmits keycodes via the keyboard interface port corresponding to the inputs received by the controller, including its own, during the functional mode. The keycodes transmitted by the controller to the PC need to correspond to those required by the particular video game/simulation program to effectuate a user's desire response to the program. To meet this need for different programs, the PC includes means for downloading the reconfiguration keycodes to the throttle controller reconfiguration engine over the keyboard interface port during the reconfiguration mode.

A reconfiguration program runs on the personal computer prior to invoking the video game program. The reconfiguration program preferably presents a graphical representation of the individual game controllers and allows the user to input a keycode corresponding to each of the controller inputs. The user can either type the keycodes in individually or, alternatively, specify a pre-stored file including a previously-entered set of keycodes. Thus, the user can save separate reconfiguration file in the PC memory for a number of separate video games. The reconfiguration program further enables the user to calibrate the game controllers during the reconfiguration mode. Finally, the reconfiguration program downloads the keycodes to the throttle controller circuitry to be stored in a non-volatile memory in the controller so as to retain the last set of downloaded keycodes even after the video program has been terminated. The throttle controller's reconfiguration engine reconfigures the input devices of the game controllers so as to transmit a reconfiguration keycode downloaded to correspond to a particular controller input when that input is actuated. In another aspect of the invention, a multi-stage trigger switch is mounted on a joystick controller. The multi-stage trigger has a default position, a first actuated position, and a second actuated position. The first and second actuated positions can be assigned any desired keycode to correspond to any desired function by the reconfiguration program. In the preferred embodiment, the first actuated position corresponds to a camera command and the second actuated position corresponds to a fire activation command.

A significant advantage of the invention is the ability to retain the configuration information even after the video program has been terminated and the machine is turned off while enabling the configuration to be changed electrically without physical replacement of the storage devices.

Another advantage of the invention is the ability to provide both analog and digital throttle, pitch, and roll to the computer.

A further advantage of the invention is the ability to calibrate the controllers and thereby use less precise components in the controllers. The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention which proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a video game/simulator system including a personal computer and several game controllers connected according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a two-dimensional graphical display of the joystick of FIG. 1 as displayed on a video display prior to reconfiguration.

FIG. 3 is a two-dimensional graphical display of the joystick of FIG. 1 after reconfiguration.

FIG. 4 is a two-dimensional graphical display of a frontal view of the throttle controller of FIG. 1 as displayed on a video display prior to reconfiguration.

FIG. 5 is a two-dimensional graphical display of a rear view of the throttle controller of FIG. 1 as displayed on a video display prior to reconfiguration.

FIG. 6 is a two-dimensional graphical display of a frontal view of the throttle controller of FIG. 1 as displayed on a video display after reconfiguration.

FIG. 7 is a two-dimensional graphical display of a rear view of the throttle controller of FIG. 1 as displayed on a video display after reconfiguration. FIG. 8 is a flowchart of the reconfiguration program operating in the host personal computer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 9 is a flowchart of a program operating in the game controller of FIG. 1 which receives the reconfiguration information from the host computer. FIG. 10 is a flowchart of a process for reconfiguring the game controller by creating a textual reconfiguration file using a text editor.

FIG. 11 is a flowchart showing the operation of the transmit keycodes step of FIGS. 9 and 10.

FIG. 12 is a block diagram of the reconfiguration video game/simulation system of FIG. 1. FIG. 13 is a schematic level diagram of the circuitry used in the system of FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 is a cross section of the joystick of FIG; 1 showing details of a dual stage trigger according to the invention. FIG. 15 is an illustration of the operation of the throttle of FIG. 1.

FIG. 16 is a flow chart of a routine for calibrating the throttle of FIG. 1.

FIG. 17 is a schematic view of the joystick hat coupled to a game board circuit as shown in FIG. 1. FIG. 18 is flow chart for an input control routine to be used in a video game or simulator software for interpreting analog outputs from the joystick hat switch of FIG. 1.

FIG. 19 is a more detailed schematic of the three position switch arrangement and associated circuitry of the throttle controller of FIG. 13.

APPENDD A is an example of a reconfiguration file for a throttle controller according to the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 shows a video game/simulation system 10 for simulating operation of a complex system having a plurality of user-controlled functions such as a combat aviation video game program. As shown in FIG. 1, the system includes a conventional personal computer (PC) 12. Referring also to FIG. 12, the personal computer includes a microprocessor 13 operable under control of a video game/simulation program stored in memory 23 during a functional mode or, according to the invention, operable under control of a reconfiguration program during a reconfiguration mode. The design and operation of the reconfiguration program and circuitry is described below with reference to FIGS. 2-11. The computer also includes an input/output bus for connecting peripheral input and output devices to the microprocessor 13, e.g., a game card 30, and a keyboard port 18 for a conventional keyboard 16. A conventional video display (200) is used for displaying images produced by operation of the program in the microprocessor.

Included on the computer 12, typically on the backside as shown in FIG. 1, are the input or output ports of the computer. The computer 12 includes a keyboard interface port 18 for, under normal operations, connecting the keyboard 16 to the computer, as well as a video port 24 for connecting to the display.

Also included on the computer 12 are two game ports 20 and 22. The dual game ports 20 and 22 are shown as if game board 26 were inserted into the computer input/output bus. The multi-ported game board 26 inserts along horizontal guides within the computer such that male edge connector 28 makes electrical contact with the input/output bus of the computer. The multi-ported game board 26 is described further in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 5,245,320, MULTIPORT GAME CARD WITH CONFIGURABLE ADDRESS, Ser. No. 07/932,501, filed August 19, 1992, which is a continuation in part of copending application VIDEO GAME/FLIGHT SIMULATOR CONTROLLER WITH SINGLE ANALOG INPUT TO MULTIPLE DISCRETE INPUTS, Ser. No. 07/911,765, filed July 9, 1992, both of which are incorporated herein by reference. Preferably, for running aviation video games and simulation programs, both a throttle controller 30 and a joystick controller 32 are connected to the computer, as well as a foot-pedal rudder controller 34. The joystick controller 32 includes cable 36 having a game port connector 38. The game port connector 38 is connectable to a mating game port connector 38M, like game ports 20 and 22, on throttle controller 30. The joystick controller 32 includes a plurality of input devices including a multi-stage switch 39, switches 40, hat 42, as well as the joystick handle 44. All of the input information, including the state of the switches and hat, is conveyed over the cable 36 to the throttle controller 30 for further processing as described further below.

Referring now to FIG. 14, the multi-stage trigger switch 39 is hingedly mounted on a front side of the joystick controller handle 44 at a position where a user's index finger normally resides when using the joystick. The multi-stage trigger 39 includes a trigger lever 300 that is hingedly mounted on the handle 44 by a pivot member 302. The trigger lever is received in a slot along the front side of the handle 44 to allow the trigger lever to be movable towards the handle 44. An actuator member 304 is connected to an inner wall of the trigger lever 300 to actuate a switch S2. A spring 306 is coupled between the underside of the trigger lever 300 and a switch SI. The spring 306 biases the lever 300 outward.

The two switches SI and S2 are fixedly mounted in the handle 44 for selective actuation by the trigger lever 300. The spring 306 is mounted on an actuator stem 308 of switch SI to be actuated thereby when the spring 306 is compressed by the trigger lever 300. A flat spring 310 is mounted opposite a switch actuator stem 312 of switch S2. The flat spring 310 is interposed between the actuator member 304 and the actuator stem 312 to require an additional force beyond that required to actuate SI to be exerted on the trigger lever 300 in order to actuate switch S2. The flat spring 310 is actually somewhat of a misnomer because the flat spring 310 is actually concave.

The multi-stage trigger switch 39 has a default unactuated position, a first actuated position, and a second actuated position. The unactuated position corresponds to the position shown in FIG. 14 wherein neither switch SI or S2 are actuated. The first actuated position corresponds to where the trigger lever 300 is slightly compressed thereby actuating only switch SI. In the preferred embodiment, actuating switch SI would activate a video camera in the video game. The second actuating position corresponds to having the trigger lever 300 completely depressed with sufficient force to cause the actuator member 304 to deform the flat spring 310 and thereby depress actuator stem 312. Thus, in the second actuated position both switch S2 and SI are actuated. In the preferred embodiment, the second actuated position activates the weapons system in the video game/simulator.

In an alternative embodiment, the multi-stage trigger 39 can have a plurality of individual positions, e.g., three or four, limited mainly by the travel of the switch. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the joystick controller 32 adds an additional conductor to the cable 36 to transmit an electrical position signal which indicates whether the switch is in the second actuated position. Thus, cable 36 has a total of nine conductors for all of the joystick outputs. If the multi-stage switch 39 has more than two actuated positions, the cable requires an additional conductor for each additional position, or the use of a discrete switch multiplexing circuit.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the throttle controller 30 is shown connected to game port 20 of game card 26 ultimately residing in the housing of computer 12, as described above. The throttle controller 30 includes a cable 41 having a game port connector 43 at one end. Connected to the connector 43 is a mating game port Y-connector 45 which couples the throttle controller output signals from cable 41 and also the foot-pedal rudder controller position signals from signal line 50 across cable 46 to connector 48 which is connected to game port 20. The foot-pedal rudder controller signal line 50 is coupled to an analog signal line of cable 46 unused by throttle controller 30. Optionally, a calibration knob 52 is connected to game port 20 across signal line 54, and is used to calibrate the controller input signals.

The throttle controller 30 further includes a keyboard input port 56 which is shown coupled to the keyboard 16 through a keyboard output cable 58. The keyboard input port 56 receives the keycodes transmitted from the keyboard 16 across cable 58 responsive to a user depressing one of the keyboard keys. The throttle controller 30 also includes a keyboard input output port 60 which is coupled to the computer keyboard interface 18 across cable 62. The throttle controller 30 has a plurality of input devices including discrete switches 64, three-way switches 66 and 68, and throttle 70. The throttle 70 can either be two separate throttle members, i.e., split-throttle, as in the preferred embodiment, or a single throttle member. In addition, throttle controller 30 can include a trackball mounted on the throttle handle near where the thumb naturally rests on the handle, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,245,320. If the trackball is included, the trackball encoder outputs can be coupled to a serial input 27 of the computer to act as a "mouse" to move a cursor on the computer display 200 (FIG. 12). Referring to FIG. 12, a block diagram of the above-described configuration is shown. Shown in FIG. 12 is a display 200 coupled to the video port 24 of the personal computer 12. Also shown in FIG. 12 are keyboard indicator lights 16A, 16B and 16C on keyboard 16 representing the current state of the NUM lock key, the CAPS lock key and the SCROLL lock key. The state of the keyboard lights 16A-16C is controlled by the personal computer 12 during normal mode operation, as is known in the art of computer programming. The personal computer 12 transmits the desired state of these lights via the keyboard port 18 to the keyboard 16 during normal operations. The invention uses this capability to download reconfiguration keycodes to the throttle 30 during the reconfiguration mode, as describee' further below.

Referring now to FIG. 13, a more detailed schematic level drawing of the throttle electronics is shown. The throttle electronics include a microcontroller 202, which, in the preferred embodiment, is a

PIC16C71 manufactured by Microchip of Chandler, Arizona. Coupled to the microcontroller 202 is a nonvolatile memory 204 over bus 206. The nonvolatile memory 204 stores keycodes corresponding to the individual input devices, e.g., switches 40. The nonvolatile memory is a read-write memory such as a electrically-erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM). The nonvolatile memory must be both read and write so that microcontroller 202 can store reconfigurable keycodes received from the personal computer over the cable 62, as described further below. In the preferred embodiment, the nonvolatile memory is a IK x 8 serial EEPROM, part number 93LC46 or equivalent, manufactured by Microchip of Chandler, Arizona.

The microcontroller 202 further includes A-to-D converter inputs 208 and 210 (A/Dl, A/D2) for converting an analog input voltage signal received from input devices 30, 32 to corresponding digital values. The microcontroller 202 further includes a plurality of I/O ports (230, 232, 238, 256, 260) for reading from and writing to the other electronic components. In addition, the microcontroller has an internal nonvolatile memory (not visible) wherein the executable code for the microcontroller is stored. Alternatively, the executable code could be located in an off-chip nonvolatile memory and even the nonvolatile memory 204 itself, depending on the particular microcontroller selected.

Coupled to the analog-to-digital inputs 208 and 210 are rheostats 212 and 214, respectively. Rheostat 212 corresponds to the output of the hat switch 42 located on the joystick handle 44 as shown in FIG. 1. Thus, moving the hat switch 42 changes the resistance of the rheostat 212 and, therefore, the current produced by the rheostat. A preferred embodiment of rheostat 212 is shown in FIG. 17. A switch 216 is interposed between rheostat 212 and the A-to-D input 208. Connected between the switch 216 and an analog input of the game port 20 is an analog signal line 218. Line 220 is connected between the switch 216 and the A-to-D input 208. A resistor Rl is coupled between line 220 and ground to convert the rheostat 212 to a potentiometer, i.e., a variable voltage source, when switch 216 is set to connect the rheostat 212 to the line 220. Switch 216 corresponds to switch 68B shown in

FIG. 1. Switch 216, therefore, enables the hat switch 42 to be operated either in an analog mode wherein the rheostat output is coupled to the analog game port input, or a digital mode wherein the rheostat output is coupled to the A-to-D input 208 and thereafter converted to a corresponding digital keycode which is then transmitted to the personal computer via the keyboard interface 18.

Referring now to FIG. 17, a preferred embodiment of the rheostat 212 and hat switch 42 circuit is shown. Each switch in the circuit corresponds to one of the discrete settings on the hat switch, i.e., center, top, bottom, left, and right. The circuit is arranged so that each switch Sll, S22,... Snn is connected in series with a corresponding resistor Rll, R22,... Rnn to form a single switching subcircuit and all of the switching subcircuits are connected between the common input voltage node and a single output node coupled to said one analog output signal line. In this circuit it is preferred for each resistor to have a different value of resistance so that the actuation of each switch produces a separate discrete current level I0uτ through switch 216, when the switch 216 is set in the analog mode. Alternatively, the hat switch circuit can be arranged in a ladder circuit with the switches Sll, S22,... Snn connected between the common input node and a series at output nodes coupled in series by separate resistors to a single output node coupled to said one analog output signal line. In that circuit it is preferred for each resistor to have the same value of resistance. Included in the game board is a timer 219 that produces a digital pulse having a pulse width proportional to the current Iouτ coupled thereto. The game board timer 219 converts the different discrete current levels on the analog output signal line 218 into different duration signals. A subroutine, shown in FIG. 18, is included in the video game/simulation program for timing the different duration signals and selecting a unique control command in the program in accordance with the timed duration. In this way, the personal computer interprets each different discrete level of signal as a separate discrete command and inputs such command to the video game/simulation program to effect a corresponding change in the displayed images produced by the program.

A similar routine to that shown in FIG. 18 is included in the microcontroller 202 firmware for interpreting the discrete voltage levels produced at the analog-to-digital input 208 when switch 216 is placed in the digital mode setting. Each discrete voltage level is assigned a corresponding keycode. When that discrete voltage level is sensed at the analog-to-digital input 208, the assigned corresponding keycode is transmitted to the personal computer over the keyboard interface port. Referring again to FIG. 13, a rheostat 214, corresponding to the throttle handle 70 position, is coupled to either one of the analog inputs of the game port 20 or the A-to-D input 210. Switch 280A, which corresponds to the three position switch 68A of FIG. 1, connects the rheostat 214 output to either line 222 connected to the game port 20 or line 224 connected to the A-to-D input 210. Line 224 also has a resistor R2 coupled thereto for converting the rheostat 214 to ε potentiometer when the rheostat is coupled to the A-to-D input 210. Thus, the throttle controller 30 can either be operated in an analog mode or a digital mode, depending on the state of switch 280A. The analog throttle is used in so-called "Type 0" games, whereas the digital throttle mode is used in "Types 1 and 2" games.

The three position switch includes a third position shown as a separate switch 280B in FIG. 13. The third position places the throttle in a calibration mode as described further below. The third position of the switch 280B can also be a separate switch that is switchable between the calibration mode and a normal mode. The third position of the switch is shown as a connecting a common supply voltage VCC to an input/output port 221 of the microcontroller 202 in the calibration mode and a ground voltage in the functional modes, i.e., the digital and analog modes. When the switch is placed in the third position, the microcontroller senses a voltage on port 221 and the microcontroller branches to a calibration routine responsive thereto. The operation of the calibration routine is described below.

A more detailed schematic of the three way switch 68A is shown in FIG. 19. In FIG. 19, the switch 68A has a signal line 227 coupled to a select input 225 of switch 280A that selects between the digital and analog modes of the throttle. Switch 280A in FIG. 19 is a digital switch that switches states responsive to the signal on select input 225. Two resistors R4 and R5 pull lines 227 and 223 to ground when switch 68A is in a middle position corresponding to the analog mode. When the switch 68A is in a top position, corresponding to the calibration mode, the supply voltage VCC is coupled to input/output port 221 via line 223. Similarly, when the switch 68A is in a bottom position, corresponding to the digital mode, VCC is coupled to select input 225 via line 227, which causes switch 280A to switch states. The microcontroller 202 is also responsible for coordinating communication with the PC over the keyboard interface 18. A PC keyboard interface, as is known in the art, is a bi-directional interface. The interface consists of clock line 226 and data line 228, which lines are coupled to the keyboard interface port 18 via cable 62. Although the interface is bi-directional, in a typical personal computer substantially all of the communication over the keyboard interface is from the keyboard to the personal computer to transmit the keycodes to the computer responsive to actuating the keyboard keys. Typical PC software operates on an interrupt basis accepting keycodes whenever input via the keyboard port, rather than waiting to poll the keyboard. However, the personal computer does on occasion transmit data the other way, i.e., from the personal computer to the keyboard. The typical occasion during which the personal computer transmits information to the keyboard is to change the state of the lights 16A-

16C on the keyboard. The invention takes advantage of this capability to facilitate downloading the reconfiguration keycodes during the reconfiguration mode as described below with respect to FIG. 11.

In order to intercept the data transmitted from the PC over the keyboard interface, as well as to allow keycodes to be transmitted to the personal computer, the clock line 226 and the data line 228 are coupled to microcontroller I/O ports 230 and 232, respectively. A double throw switch 234 is interposed in lines 226, 228 between the keyboard interface and the keyboard to allow the microcontroller to selectively disable the keyboard 16. Switch 234 is a digital switch or multiplexer which has a control input 236 connected to microcontroller output port 238 via control line 240. The signal on control line 240, therefore, selectively enables or disables the keyboard by either opening or closing switch 234. The microcontroller 202 opens switch 234, as shown in FIG. 13, responsive to the throttle controller 30 being placed in the reconfiguration mode by setting the three position switch 68A to the calibration position. In the preferred embodiment, the switch 234 is part number CD40HCT66 manufactured by National Semiconductor of Santa Clara, California. The various discrete switches on the two controllers 30 and 32 are coupled to controller 202 via multiplexer (MUX) 250. MUX 250 is a 2N to 1 multiplexer. MUX 250 includes 2N inputs and a single output 254. The plurality of discrete switches on the controllers are multiplexed to the microcontroller because of the limited number of available I/O ports in the microcontroller 202. In the event that a more sophisticated microcontroller is employed, the multiplexing scheme shown in FIG. 13 would not be necessary. The multiplexer 250 further includes select inputs 252 that are coupled to microcontroller output port 256 via bus 258. The signal on bus 258 determines which of the 2N inputs are passed through to output 254. The single multiplexer output 254 is connected to controller input port 260 via input line 262.

The throttle discrete switches 264 are coupled to the input to multiplexer 250. The throttle discrete switches 264 are also coupled to the game port 20. Similarly, the throttle discrete inputs 266 are coupled to the multiplexer 250 inputs. Using this configuration, the microcontroller can sample the states of each of the discrete switches 264 and 266 by sequentially changing the select signals on bus 258 and reading the corresponding output on line 262.

The remaining analog outputs 268 of the joystick are coupled to game port 20. The two analog outputs, in the preferred embodiment, correspond to the pitch and roll signals produced by the joystick responsive to movement of the joystick handle.

The controller 30 electronic circuitry shown in FIG. 13 controls all of the transmission to and from the personal computer. The microcontroller 202 coordinates substantially all of the communication to and from the personal computer, with the possible exception of those signals that connect directly to the personal computer via the game port 20. As indicated above, the microcontroller has two primary modes of operation: a functional mode; and a reconfiguration mode. The functional mode is characterized primarily by transmission of keycodes from the controller 30 to the personal computer. These keycodes can either be input from the keyboard 16 or generated by microcontroller 202 responsive to actuation of one of the input devices on the controllers 30 or 32. Other potential embodiments of electronics circuitry suitable for transforming input signals to keycodes are described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,716,542 issued to Peltz et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 4,852,031 issued to Brasington, which are incorporated herein by reference.

The reconfiguration mode, however, is characterized primarily by transmission of keycodes from the personal computer to the controller 30 via the keyboard interface. During the reconfiguration mode, the microcontroller disables the keyboard 16 to ensure that the transmission received from the personal computer is not passed on to the keyboard 16. The keycodes are transmitted from the personal computer microprocessor 13 to the microcontroller 202 in a serial fashion using the keyboard protocol, as is known in the art. Any number of data formats can be used to transmit the reconfiguration keycode data from the personal computer to the controller 30. Once the downloaded keycodes are received by the microcontroller 202, the keycodes are stored in the nonvolatile memory 204 where they are subsequently retrieved when a corresponding input device on the controllers 30 and 32 is actuated. This mode is further described in the next section.

Many other video games/simulation system configurations are possible without departing from the inventive principles described herein. For example, the joystick controller 32 and the throttle controller 30 can be interchanged with the joystick controller 32 having the reconfiguration electronics therein. In that case, however, the controller electronics shown in FIG. 13 would then be incorporated into the joystick controller 32. The joystick controller 32 could then be operated independently. With the joystick 32 and the throttle 30 thus interchanged, the joystick would then be coupled to the game card 26 and the throttle controller 30 would be coupled to the joystick controller 32. Furthermore, the joystick controller 32 would have a keyboard input board connectable to the keyboard 16, as well as a keyboard input/output port connectable to the computer keyboard port 18. This configuration would thus allow for a reconfigurable joystick without the need for the throttle controller 30. Similarly, any other type of controller can be designed to substitute for the throttle controller 30 while retaining the reconfiguration capability.

Additionally, the system configuration described hereinabove has focused on the use of the computer keyboard port for transmitting the reconfiguration keycodes from the computer to the controller. However, several other bi-directional computer I/O channels could provide similar capability, e.g., RS-232, Bi-directional Centronics. In addition, the "ADB" bus on the Apple computers would provide a similar transmission path. Additional circuitry, however, is necessary within the controller to communicate over the asynchronous ADB bus.

Reconfiguring the Game Controllers

Each joystick input and throttle input has an initial corresponding keycode assigned by the manufacturer of the controller. Typically, the initial keycodes match a prevalent video game. If the video game user selects a program which uses keycodes which do not match those supplied by the manufacturer, or the user desires to change the function of one or more of the controller inputs, the initial keycode set is no longer satisfactory. In accordance with the invention, the user can switch into a reconfiguration mode by invoking a reconfiguration program on the computer 12 and changing the state of the three-way switch 68A.

In one embodiment, the reconfiguration program presents a graphical representation of each of the game controllers on the display, along with a menu of configuration assignments. FIG. 2 shows such a representation of the joystick, located generally at 72. Each discrete switch 74, 76, and 78 has a separate unique character associated therewith, "a", "c", "d", respectively. Similarly, hat 82 has four different characters associated with it, i.e., "e", "f ', "g", "h", corresponding to the four separate positions of the hat 82. Also, the first and second actuated positions of the multi-stage switch 80 are initially assigned unique keycodes "B" and "b", respectively.

The program indicates which keycode, as represented by the corresponding character, currently corresponds to each input. Although single-character keycodes are shown herein, it is apparent that multi-character keycodes can likewise be used. When the reconfiguration program is initially invoked, the inputs will have no characters associated with them since none will have yet been assigned. Alternatively, the computer can store the currently assigned keycodes or, in the preferred embodiment, the keycodes can be transmitted from the throttle controller 30 to the personal computer 12.

The reconfiguration program will prompt the user to input the desired keycodes for each of the controller inputs. In the preferred embodiment, the program simply steps from one input to the next, responsive to the user depressing the desired keyboard character until all of the inputs have been assigned. Referring now to FIG. 3, shown generally at 84 is a graphically representation of the joystick after the joystick inputs have been reassigned. Following the reconfiguration program, for example, the first and second actuated positions of the multi-stage switch 80 are reassigned to keycodes "L" and "1", respectively. Were there more than two actuated positions each would be assigned an individual keycode corresponding to the desired input function. In the preferred embodiment, the first actuated position corresponds to a fire command, i.e., "L", and the second actuated position corresponds to a camera activation command, "1", for a video flight game/simulator.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, frontal and rear views of the throttle controller 30, as shown on the display, are shown generally at 86 and 102, respectively. As with the joystick in FIG. 2, each of the throttle inputs has a current keycode associated with it. Discrete input switches 88, 94, 96, and 98 each have a single unique keycode associated with them, and three-way switch 100 has a single unique keycode associated with each switch setting. Input 90, however, has two keycodes associated with it. This corresponding to two of the three switch settings of three-way switch 100. For example, when switch 100 is in a first position, corresponding to keycode "a", discrete input 90 corresponds to keycode "t." In contrast, when switch 100 is in a second position, corresponding to keycode "b", discrete input 90 corresponds to keycode "u". Similarly, discrete switch 92 has three separate keycodes, "v", "w", and "x", corresponding to the three switch settings "a", "b", and "c", respectively.

Once the desired keycodes have been entered, the user commands the reconfiguration program to download the new keycodes to the throttle controller. The computer synchronizes with the throttle controller over the keyboard interface and then transmits a packet of data to the throttle controller over the keyboard port interface 18. In the preferred embodiment, the data packet includes one or more keycodes for each of the controller inputs, each input having a corresponding datum, for example, at a predetermined offset into the packet. In order to avoid contention for the keyboard interface, in the preferred embodiment, the user is prompted to avoid actuating any of the keyboard inputs. If more than one keycode is used for each controller input, the desired number of keycodes are entered in the manner described above.

The throttle controller 30 receives the data packet from the computer 12 and stores the keycodes into the non-volatile memory 114, where it is stored until the controller is subsequently reconfigured, at which time it is overwritten.

After operation of the reconfiguration program has been completed, the user simply exits the program and sets the throttle controller three-way switch 68 to a setting corresponding to the functional mode. A flowchart of the reconfiguration program operating in host computer 12 is shown in FIG. 8.

The reconfiguration program begins by determining the number of controllers present in the video game/simulator system in step 150e. This information can either be input by the user or set to default to a standard configuration. The program next enters a loop which begins by comparing the number of controllers to zero in step 152. If the number of controllers is not equal to zero, in step 154, the program determines the number of inputs for one of the controllers, e.g, joystick. The program displays the corresponding controller on the screen as shown in FIGS. 2-7, or displays a fill-in list of inputs as described below with reference to FIG. 10.

The program then prompts the user in step 158 to input a keycode for one of the inputs, as described above. The program advances to the next input in step 160 and decrements the number of inputs 160 remaining to be assigned a keycode. Steps 156 through 160 continue until all of the inputs for the current controller have been assigned. In the event that more than one keycode is associated with a particular input, the program would not automatically move to the next input device after the user has input only a single character.

Instead, the program would wait for a special character to be entered, i.e., one that is not normally associated with any desired input keycode. Alternatively, a mouse could be used to reposition the curser in the next input field adjacent the next input. Once all of the inputs have been assigned, for the first controller

(step 156) the remaining number of controllers to be reconfigured is decremented in step 162. If there are any remaining controllers, the steps 154-160 are repeated for each controller.

If there are no controllers remaining to be reconfigured (step 152), the program branches to step 164 and transmits the keycodes input during the reconfiguration program to the throttle controller 30. The keycodes are transmitted in a predetermined format with each keycode corresponding to a particular input in the video game/simulator system. The flowchart of FIG. 8 is sufficient to allow one skilled in the art of computer programming to write a computer program operable on the host computer to implement the reconfiguration program. A preferred embodiment of step 164 is shown in FIG. 11, described below.

Referring now to FIG. 9, a flowchart of a program operable on the throttle controller is shown. The program has two modes of operation: a normal mode wherein the program detects controller inputs; and a reconfiguration mode wherein the controller receives the reconfiguration keycodes transmitted from the host computer. In the preferred embodiment, the user can switch the controller between these two modes by setting switch 68 to the appropriate setting, as described above.

The program of FIG. 9 commences in step 168 by determining the state of the controller. This step, in the preferred embodiment, involves sampling the state of the switch 68. If the controller is in the reconfiguration mode, the program awaits receipt of a reconfiguration keycode in step 170. When a keycode is received, in step 172, the keycode is stored in a memory, preferably a non-volative memory such as EEPROM 114, at a predetermined location corresponding to the specified controller input. The number of inputs remaining to be received is decremented in step 174. If there are additional keycodes to be received, the program transitions to step 170 and "busy-waits" for additional keycode transmission from the host. If all of the keycodes have been received, the program in step 176 transitions to step 168 and waits for the controller to be switched to normal mode. Once the controller is placed in normal mode, the program transitions to step 178 and awaits an input signal on any of the controller inputs received thereby. In the preferred embodiment, the program samples all of the inputs in a round-robin fashion. Once an input signal is detected, the program "looks-up" the corresponding keycode at the predetermined memory location in step 180. The program then transmits that keycode to the host computer to the keyboard input port 18 over cable 62. The program then transitions back to step 168 to determine the current state of the controller. Alternatively, switch 68 can be coupled to an interrupt line such that toggling the switch invokes a interrupt service routine which determines the state of the controller without explicitly polling the switch 68. The flowchart of FIG. 9 is sufficient to allow one skilled in the art of computer programming to write a corresponding computer program operable on the throttle controller 30. In addition to the graphical method for inputting reconfiguration keycodes during the reconfiguration program, the invention further includes a second embodiment of the reconfiguration program wherein the reconfiguration keycodes are input using a conventional text editor. A flowchart of the method using the text editor is shown in FIG. 10. Referring now to FIG. 10, in the first step 184 a text editor is invoked on the computer. Once in the text editor, a reconfiguration file is edited using conventional techniques in step 186. The reconfiguration file can be either supplied by the controller manufacturer, or, alternatively, can be created by the user. The reconfiguration file contains a list of the controller inputs and the corresponding keycodes associated with those controller inputs. The controller inputs are labelled according to a predetermined labelling convention supplied by the controller manufacturer. Adjacent a controller input label is the keycode or keycodes associated with that particular controller input. In the event that the controller input has more than a single state, e.g., the multi-stage trigger 39 described above, one or more keycodes are listed for each state of the input. Another example is the throttle stick on the throttle controller 30. Some throttle controllers have a digital throttle mode wherein a keycode is generated responsive to incremental movements of the throttle stick. For the digital throttle then, a plurality of keycodes are listed for the digital throttle stick input, each keycode corresponding to a successive incremental position of the throttle stick. An example reconfiguration file is shown in Appendix A. Once the reconfiguration file has been edited, the text editor can then be terminated and the second embodiment of the reconfiguration program invoked in step 188. This reconfiguration program 188 differs from the above-described reconfiguration program in that the reconfiguration keycodes are not entered graphically. This embodiment of the reconfiguration program contains two steps. In the first step 190, a reconfiguration packet is generated from the reconfiguration file generated in step 186 above. A reconfiguration packet is generated by parsing through the reconfiguration file and assembling a binary reconfiguration packet having the desired format. Once in the desired format, the reconfiguration packet, including the reconfiguration keycodes, is transmitted to the controller from the computer in step 192. This step is essentially the same as step 164 of FIG. 8. In both cases, the keycodes are transmitted using a predetermined protocol over the keyboard interface. Protocols necessary to transmit the keycodes efficiently and reliably are well- known in the art and are not described further herein.

Referring now to FIG. 11, the preferred method of transmitting the keycodes from the computer to the controller is shown. The method 400 shown in FIG. 11 uses the bits in the keyboard status byte in the personal computer, i.e., memory location 0:417H. The BIOS within the personal computer monitors the status of these bits and, if such status is changed, downloads the present state of the bits to the keyboard to change the state of the corresponding lights. In particular, the method 400 uses bits 4, 5 and 6 to transmit two bits of information at a time. The third bit is used to ensure that at least one of the status bits changes during each iteration of the inner loop of the method steps 408 through 416, as described below.

The method begins at step 402 by determining the number of bytes required to be downloaded to the controller 30. The variable NUM_BYTES is then set equal to the number of bytes N to be downloaded. In step 404, the variable NUM_BYTES is compared to zero to see whether another byte needs to be transmitted to the controller. If NUM_BYTES does not equal zero, the next byte to be transmitted is retrieved in step 405. Next, the number of bits in the byte is set in step 406. The number of bits is an even number, typically eight, but depending on the number of parity bits, this number can vary.

In step 408, the variable NUM_BITS is compared to zero. If NUM_BITS does not equal zero, step 410 is executed and the first two bits of the current byte to be downloaded are extracted from the current byte. The extracted bits are then written out to the keyboard status byte in step 412 along with a third bit which ensures that at least one of the three bits is different than the current value of the bits in the status byte. For example, if the previous two bits went to the keyboard status byte were 00 and the third bit was also a 0 and the current two bits are also 00, then the third bit would need to be set to a 1 so that at least one of the three bits is toggled.

The method then in step 414 executes a keyboard status request which causes the BIOS to compare the current state of the keyboard status byte with the prior state of the keyboard status byte. The keyboard status byte is changed from the prior state, by virtue of a change in at least the third bit. The BIOS then proceeds to download the keyboard status byte to the controller 30 over the keyboard interface port. The downloaded status byte is intercepted by the microcontroller 202, as described above.

Finally, in step 416, the variable NUM_BITS is decremented by two and then transitions back to step 408 to compare once again the variable NUM_BITS to 0. The sequence of steps 408 through 416 are repeated until the number of bits finally reach 0; that is, there are no remaining bits to be transmitted in the current byte.

Once all of the bits of the current byte have been transmitted from the personal computer to the controller 30 over the keyboard port, i.e., NUM_BITS = 0, the variable NUM.BYTE is decremented by 1 in step 418. Step 418 then transitions to step 404 where the variable NUM_BYTES is compared to 0 to see whether or not there are remaining bytes to be transmitted to the controller. If there are remaining bytes, step 404 transitions to step 405 and a new current byte is selected and the above-described sequence is repeated. If the number of remaining bytes is 0, however, all of the bytes will have thus been transmitted and the method 400 is be concluded in step 420.

Calibrating the Game Controllers The invention described herein also allows for the analog controller inputs to be calibrated. The calibration process described hereinafter enables the controller functions to be precisely calibrated to the corresponding video game program functions. It allows for less tolerant components to be used in the controller which thus lowers the overall cost of the controller. The calibration process, in the preferred embodiment, is conducted on the throttle stick 70 of FIG. 1. A throttle has a range of travel as shown in FIG. 15. The travel extends from an off position 450 to a full after burner (AB) position 456. In between these two extreme positions are the idle detent position 452, the throttle detent position 454, and a plurality of subdivisions, e.g., 458 through 466. The detent positions allow the user to place the throttle in one of two known positions by simply finding the desired detent. The full range of thrust of the throttle can be subdivided into an idle range between 450 and 452, a throttle range extending between 452 and 454, and an after burner range extending from 454 to 456. Each of these individual ranges is then further subdivided into individual subdomains. The subdomains determine the resolution of the throttle stick. The greater the number of subdomains, the greater the resolution of the throttle. The number of subdomains is specified by the user in the reconfiguration file, as described above, and a character or keycode is assigned to each subdomain. The exact character assigned is a function of the type of game in which the throttle is employed. For Type 1 games, the same character is associated with each individual subdomain. In Type 2 games, however, a unique character is assigned to each individual subdomain. The characters assigned in the reconfiguration file are then downloaded to the controller in the manner described above. The preferred method of calibrating the throttle is shown in FIG.

16. First, the throttle is put into the calibration mode in step 502 by placing the three-way switch 68A in the calibration position and then returning the three-way switch to the digital position. The three-way switch is placed briefly in the calibration position to signal to the microcontroller that a calibration sequence is about to occur.

Alternatively, the personal computer could download a calibration keycode which would indicate to the controller that the calibration is about to occur.

Once in the calibration mode, the number of positions of the throttle controller is determined in step 504. For the throttle controller shown in FIG. 15, there are four discrete positions in which the throttle can be placed, i.e., positions 450, 452, 454, and 456.

In step 506, the number of positions is compared to 0; and if not equal to 0, the process transitions to step 508. In step 508, the throttle is manually put in a first calibration position. In the preferred embodiment, this first throttle position is in the full off position 450. Next, in step 510, the user is prompted to press a predetermined button on the throttle controller to signal that the throttle is in the first calibration position. In step 512, the microcontroller 202 within the throttle controller samples an output signal produced by the throttle rheostat on line 224 configured as a potentiometer by switch 220, to determine a baseline voltage level for the throttle in the full off position 450. The microcontroller A-to-D converter converts this baseline voltage level to a corresponding digital representation. This digital representation is stored for subsequent use in step 516 wherein keycodes are assigned to each of the individual throttle positions, as described further below.

In step 514, the number of positions remaining to be calibrated is decremented and the number of positions is again compared to 0 in step 506. If the number of positions does not equal 0, the method transitions to step 508 wherein the user is prompted to position the throttle to a second calibration position. For a simple two-step calibration, this would correspond to the full after-burner position 456. However, in the preferred embodiment, the user is prompted to place the throttle in the idle detent position 452. Then, in step 510, the user is prompted to again press the same predetermined button which signal to the microcontroller that the throttle is in the desired second calibration position. Then, again, the microcontroller samples the output of the throttle rheostat in step 512 and converts it to a digital representation via the A-to-D converter. Then the number of remaining positions is decremented in step 514 and the number of positions is compared against 0 in step of 506.

Assuming there are remaining positions, this sequence of steps 508 through 514 are repeated for each of those remaining positions. In the preferred embodiment, the throttle is calibrated at the after-burner detent position 454 as well as the full after-burner position 456. Once all of the throttle calibration positions have been calibrated, individual keycodes are assigned to the each of the calibration positions in step 516. These are the keycodes that have been previously downloaded to the throttle controller 30 which correspond to the particular positions. In addition, however, an individual keycode is associated with each of the subdomains within the full throttle range. The number of subdomains is specified in the reconfiguration file, as described above, and all of the reconfiguration keycodes corresponding to each of the individual subdomains is downloaded during the reconfiguration mode. The microcontroller subdivides the voltage range sampled during the calibration process and assigns individual keycodes to the corresponding voltage ranges within that full range.

Having described and illustrated the principles of the invention in a preferred embodiment thereof, it should be apparent that the invention can be modified in arrangement and detail without departing from such principles. For example, is should be apparent that the number and type of game controllers can be altered without departing from the scope of the invention. Also, the microcontroller and nonvolatile memory could be in the joystick, coupled directly to the keyboard port, rather than the throttle controller. We claim all such modifications and variation coming within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

APPENDIX A

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BTN HR F10 BTN HL e

BTN HD F9 F9

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BTN 4 RU r RM r RD SHFTD SCRLCK SHFTU

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Claims

CLAIMS 1. A reconfigurable video game/simulator system comprising: a personal computer (12) having a microprocessor (13) operable under control of a system reconfiguration program (23A) during a reconfiguration mode and under control of a video game/simulator program (23B) during a functional mode, an input/output bus (14) for connecting peripheral input and output devices to the microprocessor, and a keyboard interface port (18); a display (200) coupled to the personal computer for displaying images produced by the reconfiguration and video game programs; a first video game/simulator controller (30) having a plurality of input devices (64, 66, 70), a keyboard input port (56), and a keyboard input/output port (60) coupled to the computer keyboard interface port (18); a computer keyboard (16) coupled to the controller keyboard input port for inputting reconfiguration keycodes and input keycodes; means (226, 238, 234) within the controller for transmitting the input and reconfiguration keycodes from the keyboard to the computer; means (178-182, 202, 230, 232) within the controller for transmitting predetermined reconfiguration keycodes from the controller to the computer responsive to actuation of corresponding controller input devices during the functional mode; means (13, 18) within the computer for receiving the keycodes transmitted from the controller for input to the video game simulator program (23B) during the functional mode; means (13, 23, 400) within the computer for transmitting reconfiguration keycodes from the computer to the controller during the reconfiguration mode; means (170, 202, 230, 232) within the controller for receiving the reconfiguration keycodes from the computer during the reconfiguration mode; and means (170-176, 202, 204) within the controller for reconfiguring the controller responsive to receiving the reconfiguration keycodes such that the controller transmits a reconfiguration keycode when a corresponding controller input device is actuated.
2. A reconfigurable video game system according to claim 1 wherein the reconfiguring means within the controller comprises: a non-volatile memory (204) for storing the reconfiguration keycodes; and a microcontroller (202) coupled to the non-volatile memory for writing (172) reconfiguration keycodes received from the computer to the non-volatile memory during the reconfiguration mode and for reading (180) the predetermined keycodes from the non-volatile memory responsive to the actuation of the corresponding controller input device for transmission to the computer during the functional mode.
3. A reconfigurable video game system according to claim 1 in which: the personal computer includes a game board (20) coupled to the input/output bus and having a finite number of inputs for receiving and inputting to the microprocessor a first number of analog input signals and a second number of discrete input signals; and the video game/simulator controller having a plurality of signal lines (46) coupled to the game board inputs consisting of a number of analog output signal lines not exceeding the first number and a number of discrete output signal lines not exceeding the second number.
4. A reconfigurable video game system according to claim 1 wherein the reconfigurable video game system further includes a second controller (32) having a plurality of input devices (39, 40, 42, 44), and wherein the first controller (30) further includes: a game port (38M) having the second controller coupled thereto; and means (46, 62, 250-260) for transmitting second controller (264, 266, 268) inputs from the first controller to the computer.
5. A reconfigurable video game system according to claim 4 wherein the means for transmitting the second controller inputs includes means (202, 226-232) for transmitting a keycode from the first controller to the computer responsive to actuation of a corresponding one of the second controller input devices (264, 266).
6. A reconfigurable video game system according to claim 4 wherein the means for transmitting the second controller inputs includes means (46) for transmitting from the first controller an analog signal responsive to actuation of a corresponding one of the second controller input devices (264, 268).
7. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system comprising a personal computer (12) having a microprocessor (13) operable under control of a system reconfiguration program (23B) during a reconfiguration mode and under a video game/simulator program (23A) during a functional mode, the computer having a keyboard interface port (18), a display (200) coupled to the personal computer for displaying images produced by the programs, a computer keyboard (16), and a first video game/simulator controller (30) coupled to the keyboard through a keyboard input port (56) and coupled to the computer keyboard interface port through a controller keyboard input/output port (60), the controller having a plurality of input devices (64, 66, 70), the method comprising: inputting (156-168) reconfiguration keycodes into the computer, each reconfiguration keycode corresponding to one of the controller input devices; downloading (164, 400) the reconfiguration keycodes from the computer to the controller via the keyboard interface port during the reconfiguration mode; and reconfiguring (170-176) each of the controller inputs responsive to receiving the reconfiguration keycodes such that the controller transmits a predetermined reconfiguration keycode corresponding to an input device when the input device is actuated in the functional mode.
8. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 7 further comprising: actuating (178) one of the controller input devices during the functional mode; and transmitting (180, 182) the predetermined reconfiguration keycode corresponding to a signal output from the actuated input device to the computer across the controller keyboard input/output port.
9. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 7 wherein the step of inputting reconfiguration keycodes comprises inputting (158) the reconfiguration keycodes from the keyboard.
10. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 7 wherein the step of inputting reconfiguration keycodes comprises specifying (186) a reconfiguration file stored on the computer.
11. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 7 further comprising: coupling a second video game/simulator controller (32) having a plurality of input devices (39, 40, 42, 44) to the video game/simulator controller; inputting reconfiguration keycodes (158, 186) into the computer corresponding to the second controller input devices, eich reconfiguration keycode corresponding to one of the second controller input devices; downloading (164, 192, 400) the reconfiguration keycodes corresponding to the second controller input devices from the computer to the controller; reconfiguring (170-176) each of the second controller input devices responsive to receiving the reconfiguration keycodes corresponding to the second controller input devices such that the controller transmits a predetermined reconfiguration keycode corresponding to an input device of the second controller when the input device of the second controller is actuated in the functional mode.
12. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 7 wherein the step of reconfiguring each of the controller inputs comprises storing (172) the reconfiguration keycodes in a non-volatile memory within the controller for use in the functional mode.
13. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 7 wherein the step of inputting reconfiguration keycodes into the computer during the reconfiguration mode comprises: displaying a graphical representation (72, 84, 86, 102) of the controller on the display; and inputting (158) a reconfiguration keycode corresponding to one of the controller input devices into the computer via the keyboard during the reconfiguration mode, the computer being responsive to move to a subsequent controller input device to receive a subsequent reconfiguration keycode therefor.
14. A method of reconfiguring a video game/simulator system according to claim 13 wherein the step of inputting reconfiguration keycodes into the computer during the reconfiguration mode further comprises entering more than one or more reconfiguration keycodes from the keyboard for each of the controller input devices.
15. A joystick (32) having a multi-stage trigger (39) comprising: a base; a joystick handle (44) pivotally mounted on the base; a trigger lever (300) hingedly mounted on the handle; a first switch (51) mounted on the joystick handle juxtaposed to the trigger lever; a second switch (52) mounted on the handle juxtaposed to the trigger switch; means (36) for transmitting the state of the switches to a computer; and means (304-312) for sequentially actuating the first and second switches responsive to increasing pressure applied to the trigger lever.
16. A joystick having a multi-stage trigger according to claim 15 wherein the means for sequentially actuating the first and second switches responsive to increasing pressure applied to the trigger switch includes: a spring (306) interposed between the trigger lever and the first switch for actuating the first switch (51) when a first amount of pressure is applied to the trigger lever; and means (304, 310) interposed between the trigger handle and the second switch (51) for actuating the second switch when a second amount of pressure, greater than the first, is applied to the trigger lever.
17. A joystick having a multi-stage trigger according to claim 15 wherein means for actuating the second switch includes: an actuator member (304) connected to the trigger lever and juxtaposed to the second switch; and a flat spring (310) interposed between the actuator member and the second switch.
18. A joystick having a multi-stage trigger according to claim 17 wherein the flat spring (310) includes a convex surface opposed to the actuator member.
19. A method of calibrating a controller (32) in a video game/simulator on a personal computer (12) having a calibration mode and a functional mode, the controller including a position-detecting input device (70) and a multiposition switch (68A) having a calibration position and at least one functional control position, the method comprising: switching the controller switch (68A) to the calibration position to place the controller in a calibration mode responsive to the calibration position of the switch; sampling an output signal (512) corresponding to a position of the controller input device (70) when the controller (32) is in the calibration mode; and assigning one or more keycodes (516) to the sampled signal; switching the controller switch (68A) to place the controller (32) in the functional mode and transmitting one of the assigned keycodes to the video game/simulator when the controller is placed in the calibration position during the functional mode; the transmitted keycode being selected to correspond to the position of the input device (70).
20. A method of calibrating a controller in a video game/simulator according to claim 19 wherein the step of placing the controller (32) in a calibration mode includes: placing the multiposition switch (68A) in the calibration position; detecting the switch (68A) position; and placing the switch (68A) in the digital position.
21. A method of calibrating a controller in a video game/simulator according to claim 19 wherein the step of placing the controller in at least two calibration positions includes: placing the controller (70) in a full forward position (508); and placing the controller (70) in a full off position (508).
22. A method of calibrating a controller in a video game/simulator according to claim 21 wherein the step of placing the controller in at least two calibration positions further includes: placing the controller (70) in a first detent position (508); and placing the controller (70) in a second detent position (508).
23. A method of calibrating a controller in a video game/simulator according to claim 19 wherein the step of sampling the throttle output signal (508) when the throttle is the calibration positions includes: sampling an analog voltage signal (508) representing the controller position; and converting the sampled analog voltage signal to a digital calibration value (202).
24. A method of calibrating a controller in a video game/simulator according to claim 19 wherein the step of assigning one or more keycodes (516) to each sampled signal includes: determining a calibration range between the calibration values (202); subdividing the calibration range into a plurality of sub-domains
(202); and assigning one or more keycodes to each sub-domain.
25. A method of calibrating a controller in a video game/simulator according to claim 24 wherein the step of subdividing the calibration range into a plurality of sub-domains includes subdividing the calibration range into a user-defined number of sub¬ domains.
26. A video game/simulator system comprising: a personal computer (12) having a microprocessor (13) operable under control of a video game/simulator program during a functional mode, an input/output bus for connecting peripheral input and output devices to the microprocessor, and a keyboard interface port; a game board (28) coupled to the input/output bus having a first number of analog inputs and a second number of discrete inputs; a display (200) coupled to the personal computer for displaying images produced by operating the video game/simulator program; a video game/simulator controller (30) including: a user actuated rheostat (214) having an output for producing an output signal, a keyboard input/output port (60) coupled to the computer keyboard interface port (18), first means (218) for transmitting the rheostat output signal as an analog signal to one of the game board analog inputs, second means (202) for transmitting a digital keycode via the keyboard interface port responsive to the rheostat output signal, and a switch (216) coupling the rheostat output signal selectively to the first and second transmitting means to operate the rheostat in an analog mode or a digital mode.
27. A video game/simulator system according to claim 26 wherein the second transmitting means includes: a microcontroller (202) having an analog-to-digital input (210), and a input/output port (230, 232) coupled to the computer keyboard interface port; a memory (204) coupled to the microcontroller for storing digital keycodes; and a resistor (Rl) coupled between the microcontroller analog-to- digital input and a common supply voltage; the microcontroller being operable to transmit a digital keycode via the keyboard interface port (18) responsive to the rheostat output signal when the switch (216) is in the digital mode.
28. A video game/simulator system according to claim 26 wherein the rheostat includes a plurality of parallel discrete resistors (Rll, R22, Rnn) coupled between corresponding user-actuated discrete switches (Sll, S22, Snn) and the rheostat output for producing a plurality of discrete rheostat output signals.
29. A video game/simulator system according to claim 28 wherein the microcontroller (202) transmits a digital keycode via the keyboard interface port responsive to each of the rheostat output signals.
30. A video game/simulator system according to claim 27 wherein the video game/simulator controller includes a throttle handle (70) coupled to the rheostat such that the rheostat (214) produces an continuously variable output signal responsive to translational movement of the throttle handle between a first position and a second position when the switch is in the analog mode.
31. A video game/simulator system according to claim 30 wherein the controller further includes means for calibrating the throttle handle (280A, 280B, 202, 204, R2).
32. A video game/simulator system according to claim 31 wherein the means for calibrating the throttle handle includes: means for sampling (202) a first sampled voltage signal on the resistor when the throttle handle (70) is in the first position; means for assigning (202) a first digital keycode corresponding to the first sampled voltage signal; means for sampling (202) a second sampled voltage signal on the resistor when the throttle handle is in the second position; and means for assigning (202) a second digital keycode corresponding to the second sampled voltage signal.
33. A video game/simulator system according to claim 32 wherein the means for calibrating the throttle handle further includes means for assigning (202) a keycode to corresponding voltage subdomains between the first sampled voltage signal and the second sampled voltage signal,
34. A method of controlling a camera function in a video game/simulation program running on a personal computer (12) having a keyboard interface port, the method comprising: providing a joystick controller (32) having a multi-stage trigger switch (SI, S2, 39), the switch having a default unactuated position, a first actuated position, and a second actuated position; positioning the multi-stage switch (39) in the first actuated position; generating a first signal responsive to positioning the switch in the first actuated position; and transmitting the first signal to the personal computer wherein the video game/simulation program enables the camera function responsive to receipt of the first signal.
35. A method of controlling a camera in a video game/simulation according to claim 34 wherein the step of generating a first signal responsive to positioning the switch (39) in the first actuated position includes generating a camera keycode corresponding to the camera function in the video game/simulation program.
36. A method of controlling a camera in a video game/simulation according to claim 35 wherein the step of transmitting the first signal includes transmitting the camera keycode over the personal computer keyboard interface port.
37. A method of controlling a camera in a video game/simulation according to claim 36 further comprising: positioning the multi-stage switch (39) in the second actuated position; generating a second signal responsive to positioning the switch in the second actuated position; and transmitting the second signal to the personal computer (12) wherein the video game/simulation program fires a weapon function responsive to receipt of the second signal.
38. A method of controlling a camera in a video game/simulation according to claim 37 wherein the step of generating a second signal responsive to positioning the switch (39) in the second actuated position includes generating a weapons keycode corresponding to the weapons function in the video game/simulation program, and wherein the step of transmitting the second signal includes transmitting the weapons keycode over the personal computer keyboard interface port (18).
39. A method of controlling a camera in a video game/simulation according to claim 38 further comprising: positioning the multi-stage switch (39) in the default unactuated position; generating first and second signals responsive to positioning the switch in the default unactuated position; and transmitting the first and second signals to the personal computer (12) wherein the video game/simulation program disables the camera function responsive to receipt of the first signal and ceases firing the weapon function responsive to receipt of the second signal.
PCT/US1994/000184 1992-07-09 1994-01-05 Reconfigurable joystick controller with multi-stage trigger WO1994016426A1 (en)

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US08/002,828 1993-01-07
US08/002,828 US5396267A (en) 1992-07-09 1993-01-07 Reconfigurable video game system
US7876393A true 1993-06-15 1993-06-15
US08/078,763 1993-06-15

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US5635957A (en) * 1994-08-02 1997-06-03 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Cursor control apparatus having foot operated pedal and method for same
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