WO1993012724A1 - Optical fibre device intended to the repair of damaged nerve fibres - Google Patents

Optical fibre device intended to the repair of damaged nerve fibres Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1993012724A1
WO1993012724A1 PCT/FR1992/001244 FR9201244W WO9312724A1 WO 1993012724 A1 WO1993012724 A1 WO 1993012724A1 FR 9201244 W FR9201244 W FR 9201244W WO 9312724 A1 WO9312724 A1 WO 9312724A1
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WO
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
ends
characterized
nerve
fiber
device according
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/FR1992/001244
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Jean Berque
Original Assignee
Jean Berque
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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Publication date

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/11Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for performing anastomosis; Buttons for anastomosis
    • A61B17/1128Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for performing anastomosis; Buttons for anastomosis of nerves

Abstract

The invention relates to a device based on optical fibre(s) allowing to make a neurological exogenous brigde to the damaged nerve fibres of a human body. Said bridge may be used for bridging an isolated nerve or multiple fibres of the spinal cord by using an alternative embodiment with multiple optical fibres. The device is comprised of a cylindrical handle (1) whose port is obturated at both ends by a removable plug (2) and (2') with a passage (3) and (3') for setting in place the optical fibre (4). The free ends of the handle (1) have on either side two articulated arms (5, 5') and (6, 6') whose lower straight portion is provided with teeth (7). The articulation (8) of the two hinged arms is made possible by providing an area of reduced thickness.

Description

fiber optic device for the repair of injured nerve fibers

The present invention relates to a fiber device (s) Optical (s) for the repair of injured nerve fibers in the human organism.

The lesions in peripheral nerves or spinal cord are common in humans; often accidental they may also have a congenital or degenerative as a result of various pathologies.

These neurological lesions are in most cases irreversible and result in distal disorders more or less disabling motor skills, sensitivity and trophic areas concerned.

The constant progress of surgery and micro surgery sometimes allow the realization of effective sutures. Thus members amputees clean cut could be sewn. But these cases frank section are quite rare and usually neurological suture is far from always possible.

In addition, to ensure a good percentage of success, the intervention must be very early. When the lesions of nerve fibers are older or of a different nature than the free-wrenching section, crushing - suture attempts are often failures.

It should finally be noted that all interventions so far attempted to repair a severed spinal cord failed. Some drug phaπnacologi- c processes are under study and could provide some encouraging results in neurological recovery after trauma, provided of course that the initial neurological injuries are not too decaying.

nerves crops with delayed graft are- a possible area, but many parameters are still far from being resolved. Of electrostimulation experiments were realized in paraplegics and gave some encouraging results; a ble implant equipment is under consideration but, as will be explained below, the electricity can not be the only mode of transmission of nervous influx.

In addition, the electrical stimulation, external or by i plantable device, can recreate the junction between the nerve centers and the periphery as it can in no way correspond to a physiological message.

It is therefore expected with the process electrostimulation some recovery of strength, trophicity or devices paralyzed segments of traction but it will only be a second best and will remain far removed from the rehabilitation of harmonious movements and voluntarily controlled.

As has been seen, apart from exceptional immediate stitches frank section, all currently existing processes or research courses are far to bring the patient to a state of near perfect physiologic state.

Four reach this physiological parameters perfection the solution is to restore relationships and messages between nerve centers or the brain and periphery. Simply insert a simple mechanism in nerve fibers damaged to reinstate physiological conduction mainly driving and probably also sensitive.

And restoring the physiological conduction of nerve impulses may be effected by a connection method or an exogenous neuro-bridging through the interposition of a simple drive mechanism, in place of the injured part of the nerve fiber in the case unit, root or truncal injury, or nerve fibers in the case of a multifocal lesions of nerve plexus and especially the fibers of the spinal cord.

The means of this solution mainly depend on the applicant research on the human body and light, that led to the demonstration of photosynthesis protein for human and animal scale.

This theory photosynthetic interested all the cells and tissues of the body as wide as the physiology of cell biology. Regarding the fabric .nerveux this theory leads to two particularly important conclusions: the first relates to the birth of nerve impulses; this nerve impulse propagating along the nerve fibers, relayed by the dorsal root ganglia and reaching higher nerve centers and the brain is highlighted by electrophysiology experiments. All books of Physiology and Medical Biophysics have agreed to conclude an electrical transmission of nerve impulses along nerve fibers, but the problem of the birth of this nerve impulses remains a mystery. The theory photosynthetic birth of nerve impulses can be explained by a photo-electric mechanism and photo-conductivity.

The second key finding of photosynthetic theory applied to the nerve tissue is particularly important since it enables lead-to the concept of exogenous neurological surgery. According to this conclusion the following principle can be stated: the nerve fiber is the perfect analogue of an optical fiber. The nervous system complexity and extreme level of performance has often been likened to a telephone system. It would indeed be a wired telecommunications network, cabling consisting of optical fibers which are known can convey, especially when they correspond to the wavelength of the infr -Red, thousands or even millions information and simultaneously.

Comparative anatomy of the nerve fiber and an optical fiber thus leads to the notion of structural equivalence almost perfect, a simple reminder of the physics of light then broadens the concept of nerve impulses in his informative component. Light, whether wave or particle decomposes in the direction of its propagation in a triple equivalent field to a triad: a light field accompanied by an electric field and a magnetic field these three fields propagating along three plants perpendicular to each other. The perfect complementarity of these three energy components leads to the hypothesis that these three fields are inseparable. It is well known that an electric field induces a magnetic field and vice versa. It is also known as an electronic agitation generates photons. Similarly the electric spark generated between two electrodes is sometimes visible to the naked eye. So if the above three energy fields are inseparable, it is clear that the electrical conduction perfectly demonstrated at the sheath of nerve fibers can not be conceived in synergy with a light field which, of course, would spread into the light the fiber.

This new concept in optical transmission through nerve fibers to better explain a phenomenon that would have no purpose if the transmission was purely electrical. This is the phenomenon of the crash or nerve compression. It is known that when it is pronounced results in paralysis of innervated distal segments. Gold remains a wire electrical wire and, unless section, the current still flows.

This is not the case at all optical fibers of which the crash stops sinusoidal conduction of light; an optical fiber apparatus is unusable since the conductive fiber is deteriorated.

In summary, based on two concepts previously exposed it appears that nerve impulses would not be a purely electric conduction but actually optoelectronic and magnetic conduction incidentally.

The present invention solves this problem and proposes to reconstruct the light of the nerve fiber by interposing, at the lesion, an optical fiber.

The inclusion of fiber device (s) optic (s) in the nerve fibers allows to expect not only the rehabilitation of motor function or the sensitivity but also in the direction of physiological continuity allowing recovery of the information between the brain or the nerve centers and the periphery.

It would thus be hoped among other recover from injury of a peripheral nerve

(Sciatica, ulnar, brachial plexus), a cover of the motor in paraplegics or quadriplegics.

Finally, advances in computer technology and optoelectronics at the scale of miniaturization and nanotechnology also offers hope one day to see a running prosthetic hand or foot controlled by the brain.

The device according to the invention for the neuro-bridging two versions depending on whether the bridging interested a nerve fiber or spinal cord.

The following description first interested the first version aimed bridging of a single nerve fiber.

The device consists of a cylindrical sleeve within which the optical fiber is located to be inserted at the proximal and distal ends of the injured nerve fibers; this optical fiber of length greater than that of the sleeve, is held in place inside the sleeve via two removable solid plugs pierced at their center with a sluice for receiving and protecting the ends of the fiber optical.

These two stoppers are inserted at the ends of the cylindrical sleeve which they close and light. They provide protection of the optical fiber during the handling of the device and its maintenance within the sleeve. They will be removed during the operation of nerve fibers bypass. The cylindrical sleeve further includes at each of its ends two hinged arms open, semicylindrical, the articulation being provided by a zone of lesser thickness.

These two arms articulated -hêmicylindriques - may be closed at the end of intervention to be sheathed on both the other end portions of the nerve fiber bridged, the central cylindrical sleeve covering meanwhile the actual bridging is -to say the optical fiber. Closing both articulated arms can be provided by an asynchronous oppositional toothing system, the final compression obtainable by a bonding system.

The optical fiber carried by the apparatus will advantageously be of a diameter just smaller than that of the nerve fiber in which it will be introduced. The cylindrical sleeve for its part is advantageously of a diameter slightly larger than the nerve fiber bridged. In this way since the two ends of the optical fiber will be inserted in both ends of the nerve fiber, the sleeve can slide along the latter so that any fascial suture joining the optical fiber around the fiber ends nerve that could be because of their key Disabling retractility. once carried out the suture, the sleeve comes to cover the optical fiber and the articulated arms are closed at each end so as to sheathe the distal and proximal portions of the nerve fiber.

The variant of the device described uses the same apparatus which, instead of a single optical fiber, include between two plugs tens of these fibers.

The same method can thus be applied at the level of the spinal cord with the only difference reinsertion of multiple optical fibers. In this variant it is understood that the diameter of the cylindrical sleeve is slightly greater than the diameter of the cord.

1 shows, in section, the device according to the invention in its first version to an optical fiber.

Figures 2 and 3 show, in section, the main time of surgery.

At Figure 2, the optical fiber is fixed in the two ends of the nerve fiber and the cylindrical sleeve has been moved sideways on the nerve fiber to practice any suture of two ends.

At Figure 3, the sleeve has been put in his place. It thus covers the optical fiber bridged. The two articulated arms are closed on the both terminal ends of nerve fiber to avoid retractility thereof and to ensure proper containment of the bypass.

4 shows the closure coaptative teeth of the two articulated arms. bonding may permanently fasten the two articulated arms which reconstitute and a sheathing tunnel. 5 shows a sectional view of the variant of the device of Figure 1. the only difference is to have several tens of optical fibers.

It is intended to bypass the spinal cord.

The device shown in Figure 1 comprises a cylindrical sleeve (1) whose light is blocked at both ends with a removable cap (2) and (2 *), carrying a throat (3) and (3 ') now in instead the optical fiber (4), the free ends of the cylindrical sleeve (1) comprise on either side two articulated arms (5, 5 ') and (6, 6') whose lower straight portion is toothed (7) .

The joint (8) of the two articulated arms is permitted by a zone of lesser thickness. It should finally be noted that the removable plugs (2) and (2 ') must be long enough so that the optical fiber (4) inserted into their sluice or a greater than the sleeve length (1).

When bridging each end of the optical fiber 4 will be inserted into each of the two ends of the nerve fiber 9 and 9 'as shown in Figures 2 and 3. The device shown in Figure 5 is a variant with several optical fibers the device shown in Figure 1. The main difference therefore reside in removable plugs maintaining optical fibers in place and must include several sluices in this variation.

All the component parts of the unitary device or its variant may be carried out on an industrial scale. The ends of the optical fiber could also be butted to each end of nerve fiber, that is to say, without insertion of the optical fiber in the nerve fiber. such a possibility may thus be carried out according to the diagram of Figure 6.

A sleeve provided with articulated arms and toothed, as described above can be advantageously used to maintain integral the entire fiber optic nerve-fibers and ensure abutment. The main part of the device which comprises the sleeve and the four articulated arms may be carried out in .dacron in a single molding operation. The removable caps may also be made of Dacron. As for the optical fiber will be made of a flexible material preferably. It will operate preferably in the range of 1 • infrared.

The material of the component can be any material having the physical characteristics of the optical fibers and biocompatible. It is preferably of flexible glass.

Thus preferential optical fibers are fibers of silica dioxide, monocrystalline fibers based on sodium chloride and polycrystalline fibers based on silver halide or thallium halides.

The diameter of the optical fibers will depend on the nerve fibers that it is desired be bridged.

It will generally be between about lμm and 100 microns but may deviate from these values ​​in the case of nerve fibers thinner or thicker. It should be slightly less than the diameter of the nerve fibers in case of coupling by insertion and will advantageously be equivalent if abboutement.

The optical fibers are preferably solid but may also be in the form of a hollow cylinder.

Claims

1. Device for bridging of one or several nerve fibers, characterized in that it comprises a central cylindrical sleeve (1) containing one or more fiber (s) Optical (s) (4).
2. Device according to Claim 1, characterized in that the sleeve is extended at each of its ends by two semicylindrical articulated arms (5, 5 ') and (6, 6').
3. Device according to claims 1 and 2, characterized in that it comprises two removable plugs (2) and (2 ') provided with one or more sluices (3) and (3 •) for maintaining and protect or the ends of the fiber (s) optical (s) (4) contained (s) in the sleeve.
4. Device according to claims 1 to 3, characterized in that the ends of both plugs (2) and (2 ') closing the light of the central cylindrical sleeve (1) beyond the sleeve.
5. Device according to claims 1 to 4, characterized in that the one or more fiber (s) Optical (s) (s) included in the central cylindrical sleeve (1) are longer than the latter.
6. Device according to one of claims 1 to 5, characterized in that the articulation of the arms (5, 5 ') and (6, 6') extending from the central sleeve (1) at each end is defined by a thinner zone (8).
7.A device according to claims l to 6, characterized in that the two articulated arms (5, 5 ') and (6, 6') comprise an asynchronous toothed locking system and oppositional (7).
8. Device according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the sleeve (1) is made of dacron.
9. Use of the device according to one of claims 1 to 8 for bridging of nerve fibers, characterized in that both ends of the optical fiber are inserted into the two ends of the nerve fibers to be bridged.
10. Use of the device according to one of claims 1 to 8 for bridging of nerve fibers, characterized in that both ends of the optical fiber are butted at the two ends of the nerve fibers to be bridged.
11.Use according to any of claims 9 and 10, characterized in that the two ends of the nerve fibers and the optical fiber are held together with the locking system according to claim 7.
PCT/FR1992/001244 1991-12-30 1992-12-30 Optical fibre device intended to the repair of damaged nerve fibres WO1993012724A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR91/16465 1991-12-30
FR9116465A FR2685628B1 (en) 1991-12-30 1991-12-30 Fiber device (s) Optical (s) for the repair of injured nerve fibers.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP19930911659 EP0619721A1 (en) 1991-12-30 1992-12-30 Optical fibre device intended to the repair of damaged nerve fibres

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1993012724A1 true true WO1993012724A1 (en) 1993-07-08

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/FR1992/001244 WO1993012724A1 (en) 1991-12-30 1992-12-30 Optical fibre device intended to the repair of damaged nerve fibres

Country Status (4)

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EP (1) EP0619721A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2127118A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2685628B1 (en)
WO (1) WO1993012724A1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7076292B2 (en) 2002-04-25 2006-07-11 Medtronic, Inc. Optical communication of neurostimulation-system information
US7147647B2 (en) 2002-04-26 2006-12-12 Medtronic, Inc. Sintered titanium tube for the management of spinal cord injury
JP2015061604A (en) * 2009-03-10 2015-04-02 ザ ジョーンズ ホプキンズ ユニバーシティThe Johns Hopkins University Biological tissue connection and repair device and method of using the same

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3833002A (en) * 1973-09-10 1974-09-03 J Palma Apparatus for aiding severed nerves to join
US4412825A (en) * 1981-09-17 1983-11-01 Tokarz Richard D Medical entry connector for teeth bearing animals
US4432363A (en) * 1980-01-31 1984-02-21 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus for transmitting energy to a device implanted in a living body
US4534349A (en) * 1983-02-02 1985-08-13 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Absorbable sutureless nerve repair device
US4863668A (en) * 1988-09-22 1989-09-05 University Of Utah Method of forming fibrin-collagen nerve and body tissue repair material

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3833002A (en) * 1973-09-10 1974-09-03 J Palma Apparatus for aiding severed nerves to join
US4432363A (en) * 1980-01-31 1984-02-21 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus for transmitting energy to a device implanted in a living body
US4412825A (en) * 1981-09-17 1983-11-01 Tokarz Richard D Medical entry connector for teeth bearing animals
US4534349A (en) * 1983-02-02 1985-08-13 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Absorbable sutureless nerve repair device
US4863668A (en) * 1988-09-22 1989-09-05 University Of Utah Method of forming fibrin-collagen nerve and body tissue repair material

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7076292B2 (en) 2002-04-25 2006-07-11 Medtronic, Inc. Optical communication of neurostimulation-system information
US7865246B2 (en) 2002-04-25 2011-01-04 Medtronic, Inc. Optical communication of neurostimulation-system information
US7147647B2 (en) 2002-04-26 2006-12-12 Medtronic, Inc. Sintered titanium tube for the management of spinal cord injury
JP2015061604A (en) * 2009-03-10 2015-04-02 ザ ジョーンズ ホプキンズ ユニバーシティThe Johns Hopkins University Biological tissue connection and repair device and method of using the same
US9539009B2 (en) 2009-03-10 2017-01-10 The Johns Hopkins University Biological tissue connection and repair devices and methods of using same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA2127118A1 (en) 1993-07-08 application
FR2685628B1 (en) 1994-02-11 grant
FR2685628A1 (en) 1993-07-02 application
EP0619721A1 (en) 1994-10-19 application

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