WO1991017377A1 - Improved automatic faucet system - Google Patents

Improved automatic faucet system Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1991017377A1
WO1991017377A1 PCT/US1990/002499 US9002499W WO9117377A1 WO 1991017377 A1 WO1991017377 A1 WO 1991017377A1 US 9002499 W US9002499 W US 9002499W WO 9117377 A1 WO9117377 A1 WO 9117377A1
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WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
signal
spray head
spout
fluid
dispensing system
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1990/002499
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Natan E. Parsons
Joel S. Novak
Original Assignee
Masco Corporation Of Indiana
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03CDOMESTIC PLUMBING INSTALLATIONS FOR FRESH WATER OR WASTE WATER; SINKS
    • E03C1/00Domestic plumbing installations for fresh water or waste water; Sinks
    • E03C1/02Plumbing installations for fresh water
    • E03C1/04Water-basin installations specially adapted to wash-basins or baths
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03CDOMESTIC PLUMBING INSTALLATIONS FOR FRESH WATER OR WASTE WATER; SINKS
    • E03C1/00Domestic plumbing installations for fresh water or waste water; Sinks
    • E03C1/02Plumbing installations for fresh water
    • E03C1/05Arrangements of devices on wash-basins, baths, sinks, or the like for remote control of taps
    • E03C1/055Electrical control devices, e.g. with push buttons, control panels or the like
    • E03C1/057Electrical control devices, e.g. with push buttons, control panels or the like touchless, i.e. using sensors
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03CDOMESTIC PLUMBING INSTALLATIONS FOR FRESH WATER OR WASTE WATER; SINKS
    • E03C2201/00Details, devices or methods not otherwise provided for
    • E03C2201/30Diverter valves in faucets or taps

Abstract

An automatic fluid dispensing system is equipped with an automatically operated spout (14) and a manually actuated spout (22), such as a hand-held spray head (22). A manually actuated switch (60) or transducer such as a sonic whistle (70) can override the operation of the automatic spout (14), which occurs, for example, on removing the spray head (22) from its cradle (24), or on operation of the spray head (22), so as to permit the on demand use of the spray head (22).

Description

IMPROVED AUTOMATIC FAUCET SYSTEM

Related Applications

This application is related to commonly assigned U.S.

Patent Application Serial No. , entitled "Improved

Diaphragm-Type Operating Valve," and U.S. Patent Application

Serial No. , entitled "Improved Ultrasonic Sensor

Arrangement for an Automatic Faucet System," both filed on even date herewith.

Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed to an automatic fluid dispensing system that incorporates both an automatically operated spout and a manually actuated, hand-held sprayer, and that preferably also incorporates one or more of the inventions disclosed in the above referenced patent applications.

Background of the Invention

Heretofore, automatic fluid dispensing systems have been proposed in which an automatic spout supplies fluid generally in response to a sensed condition, e.g. , motion or presence of an object in a target region within or above a sink. The many advantages of automatic fluid dispensing systems have been extensively discussed in the above referenced applications and other patents such as U.S. Patent Nos. 4,520,516; 4,604,735; 4,839,039 and 4,921,221. Advantages include ease of use, promotion of sanitation, and efficient dispensing of the fluid.

Conventional faucet/sink arrangements that are not so equipped for automatic operation, however, often advantageously incorporate both a spout that is fixedly secured to the sink (or can only rotate with a single degree of freedom) , and a second, hand-held spout, for example, a spray head. Generally speaking, such a spray head is relatively freely movable since it typically is connected to the source of fluid by an extended flexible tube. The tube forms its only physical connection to the faucet/sink arrangement.

Desirable is an arrangement which combines the many advantages of an automatic fluid dispensing system with the convenience and versatility of such a dual spout arrangement. Summary of the Invention

Briefly, the invention provides for the incorporation and use of a manually actuated spray head in conjunction with an automatically operated spout in a fluid dispensing system. Such a system more particularly includes a sprayer assembly comprising a manually actuated spray head for hand-held operation, a cradle preferably provided in an escutcheon on the sink for holding the spray head when not in use, and a flexible tube for supplying fluid to the spray head. The system also includes a preferably long-necked, primary spout secured to the sink, generally fixedly or rotatably with a single degree of freedom of motion. A spout tip structure is located at the primary spout's free end, and includes a spout outlet orifice and a transducer assembly for generating a signal corresponding to a sensed condition, e.g., motion or presence of an object in a target region. A valve arrangement, for example, including both operating and diverter valves, supplies fluid to the spout in response to the transducer assembly generated signal, and supplies fluid to the spray head regardless of that signal in response to a signal generated or transmitted by a user actuated device.

In other words, when the transducer assembly generated signal is supplied from the spout tip structure to a logic controller for the operating valve, the operating valve is opened to deliver fluid to the diverter valve. The diverter valve normally supplies the fluid to the primary spout for dispensing a flow of fluid in response to the sensed condition. On the other hand, when the signal from the user actuated device is applied to the logic controller, the operating valve is opened to deliver fluid to the diverter valve regardless of the condition of the target region, thus deactivating and overriding the automatic operation of the primary spout, and permitting the "on demand" use of the spray head. To use the spray head while the automatic operation of the operating valve is overridden, the user need only press the actuating level on the spray head (if that was not already done to generate the signal from the user actuated device) . This causes the flow of fluid from the operating valve to be diverted by the diverter valve to the spray head. It can be readily appreciated that the manually actuated device that controls the use of the spray head by overriding the automatic spout's operation is a key feature of this aspect of the invention. In various embodiments, this device is a switch mounted, for example, in the spray head to be switched upon pressing the activating lever, between the spray head and its cradle to be switched upon lifting the spray head therefrom, or elsewhere in a user accessible location. In these embodiments, the switch can take the form of a reed switch which, for example, when closed, causes the system to change from an automatic to a manual mode of operation, and when opened, causes the system to return to automatic operation. Such arrangements generally entail a so-called "hard-wired" electrical circuit or optic circuit, e.g., using optic fibers, whereby the closing of the switch permits a signal to be delivered by the circuit to the logic controller for use in controlling the oper.ing of the operating valve. In this sense, the switch is part of a signal generation arrangement.

Where the switch is operated on pressing the diverter valve actuating lever of the spray head, or by lifting the spray head from its cradle, the user only needs to pick up the spray head and depress its actuating lever in order to use the spray head. Thus, as far as the user can tell, when compared with the conventional kitchen sink arrangement having a spray head, no additional steps are required to use the spray head of the automatic fluid dispensing system of the present invention.

Another alternative and preferred version of the user actuated device is a sonic generator that is integrated into the spray head, such as an ultrasonic whistle disposed between a lever-like actuator and body of the spray head. In such an arrangement, when the activ cor is pressed, the ultrasonic generator emits a signal in o the air which is received by a suitable ultrasonic transducer located elsewhere for conversion by the logic controller to an appropriate control signal to regulate the flow of fluid through the operating valve. Such pressing of the sprayer actuating lever also causes the diverter valve to shut off the flow through the primary spout and divert the flow to the spray head. The use of a sonic signal eliminates the need for a defined, "hard-wired" communication path between the spray head and the logic controller, while achieving the above described economy of user actions required to utilize the spray head.

Where the user actuated device is a sonic whistle, and if the transducer assembly uses a suitable transducer, that transducer can perform, in addition to its primary function of receiving the signal generated by the transducer assembly itself, the additional function of receiving the signal generated by the sonic whistle. In this way, the need for yet another transducer that is dedicated to receive only the signal from the sonic transducer is eliminated.

Instead of using ultrasound, the user actuated device can be another form of transducer, selected to take advantage of passive or active infrared or other technologies that are well known and can be readily implemented in light of the teachings contained herein by those skilled in the art.

Brief Description of the Drawings

These and further features and advantages of the present invention are described in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a partially sectioned, partially broken away view of an automatic faucet system in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the hose leading to the spray head of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a spray head and holder therefore, partially in cross-section, in accordance with yet another embodiment of the invention in which the holder for the spray head includes a switch for controlling the operation of the operating valve of FIG. 1 whenever the spray head is to be used;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view, partially in cross-section and partially broken away, of another embodiment of the invention in which the spray head itself includes a sonic whistle for controlling the operation of the automatic operating valve of FIG. 1 whenever the spray head is to be used; and FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a method for operating the spray head of FIG. 4.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment

FIG. l shows an automatic kitchen faucet system 10 in accordance with the invention. As illustrated, the automatic faucet system 10 is installed on a conventional kitchen sink 12, with components located above and below the sink 12. A long-necked spout 14 is mounted to the rim of the sink 12 through a central opening 16 in an escutcheon 18 and extends up and over the sink 12. Also mounted on the escutcheon 18 is a manually controlled, single actuator mixer valve 20 for mixing of hot and cold water and regulating the rate of flow. The mixer valve 20 is mounted on one side of the escutcheon 18, and a sprayer or spray head 22 is removably received in an open-topped cavity, holder or cradle 24 located on the other side of the escutcheon 18. Below the sink 12 is a solenoid actuated operating valve 25 which opens and closes in response to an electrical signal.

Hot and cold inlet pipes 26, 28 direct hot and cold water, respectively, to the mixer valve 20, where they are combined in regulated fashion determined by the lateral location, left or right, of a single arm or handle 30 of the mixer valve 20. The mixer valve 20 controls the flow rate of water by the location, forward and aft, of the handle 30.

In other words, the mixer valve 20 mixes the water streams obtained from pipes 26, 28 in proportions and at flow rates determined by the setting of the handle 30, and discharges water at a selected temperature and flow rate. For example, when the handle 30 is in its right-most position, all cold water is discharged from the mixer valve 20, when in its left-most position, all hot water is discharged, and in the middle position, an equal mix of hot and cold water is discharged. The water temperature is continually adjustable by moving the handle 30 to any position intermediate these positions. Continuing the example, the far forward position corresponds to "shut-off," i.e., zero flow is discharged, while far aft corresponds to maximum flow rate being discharged. The structure and operation of a suitable mixer valve is disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 3,056,418, which is incorporated herein by reference. A mixer valve of this type is sold under the trademark DELTA® by Delta Faucet Company, division of Masco Corporation of Indiana, U.S.A. While such valves are known, the use of a single handle, flow controlling mixer valve for use in an automatic faucet system has not been suggested heretofore.

The discharged water from the mixer valve 20 in the illustrated automatic faucet system 10 is directed by a pipe 32 to the operating valve 25. The operating valve 25 opens in response to a solenoid energizing control signal from logic controller C. The construction and operation of a preferred version of the operating valve 25 is further described in the above referenced U.S. Patent Application entitled "Improved Diaphram-Type Operating Valve." When the operating valve 25 is open, water flows therethrough and out a pipe 34 that passes through the rim of the sink 12 and into a spout neck inlet 38 disposed in the escutcheon 18. The water normally then flows through the long-necked spout 14.

The long-necked spout 14 is equipped with a spout tip structure 40 located at the free or distal end of a spout neck 42, and a manually actuated diverter valve 44 (typically simply called a "diverter") disposed at the other end of the spout neck 42 and intermediate it and the spout neck inlet 38.

The spout tip structure 40 is provided with a spout outlet orifice 45a covered by an aerator 45b. The aerator 45b acts as a flow restrictor to increase water pressure from the orifice 45a, and adds air to the discharged water to create a colli ated, foaming stream.

Structure 40 also houses a transducer assembly 48 which includes sensors 48a, 48b for automatically controlling (subject to manual override, as described below) the opening and closing of the operating valve 25, in response to, e.g., the presence or movement of an object disposed below the spout tip structure 40 and in or above the sink 12. In other words, the control signal from logic controller C is responsive to the detection by the transducer assembly 46 of a predetermined acoustic signal so as to control the operation of the operating valve 25 accordingly. A further description of such an automatic faucet system can be had witi. reference to the above referenced U.S. Patent No. 4,520,516.

The illustrated automatic fluid dispensing system 10 is provided with an automatic operation deactivating switch 50. Switch 50 permits the manual override of the automatic system at the option of the user. When a user presses switch 50, which for example is a reed switch conveniently located above the sink 12, next to the single handle mixing valve 20, an electric signal is transmitted to logic controller C. In response to this signal, the logic controller C causes the operating valve 25 to open, causing water to flow to the long-necked spout 14, regardless of the condition of the target region as would be normally sensed by the transducer assembly 48 for automatic operation of the spout 14. Under these circumstances, the system 10 can so provide water either (i) for so long as the switch 50 is depressed, (ii) for a preselected, fixed period of time, or (iii) until the switch 50 is depressed a second time. The logic controller C can be designed to effect a predetermined one or another of these alternative automatic operation override schemes, or to permit the user to select from these schemes by switching a suitable manually operable, three position switch 51 located at the controller C. Alternatively, the switch 50 can be suitably adapted to perform both functions, providing automatic flow override selection, and where override is selected, providing the choice of override schemes as described above. Where switch 50 performs both of these functions, switch 51 is not needed.

The diverter 44 shown in FIG. 1 is of a conventional design which, on manually pressing of an actuating lever 52 on the spray head 22 diverts the stream from continuing up through the spout 14 and instead directs the stream back out of the spout 14 through a spout neck outlet 54 and through an extended, flexible sprayer hose 56 to the spray head 22.

The structure and operation of a suitable diverter that is advantageously made in cartridge form to slip into a cavity within the spout neck 42 is disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 4,577,653, which is incorporated herein by reference. As described in that patent, the diverter 44 has an inlet, in this case, in fluidic communication with the spout inlet 38, and two outlets, one opening to the spout neck 42 and the other opening to the spout neck outlet 54. A valve element, represented at 44a, responds to a reduction in pressure in the spout neck outlet 54 to divert the flow from continuing up through the spout neck 42, so that it flows into the spout neck outlet 54. The pressure change is caused by opening the orifice in the spray head 22 which occurs when the actuating level 52 is pressed. A diverter of this type is commercially available from Delta Faucet Company. While such diverters and sprayers are known, their use in an automatic faucet system has not been suggested heretofore.

The spray head 22 shown in FIG. 1 has a sprayer body 58 of generally conventional "gun-like" form, having a handle portion or grip 58a, and a sprayer portion 58b perpendicular thereto. The actuating lever 54 is provided as a top mounted trigger.

Between and generally enclosed by the actuating lever 52 and the sprayer body 58 is a switch 60 which, in this embodiment, is in the form of two normally spaced electrical contacts 60a, 60b. When the actuating lever 52 is pressed, these contacts 60a, 60b are closed so as to make electrical contact, which causes the automatic operation of the system 10 to be temporarily deactivated and overridden as described below. In a preferred arrangement, the switch 60 takes the form of a reed switch.

The switch 60 is "hard-wired" by means of wires 62 through to the automatic operation deactivating switch 50, and from there it is coupled to the logic controller C. (Alternatively, the switch 60 can be directly coupled to the logic controller C.) For this, the wires 62 extend along the hose 56 between an inner and outer hose jacket 56a, 56b, as shown in FIG. 2.

Instead of using an electrical switch and wires, an optic system (not shown) can be incorporated, using fiber optics to transmit the signal from a suitable transducer mounted at and responsive to pressing of the actuating lever 52. The handle portion 58a is contoured to be held by a user, who, for operation of the spray head 22, points the sprayer portion 58b and more particularly its front orifice 58c in any desired direction, and presses the actuating level 52 toward the handle portion 58a of the spray head body.

As described above, this latter action causes the diverter valve 44 to divert the flow of water to the spray head 22 and out through the front orifice 58c, and causes the contacts 60a, 60b of switch 60 to close.

In this state, the logic controller C opens the operating valve 25, regardless of the condition of the target region which is normally sensed by the transducer assembly 48, and the diverter valve 44 diverts the flow of water from spout 14 to the spray head 22. On release of the actuating lever 52, the contacts 60a, 60b open, i.e., separate, thereby returning the operating valve to automatic operation. Also on release of the actuating lever 52, the diverter valve 44 returns to its normal position to allow flow of water through the spout 14.

FIG. 3 shows an alternative version of the switch 60. Here, the switch 60 is, for example, a reed switch situated in the sprayer holder 24, that is, in the cavity formed in the escutcheon 18. A magnet 60c is secured to the lower end of the body 58 proximate the reed 60d of the reed switch 60. When the spray head 22 is removed, the reed 60d toggles to close the switch 60 so as to cause the interruption of the automatic operation of the operating valve 25 (FIG. 1) . When so removed, the actuating lever 52 must still be depressed to control the diverter valve 44 (FIG. 1) . On return of the spray head 22 to its holder 24, the magnet 60c causes the reed 60d to toggle in the other direction to open the switch and thereby restore automatic operation of the operating valve 25 (FIG. 1) .

FIG. 4 shows yet another variation on the design of the spray head 22 for use in the automatic fluid dispensing system 10. Here, the switches 60 of FIGS. 1 and 3 have been replaced by a sonic signal generator 70, such as a bellows-type ultrasonic whistle. In this design, when the actuating lever 52 is pressed, a bellows or pleated expandable portion 70b is compressed in accordion fashion, thereby emitting an acoustic signal through orifice 70a.

The ultrasonic signal so generated is then received by transducer 48a (FIG. 1) , which causes the logic controller C (FIG. 1) to open the operating valve 25 (FIG. 1) as though the preselected condition of the target region was sensed by the transducer assembly 48 (even though that condition need not have actually occurred) . Alternatively, another transducer separate from the transducer assembly 48 (FIG. 1) and, for example, located at the logic controller C, can be used as the signal receiver.

FIG. 5 illustrates in block diagram form the operation of the sonic generator 70 as just described. In summary, on manual actuation of the actuating lever 54, the manual actuator 72 causes the signal generator 74 to emit an ultrasonic signal which is received by a signal receiver 76 which converts the acoustic signal into a signal usable by the logic controller 78, which then opens the operating valve 25 via the operating valve operator 80. The operating valve 25 can remain open, depending on the design at the system, for a preselected, fixed period of time or until a second acoustic signal is received. Such a second acoustic signal can be generated, for example, from the sonic generator 70 on release of the actuating lever and consequent expansion of the bellows portion 70b (FIG. 4) .

Some of the advantages of using the sonic generator arrangement of FIG. 5 include (a) the elimination of the need for a hard-wired communication link between the spray head 22 and the signal receiver, (b) the use of the transducer assembly for both automatic operation and as the signal receiver for deactivating and overriding the automatic operation, and (c) the "one-step" action of pressing the actuating lever of the spray head to cause both override of the automatic system and the diversion of the fluid flow.

The foregoing description has been limited to a specific embodiment of this invention. It will be apparent, however, that variations and modifications may be made to the invention, with the attainment of some or all of the advantages of the invention. Accordingly, it is the object of the appended claims to cover all such variations and modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the invention. This specification is intended to be construed in an illustrative and not restrictive manner.

Claims

CLAIMS ;
1. A fluid dispensing system, comprising:
A. a first spout;
B. a first signal generator operatively associated with said first spout;
C. a second spout;
D. a second signal generator operatively associated with said second spout;
E. operator means for controlling the flow of fluid through said first spout corresponding to a first signal from said first signal generator, and for controlling the flow of fluid through said second spout corresponding to a second signal from said second signal generator.
2. The fluid dispensing system of claim 1 wherein said second spout includes a manual actuator, and said second signal generator generates said second signal in response to manual actuation of said actuator.
3. The fluid dispensing system of claim 1 wherein said second spout comprises a spray head including a manual actuator for manually controlling the flow of fluid therethrough, and said system further comprises holder means for removably holding said spray head, and a flexible tube for supplying fluid to said spray head, and wherein said spray head normally dispenses fluid while being manually held and actuated.
4. The fluid dispensing system of claim 3 wherein said first signal generator comprises ultrasonic transducer means for sensing a condition in a target region and controlling the flow of fluid through said first spout corresponding to the sensed condition.
5. The fluid dispensing system of claim 3 wherein said second signal generator comprises means for supplying the second signal to said operator means in response to removing said spray head from said holder means.
6. The fluid dispensing system of claim 3 wherein said second signal generator comprises means for supplying the second signal to said operator means in response to actuation of said manual actuator.
7. The fluid dispensing system of claim 6 wherein said signal supplying means comprises means for generating a sonic signal upon actuation of said manual actuator, and said second signal generator further comprises transducer means for receiving said sonic signal and generating the second signal in response thereto.
8. The fluid dispensing system of claim 7 wherein said first signal generator comprises transducer means for generating a sonic signal, receiving the sonic signal generated thereby, and receiving the sonic signal generated by said sonic signal generating means.
9. The fluid dispensing system of claim 1 wherein said operator means comprises a solenoid actuated operating valve, and a logic controller for receiving the first and second signals and generating an electrical signal in response thereto for controlling the operation of said operating valve.
10. An automatic fluid dispensing system for use in a sink arrangement, comprising:
A. a long-necked spout including a spout tip structure, said long-necked spout being secured to a sink;
B. a transducer assembly disposed in said spout tip structure for generating a first signal corresponding to a sensed condition in a target region;
C. a sprayer assembly comprising a manually actuated spray head for hand-held operation, a cradle for holding said spray head when not in use, and a flexible tube for supplying fluid to said spray head;
D. first manually actuated means for selectively supplying a second signal indicative of a user's desire to use the spray head; E. second manually actuated means for selectively operating said spray head; and
F. a valve arrangement for supplying fluid to said long-necked spout in response to said first signal, and for supplying fluid to said spray head regardless of the first signal in response to said second signal and said second manually actuated means.
11. The automatic fluid dispensing system of claim 10 wherein said first manually actuated means comprises a switch.
12. The automatic fluid dispensing system of claim 11 wherein said switch comprises a reed switch arrangement, said arrangement including a magnet mounted on said spray head and a reed mounted for toggling movement on said cradle.
13. The automatic fluid dispensing system of claim 10 wherein said first manually actuated means comprises a transducer.
14. The automatic fluid dispensing system of claim 13 wherein said transducer comprises a sonic generator mounted on said spray head.
15. An automatic fluid dispensing system having a primary spout, a spray head, a valve arrangement for directing fluid to one of said primary spout and said spray head, and a controller for controlling operation of said valve arrangement, said system further comprising:
A. means for supplying fluid to said primary spout by operating said valve arrangement in response to a detected condition in a target region; and
B. means for supplying fluid to said spray head by operating said valve arrangement in response to i) a signal supplied to said controller and indicative of the desired use of said spray head, and ii) manual opening of an orifice in said spray head.
16. The automatic fluid dispensing system of claim 15 further including a manually actuated sonic generator mounted on said spray head for generating a sonic signal, and a transducer coupled to said controller for receiving said sonic signal and converting said sonic signal to said signal.
17. A method of operating an automatic fluid dispensing system having a primary spout, a spray head, a valve arrangement for directing fluid to one of said primary spout and said spray head, and a controller for controlling operation of said valve arrangement, said method comprising the steps of:
A. supplying fluid to said primary spout by operating said valve arrangement in response to a detected condition in a target region; and
B. supplying fluid to said spray head by operating said valve arrangement in response to i) a signal supplied to said controller and indicative of the desired use of said spray head, and ii) manual opening of an orifice in said spray head.
18. The method of claim 17 further comprising the step of manually pressing an actuating lever on said spray head to actuate said valve arrangement to supply fluid to said spray head, and to generate said signal.
19. The method of claim 17 further comprising generating said signal by a sonic generator.
PCT/US1990/002499 1990-05-04 1990-05-04 Improved automatic faucet system WO1991017377A1 (en)

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6508272B1 (en) 2000-11-20 2003-01-21 Arichell Technologies, Inc. Device and method for operating at least two valves
US7472433B2 (en) 2006-01-05 2009-01-06 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Method and apparatus for determining when hands are under a faucet for lavatory applications
US7631372B2 (en) 2005-03-14 2009-12-15 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Method and apparatus for providing strain relief of a cable
US7997301B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2011-08-16 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Spout assembly for an electronic faucet
US8104113B2 (en) 2005-03-14 2012-01-31 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Position-sensing detector arrangement for controlling a faucet
US8844564B2 (en) 2006-12-19 2014-09-30 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Multi-mode hands free automatic faucet
US8939429B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2015-01-27 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Spout assembly for an electronic faucet
US8944105B2 (en) 2007-01-31 2015-02-03 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Capacitive sensing apparatus and method for faucets
US9175458B2 (en) 2012-04-20 2015-11-03 Delta Faucet Company Faucet including a pullout wand with a capacitive sensing
US9194110B2 (en) 2012-03-07 2015-11-24 Moen Incorporated Electronic plumbing fixture fitting
US9228329B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-05 Delta Faucet Company Pull-out wand
US9243392B2 (en) 2006-12-19 2016-01-26 Delta Faucet Company Resistive coupling for an automatic faucet
US9243756B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-26 Delta Faucet Company Capacitive user interface for a faucet and method of forming
US9285807B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-03-15 Delta Faucet Company Electronic user interface for electronic mixing of water for residential faucets
US9315976B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2016-04-19 Delta Faucet Company Capacitive coupling arrangement for a faucet
US9394675B2 (en) 2010-04-20 2016-07-19 Delta Faucet Company Capacitive sensing system and method for operating a faucet

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6874535B2 (en) 2000-11-20 2005-04-05 Arichell Technologies, Inc. Device and method for operating at least two valves
US6508272B1 (en) 2000-11-20 2003-01-21 Arichell Technologies, Inc. Device and method for operating at least two valves
US9243391B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2016-01-26 Delta Faucet Company Multi-mode hands free automatic faucet
US8939429B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2015-01-27 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Spout assembly for an electronic faucet
US7997301B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2011-08-16 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Spout assembly for an electronic faucet
US8424569B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2013-04-23 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Spout assembly for an electronic faucet
US7631372B2 (en) 2005-03-14 2009-12-15 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Method and apparatus for providing strain relief of a cable
US8104113B2 (en) 2005-03-14 2012-01-31 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Position-sensing detector arrangement for controlling a faucet
US7472433B2 (en) 2006-01-05 2009-01-06 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Method and apparatus for determining when hands are under a faucet for lavatory applications
US9243756B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-26 Delta Faucet Company Capacitive user interface for a faucet and method of forming
US9285807B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-03-15 Delta Faucet Company Electronic user interface for electronic mixing of water for residential faucets
US9715238B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2017-07-25 Delta Faucet Company Electronic user interface for electronic mixing of water for residential faucets
US9228329B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-05 Delta Faucet Company Pull-out wand
US9856634B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2018-01-02 Delta Faucet Company Fluid delivery device with an in-water capacitive sensor
US9243392B2 (en) 2006-12-19 2016-01-26 Delta Faucet Company Resistive coupling for an automatic faucet
US8844564B2 (en) 2006-12-19 2014-09-30 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Multi-mode hands free automatic faucet
US8944105B2 (en) 2007-01-31 2015-02-03 Masco Corporation Of Indiana Capacitive sensing apparatus and method for faucets
US9315976B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2016-04-19 Delta Faucet Company Capacitive coupling arrangement for a faucet
US9394675B2 (en) 2010-04-20 2016-07-19 Delta Faucet Company Capacitive sensing system and method for operating a faucet
US9828751B2 (en) 2012-03-07 2017-11-28 Moen Incorporated Electronic plumbing fixture fitting
US9758951B2 (en) 2012-03-07 2017-09-12 Moen Incorporated Electronic plumbing fixture fitting
US9194110B2 (en) 2012-03-07 2015-11-24 Moen Incorporated Electronic plumbing fixture fitting
US9175458B2 (en) 2012-04-20 2015-11-03 Delta Faucet Company Faucet including a pullout wand with a capacitive sensing

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