WO1990005493A1 - Surgical instrument - Google Patents

Surgical instrument Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1990005493A1
WO1990005493A1 PCT/SE1989/000656 SE8900656W WO9005493A1 WO 1990005493 A1 WO1990005493 A1 WO 1990005493A1 SE 8900656 W SE8900656 W SE 8900656W WO 9005493 A1 WO9005493 A1 WO 9005493A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
instrument
tubular member
inlet
tissue
tube
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/SE1989/000656
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Pål Svedman
Original Assignee
Svedman Paal
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to SE8804114-0 priority Critical
Priority to SE8804114A priority patent/SE462414B/en
Application filed by Svedman Paal filed Critical Svedman Paal
Publication of WO1990005493A1 publication Critical patent/WO1990005493A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/3203Fluid jet cutting instruments
    • A61B17/32037Fluid jet cutting instruments for removing obstructions from inner organs or blood vessels, e.g. for atherectomy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/008Drainage tubes; Aspiration tips
    • A61M1/0084With gas or fluid supply means, e.g. for supplying rinsing fluids, anticoagulants
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320016Endoscopic cutting instruments, e.g. arthroscopes, resectoscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/3203Fluid jet cutting instruments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2202/00Special media to be introduced, removed or treated
    • A61M2202/08Lipoids

Abstract

The invention relates to an instrument, especially but not exclusively for removing tissue, comprising an elongate, tubular member (10) whose one end is directly or indirectly connected to a suction pump (15) for generating a subpressure in the tubular member (10), the tubular member (10) being provided with at least one inlet (12) through which the tissue is sucked in under the action of the subpressure in the tubular member (10) so as to be conveyed to a collecting vessel. The instrument is provided with means (19, 20, 16, 17) for supplying the interior of the tubular member (10) with a pressurised liquid which is caused to pass the area of the inlet (12), while simultaneously disintegrating the sucked-in tissue, and subsequently to convey the disintegrated tissue to the collecting vessel.

Description

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT

The present invention relates to an instrument, especially but not exclusively for removing tissue, com- prising an elongate tubular member whose one end is di¬ rectly or indirectly connected to a suction pump for generating a subpressure in the tubular member, said tubular member being provided with at least one inlet through which the tissue is sucked in under the action of the subpressure in the tubular member, so as to be conveyed to a collecting vessel.

A tubular instrument connected to a suction pump is known in plastic surgery and is generally used to suck out fatty deposits. One advantage of this instrument is that long and disfiguring scar formations can be avoided al¬ though the operation area may be large. The tubular member which typically is of a length of 150-200 mm and a dia¬ meter of 3-10 mm, is inserted through centimetre long in¬ cisions in the skin and is hermetically connected to a suction pump with a collecting vessel. The inlet through which the fatty tissue is sucked in is either blunt or cutting. By moving the instrument back and forth under the skin, the tissue introduced into the inlet is torn or cut loose in lumps which are several millimetres in diameter, and is sucked out into the collecting vessel. Large blood vessels slide away from the inlet and therefore are preserved at least to some extent.

This technique suffers from several drawbacks. No accuracy is possible since the removal of tissue occurs unevenly, and sometimes no tissue at all is removed. This is due to the fact that the subpressure in the inlet of the tubular member, through which the tissue is to be sucked in, ceases when tissue that has already been torn or cut loose, clogs the tube. The operation area must therefore be sucked several times, which significantly prolongs the operation time and causes increasing irritation of the tissue. There will also be bleeding of clinical consequence, especially when the edges of the inlet of the tubular member are designed to be cutting. I a large number of patients, cosmetically unsatisfactory dimples in the skin remain in the operation area, which a least in part can be explained by the unsatisfactory function. The field of application for the prior art instrument is besides restricted to fatty tissue.

One object of the invention is to provide an instru ment of the type mentioned by way of introduction, by means of which the above drawbacks in removing tissue ar eliminated.

A further object is to provide an instrument which more versatile and can be used to remove e.g. tumour tissue. A still further object of the instrument according the invention is to facilitate removal of such tissues from the inside of the artery walls as can cause constri tion of the artery and result in impaired or, sometimes, stopped blood supply to the tissue. The characterising clause of claim 1 states the dis tinctive features of the invention.

Since the pressurised liquid supplied to the tubula member is caused to pass the area of the inlet of the tubular member, the tissue which, as the instrument is moved, is gradually introduced into the inlet of the tu¬ bular member, will be exposed to this pressurised liquid and broken up into extremely small tissue fragments, ty¬ pically including about 4-300 cells (this applies to fat tissue). The pressurised jet of liquid passes the inlet substantially in parallel with the plane of the inlet an "cuts" the tissue to pieces as it is sucked into the in¬ let. At the same time this fragmented tissue is subjecte to the sucking action of the suction pump, and the mixtu of liquid and fragments is sucked into the collecting vessel. The pressurised liquid hits the tissue in the fo of a jet whose diameter, distribution and direction are determined by the shape and orientation of the nozzle. T jet loses a minor portion of its kinetic energy when it hits the tissue, and assists most effectively in conveyin the liquid and the fragmented tissue in the direction of the sucking action. The subpressure in the tubular member prevents liquid from passing into the surrounding tissue. The advantage of the instrument resides in even and, con¬ sequently, rapid removal of tissue. The draining function is secured in that the tissue fragments are so small that the tubular member cannot be clogged, at the same time as the conveyance to the collecting vessel is rendered more effective by the thrust of the jet of water. The power of the jet can be adjusted so that tissue of different den¬ sity can be excised, and optimised to save blood vessels. The size of the inlet can also be varied. Preferred embodiments of the inventive instrument an distinctive features thereof are stated in the subclaims.

The invention will now be described in more detail below in the form of a number of embodiments and with re¬ ference to the accompanying drawings in which: Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a first embodiment o the instrument according to the invention;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section of the excising por tion of the tubular member included in the instrument and shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section of the excising por tion in a second embodiment; and

Figs 4, 5 and 6 illustrate a third, a fourth and a fifth embodiment of the instrument according to the in¬ vention. Figs 1 and 2 illustrate a tube 10 of circular cross- section which can be rigid and made of, for example, a tissue-compatible metal. The tube 10 can also be flexible and then be made of a tissue-compatible plastic material. If the instrument according to the invention is to be used to remove e.g. abdominal fat, its length can typically be 150-200 mm and its inner diameter 4-8 mm. Smaller sizes can be convenient in face surgery and bigger ones in ex- tensive operations.

In this embodiment, one end of the tube 10 is closed and softly rounded, as indicated at 11. In the vicinity of the closed end there is an oval inlet 12 preferably having non-cutting edges. Normally the inlet 12 is positioned about 5-30 mm from the rounded end 11.

The other end of the tube 10 is designed as or pro¬ vided with a sleeve-shaped grip or guide portion 13 which is, in turn, connected via a conduit 14 to a suction pump 15, whereby a suction effect in the direction of the arrow B arises.

One wall of the tube 10 is designed as or provided with a duct 16 (Fig. 2) having a diameter of e.g. 2 mm. One end of the duct 16 opens into a nozzle 17 disposed inside or outside the tube 10, between the inlet 12 there¬ of and the rounded end 11. The aperture of the nozzle 17 is disposed centrally in the tube 10 and directed to the opposite end of the tube 10, as shown by the arrow B which also symbolises the sucking direction provided by the suc- tion pump 15.

The other end of the duct 16 is connected to a thick- walled conduit 18 which is, in turn, connected to a liquid container 19. The liquid in the container 19 is adapted to be pressurised by means of a pressure-generating unit 20 of some prior art type. The liquid in the container 19 is a tissue-compatible solution to which an antibiotic and/or a vasoconstrictive substance is optionally added.

On application of the inventive instrument to tissue, the liquid from the container 19 is caused to flow under a pressure of typically 100-400 bars through the duct 16 in the direction of the arrow A, which results in the nozzle 17 forming a jet 21 whose direction of motion substanti¬ ally conforms with the sucking direction (arrow B). When the instrument, i.e. the tube 10, is inserted in the tissue or held against a tissue surface, the inlet 12 is clogged, whereby a subpressure is generated inside the tube 10. The tissue (not shown) thus is sucked through the inlet 12. Under the action of the jet of liquid 21, the sucked-in tissue is broken up into small fragments, and this mixture of liquid and small fragments is fed in the direction of the arrow B at a rate of about 0.5-1 m/s. N tissue is gradually sucked in through the inlet 12 of th tube 10, and by means of the jet of liquid 21 the tissue is excised evenly and rapidly. Owing to the fragmentation of the tissue, the risk that the interior of the tube 10; is clogged, is eliminated. The removed tissue is collecte in a vessel (not shown).

Figs 3-6 to which reference is now made, illustrate other feasible embodiments of the instrument according to the invention. The same reference numerals as in Figs 1-2 are used. In Fig. 3, the duct 16 for the pressurised liquid opens into a nozzle 17 which is disposed eccentrically in side the tube 10 and positioned between the laterally arranged inlet 12 and the closed end of the tube 10 and closest to the tube wall which has the inlet 12. Suck po- sitioning of the nozzle 17 implies that the jet of liquid 21 attacks sucked-in tissue at a somewhat earlier stage a compared with the embodiment according to Figs 1 and 2.

In Fig. 4, the inlet 12 of the tube 10 is formed ±n the end thereof. The nozzle 17 is disposed eccentrically inside the tube 10, and the aperture of the nozzle is angularly set so that the pressurised jet of liquid is di rected transversely of the longitudinal direction of the tube 10. Thus, the mixture of liquid and fragmented tissu is fed towards the opposite tube wall where the mixture it subjected to the sucking action indicated by the arrow B. Fig. 5 illustrate that the duct 16 for the pressur ised liquid is arranged in one wall of the tube, but it i obvious that the duct 16 can also be arranged inside or outside the cavity of the tubular member, and in the latter case the duct is caused to communicate via a leads- in with the interior of the tube 10 (Fig. 5). The tube IQ through which the tissue fragments are conveyed, can also be a direct extension of the tube 16 supplying the pressu rised liquid (Fig. 6). In this embodiment, the tube 10 usually is flexible. In a tubular instrument according to this embodiment, one end is consequently connected to a liquid reservoir, alternatively having a source of pres¬ sure, and the opposite end is connected to a suction pump The preferably rigid, tubular portion 16 for the pressur¬ ised liquid passes after the inlet 12 into a portion whic usually, but not necessarily, is flexible and whose inter ior is subjected to the sucking action (indicated by the arrow B) of the suction pump which is not shown in this Figure.

The instrument according to the invention can also b used outside plastic surgery. Thus, the instrument can also be used to remove vasoconstrictions and tumours.

In each of the embodiments stated above, the tubular member 12 can be provided with prior art fibre optics and, alternatively, electronic sensing means, for locati and monitoring the result of the excisive operation. Moreover it will be appreciated that the inlet 12 o the tubular member can be provided with a coarse- or fin meshed grating for preventing big blood vessels from bei pulled into the tube 10. The inlet 12 can also be provid with a loop or like member which has non-cutting edges a extends a short distance beyond the circumference of the inlet, thereby facilitating the introduction of tissue.

It is also possible to arrange a nozzle 17 the dire tion of which can be adjusted within limits by the opera¬ tor. To a person skilled in the art it is further obviou that the tube 16 for the pressurised liquid can also be flexible, which is illustrated by e.g. the embodiment shown in Fig. 5.

Claims

1. An instrument, especially but not exclusively for removing tissue, comprising an elongate tubular member (10) whose one end is directly or indirectly connected to a suction pump (15) for generating a subpressure in said tubular member (10), said tubular member being provided with at least one inlet (12) through which the tissue is sucked in under the action of the subpressure in said tu¬ bular member (10) so as to be conveyed to a collecting vessel, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that means (19, 20 16, 17) are adapted to supply the interior of said tubula member (10) with a pressurised liquid which is caused to pass the area of said inlet (12), while simultaneously disintegrating the sucked-in tissue, and subsequently to convey the disintegrated tissue to said collecting vessel
2. The instrument as claimed in claim 1, c h a r - a c t e r i s e d by a tube (16) adapted to conduct the pressurised liquid to a nozzle (17) which in said tubular member (10) produces a jet of liquid which is substan¬ tially parallel to the plane of said inlet (12).
3. The instrument as claimed in claim 2, c h a r - a c t e r i s e d in that the aperture of the nozzle (17 is disposed centrally in the tubular member (10).
4. The instrument as claimed in claim 2, c h a r ¬ a c t e r i s e d in that the aperture of the nozzle (17 is disposed eccentrically in the tubular member (10).
5. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre¬ ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the nozzle (17) is adapted to conduct the jet of liquid past the inlet (12) in the direction of the end of the tubular member (10), which is connected to the suction pump (15).
6. The instrument as claimed in any one of claims 1, 2, 3, or 5, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that said tubu lar member (10), upstream of said inlet (12), forms a duct for the pressurised liquid and preferably is rigid, and that, downstream of said inlet (12), said tubular member (10) is flexible.
7. The instrument as claimed in any one of claims 1-4, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that said nozzle (17) is adapted to conduct the jet of water past the inlet (12 in the direction away from the end of said tubular member (10), which is connected to said suction pump (15) and, after a bend, towards said end.
8. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre¬ ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the tub (16) through which the pressurised liquid is conveyed forms part of the wall of said tubular member (10).
9. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre- ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the tube (16) through which said pressurised liquid is con¬ veyed is disposed outside said tubular member (10).
10. The instrument as claimed in any one of claims 1-8 , c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the tube (16) through which the pressurised liquid is conveyed is dis¬ posed inside the cavity of the said tubular member (10).
11. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that said tubular member (10) is rigid.
12. The instrument as claimed in any one of claims 1-10, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that said tubular member (10) is flexible.
13. The instrument as claimed in any one of claims 1-10, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the tube (16) through which the pressurised liquid is conveyed is rigi
14. The instrument as claimed in any one of claims 1-10, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the tube (16) through which the pressurised liquid is conveyed is flex ible.
15. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that said nozzle (17) for the pressurised liquid is adjustable in any desired angular positions.
16. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre¬ ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the tu bular member (10) has optical means, preferably fibre optics, for monitoring the removal of tissue.
17. The instrument as claimed in any one of the pre¬ ceding claims, c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that the inlet (12) of the tubular member (10) is provided with a grating.
PCT/SE1989/000656 1988-11-15 1989-11-15 Surgical instrument WO1990005493A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
SE8804114-0 1988-11-15
SE8804114A SE462414B (en) 1988-11-15 1988-11-15 Instruments Foer avlaegsning of vaevnad

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1990005493A1 true WO1990005493A1 (en) 1990-05-31

Family

ID=20373939

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/SE1989/000656 WO1990005493A1 (en) 1988-11-15 1989-11-15 Surgical instrument

Country Status (3)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0444071A1 (en)
SE (1) SE462414B (en)
WO (1) WO1990005493A1 (en)

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0470781A1 (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-02-12 Possis Medical Inc. Thrombectomy method and device
EP0485133A1 (en) * 1990-11-08 1992-05-13 Possis Medical, Inc. Asymmetric water jet atherectomy
EP0527312A1 (en) * 1991-08-14 1993-02-17 Convergenza Ag Rinsing catheter
US5188102A (en) * 1990-05-11 1993-02-23 Sumitomo Bakelite Company Limited Surgical ultrasonic horn
EP0533432A1 (en) * 1991-09-17 1993-03-24 Yamauchi, Teiyu Catheter device
US5320599A (en) * 1990-02-14 1994-06-14 Cordis Corporation Drainage catheter
US5322504A (en) * 1992-05-07 1994-06-21 United States Surgical Corporation Method and apparatus for tissue excision and removal by fluid jet
US5472416A (en) * 1994-01-10 1995-12-05 Very Inventive Physicians, Inc. Tumescent lipoplastic method and apparatus
US5674226A (en) * 1992-05-07 1997-10-07 Sentinel Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for tissue excision and removal by fluid jet
US5735815A (en) * 1993-07-26 1998-04-07 Sentinel Medical, Inc. Method of using fluid jet surgical cutting tool
US5766194A (en) * 1996-12-23 1998-06-16 Georgia Skin And Cancer Clinic, Pc Surgical apparatus for tissue removal
EP0873719A3 (en) * 1997-04-26 1999-01-13 Convergenza Ag Device comprising a therapeutic catheter
AU725925B2 (en) * 1990-08-06 2000-10-26 Possis Medical, Inc. Thrombectomy method and device
WO2001030284A1 (en) * 1999-10-28 2001-05-03 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Liquefracture handpiece
US6790196B2 (en) 2001-12-18 2004-09-14 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Aspirating devices for removal of thrombus/lipid from a body lumen
WO2008134713A1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-11-06 Andrew Technologies Llc Liposuction based on tissue liquefaction
WO2009100319A1 (en) * 2008-02-07 2009-08-13 Andrew Technologies Llc Liposuction of visceral fat using tissue liquefaction
WO2010146159A1 (en) * 2009-06-18 2010-12-23 Medizinische Universität Graz Apparatus and method for sucking a fluid to be sucked
US7879022B2 (en) 1998-02-06 2011-02-01 Medrad, Inc. Rapid exchange fluid jet thrombectomy device and method
US7951161B2 (en) 2006-05-09 2011-05-31 Medrad, Inc. Atherectomy system having a variably exposed cutter
US8162878B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2012-04-24 Medrad, Inc. Exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system
USRE43617E1 (en) 1995-02-06 2012-08-28 Andrew Mark S Tissue liquefaction and aspiration
US8303538B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2012-11-06 Medrad, Inc. Rheolytic thrombectomy catheter with self-inflating distal balloon
US8366700B2 (en) 2007-04-30 2013-02-05 Andrew Technologies, Llc Liposuction of visceral fat using tissue liquefaction
US8439878B2 (en) 2007-12-26 2013-05-14 Medrad, Inc. Rheolytic thrombectomy catheter with self-inflating proximal balloon with drug infusion capabilities
CN103251440A (en) * 2012-01-26 2013-08-21 科维蒂恩有限合伙公司 Thrombectomy catheter systems
US8647294B2 (en) 2008-03-20 2014-02-11 Medrad, Inc. Direct stream hydrodynamic catheter system
US8974418B2 (en) 2007-06-12 2015-03-10 Boston Scientific Limited Forwardly directed fluid jet crossing catheter
WO2014159204A3 (en) * 2013-03-14 2015-06-11 Boston Scientific Limited Thrombectomy catheters, systems and methods
WO2015179329A1 (en) * 2014-05-19 2015-11-26 Walk Vascular, Llc Systems and methods for removal of blood and thrombotic material
US9248221B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2016-02-02 Incuvate, Llc Aspiration monitoring system and method
US9433427B2 (en) 2014-04-08 2016-09-06 Incuvate, Llc Systems and methods for management of thrombosis
US9586023B2 (en) 1998-02-06 2017-03-07 Boston Scientific Limited Direct stream hydrodynamic catheter system
US9597107B2 (en) 2002-10-25 2017-03-21 Hydrocision, Inc. Nozzle assemblies for liquid jet surgical instruments and surgical instruments employing the nozzle assemblies
US10226263B2 (en) 2015-12-23 2019-03-12 Incuvate, Llc Aspiration monitoring system and method

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US3542031A (en) * 1968-06-24 1970-11-24 Marshall B Taylor Vacuum curette
FR2568777A1 (en) * 1984-08-08 1986-02-14 Goddio Anne Liposuction cannula.
EP0175096A1 (en) * 1984-09-06 1986-03-26 Elmar M. Dipl.-Ing. Veltrup Device for the removal of solid bodies or concrements from body vessels

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3542031A (en) * 1968-06-24 1970-11-24 Marshall B Taylor Vacuum curette
FR2568777A1 (en) * 1984-08-08 1986-02-14 Goddio Anne Liposuction cannula.
EP0175096A1 (en) * 1984-09-06 1986-03-26 Elmar M. Dipl.-Ing. Veltrup Device for the removal of solid bodies or concrements from body vessels

Cited By (53)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5320599A (en) * 1990-02-14 1994-06-14 Cordis Corporation Drainage catheter
US5785678A (en) * 1990-02-14 1998-07-28 Cordis Corporation Drainage catheter and method of using
US5395315A (en) * 1990-02-14 1995-03-07 Cordis Corporation Drainage catheter
US5188102A (en) * 1990-05-11 1993-02-23 Sumitomo Bakelite Company Limited Surgical ultrasonic horn
EP0470781A1 (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-02-12 Possis Medical Inc. Thrombectomy method and device
AU725925B2 (en) * 1990-08-06 2000-10-26 Possis Medical, Inc. Thrombectomy method and device
EP0485133A1 (en) * 1990-11-08 1992-05-13 Possis Medical, Inc. Asymmetric water jet atherectomy
US5496267A (en) * 1990-11-08 1996-03-05 Possis Medical, Inc. Asymmetric water jet atherectomy
US5318518A (en) * 1991-08-14 1994-06-07 Hp Medica Gesellschaft Mbh Fur Medizintechnische Systeme Irrigating catheter
EP0527312A1 (en) * 1991-08-14 1993-02-17 Convergenza Ag Rinsing catheter
EP0533432A1 (en) * 1991-09-17 1993-03-24 Yamauchi, Teiyu Catheter device
US5322504A (en) * 1992-05-07 1994-06-21 United States Surgical Corporation Method and apparatus for tissue excision and removal by fluid jet
US5674226A (en) * 1992-05-07 1997-10-07 Sentinel Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for tissue excision and removal by fluid jet
US5735815A (en) * 1993-07-26 1998-04-07 Sentinel Medical, Inc. Method of using fluid jet surgical cutting tool
US5472416A (en) * 1994-01-10 1995-12-05 Very Inventive Physicians, Inc. Tumescent lipoplastic method and apparatus
USRE43617E1 (en) 1995-02-06 2012-08-28 Andrew Mark S Tissue liquefaction and aspiration
US5766194A (en) * 1996-12-23 1998-06-16 Georgia Skin And Cancer Clinic, Pc Surgical apparatus for tissue removal
US5947988A (en) * 1996-12-23 1999-09-07 Smith; Sidney Paul Surgical apparatus for tissue removal
EP0873719A3 (en) * 1997-04-26 1999-01-13 Convergenza Ag Device comprising a therapeutic catheter
US9586023B2 (en) 1998-02-06 2017-03-07 Boston Scientific Limited Direct stream hydrodynamic catheter system
US7879022B2 (en) 1998-02-06 2011-02-01 Medrad, Inc. Rapid exchange fluid jet thrombectomy device and method
WO2001030284A1 (en) * 1999-10-28 2001-05-03 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Liquefracture handpiece
US6790196B2 (en) 2001-12-18 2004-09-14 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Aspirating devices for removal of thrombus/lipid from a body lumen
US9597107B2 (en) 2002-10-25 2017-03-21 Hydrocision, Inc. Nozzle assemblies for liquid jet surgical instruments and surgical instruments employing the nozzle assemblies
US8162878B2 (en) 2005-12-05 2012-04-24 Medrad, Inc. Exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system
US7951161B2 (en) 2006-05-09 2011-05-31 Medrad, Inc. Atherectomy system having a variably exposed cutter
JP2010525890A (en) * 2007-04-30 2010-07-29 アンドリュー・テクノロジーズ・エルエルシー Liposuction based on liquefaction of tissues
US9089361B2 (en) 2007-04-30 2015-07-28 Andrew Technologies, Llc Liposuction based on tissue liquefaction
US8221394B2 (en) 2007-04-30 2012-07-17 Andrew Technologies, Llc Liposuction based on tissue liquefaction
US8366700B2 (en) 2007-04-30 2013-02-05 Andrew Technologies, Llc Liposuction of visceral fat using tissue liquefaction
WO2008134713A1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-11-06 Andrew Technologies Llc Liposuction based on tissue liquefaction
US8974418B2 (en) 2007-06-12 2015-03-10 Boston Scientific Limited Forwardly directed fluid jet crossing catheter
US8303538B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2012-11-06 Medrad, Inc. Rheolytic thrombectomy catheter with self-inflating distal balloon
US8439878B2 (en) 2007-12-26 2013-05-14 Medrad, Inc. Rheolytic thrombectomy catheter with self-inflating proximal balloon with drug infusion capabilities
WO2009100319A1 (en) * 2008-02-07 2009-08-13 Andrew Technologies Llc Liposuction of visceral fat using tissue liquefaction
JP2015091326A (en) * 2008-02-07 2015-05-14 アンドリュー・テクノロジーズ・エルエルシー Liposuction of visceral fal using tissue liquefaction
JP2011511670A (en) * 2008-02-07 2011-04-14 アンドリュー・テクノロジーズ・エルエルシー Liposuction visceral fat using tissue liquefaction
US8647294B2 (en) 2008-03-20 2014-02-11 Medrad, Inc. Direct stream hydrodynamic catheter system
WO2010146159A1 (en) * 2009-06-18 2010-12-23 Medizinische Universität Graz Apparatus and method for sucking a fluid to be sucked
CN103251440A (en) * 2012-01-26 2013-08-21 科维蒂恩有限合伙公司 Thrombectomy catheter systems
US10064643B2 (en) 2012-01-26 2018-09-04 Covidien Lp Thrombectomy catheter systems
CN103251440B (en) * 2012-01-26 2015-08-19 科维蒂恩有限合伙公司 Thrombectomy catheter system
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EP0444071A1 (en) 1991-09-04
SE8804114D0 (en) 1988-11-15
SE462414B (en) 1990-06-25
SE8804114L (en) 1988-11-15

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