WO1989012017A1 - Reusable winding tube - Google Patents

Reusable winding tube Download PDF

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Publication number
WO1989012017A1
WO1989012017A1 PCT/US1989/002267 US8902267W WO8912017A1 WO 1989012017 A1 WO1989012017 A1 WO 1989012017A1 US 8902267 W US8902267 W US 8902267W WO 8912017 A1 WO8912017 A1 WO 8912017A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
cap
hollow tube
yarn carrier
tube
yarn
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1989/002267
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Stephen S. Powel
Robert J. Darby
Original Assignee
Powel Stephen S
Darby Robert J
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US07/200,939 priority Critical patent/US4834314A/en
Priority to US200,939 priority
Priority to US32103889A priority
Priority to US321,038 priority
Application filed by Powel Stephen S, Darby Robert J filed Critical Powel Stephen S
Publication of WO1989012017A1 publication Critical patent/WO1989012017A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H75/00Storing webs, tapes, or filamentary material, e.g. on reels
    • B65H75/02Cores, formers, supports, or holders for coiled, wound, or folded material, e.g. reels, spindles, bobbins, cop tubes, cans
    • B65H75/04Kinds or types
    • B65H75/08Kinds or types of circular or polygonal cross-section
    • B65H75/10Kinds or types of circular or polygonal cross-section without flanges, e.g. cop tubes
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H75/00Storing webs, tapes, or filamentary material, e.g. on reels
    • B65H75/02Cores, formers, supports, or holders for coiled, wound, or folded material, e.g. reels, spindles, bobbins, cop tubes, cans
    • B65H75/18Constructional details
    • B65H75/185End caps, plugs or adapters
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H75/00Storing webs, tapes, or filamentary material, e.g. on reels
    • B65H75/02Cores, formers, supports, or holders for coiled, wound, or folded material, e.g. reels, spindles, bobbins, cop tubes, cans
    • B65H75/18Constructional details
    • B65H75/28Arrangements for positively securing ends of material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/30Handled filamentary material
    • B65H2701/31Textiles threads or artificial strands of filaments

Abstract

An end cap (20) is releasably mounted on the end of a cylindrical hollow tube (10) to form a reusable cylindrical yarn carrier or winding tube which carries a filamentary or fibrous yarn thereon. The confronting walls (16, 30) of the hollow tube and end cap are formed of a rigid material and define a starting groove (40, 42) therebetween. When the yarn carrier has been emptied, the end cap is loosened or separated from the hollow tube and the residual fibers or filaments vacuumed or stripped away.

Description

REUSABLE WINDING TUBE

Cross Reference to Related Applications This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application Serial No. 200,939 filed May 31, 1988 and entitled REUSABLE WINDING TUBE.

Background and Summary of the Present Invention The present invention is directed to winding tubes, and more particularly to a reusable winding tube in which the fibers or filaments are more easily removed from the peripheral starting groove which carries the waste bunch once the package has been emptied.

In conventional automatic winding operations, yarn is wound onto a cylindrical laminated paper tube. One end of the paper tube includes a peripheral starting groove cut into the surface thereof. In some systems, the starting groove is divided into two arcuate por¬ tions. The greater arcuate portion (approximately 270°) is wider and referred to as the lead-in portion, while the smaller (approximately 90°) arcuate portion (locking portion) is narrower and locks one or more of the initial strands of yarn therein during the initial few turns of the automatic winding operation. In other systems, particularly those in which fine denier yarn is being wound, the starting groove has a single configuration that is constant in cross-sectional size and shape around the entire periphery. It is also possible that the starting groove extends only par¬ tially around the periphery of the tube. These strands become a part of what is hereinafter commonly referred to as the "waste bunch". The completed yarn package is removed from the winding machine, and stored or shipped for further processing. During further processing, the yarn is then removed from the yarn carrier. When the yarn package is removed from the package, the last few strands of the waste bunch remain wedged in the lead-in and locking portions of the starting groove. Because of the construction of conventional paper tubes, it is very difficult to remove these strands of fibrous or filamentary material. Previous attempts to remove these strands have included vacuum stripping, cutting of the strands, or a combination of both. Neither technique is satisfactory, because vacuum stripping simply does not remove all the fibrous or filamentary material. Cutting the waste bunch of these types of paper tubes generally results in damage to the surface of the paper tube making it unsuitable for further use. Such damage occurs when the layers or laminae of the laminated paper tube are nicked, cut, or otherwise interrupted. Use of a damaged tube at high speeds then tends to result in delamination.

As a result, conventional paper winding tubes are generally not reusable. There have been some attempts to reuse the tubes at least once by providing a transfer groove at each end of the tube. However, often the paper tube is otherwise damaged during the automatic doffing and emplacement operations which substantially eliminates the reuse of the paper tubes. Conventional paper tubes are relatively expensive (25Φ to $1.00 apiece) and a typical yarn manufacturer will use hundreds of thousands or even millions each year. Thus the cost of non-reusable yarn carriers is extre¬ mely high.

Merely the replacement of paper tubes with a stronger material such as a polymeric material or alu¬ minum is not an obvious solution. First, it is dif¬ ficult to mold or machine a groove of the proper configuration into the surface of a polymeric or metallic tube. Secondly, merely a change of material does not solve the problems attendant to cleaning the starting groove. Vacuuming the groove remains a problem and utilizing a knife will still damage the surface of the tube so that it cannot be reused. While the use of polymeric material or metallic material such as aluminum may be a first step toward an improved tube, it has been found that some improved technique for cleaning of the starting groove must be provided in order to achieve a reusable winding tube.

Examples in the prior art of separable yarn carriers are illustrated in the United States Patents to Chaffin No. 1,991,880; Moss No. 2,837,297; and Underwood No. 3,971,526. However, none of these yarn carriers are for high speed automatic winding opera¬ tions or solve the problems attendant to the removal of residual fibers and filaments from a waste bunch.

A French Patent No. 2,463,088 to Viscosuisse, S.A. shows a somewhat related concept in which a paper or cardboard tube has a friction fit slip-on ring releasably attached to the end thereof. The slip-on ring has resilient fingers that fit inside the paper tube and hold the two components in assembled relation. However, the confronting walls of the slip-on ring and paper tube are not peculiarly designed or of a satis¬ factorily rigid material to form a starting groove of constant size and shape.

In the broadest aspect of the present invention then, the winding tube is made reusable by the com¬ bination of selecting an appropriate material and a unique fabrication technique. The winding tube is formed of a rigid or substantially incompressible poly¬ meric or lightweight metallic material in two separable parts, i.e., the main hollow tube portion and a remo- vable end cap. A starting groove which extends around a portion of all of the entire periphery is formed between confronting end walls of the end cap and hollow tube to properly receive and lock the first few strands of the transfer tail during the automatic winding operation. After the yarn package is emptied, the end cap is removed or partially removed from the hollow tube portion, the fibers or filaments vacuumed or stripped away, and the end cap replaced. The yarn carrier is then ready for reuse.

In its more specific aspects the reusable winding carrier of the present invention includes a hollow tube having an outer, substantially cylindrical surface adapted to carry a filamentary or fibrous yarn thereon and an end wall of a prescribed con iguration. The end cap includes an outer substantially cylindrical surface having generally the same radius as the outer surface of the hollow tube and an end wall of a prescribed con¬ figuration. The end cap and hollow tube include mating threads or other releasable attachment means for releasably mounting the end cap on at least one end of the hollow tube. It is possible that both ends of the hollow tube may include releasable end caps to make the winding tube last even longer.

A starting groove is formed between the aforesaid confronting walls of the hollow tube and the end cap which starting groove extends around a portion of all of the entire periphery of the yarn carrier. In some embodiments, the groove is formed with a relatively narrow locking portion extending around a minor portion (approximately 90°) of the periphery of the tube and a relatively wider lead-in portion extending around the remaining portion of the periphery. The lead-in por¬ tion guides the first few turns of the waste bunch into the locking groove. The wider and narrower portions of the starting groove are formed by molding recesses into or chamfering one or both abutting ends of the hollow tube and/or end cap during the fabrication of the com¬ ponents .

In other embodiments, notably for the winding of finer denier yarns, the lead-in portion is unnecessary. For such operations, the starting groove between the end cap and hollow tube has a substantially constant cross-sectional configuration throughout.

Since the confronting walls of the end cap and hollow tube and the surfaces thereof which engage each other to releasably attach the end cap to the hollow tube are both of a rigid or substantially incompressible material such as a polymeric or lightweight metallic material, the configuration of the groove may be reliably formed and main¬ tained even after repeated usage. When the opera¬ tor torques the end cap against the hollow tube, the end cap remains tightly against the end of the hollow tube and the angle of the starting groove is formed and maintained. As a result, yarn can- not slip down between the engaged confronting walls. Because the material is incompressible, subsequent loosening does not occur. Further, humidity is less likely to change the groove dimensions of a rigid, incompressible material whereas paper is very sensitive to humidity. Each confronting wall of the groove should be formed as a seamless structure, because it is too expensive to form, grind and burnish a joint between dis¬ similar materials. The rigid walls surrounding the groove will maintain the proper angle therebetween even after repeated usage and regardless of humi- dity changes. Thus, the rigid polymeric or light¬ weight metallic material surrounding the latching groove can be machined or molded and retain the precise geometry required on repeated latching to retain long term stability and reliability.

The construction of the present invention combines the benefits of overall economy for the plant; facili¬ tates cleaning the transfer groove; allows replacement or refurbishment of worn or damaged portions of the winding tube assembly; and minimizes the chance of damage to the tube during shipment and use.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a reusable yarn carrier or winding tube by facilitating the cleaning of the starting groove.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a winding tube of the type described in which with winding tube is formed .of a more permanent material, the end portion of with winding tube is re¬ movable from the main body portion and the surfaces r confronting the starting groove and attachment means are formed from a rigid material.

Other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention will become apparent upon reading the following detailed description of a preferred embodi¬ ment along with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating one embodiment of a yarn package wound on a winding tube made in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side view, with parts broken away, illustrating the winding tube of the present invention;

Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional view with parts broken away, taken diametrically through one end of the yarn carrier of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a greatly enlarged sectional view of the end cap removed from the cylindrical portion of the winding tube ;

Figure 5 is a perspective view, similar to Figure 1, except showing an alternate embodiment of the winding tube of the present invention; and

Figure 6 in an enlarged section view, with parts broken away, illustrating the interface between the end cap and hollow tube of all embodiments.

Detailed Description of a Preferred Embodiment

Turning now to the drawings, and particularly to Figure 1, there is illustrated a yarn package of the type formed in accordance with conventional automatic winding techniques. The yarn package includes a winding tube WT about which thousands of turns of yarn Y are wrapped. The winding tube WT is formed of at least two parts, i.e. the cylindrical hollow tube 10 and at least one end cap 20. A groove extending around the periphery is formed between the hollow tube 10 and releasable end cap 20. As the yarn package is ini¬ tially formed, a relatively small number of turns of the yarn are guided. into the starting groove where they are locked and form the waste bunch. The length of yarn extending between the waste bunch and the yarn package Y is referred to hereinafter as the transfer tail TT.

An empty winding tube WT is initially emplaced on the spindle (not shown) of a winding machine ready to have yarn wound thereupon. During the automatic winding operation of polyester or any other extruded polymeric yarn thereon, a vacuum hose is is receiving the continuous extrusion of polyester or any other polymeric yarn filament through a spinneret awaiting the emplacement of the winding tube. The vacuum hose is then held near the bottom periphery of the winding tube WT while a hand-held wire instrument is used by the operator to lift or move the yarn filament into engagement with the starting groove. As the yarn is guided into the starting groove, it latches up and breaks from the remainder of the yarn being carried away by the vacuum hose. After the break occurs, rota¬ tion of the winding tube causes a few turns to form a waste bunch in the starting groove. The waste bunch includes approximately one hundred or less turns. Formation of the waste bunch functions to lock the leading end of the yarn tail as well as to maintain the "off-spec" yarn out of the yarn package while the speed of the yarn being extruded and the rotation of the tube is stabilized. After the waste bunch is completed, the winder goes into a normal wind cycle with the yarn being wrapped around the main body of the hollow tube 10. Once the yarn package is emptied, the winding tube WT must either be discarded, or else the groove in which the waste bunch is wound must be cleaned of remaining fibers. While in conventional winding tech¬ niques, for all practical purposes the groove of a paper tube cannot be cleaned, in the present invention such cleaning is made possible and even facilitated.

Thus, in the present invention, once the winding tube WT is emptied, the end cap 20 is loosened from the hollow tube 10, whereupon the remaining fragments, filaments, or fibers of the waste bunch may be easily vacuumed or stripped away. The end cap 20 is then tightened and the yarn carrier WT is ready for reuse.

As illustrated in Figure 5, the starting groove may not extend completely around the winding tube WT. For example, a starting groove SG is illustrated in Figure 5 which is only about 90° in arcuate length. This allows the first several turns of the transfer tail to enter and be locked. The remaining portion RP of the interface between the end cap 20 and tube 10 merely engage and abut with essentially no groove therebetween other than perhaps a trough for the waste bunch.

Turning now to Figure 2 there is illustrated an empty winding tube WT. A hollow cylindrical tube 10 is provided with a releasable end cap 20 on at least one end thereof. The periphery of tube 10 and end cap 20 are substantially coextensive. As illustrated in Figure 2 in some embodiments, a second end cap 20 may be releasably attached to the opposite end, in which case the life expectancy of the tube may be extended, and either end of the tube may serve to accumulate the waste bunch. However, it is felt that a quite satisfac¬ tory, long lasting winding tube WT can be fabricated which includes the end cap 20 on one end alone. Both the hollow tube 10 and the end cap(s) are formed of a more permanent material such as polymers selected from the group containing polycarbonate, PBT, PVC, ABS, polytetraphthalate, glass filled polymers, and carbon filled polymers. The tubes may even be formed of alu¬ minum, magnesium, or some other lightweight metallic material. One side advantage of the present invention is that paper tubes are limited as to the spindle speed. It is anticipated that polymeric or aluminum winding tubes may be operated at much higher spindle speeds thus leading to other economies for the yarn manufacturer.

Looking at Figures 3 and 4, the relationship bet¬ ween the end cap 20 and the hollow tube 10 as designed for use with all but fine denier yarns is best shown as a result of the enlarged illustrations of a first embo¬ diment. The hollow tube 10 includes a marginal or ter¬ minal portion 12 having a reduced wall thickness and internal threads 14 extending peripherally around the interior wall thereof. Hollow tube 10 terminates in a end wall 16 which is the terminal end of marginal por¬ tion 12. A tapered or chamfered surface 18 joins the outer periphery of the hollow tube 10 and the end wall 16 to guide yarn being wrapped around hollow tube 10 in the area of the end portion thereof inwardly toward the peripheral groove portions.

The end cap 20 includes an axially extending end or nose 22 of reduced wall thickness and having outer threads 24 around the periphery thereof which mate with and engage the inner threads 14,24 form a means for releasably mounting the end cap 20 onto the hollow tube 10. Alternate mounting means might include snap fits, bayonet tabs, male and/or female tapered marginal por¬ tions, and the like, it is being understood that the mating threads 14,24 are representative thereof. In this regard, however, it is important that the con¬ nection between the end cap 20 and hollow tube 10 be secure and tight, so as to properly form the starting groove. Immediately adjacent the base of threads 24 on end cap 20 is a radially extending peripheral rim 26, which forms a stop means against which the end wall 16 of the hollow tube 10 engaged as the end cap is mounted on the hollow tube 10. The marginal or end portions 12 of the hollow tube 10 is longer than the nose 22 of the end cap 20, so that the end wall 16 will engage peripheral rim 26 prior to the time the terminal wall 23 of the end cap 20 would otherwise engage the corresponding portion of hollow tube 10.

A shoulder 28 extends around approximately three- fourths of the periphery of the end cap 20 (approximately 270°) and separates the peripheral rim 26 from a second or groove forming wall 30. The shoulder 28 maintains a separation (approximately .022 inches) between the end wall 116 of hollow tube 10 and the second groove forming wall 30 which separation is substantially greater than the diameter of the yarn being wound thereon. A beveled surface 32 (approximately 45°) angles outwardly from the groove forming wall 30 toward the outer periphery of the end cap 20 to guide yarn into the groove between wall 30 and the end wall 116. Finally a slight chamfer 34 con¬ nects the outer periphery of end cap 20 with the first bevel chamfer 32.

In the remaining one-fourth (approximately 90°) of the periphery of the end cap, the shoulder 28 and groove forming wall 30 are replaced by the slightly angled peripheral rim 36 which, with end wall 16, for the locking portion 42. Rim 36 does not extend radially, rather is tapered away from an imaginary radius by an angle of approximately 5° 30 min. Again the second rim 36 is connected to the outer periphery of end cap 20 by a chamfered surface 34. Chamfered surfaces 18 and 34 cooperate to form a trough in which the waste bunch is collected.

Thus formed, there is a peripheral groove means formed between the confronting walls of the inter¬ mediate ring 100 and the end cap 20 which encircles the yarn carrier. The groove means includes first a rela¬ tively wide lead-in portion 40 which is formed by shoulder 28 and which extends approximately 270° around the periphery of the winding tube WT. Secondly a rela¬ tively narrow locking portion 42 is formed between the confronting end wall 116 of hollow tube 10 and the second peripheral rim 36 of end cap 26. So arranged, the yarns of the transfer bunch are directed toward the lead-in groove 40 and into the locking groove 42 as the winding tube is rotated.

In other embodiments where the yarn carrier is intended for use with finer denier yarns that do not require the lead-in portion 40, the end cap and hollow tube which form the starting groove are so constructed as to continue the locking portion 42 around the entire periphery of the starting groove. Thus, the lead-in portion 40 is eliminated, and the starting groove takes on the configuration of the locking portion 42.

Figure 6 is illustrative of the portion of the interface between the end cap 2- and hollow tube 10 and surrounding the latching groove 42. The illustratewd construction is applicable to all embodiments (Figures 3-5) whether the latching groove includes a lead-in portion or not. The confronting walls of the end cap include the radial rim or face 26 and the slightly angled rim or face 36. The corresponding rims or faces of the hollow tube 10 are -radial face 19 and slightly angled face or rim 16. Angles faces 16,36 are both preferably inclined from a radial plane by an angle of 5°30'. Since the nose of end cap 22 is not as long as the corresponding marginal portion 12 of the hollow tube 10, the walls or faces 19,26 can be torqued snugly together. Further, the rigid or incompressible material of the portion of the end cap and hollow tube surrounding the groove 42 permit the configuration of the groove 42 to be reliably formed and maintained even after repeated usage.

The latching operation for successful repeated latching requires the walls forming the groove to be economically formed to precise tolerances, and to main¬ tain those tolerances regardless of the humidity, and after many entrances and exists of yarn therefrom. While the torquing requires a rigid incompressible material for faces 19,26, one might attempt to form the exterior surface are of the end cap 20 and/or winding tube 10 from a compressible material such as paper or cardboard. It is believed, however, that the forming, grinding, and burnishing operations necessary to lami¬ nate paper to a rigid inner tube would not be economi¬ cally feasible. Further, paper is humidity sensitive, would tend to deteriorate after repeated usage, and not maintain the tolerances necessary for successful latching. Therefore, the walls of the end cap and the wall of the hollow tube on either side of the starting groove need to be integrally formed with no seam therein.

As can be easily seen from Figures 3 and 4, when the yarn package is emptied, some yarn fibers and fila¬ ments tend to remain in the starting groove. Such yarn ends cannot be vacuumed or stripped away in conven¬ tional, integrally formed paper tubes. However, the present construction permits the operator to loosen the end cap slightly, whereupon the fibers and filaments are released and can be easily removed by suction or other stripping techniques.

As suggested earlier, the separable end cap and peripheral groove configuration may appear at both ends of the winding tube, if desired. Also, the hollow tube and/or end cap may be formed of polymeric or metallic materials to increase the longevity thereof.

While the invention has been described in detail hereinabove, it is obvious that various changes and modifications might be made without departing from the scope of the invention which is set forth in the accompanying claims, in which:

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A reusable yarn carrier comprising: a) a hollow tube having an outer, substantially cylindrical surface adapted to carry a fibrous or fila¬ mentary yarn thereon; b) an end cap having an outer cylindri¬ cal surface means for releasably mounting said end cap on at least one end of said hollow tube; c) confronting walls of said hollow tube and end cap being formed of a substantially incompressible material and defining a starting groove therebetween at least par¬ tially encircling said yarn carrier, which groove collects the first wraps of yarn of a waste bunch; d) whereby the end cap of said yarn carrier is separable from the hollow tube to loosen trapped fibers and-- facilitate cleaning and said yarn carrier can be reliably and repeatedly used.
2. The yarn carrier according to Claim 1 wherein starting groove if of a constant cross-sectional con¬ figuration throughout.
3. The yarn carrier according to Claim 1 wherein said hollow tube and said end cap are formed of a poly¬ meric materials.
4. The yarn carrier according to Claim 3 wherein said polymeric material is polycarbonate.
5. the yarn carrier according to Claim 1 wherein said yarn carrier is formed of a metallic material selected from the group containing aluminum and magnesium.
6. The yarn carrier according to Claim 1 wherein the means for releasably mounting said end cap on at least one end of said hollow tube includes: a) a marginal end of one of said hollow tube and end cap having a reduced wall thickness and being provided with internal threads thereon; b) a cooperating marginal end portion of the other of said hollow tube and end cap having a reduced wall thickness and being provided with exterior threads thereon; and c) said interior threads and exterior threads mating together to permit assembly and disassembly of said end cap.
7. The yarn carrier according to Claim 6 wherein one of said end caps is provided on each end of said hollow tube.
8. The yarn carrier according to Claim 1 wherein said locking portion is formed by at least one of the confronting walls of said hollow tube and said end cap being tapered from an imaginary radius.
9. The yarn carrier according to Claim 8 wherein first peripheral chamfered surface connects the outer peripheral surface of said hollow tube and the end wall thereof and a second peripheral chamfered surface con¬ nects the outer cylindrical surface of said end cap with the end wall thereof, said first and second cham¬ fered surfaces form a trough, when said tube and end cap are assembled in which said waste bunch is collected.
10. The yarn carrier according to Claim 1 wherein the confronting walls of said hollow tube and said end cap are each seamless.
11. A reusable yarn carrier comprising: a) a hollow tube having an outer, substantially cylindrical surface adapted to carry a fibrous or fila¬ mentary yarn thereon; b) an end cap having an outer cylindri¬ cal surface substantially coexten¬ sive with the outer surface of said hollow tube, means for releasably mounting said end cap on at least one end of said hollow tube; c) abutting walls of said tube and end cap defining a peripheral groove therebetween encircling said yarn carrier, said peripheral groove comprising a relatively narrow locking portion extending partially around said periphery and a rela¬ tively wider lead-in portion around the remainder of said periphery; d) whereby the lead-in portion guides the first few turns of the transfer bunch into the locking portion and said abutting walls of said tube and end cap of said yarn carrier are separable to loosen trapped fibers and facilitate cleaning and reuse.
12. The yarn carrier according to Claim 11 wherein said hollow tube and said end cap are formed of a poly¬ meric material.
13 The yarn carrier according to Claim 12 wherein said polymeric material is polycarbonate.
14. The yarn carrier according to Claim 11 wherein said yarn carrier is formed of a metallic material selected from the group containing aluminum and magnesium.
15. The yarn carrier according to Claim 11 wherein the means for releasably mounting said end cap on at least one end of said hollow tube includes: a) a marginal end of one of said hollow tube and end cap having a reduced wall thickness and being provided with internal threads thereon; b) a cooperating marginal end portion of the other of said hollow tube and end cap having a reduced wall thickness and being provided with exterior threads thereon; and
c) said interior threads and exterior threads mating together to permit assembly and disassembly of said end cap.
16. The yarn carrier according to Claim 15 wherein one of said end caps is provided on each end of said hollow tube.
17. The yarn carrier according to Claim 11 wherein said peripheral groove comprises a lead-in por¬ tion and a locking portion, said lead-in portion extending approximately 270° around the periphery of said tube and said locking portion extending approxima¬ tely 90° around the periphery of said tube.
18. The yarn carrier according to Claim 17 wherein said lead-in portion is formed by a shoulder separating the abutting walls of said hollow tube and said end cap, and said locking portion is formed by one of the abutting walls of said hollow tube and said end cap being tapered down from an imaginary radius.
19. The yarn carrier according to Claim 18 wherein said lead-in groove has a width greater than the diameter of the yarns being wound thereon.
20. The reusable yarn carrier according to Claim 11 wherein said lead-in portion further including a bevel surface intersecting and angled outwardly from said angled peripheral rim toward the outer periphery of said tube or end cap; said angled peripheral rim and said bevel surface being spaced from the other abutting wall in said lead-in portion by a shoulder.
21. The reusable yarn carrier according to Claim 11 wherein said peripheral groove further including stop means for positioning the seated cap at a prescribed location in said hollow tube, thereby ensuring definition of said peripheral groove.
PCT/US1989/002267 1988-05-31 1989-05-22 Reusable winding tube WO1989012017A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US07/200,939 US4834314A (en) 1988-05-31 1988-05-31 Reusable winding tube
US200,939 1988-05-31
US32103889A true 1989-03-09 1989-03-09
US321,038 1989-03-09

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
KR1019900700221A KR900701642A (en) 1988-05-31 1990-02-02 Reusable feeding machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1989012017A1 true WO1989012017A1 (en) 1989-12-14

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1989/002267 WO1989012017A1 (en) 1988-05-31 1989-05-22 Reusable winding tube

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KR (1) KR900701642A (en)
AU (1) AU3756389A (en)
WO (1) WO1989012017A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2287238A (en) * 1994-03-08 1995-09-13 Feramatic Ag Adjustable winding core for winding flat objects

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FR2463088A1 (en) * 1979-08-10 1981-02-20 Schweizerische Viscose Ring mounted on a wire support for attaching and fixing the beginning of the wire when it is wound
US4369933A (en) * 1981-01-13 1983-01-25 Sonoco Products Company Yarn tube with pickup groove accommodating left hand and right hand pickup
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US1991880A (en) * 1934-04-09 1935-02-19 Clarence E Chaffin Thread package
US2837297A (en) * 1954-04-26 1958-06-03 Clarence B Moss Spool with threadably mounted end members
US3103305A (en) * 1961-10-30 1963-09-10 Du Pont Slotted textile core
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FR2463088A1 (en) * 1979-08-10 1981-02-20 Schweizerische Viscose Ring mounted on a wire support for attaching and fixing the beginning of the wire when it is wound
US4401283A (en) * 1980-11-12 1983-08-30 Kelley Douglas M Yarn tube
US4369933A (en) * 1981-01-13 1983-01-25 Sonoco Products Company Yarn tube with pickup groove accommodating left hand and right hand pickup
US4371130A (en) * 1981-01-13 1983-02-01 Sonoco Products Company Yarn tube with universal pickup groove

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2287238A (en) * 1994-03-08 1995-09-13 Feramatic Ag Adjustable winding core for winding flat objects
US5564646A (en) * 1994-03-08 1996-10-15 Feramatic Ag Winding core for winding flat objects
GB2287238B (en) * 1994-03-08 1997-12-10 Feramatic Ag Winding core for winding flat objects

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
KR900701642A (en) 1990-12-03
AU3756389A (en) 1990-01-05

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