WO1989002641A1 - Small self-contained programmable device for the teaching and study of theory of music - Google Patents

Small self-contained programmable device for the teaching and study of theory of music Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1989002641A1
WO1989002641A1 PCT/FR1988/000436 FR8800436W WO8902641A1 WO 1989002641 A1 WO1989002641 A1 WO 1989002641A1 FR 8800436 W FR8800436 W FR 8800436W WO 8902641 A1 WO8902641 A1 WO 8902641A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
sequencer
music
information
characterized
keys
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/FR1988/000436
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Françoise RACE
Original Assignee
Race Francoise
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to FR87/12354 priority Critical
Priority to FR8712354 priority
Application filed by Race Francoise filed Critical Race Francoise
Publication of WO1989002641A1 publication Critical patent/WO1989002641A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H1/00Details of electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H1/18Selecting circuits
    • G10H1/26Selecting circuits for automatically producing a series of tones
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B15/00Teaching music
    • G09B15/02Boards or like means for providing an indication of notes
    • G09B15/04Boards or like means for providing an indication of notes with sound emitters
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H1/00Details of electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H1/0008Associated control or indicating means

Abstract

Through a simplified keyboard (2) and by means of a set of displays and indicators, the user enters into the memory (64) of the present musical sequencer the data composing the melodies in several parts which he can then listen to on the internal loudspeaker (53) by isolating the voice part(s) of his choice, by modifying the tempo or by selecting the extract he wishes to hear. A microprocessor (61) and a suitable software (63) control the keyboard as well as the indicators and the displays associated with the various functions of the apparatus by means of the interface (62). They also control the frequency values and the lengths of the sounds produced by the programmable oscillators (64). An audio device enables by means of the audio outpout (58) melodies to be saved by encoding them in a cassette recorder. The apparatus is equipped with a headset output (59) and a MIDI output (56).

Description

SMALL ELECTRONIC DEVICE PROGRAMMABLE SELF FOR TEACHING AND STUDY SOLFEGE

The object of the present invention is to restore a small loudspeaker (53) incorporated in a standard housing (1), melodies for several voices, intro¬ duced in a nonvolatile memory (64) directly by the user using a keyboard having a small number of keys (33 to 48), accompanied by lights (10 to 32) and an explicit screen printing (69), comprising all usual symbols of theory.

In the current state of the art there are only devices of 'premium' to obtain d ^ s neighbors performance. These devices are called 'sequencing', but unlike the present inven¬ tion they have no didactic purpose. Rather, they are intended to achieve musical models' or panying accco records for chan¬ tors. In addition they require généralement- for entering information style keyboard organ électro¬ lunch, and for returning a synthesizer and an amplifier. All these devices represents a high cost that it intended for experienced users.

The method according to the present invention differs markedly by its extreme simplicity, its low cost and its technical application which diffé¬ annuity in that it is directed to a didactic purpose. This is no longer to produce musical sounds to the approval of the ear, but to facilitate learning music theory by repeated listening of music theory or melodies exercises in intro- your device by user himself from the scores of his choice.

The sounds delivered by the device are generated by programmable oscillators 68B40 kind (65). These oscillators are used to obtain the frequency of the sounds produced. The output signals of these lators oscil¬ are then mixed with the components (resistors and capacitors) associated with a mixing circuit (67).

Each of the outputs of the oscillators is associated with a voice device. Since it is possible to individually disable the outputs of the oscillators, this allows to listen a single voice or any combination of voice concurrency up the maximum number of outputs used oscillators.

An additional signal is also mixed with the previous generated by one of the outputs of one type of buffer 'Latche' contained in the interface (62), producing a signal top "sound to simulate the batte¬ ments of a metronome.

All of these signals is then sent to the input of an amplifier circuit (68) allowing, with the Ai- of a potentiometer (57) located on the rear face of the cabinet, to adjust a level of proper listening. DIN 180th outlet (58) enables connection to an external amplifier. A tap of the type JACK (59) allows the connection of a small walkman headphone type, connection automatically cutting listening on the internal speaker. Both derniè¬ res taken are also located on the rear of the cabinet. A third connector (55) is also located at the rear of the cabinet. It is intended for the supply connection 9 Volts external to the device. This

SUBSTITUTE SHEET power could be replaced by the use of batteries or batteries housed inside the case and further increasing its autonomy.

The LEDs (10 to 32) as well as the light counts, said 7-segment displays (49 to 52) are controlled by 'buffers' type HC 374, included in the interface (62). A multiplexing system can only use two boxes for all the lights and displays. These LEDs and displays are intended to indicate to the user that the last operation just executed or one that is ongoing. The detailed role of each of these LEDs and displays the subject of a subsequent paragraph.

The user selects the various operations it wants to perform on the device using the front panel keys (33 to 48), these buttons activate the buffers of entries included in the interface (62) and in association with the microprocessor. The role of chacunes of these keys is the subject of a subsequent paragraph.

A microprocessor Z80C-type (61) provides, through appropriate software embedded in a memory of the type 27C256 (63), reading opéra¬ tor information through the input circuits, the management of the displays and display and generating the frequency for reproducing the musical notes stored in the nonvolatile memory (64).

Given the number of boxes used in connection with the microprocessor, a 'buffer' bi-directional type HC 245 is inserted between the microprocessor and the same boxes. A decoder HC 138 type allows the microprocessor to select the box in which he wants to talk, and

SUBSTITUTE SHEET therefore not Selecter in one at a time.

An oscillator consisting of the set of components around a quartz 4 Mhz, provides the necessary clock signal 5 to the microprocessor, as well as oscilla¬ teurs- programmable. It also gives all 11'appareil great accuracy in pitch and the duré_e produced musical notes.

101 / A. Dispσsitif particular, known digital encoding used to send the audio jack (58), a coded signal that the user can register with a tape on an ordinary cassette. The inverse arrangement is provided, with a housing

15 comparator LM393 type for re-introduce, through the same outlet (58), the informa¬ tions corresponding to the music piece préa¬ viously 'backed' on cassette ..

20 An additional outlet (56), said output MIDI 'lets through a coding in accordance with the MIDI standard, for connecting the device to an instrument or system with one input MIDI. This allows you to hear the notes dictated by the device, either on the speaker

25.- 'INTERNAL * but directly to the external system in utilisaitt all timbral possibilities that he dispostée ..

Les mechanical and electrical considerations of in- 30 appear are indicated by the boards 1 to 9.

Plate # 1 describes the upper face, which, due to its inclination is also called the front face in this specification. 35 The face? before comprises a screen printing (Plate n β 7), representing all common symbols of theory,

SUBSTITUTE SHEET and a definition of each key (42 to 48) say 'function keys' of the unit.

A zone (3) is reserved on behalf of the device. Another area (4) carries the corresponding symbols for auxiliary functions (described below). Three areas (5, 6 and 7) are the parameters related to the names of the notes, their length or height. Two zone (8 and 9) define the main functions.

The front panel also includes indicator lights (10 to 32) and display (49 to 52) associated with actions of the various keys as follows:

The (44) changes in programma¬ tion of fashion, fashion that we recognize through visualization on displays (50 to 52) no program of the Voice, whose number appears on the first display (49). Decimal points of these displays are then illuminated.

The key (46) used to fix the key of the song, indicating with the aid of the key (33) if the reinforcement comprises sharps or flats, what is controversial by the LEDs (10) and (31), the selected alterations being secured by the keys (34) to (40). The key (46) has a second function, positioning it on a not any program. This program steps can be selected using the buttons (44) and (45) or directly by entering a numeric value through the keys (33) to (42). When performing the piece of music, this second function allows the selection of the original measure.

The (47) selects the execution tempo of the song, the way to go this parameter is identical to the 'START'. the setting is controlled using the displays.

The key (47) has the second function selecting the voice number to program. Fixing that parameter using the buttons (34) to (37). Fashion programma¬ tion is controlled this parameter through the left display (49). Offline programming, the 'VOICE' sets the number of active voice, the same voice service being symbolized by the '-' sign on the displays.

The key (43) allows you to enter review mode, and with the keys (44) and (45) to scroll on the LEDs (10) (31) all previously entered information used by ¬ tor. It is also when in this mode insert forgotten information or delete unnecessary information by pressing the buttons on respectively (48) and (45) or (48) and (44). "

The second function of this key is the choice of the type of measurement that will be entered with the keys (33) to (42), and a visual check on the displays.

To access the second function of the keys must be pressed précé¬ dentes first key (48) which has the effect of turning the LED (32). This light goes out as soon as the relevant function is activated.

In programming mode duration are selected notes by pressing the button (48) and on one of the buttons (34) to (41) and selecting the corresponding symbol sponding to the length of the note that we will program¬ sea. the LEDs (23) (30) confirm the selected time. You can program all durations from demisemiquaver up the round, including the different types of triplets and related values ​​or plotted values.

The possible alteration of the rating is fixed by the ap¬ pui the key (33), the confirmation thereof is ensured by the LEDs (10) and (31).

The pitch of the note in question is secured with the key (42) and it displays the octave selected by means of LEDs (19) to (22).

Offline programming, implementation of the piece is started by pressing the button (45). It will be momentarily stopped by pressing this button again, or by pressing definitely first key (48).

Out running a number of auxiliaries functions are available. first pressing in is reached the button (48) and on one of the buttons (34) to (41).

The (34) gives access to the transposi¬ tion function and allows you to hear the melody highest or lowest it has actually been entered in the device. This transposition may be fixed halftone halftone using the keys (44) and (45), with control over the display (50) to (52). The button (35) triggers the transmission of the audio jack (58), code sequences corresponding to the informa¬ tions of piece previously entered in the memory of the device. This process is called digital backup on tape. The button (36) triggers the reverse process. The unit is waiting for a coded signal sent to it on the audio jack. As soon as he recognizes the coded signal, it reloads the piece of music in non-volatile memory (64). We can then re-listen by setting all the desired parameters.

The key (37) lets you select the song number you want to program or listen. It may indeed have the same instant four independent songs in memory. Is fixed this setting keys (44) and (45), with a control over the left display (49).

The key (38) switches on or off Service tops sound simulating the metronome. These tops will be heard during the execution of the song. The (39) adjusts accurately ré¬ ference on the device frequency. Δ ai¬ of the keys (44) and (45) and the visual inspection on the display (50) to (52), one can thus adjust the "LA" of the apparatus of 412-450 Herz. At each startup, the usual value, namely 440 Herz, was taken by the camera.

Finally the keys (40) and (41) provide access to demonstration tunes.

N β 2 board gives a representation rear and bottom of the device.

On the underside are arranged four rubber feet (54) for on-raise the device slightly so that the sound produced by the loudspeaker (53) so more easily.

On the back are the external connection elements, namely: Jack Type power socket (55), the MIDI (56), the potentiomè¬ be volume control (57), the audio output (58) and the headset jack (59).

Plate No. 3 gives a transparent view from the left side of the device.

It will be noted there essentially the printed circuit (60) circuit made in double sided its métalli¬ holes and bearing all the electronic components and the apparaissants keys and indicators on the front panel.

Plate # 4 gives a block diagram of the entire apparatus. It includes the keyboard (2) with the buttons, lights and displays, the main electronic components namely: the microprocessor (61), the memory program¬ me (63), the user memory (64), programmable oscillators (65 ). Controlling the LEDs and displays are made by the interface (62). The outputs of the oscillators are pro¬ grammable mixed by (67) and amplified (68) which transmits sound to the loudspeaker (53) or a écou¬ tor by the socket (59). A housing (66) serves as an inter¬ face to generate the signals on the MIDI output.

Boards No. 5 and No. 6 show the complete β electronic diagrams and are referenced to the nomenclature annexed to the present description.

Plate n β 7 is the representation of the sérigra¬ phy of the front face of the device.

The boards 8 and 9 show the two faces of the printed circuit carrying the electronic components.

REPLACEMENT SHEET ANNEX n β l N omenclature

ICs / Resistors, Capacitors

R 1: 47 ohm 1/4 ff

R 2 to R 5: 150 ohms

R 6 and R 28: 1 M ohms

R 7 and R 8: 2.2K ohms

R 9: 10 K ohms

R 10: 27 ohms

R 11: 100 ohms

R 12 to R 27: 51 K ohms

C 1: 10 uF 16 V

C 2 -C 5: 0.1 uF 16 Y

C 6 and C 20: 10 uF 16 V

C 7 and C 8: 22 pF

C 9 and C 10: 10 uF 16 V

C 11 and C 15: 10 nF

Figure imgf000012_0001
C 12 and C 13: 470 uF 25 V

C 14: 220 uF 16 V

C 14 to C 19: December 100 nF

R 29: 2.2K ohms

Various

D 1: 1 N diode 4148-8 1: 4 Mhz crystal AF 1 to AF 4: 7-segment displays TLR 313

L 1 to L 8: red LED diam. 3 mm

L 9 to L 23: Green LEDs dia. 3 mm

BP 1 to BP 16: Round Keys diameter 9 mm

P 1: K ohm potentiometer 4 Log. Inter + HP: Speaker 8 ohm 1 watt

J 1: Power Jack - J2 and J 4: DIN jack 180 '

J 3: Stereo Headphone Jack

S 1: Support 40 pins - S 2: support 28 pins

Claims

claims
1. autonomous programmable sequencer for the enre¬ tration and restitution of melodies for several voices characterized in that it consists of a boi- tier (1) comprising a set of program- ming keys (33 to 48) to indicate directly the frame of the piece of music, the name and duration of notes, tempo and the different types of measurement. It further includes a speaker (53) and a dispo¬ Display number operative part of the measure being implemented. (49 to 52) or the step number of pro¬ gram when entering information, and the indicators (10-32) guiding the user in the different phases of operation of the unit. The information is retained even after stopping of the apparatus, through a backup memory (64).
2. Sequencer according to claim 1, characterized "in that the programming keys (33 to 48) were analyzed by software embedded in a memory (63), thanks to a microprocessor (61) from the information read keys by means of buf¬ input irons, and dictating via the interface (62) the number of LEDs to turn on or values ​​to appear on the display (49 to 52). The microprocessor also dictates of programmable oscilla¬ tors (65), the frequency of sounds occur during the execution of melodies.
3. Sequencer according to claim 1 characterized in that it selects for the refund any voice mixing combination, from one voice to the maximum number of available voice, and éven¬ tuellement to superimpose on this or these voices a top sound simulating a metronome marking the tempo.
SUBSTITUTE SHEET
4. Sequencer according to claim 1 characterized in that it offers many possibilities listening, namely on internal loudspeaker (53), on the walkman headphone type a jack (59) located at the rear of device on external amplifier by in¬ termédiaire a second standardized audio jack (58) and also on any device (keyboard or electronic organ) responsive to the MIDI standard, this sequencer then serving to pilot these dis- positive, with the plug (56).
5. Input method of musical scores for several voices by means of the sequencer according to claims 1 to 4, characterized in that the input information of note pitch, length of these notes, and all the parameters of the current notation ( tone, tempo, type of measure, damage) is sequentially and with the constant assistance of serigraphy on the front panel (2) and the LEDs and control displays.
6. A method of safeguarding the information stored in the sequencer according to claims 1 to 4, allowing for a simple connecting cable between the audio jack (58) and a cassette recorder ordi¬ nary recording a coded manner all information corresponding to pieces of music, and by allowing the reverse process (the cassette reading on the tape), to re-introduce these pieces in this sequencer.
7. Sequencer according to claims 1 to 6 corseted caracté¬ in that its small dimensions, its low weight and its ease of use make a working tool substantial assistance for users little trained on the music decryption.
SHEET REMPLAOIMENT
PCT/FR1988/000436 1987-09-07 1988-09-05 Small self-contained programmable device for the teaching and study of theory of music WO1989002641A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR87/12354 1987-09-07
FR8712354 1987-09-07

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1989002641A1 true WO1989002641A1 (en) 1989-03-23

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/FR1988/000436 WO1989002641A1 (en) 1987-09-07 1988-09-05 Small self-contained programmable device for the teaching and study of theory of music

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO1989002641A1 (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0495203A2 (en) * 1991-01-15 1992-07-22 Wolfgang Ernst Electronic musical device for studying, accompaniment and training
FR2789214A1 (en) * 1999-02-03 2000-08-04 Alain Georges Music player and composer incorporates microprocessor or microcontroller and synthesizer to combine multiple functions
US6608249B2 (en) 1999-11-17 2003-08-19 Dbtech Sarl Automatic soundtrack generator
US6815600B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2004-11-09 Alain Georges Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6972363B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2005-12-06 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US7076035B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2006-07-11 Medialab Solutions Llc Methods for providing on-hold music using auto-composition
US7078609B2 (en) 1999-10-19 2006-07-18 Medialab Solutions Llc Interactive digital music recorder and player
US7169996B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2007-01-30 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for generating music using data/music data file transmitted/received via a network
US7176372B2 (en) 1999-10-19 2007-02-13 Medialab Solutions Llc Interactive digital music recorder and player
US9065931B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2015-06-23 Medialab Solutions Corp. Systems and methods for portable audio synthesis
US9818386B2 (en) 1999-10-19 2017-11-14 Medialab Solutions Corp. Interactive digital music recorder and player

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4089246A (en) * 1976-08-09 1978-05-16 Kooker Stephen L Musical rhythm-tempo tutoring device
GB2091019A (en) * 1981-01-12 1982-07-21 Texas Instruments Inc Musical Learning Aid
WO1982002610A1 (en) * 1981-01-27 1982-08-05 Walter Pepersack Signal emitting device with adjustable beat frequency

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4089246A (en) * 1976-08-09 1978-05-16 Kooker Stephen L Musical rhythm-tempo tutoring device
GB2091019A (en) * 1981-01-12 1982-07-21 Texas Instruments Inc Musical Learning Aid
WO1982002610A1 (en) * 1981-01-27 1982-08-05 Walter Pepersack Signal emitting device with adjustable beat frequency

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0495203A2 (en) * 1991-01-15 1992-07-22 Wolfgang Ernst Electronic musical device for studying, accompaniment and training
EP0495203A3 (en) * 1991-01-15 1994-02-02 Wolfgang Ernst
FR2789214A1 (en) * 1999-02-03 2000-08-04 Alain Georges Music player and composer incorporates microprocessor or microcontroller and synthesizer to combine multiple functions
US7176372B2 (en) 1999-10-19 2007-02-13 Medialab Solutions Llc Interactive digital music recorder and player
US7078609B2 (en) 1999-10-19 2006-07-18 Medialab Solutions Llc Interactive digital music recorder and player
US9818386B2 (en) 1999-10-19 2017-11-14 Medialab Solutions Corp. Interactive digital music recorder and player
US7071402B2 (en) 1999-11-17 2006-07-04 Medialab Solutions Llc Automatic soundtrack generator in an image record/playback device
US6608249B2 (en) 1999-11-17 2003-08-19 Dbtech Sarl Automatic soundtrack generator
US8989358B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2015-03-24 Medialab Solutions Corp. Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6972363B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2005-12-06 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US7102069B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2006-09-05 Alain Georges Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US7076035B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2006-07-11 Medialab Solutions Llc Methods for providing on-hold music using auto-composition
US6916978B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-07-12 Alain Georges Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US7022906B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2006-04-04 Media Lab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US7026534B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2006-04-11 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6897368B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-05-24 Alain Georges Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6979767B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-12-27 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6815600B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2004-11-09 Alain Georges Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6977335B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-12-20 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US7169996B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2007-01-30 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for generating music using data/music data file transmitted/received via a network
US6960714B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-11-01 Media Lab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US8153878B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2012-04-10 Medialab Solutions, Corp. Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US6958441B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-10-25 Alain Georges Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions
US9065931B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2015-06-23 Medialab Solutions Corp. Systems and methods for portable audio synthesis
US7015389B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2006-03-21 Medialab Solutions Llc Systems and methods for creating, modifying, interacting with and playing musical compositions

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