USRE38812E1 - Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices Download PDF

Info

Publication number
USRE38812E1
USRE38812E1 US09574632 US57463200A USRE38812E US RE38812 E1 USRE38812 E1 US RE38812E1 US 09574632 US09574632 US 09574632 US 57463200 A US57463200 A US 57463200A US RE38812 E USRE38812 E US RE38812E
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
gaming devices
bonus
method
gaming
network
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US09574632
Inventor
John F. Acres
Alec Ginsburg
David Wiebenson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
IGT Inc
Original Assignee
Acres Gaming Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date
Family has litigation

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/3227Configuring a gaming machine, e.g. downloading personal settings, selecting working parameters
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/323Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the player is informed, e.g. advertisements, odds, instructions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/3232Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed
    • G07F17/3234Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed about the performance of a gaming system, e.g. revenue, diagnosis of the gaming system
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/3232Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed
    • G07F17/3237Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed about the players, e.g. profiling, responsible gaming, strategy/behavior of players, location of players
    • G07F17/3239Tracking of individual players
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3244Payment aspects of a gaming system, e.g. payment schemes, setting payout ratio, bonus or consolation prizes
    • G07F17/3251Payment aspects of a gaming system, e.g. payment schemes, setting payout ratio, bonus or consolation prizes involving media of variable value, e.g. programmable cards, programmable tokens
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3244Payment aspects of a gaming system, e.g. payment schemes, setting payout ratio, bonus or consolation prizes
    • G07F17/3255Incentive, loyalty and/or promotion schemes, e.g. comps, gaming associated with a purchase, gaming funded by advertisements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3244Payment aspects of a gaming system, e.g. payment schemes, setting payout ratio, bonus or consolation prizes
    • G07F17/3258Cumulative reward schemes, e.g. jackpots

Abstract

A system for monitoring and configuring gaming devices interconnected over a high-speed network is disclosed. The system can support a file server, one or more floor controllers, one or more pit terminals, and other terminals all interconnected over the network. Each gaming device includes an electronic module which allows the gaming device to communicate with a floor controller over a current loop network. The electronic module includes a player tracking module and a data communication node. The player tracking module includes a card reader for detecting a player tracking card inserted therein which identifies the player. The data communication node communicates with both the floor controller and the gaming device. The data communication node communicates with the gaming device over a serial interface through which the data communication node transmits reconfiguration commands. The gaming device reconfigures its payout schedule responsive to the reconfiguration commands to provide a variety of promotional bonuses such as multiple jackpot bonuses, mystery jackpot bonuses, progressive jackpot bonuses, or player specific bonuses.

Description

This is a division, of application Ser. No. 08/322,172, Oct. 12, 1994 now U.S. Pat. No. 5,655,961.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to gaming devices, and more particularly to a method and apparatus for controlling gaming devices interconnected by a computer network.

Networked gaming devices are known in the art. Interconnecting a plurality of gaming devices such as slot machines via a computer network to a central computer provides many advantages. The primary advantage of networked gaming devices is the ability to extract accounting data from the individual gaming devices as well as providing player tracking. An example of a data collection system is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,283,709 issued to Lucero et al. Network systems such as described in Lucero et al. allow the central host computer to monitor the usage and payout, collectively known as audit data, of the individual gaming devices. This audit data includes data related to the number of coins or tokens inserted into the device, the number of times the device has been played, the amount paid in raises, the number and the type of jackpots paid by the machine, the number of door openings, etc. The host computer can then compile an accounting report based on the audit data from each of the individual gaming devices. This report can then be used by management, for example, to assess the profitability of the individual gaming devices.

Player tracking, as the name indicates, involves tracking individual player usage of gaming devices. In prior art player tracking systems, the player is issued a player identification card which has encoded thereon a player identification number that uniquely identifies the player. The individual gaming devices are fitted with a card reader, into which the player inserts a player tracking card prior to playing the associated gaming device. The card reader reads the player identification number off the card and informs a central computer connected thereto of the player's subsequent gaming activity. By tracking the individual players, individual player usage can be monitored by associating certain of the audit data with the player identification numbers. This allows gaming establishments to target individual players with direct marketing techniques according to the individual's usage.

One problem that can occur with current player tracking systems is that the player can insert a player identification card incorrectly unbeknownst to the player. Currently, if a player inserts a player identification card improperly into the card reader, a message appears on a display located away from the card reader. Unfortunately, the player may not be looking at the display while inserting the card. As a result, the player may not see the message on the display. Another prior art approach has been to provide a light emitting diode on the gaming device to indicate to the player the status of the card insertion. This too has been ineffective because the player may not know the purpose of the LED or the LED may be drowned out by all the other lights of the casino. The player may therefore commence playing with the card improperly inserted. In this case, both the player and the casino lose valuable player tracking information. This is frustrating for the player because his activity will not be credited to his account and frustrating for the casino because the casino's records will be incomplete. Accordingly, a need remains for an improved method and apparatus for informing the player when a player tracking card has been improperly inserted.

The full power of networked gaming devices has not been completely realized. Although the audit data indicates which devices are being under utilized and when, there is currently no automated method for altering under utilized gaming devices' configurations to make them more attractive to play. For example, during certain hours of the day, e.g. four to six a.m., the audit data may indicate that the machines are being under utilized. Thus, it would be desirable to reconfigure the under utilized gaming devices to provide an additional incentive to players to use these devices. In the past casinos have run “bonuses” during these times. An example of such bonuses include a “double jackpot” wherein a player hitting a jackpot is paid double the jackpot amount. Currently this is implemented by having an attendant manually payout the additional payout amount. This manual technique, however, is cumbersome and inefficient to administer because an attendant must be constantly supervising the bonusing gaming devices. Accordingly, a need remains for an automated method and apparatus to provide bonusing for gaming devices.

Another limitation of the current bonusing systems is that only predetermined machines are eligible for the bonusing. For example, in a progressive bonusing machine a plurality of machines are connected together to form a bank. Only the machines in the bank are then eligible to win the progressive jackpot. Thus, a casino must dedicate a certain number of its machines to these banks. This limits the casino's flexibility in tailoring its bonusing to the number and make-up of its customers. Accordingly, a need remains for a more flexible bonusing system whereby any of the casino's machines can participate in the bonusing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is, therefore, an object of the invention to reconfigure gaming devices remotely over a network to provide bonusing.

Another object of the invention is to provide an integrated system usable with a variety of gaming devices made by different manufacturers.

Another object of the invention is to integrate player tracking, data collection, and bonusing over the same network.

A further object of the invention is to provide visual feedback to the user when a player tracking card has been improperly inserted.

A system for operating networked gaming devices is described. The system according to the invention allows a casino in which the system is installed to run promotions or bonuses on any properly equipped gaming machines while simultaneously gathering player tracking and accounting data from all machines. The system provides the capability for the casino to select which of the plurality of machines are used in any given promotion. The system further allows any number of different promotions to operate simultaneously.

The system includes a plurality of gaming devices or machines connected to an associated floor controller over a network. The system includes one or more of said floor controllers. The floor controllers are interconnected by a high-speed network, such as an Ethernet network, to a database where accounting and player tracking data is stored. The system can also include pit terminals and/or fill and jackpot processing terminals. Each promotion involves sending a reconfiguration command from the floor controller to a gaming device that has been selected to be part of a given promotion over the associated network. Upon receipt of the reconfiguration command, the gaming device reconfigures its payout schedule in accordance with the received reconfiguration command. In the preferred embodiment, this reconfiguration includes activating a bonus payout schedule. A partial list of the promotions according to the invention include, but are not limited to: a multiple jackpot wherein the gaming device reconfigures its payout to be a multiple of its default payout schedule; a bonus jackpot wherein the gaming device reconfigures its payout schedule to payout an additional bonus amount when certain conditions are met; and a progressive jackpot wherein two or more gaming devices are combined in a progressive jackpot having a progressive jackpot payout schedule. In addition to these, many other promotions are possible by the above-described system for controlling and monitoring a plurality of gaming devices.

The system also allows for improved player tracking by recording each and every machine transaction including time of play, machine number, duration of play, coins in, coins out, hand paid jackpots and games played. The player tracking is conducted over the same network as the accounting data is extracted. This allows the invention to provide bonusing to certain individual players as well as during certain times. As with standard player tracking, the above-described system monitors and reports how many coins are played by each player. The system according to the invention, however, also includes the ability to record how long each player spends at each machine and the number of coins won, games played, and hand jackpots won by each player. The invention is able to record all this information because the system operates on a transaction by transaction basis. Each transaction, whether it be a coin in, a handle pull, etc., is recorded by the system. Other systems simply compile the player tracking information at the completion of play. All this information is stored on the database, which can be later analyzed for future targeted direct mailing campaigns. The player tracking according to the invention also allows the casino to schedule buses and other groups and measure their profitability. The system also allows for cashless play as well as advanced accounting and security features.

An advantage of the invention is that any of the casino's machines can be incorporated into a bonus promotion.

Another advantage of the invention is that several bonus promotions can operate simultaneously.

A further advantage of the invention is the ability to record each and every machine transaction including time of play, machine number, duration of play, coins in, coins out, hand paid jackpots and games played.

A further advantage of the invention is the ability to associate a player with a certain machine.

A further advantage of the invention is the ability to perform more targeted direct mailing based on individual play.

A further advantage of the invention is the ability to calculate a theoretical win exactly.

A further advantage of the invention is the ability to generate jackpot announcements, which provides for, among other things, better slot tournaments.

A yet further advantage of the invention is the ability to quickly and easily add new machines to the network.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention which proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an illustration of a system for monitoring and configuring gaming devices according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an electronic module associated with each gaming device to permit monitoring and configuring thereof.

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a data communication node of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a discrete machine interface circuit of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a player tracking module of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram of a card reader circuit of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 7A is an exploded view of a card reader according to the invention.

FIG. 7B is a rear perspective view of the card reader of FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7C is a front perspective view of the card reader of FIG. 7A.

FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram of a display circuit of the player tracking module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram of a personality board of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram of a triac driver circuit of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram of a relay driver circuit of the electronic module of FIG. 2.

FIG. 12 is a block diagram of a communication board included in each floor controller of FIG. 1.

FIG. 13 is a flow chart for the power-on procedure for the data communication node (DCN) of FIG. 2, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 14 is a flow chart for processing of the discrete gaming device inputs, of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is a flow chart for the step of incrementing meter counts associated with each gaming device of FIG. 14, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 16 is a flow chart for the step of processing the serial interface between the gaming device and the data communication node of FIG. 13, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 17 is a flow chart for the step of processing the network interface between the floor controller and the data communication node of FIG. 13, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 18 is a flow chart for the step of processing the network message of FIG. 17, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 19 is a flow chart for the step of processing the data communication node request of FIG. 18, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 20 is a flow chart for the step of FIG. 13 of processing the player tracking interface, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 21 is a flow chart for the step of processing a valid inserted card of FIG. 20, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 22 is a flow chart for the step of processing player tracking information of FIG. 21, which is implemented in firmware executed by the DCN controller.

FIG. 23 is a flow chart for the power-on procedure for the player tracking (PT) node of FIG. 2, which is implemented in firmware executed by the PT controller.

FIG. 24 is a flow chart for the step of processing the DCN interface of FIG. 23, which is implemented in firmware executed by the PT controller.

FIG. 25 is a flow chart for the step of processing the DCN message of FIG. 24, which is implemented in firmware executed by the PT controller.

FIG. 26 is a flow chart for the step of processing the card reader bezel update of FIG. 23, which is implemented in firmware executed by the PT controller.

FIG. 27 is a flow chart for the step of processing the card reader of FIG. 23, which is implemented in firmware executed by the PT controller.

FIG. 28 is a flow chart for the power-on floor controller process, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

FIG. 29 is a flow chart for the message processing step of FIG. 28, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

FIG. 30 is a flow chart for the message handling step of FIG. 29, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

FIG. 31 is a flow chart for the step of assigning unique machine addresses of FIG. 30, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

FIG. 32 is a flow chart for the system monitoring step of FIG. 28, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

FIG. 33 is a flow chart for the event handling step of FIG. 32, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

FIG. 34 is a flow chart for bonus control, which is implemented in software executed by the floor controller.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Table of Contents

I. SYSTEM ORGANIZATION

    • A. SYSTEM OVERVIEW
    • B. DATA COMMUNICATION NODE
      • 1. OVERVIEW
      • 2. CONTROLLER AND MEMORY
      • 3. NETWORK INTERFACE
      • 4. SERIAL MACHINE INTERFACE
      • 5. SERIAL DISPLAY INTERFACE
      • 6. DISCRETE MACHINE INTERFACE
      • 7. MACHINE CONFIGURATION
    • C. PLAYER TRACKING MODULE
      • 1. OVERVIEW
      • 2. SERIAL DISPLAY CIRCUIT
      • 3. SERIAL EXPANSION PORTS
      • 4. CARD READER
      • 5. DISPLAY
      • 6. DISCRETE INPUT SECTION
    • D. PERSONALITY BOARD
    • E. BONUS DISPLAY DRIVERS
    • F. FLOOR CONTROLLER

II. OPERATION

    • A. DATA COMMUNICATION NODE
      • 1. POWER UP PROCEDURE
      • 2. READING UNIQUE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
      • 3. MONITORING GAMING DEVICE DISCRETE INPUT
      • 4. PROCESSING GAMING DEVICE SERIAL INTERFACE
      • 5. PROCESSING NETWORK INTERFACE
      • 6. PROCESSING PLAYER TRACKING INTERFACE
      • 7. PROCESSING CARD INSERTION
    • B. PLAYER TRACKING MODULE
      • 1. POWER UP PROCEDURE
      • 2. PROCESSING DCN INTERFACE
      • 3. PROCESSING DISPLAY UPDATE
      • 4. PROCESSING BEZEL UPDATE
      • 5. PROCESSING CARD READER
    • C. FLOOR CONTROLLER
      • 1. POWER UP PROCEDURE
      • 2. MESSAGE PROCESSING
      • 3. ASSIGNING GAMING DEVICE ADDRESSES
      • 4. SYSTEM MONITORING
      • 5. BONUS CONTROL
I. SYSTEM ORGANIZATION A. System Overview

A system for operating a plurality of gaming devices is shown generally at 10 in FIG. 1. The system, hereinafter described, monitors and reconfigures a plurality of gaming devices or machines 12-16 and 22-26. The system includes the following capabilities: remote reconfiguration, accounting data extraction, integrated player tracking, and cashless play. Remote reconfiguration includes sending a reconfiguration command from a host computer to one or more of the gaming devices. The gaming devices, on receiving a reconfiguration command, will reconfigure its jackpot payout schedule in accordance with the reconfiguration command.

This reconfiguration, in the preferred embodiment, comprises activating a bonus payout schedule. This bonus payout schedule is in addition to the normal pay table of the gaming device. The bonus payout schedule provides for additional bonus payouts in addition to the payouts specified by the device's normal pay table. The difference between the two is important for regulatory reasons. The composition of the pay table is subject to regulation by the various state gaming commissions while the bonus payout schedule is not. The preferred embodiment currently activates only the bonus payout schedule responsive to the reconfiguration command, while not altering the payout table. The invention, however, is not limited to activating only the bonus payout schedule. Other embodiments, which would be subject to regulatory approval, could modify the device's payout table. The preferred embodiment, however, does not.

The system, according to the invention, implements a variety of bonusing events through this reconfiguration process. These bonusing events include: a multiple jackpot wherein the gaming device reconfigures its payout to be a multiple of its default payout schedule; a bonus jackpot wherein the gaming device reconfigures its payout schedule to payout an additional bonus amount when certain conditions are met; and a progressive jackpot wherein two or more gaming devices are combined in a progressive jackpot having a progressive jackpot payout schedule.

The system, according to the invention, also provides for integrated player tracking and accounting data extraction. Unlike prior art systems that use disparate systems for player tracking and accounting data extraction, the system 10 provides for player tracking and accounting data extraction over the same network. The player tracking, according to the invention, allows the casino to run certain promotional events. The integrated player tracking and accounting data extraction also allows the system to support cashless play wherein a credit is given to a player over the network.

The system 10 includes one or more floor controllers 18 and 28. Each floor controller supports up to a predetermined maximum number of gaming devices. In the preferred embodiment, each floor controller can support up to 1024 gaming devices. The preferred embodiment also supports up to eight floor controllers. Thus, the system 10 can support up to 8192 separate gaming devices.

The system supports a multiplicity of various gaming devices. The gaming devices 12-16 and 22-26 shown in FIG. 1 are the type having a pull handle for initiating a game, e.g., slot machines. However, the invention is not limited to such gaming devices. The gaming devices shown in FIG. 1 can also be gaming tables or push button operated machines as well, e.g., video poker. As will be described hereinafter, the system supports any gaming device providing traditional discrete connections, e.g., coins-in, coins-out, etc., as well as those having serial interfaces, as described below.

The floor controllers 18 and 28 are, in the preferred embodiment, IBM-compatible personal computers. Each floor controller is responsible for monitoring the activity level of the corresponding gaming devices connected thereto and issuing commands to the associated gaming devices to reconfigure their payout schedules during certain bonusing events. The floor controllers issue status requests to each of the individual gaming devices to determine the activity level of each. In the event the floor controller detects any activity, the floor controller communicates that activity to a file server 32, which is connected to the floor controllers via a high speed network 38 connected therebetween.

In the preferred embodiment, the file server 32 includes a high performance personal computer or work station having a large hard disk capacity in order to store the gaming device activity therein. In the preferred embodiment, the high speed network 38 is a ten megabyte ethernet network. The system 10 also includes commercially available network software to support the industry-standard ethernet network 38. An example of such network software is Novell network software sold by Novell of Provo, Utah. The file server 32 also includes a database program by which reports can be generated using the data stored on the file server. Such reports include, e.g. area, model, denomination and summary reports. The database software also allows a user to generate custom reports. The database software is based on the industry-standard Paradox database language.

The system 10 also includes a pit terminal 34 which is also connected to the ethernet network 38. The pit terminal 34 is also a standard personal computer, in the preferred embodiment, and can be used to monitor the gaming device activity in the pit. This terminal 34 can also be used as a security monitoring device to detect any unanticipated events like fills or payouts.

The system 10 further includes any number of fill and jackpot processing terminals 36. These terminals 36 are placed in the cage and/or the change booth areas of the casino for fill and hand-paid jackpot processing. When a fill is required, a floor person goes to the nearest cashier's booth and states the gaming device number requiring a fill. The booth attendant enters the number into the fill and jackpot processing terminal 36 located in the cashier's booth. The terminal 36 then looks up the record associated with the particular gaming device in the file server 32 to determine the correct fill amount. The terminal 36 also calculates a theoretical hopper balance for the particular device based on the latest meter information, as described further below. If the calculation shows a significant hopper balance, a warning is given on the computer screen from which security can then be alerted.

A fill and jackpot processing terminal 36 prints a fill ticket upon demand. If the calculated hopper balance was nearly zero, the terminal 36 cause the words “computer verified” to be printed on the ticket in place of a supervisor's signature. In the event that the calculated hopper balance was not near zero, an extra signature is required to complete the fill transaction. The system follows a similar procedure for processing hand-paid jackpots.

A dispatch station (not shown) can also be included in the system. The dispatch station allows the casino to monitor activity on the gaming devices and “run the casino” from one location. The dispatch station allows the dispatcher to monitor customer service, maintenance, and security events and direct other casino personnel to handle these situations appropriately. For example, during hopper empties (fills) and jackpot events, as indicated by the dispatcher station, the dispatcher could radio down to the floor to have someone verify the event. The dispatcher station can also indicate when a machine door is opened without a technician card inserted, for example, in which case the dispatcher could take the appropriate course of action.

The above-described system 10 is but one embodiment of the system according to the invention. The system tasks can be allocated in a variety of ways amongst the system computers including floor controllers 18 and 28, file server 32, pit terminal 34 and fill and jackpot terminals 36. In some cases, the pit terminal 34 and fill and jackpot terminals 36 can even be eliminated and their tasks allocated to the floor controller or file server. In fact, because the file server 32 is essentially a virtual hard disk for the floor controllers 18 and 32, the floor controllers and the file server can be considered a single host computer for the system 10.

B. Data Communication Node

1. Overview

In order to communicate with the floor controller, each gaming device includes therein an electronic module 40, as shown in FIG. 2. This module 40 can be inserted into a variety of pre-existing gaming devices. The module allows the host computer to uniquely identify the gaming device on the network, including the device type. The module 40 includes two main subcomponents: a data communication node 42 and a player tracking module 44. The data communication node 42 keeps track of the coins-in, coins-out, coins to drop, games played, jackpot occurrences and other related functions of the associated gaming device. The player tracking module 44 keeps track of the player that is playing the associated gaming device. Together, the data communication node 42 and the player tracking module 44 allow the floor controller connected to the associated gaming device to monitor and control the activity of the gaming device. The system hereinafter described in detail includes the following capabilities: slot accounting, player tracking, bonus jackpots and cashless play.

2. Controller And Memory

The data communication node (DCN) 42 includes a data communication node controller 46, which in the preferred embodiment is an HD6473258P10 controller manufactured by Hitachi of Tokyo, Japan. The DCN 42 is coupled to the player tracking controller 44 through bus interface logic 45. The bus interface logic 45 is conventional interface logic including, for example, transceivers, as is known in the art of digital design.

A memory 48 is connected to the DCN controller 46. The memory includes program memory for storing program instructions for the DCN controller 46. In the preferred embodiment, this program memory includes a nonvolatile read-only memory (ROM). However, this program memory could also be flash or “battery” backed RAM in order for the program memory to be updated by the floor. controller. In the event flash or “battery” back RAM is used the floor controller would download the updated program to the DCN controller and the DCN controller would overwrite the program memory with the downloaded program.

The memory 48 also includes system memory, e.g., static random-access memory (SRAM) for storing the gaming device information. This gaming device information includes at least the following meters: coins-in, coins-out, coins to drop, games played, jackpot occurrences, A separate meter counter is kept in memory 48 for each of these values. To increase reliability of the data, in the preferred embodiment, a redundant set of these counters is kept in a physically separate memory device within memory 48. Moreover, the memory devices storing these counters are nonvolatile so that in the event of a power failure the counts will be retained. The nonvolatile memories can either be battery-backed SRAM or electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM). Although memory 48 is shown external to DCN controller 46, much if not all of the memory 48 can be included in the DCN controller 46.

3. Network Interface

The data communication node 42 also includes a network interface 49 for connecting the data communication node 42 to the associated floor controller. The network interface is coupled to the floor controller through a personality board 202, described below.

A more detailed drawing of network interface 49 is shown in FIG. 3. In FIG. 3, the DCN controller 46 receives data from the floor controller over conductor 52 which is optically isolated from a connector 51 by optical isolator circuit 54. The DCN controller 46 transmits data to the floor controller over conductor 56, which is optically isolated from the connector 51 by optical isolator circuit 58. Each of the opto-isolator circuits 54 and 58 include an opto-coupler as are known in the art. A bus 222 (FIG. 2) is connected between the network interface 49 and the personality board 202.

4. Serial Machine Interface

Referring to FIG. 2, the data communication node includes a serial machine interface 60. The serial machine interface 60 allows the data communication node 42 to communicate with the associated gaming device advance serial interface as contrasted with the discrete interface, to be described further hereinafter. A bus 224 (FIG. 2) connects the serial machine interface 60 to the associated gaming device at connector 62. The serial interface, in the preferred embodiment, is a standard RS-232 three wire interface.

Referring to FIG. 3, the DCN controller 46 receives data from the gaming device over conductor 64 which is connected between the DCN controller 46 and a differential to single-ended converter 66. The DCN controller 46 transmits data to the gaming device over conductor 68 connected between the DCN controller 46 and the converter 66. The converter 66 converts the differential inputs of the serial interface 62 to a single-ended output which is transmitted over conductor 64 to the DCN controller 46. The converter 66 also converts the single-ended input received from the DCN controller 46 to a differential output signal and transmits that to the serial interface 62. The serial machine interface is the means by which the DCN controller communicates certain reconfiguration data, referred to as reconfiguration commands, to the machine. These reconfiguration commands cause the machines to activate a bonus payout table to allow the machine to append bonus payments to their standard jackpot payouts, as specified by their payout table, during certain bonus activities.

5. Serial Display Interface

The data communication node 42 further includes a serial display interface 70 illustrated in more detail in FIG. 3. The serial display interface 70 includes logic coupled between the DCN controller 46 and an expansion connector 71. The expansion connector 71 allows the DCN controller 46 to communicate with an expansion device connected thereto.

6. Discrete Machine Interface

The data communication node 42 also includes a discrete machine interface 72, which is shown in detail in FIG. 4. The discrete machine interface 72 includes a plurality of opto-couplers 78 coupled between the discrete outputs from the gaming device or machine and the DCN controller 46. The discrete outputs of the machine are received at terminals 74A-74J of a connector 74 via a cable (not shown) connected between the machine and the connector 74. The discrete outputs are coupled to corresponding inputs 76A-76J via opto-couplers 78. The discrete outputs from the machine include: an EXTRA signal, a POWER signal, a COIN IN signal, a COIN OUT signal, a COIN DROP signal, a JACKPOT signal, a HANDLE signal, a TILT signal, a SLOT DOOR signal, and a DROP DOOR signal. Each of these signals correspond to a known event in the machine. For example, when a coin is dropped in the machine a COIN IN signal appears on terminal 74C. This COIN IN signal is then transmitted to the DCN controller 46 on line 76C via the associated opto-coupler.

All of the signal lines 76A-76J include a pullup resistor and a pulldown capacitor, which combined form an RC network on the associated line. The resistors are, in the preferred embodiment, in the form of a resistor pack 80 and the capacitors are individual discrete capacitors 82. Alternatively, the capacitors can be removed for high-speed signals.

7. Machine Configuration Circuit

The data communication node 42, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, further includes a machine configuration circuit 84. In the preferred embodiment, as shown in FIG. 3, the machine configuration circuit 84 includes a parallel to serial converter 86, which includes eight parallel inputs IN, a serial input SIN, a clock input CLK, a strobe input STB, and a serial output SOUT. The parallel inputs IN are connected to a personality board, as described hereinafter, to receive a unique machine configuration number therefrom, which uniquely identifies the type of machine that the data communication node is connected to. In the preferred embodiment, the machine identification number is comprised of six bits. Therefore, the two remaining parallel inputs can be used to provide additional inputs, such as additional discrete machine inputs, to the DCN controller 46.

The machine configuration number presented on the parallel inputs of the parallel to serial converter 86 is latched therein responsive to a strobe signal received at the strobe STB input. A strobe input is generated by the DCN controller 46 on conductor 90 which is coupled to the strobe STB input. The parallel data is clocked out of the converter 86 to the DCN controller 46 on conductor 88 and connected between the serial output SOUT of the converter 86 and an input of the DCN controller 46 responsive to a clock signal received on the clock input CLK of the converter 86. The clock signal is generated by the DCN controller 46 and is transmitted to the converter 86 via conductor 92 which is coupled between an output of the DCN controller 46 and the clock input CLK of the converter 86.

The converter 86 also includes a serial input SIN for receiving serial input data. The serial input SIN is coupled to an expansion terminal 94C of expansion connector 94. Conductors 90 and 92 are also coupled to the expansion terminal 94 to provide the clock and strobe signals thereto. The expansion terminal 94 therefore provides the means for the DCN controller 46 to access additional serial information through the parallel to serial converter 86. In the preferred embodiment, the parallel to serial converter 86 is part number 4021 manufactured by Toshiba Corporation of Tokyo, Japan.

C. Player Tracking Module

1. OVERVIEW

Referring again to FIG. 2, the module 40 coupled to each of the gaming devices includes a player tracking module 44. The player tracking (PT) module 44 includes a player tracking controller 98, a card reader 100, a serial display driver 101, a display 102, and expansion interfaces 104 and 106. The player tracking controller 98 communicates with the data communication node controller 46 through bus interface logic 110. The DCN controller 46 and PT controller 98 maintain a master-slave relationship, respectively. Therefore, all communication is initiated by the DCN controller 46. The bus interface logic is conventional logic and its design is well-known in the art of digital electronics.

In the preferred embodiment, the player tracking module 44, with the exception of the card reader 100 and the display 102, resides on a single printed circuit board, while the data communication node 42 resides on a separate printed circuit board. The player tracking module 44 and the data communication node 42 are then connected by a cable 111 such as a ribbon cable.

2. Serial Display Circuit

A more detailed drawing of the player tracking module 44 is shown in FIG. 5. In FIG. 5, the serial display circuit 101 includes a transistor Ql and a resistor R1 connected to the base thereof. A conductor 112 is connected between the PT controller 98 and the resistor R1 to provide a drive signal to transistor Q1. The drive signal causes transistor Q1 to conduct a current and thereby drive a display connected to the collector of Q1 at a terminal 114 of a connector 115. In the preferred embodiment, the terminal 114 is connectable to a small vacuum florescent display to provide serial display data thereto.

3. Serial Expansion Ports

The player tracking module 44 also includes two serial expansion ports 104 and 106. Each of the expansion ports 104 and 106 includes a differential to single-ended converter 116 and 118, respectively. In the preferred embodiment, these converters 116 and 118 are part number LTC490 manufactured by Linear Technology Corporation of Milpitas, California. The PT controller 98 communicates with each converter via two single-ended, serial signal lines: an input signal line and an output signal line. The converters convert the single ended signals appearing on these lines to differential signals. The differential signals, however, can be used as single-ended signals as is known in the art. The first expansion port 104 interfaces the player tracking node 44 with a large vacuum florescent display 102 (FIG. 5) used to display player tracking messages, as described further below. The display is connected to the connector 115, in the preferred embodiment, by a cable 103. The other expansion ports 106 provides the player tracking module with future expansion capabilities to support additional features.

4. Card Reader

Referring now to FIGS. 6 and 7, the card reader 100 will now be described. FIG. 6 shows the electrical schematic for the card reader while FIG. 7 shows the mechanical drawing thereof. In FIG. 7A, an exploded view of the card reader is shown. The card reader includes a plastic bezel 116 having a card reader opening 118 formed therealong for receiving a card 120 therein. The bezel 116 includes guide rails 122 and 124 disposed at opposite, respective lateral ends of the opening 118. The guide rails 122 and 124 have stops 126 and 128, respectively. The guide rails 122 and 124 guide the card 120 through the opening 118 until an end of the card 120 contacts stops 126 and 128. The card is shown fully inserted in FIGS. 7B and 7C with the end of the card 120 abutting the stops 126, 128.

The card reader also includes a printed circuit board 130 having a longitudinal opening to allow the guide rails 122 and 124 to be inserted therein in order to allow the printed circuit board 130 to be pushed up flush against a mounting plate 132 of the bezel 116, as shown in FIGS. 7B and 7C. Mounted on one side of the printed circuit board 130 is an array of photodiodes 134 and an array of photodetectors 136. The photodiodes 134 are mounted on the printed circuit board along one side of the opening in the printed circuit board, while the photodetectors 136 are mounted on the printed circuit board along an opposite side of the opening. The photodiodes and the photodetectors are vertically aligned in a one-to-one relationship, i.e., one photodiode for each photodetector. In the preferred embodiment, the array of photodiodes includes eight individual diodes spaced equidistance along the opening in the printed circuit board 130. The photodiodes 134 are mounted along the opening in the printed circuit board 130 so as to align with separate rows of openings in the card 120, as described further below. The card reader also includes optional light masks 138 and 140. The light mask 138 is associated with the array of photodiodes 134 and has a plurality of openings therein, each opening corresponding to an individual photodiode in the array 134. Similarly, light mask 140 is associated with the array of photodetectors 136 and also has one opening for each of the photodetectors. The light mask 138 is mounted on the printed circuit board 130 beneath the array of photodiodes 134 along the opening in the printed circuit board 130. The light mask 138 is aligned with the photodetectors 134 so that the openings in the light mask 138 are directly beneath a corresponding photodiode in the array. The light mask 138 minimizes the amount of light emitted by a photodiode that can be detected by a photodetector other than the corresponding photodetector. The light mask 140 is mounted on top of the photodetector array 136 so that the openings therein align with the individual photodetectors. The light mask 140 further eliminates extraneous light from the photodiodes as well as extraneous ambient light.

Also mounted on the printed circuit board 130 are a plurality of light-emitting diodes 142, as shown in FIG. 7C in broken line. The light-emitting diodes are mounted on a side of the printed circuit board opposite the side on which the photodiodes and photodetectors are mounted on. The light-emitting diodes 142 are mounted around the perimeter of the opening in the printed circuit board 130 and are received in a recessed portion 144 of the bezel 116. The light-emitting diodes 142 comprise a means for providing visual feedback to a user inserting a card 120 into the bezel 116, as described further below. In the preferred embodiment, the light-emitting diodes 142 are dual light-emitting diodes capable of producing two primary colors and a third combination color.

Referring now to FIG. 6, an electrical schematic of the card reader is shown. The schematic includes the array of photodiodes 134 disposed along one side of the card reader opening 118 and the array of photodetectors 136 disposed along the opposite side of the opening 118. In the preferred embodiment, there are eight photodiodes and eight corresponding photodetectors. The photodiodes are arranged in pairs, with the two photodiodes within each pair being connected in a serial fashion. The anode of the first photodiode in the pair is coupled to the supply voltage through resistor, while the cathode of a second photodiode in the pair is connected to an output of a driver circuit 144. The driver circuit, in the preferred embodiment, includes two open collector inverters connected in parallel. A signal is provided to the driver circuit 144 by the PT controller 98 over a conductor 146. A signal on conductor 146 causes the driver circuit 144 to conduct current and thereby actuate the photodiodes 134 substantially simultaneously.

The photodetectors 136 are comprised of a plurality of light-sensitive phototransistors PD1-PD8. The emitters of the phototransistors PD1-PD8 are all coupled to ground. The collectors of phototransistor PD1 and PD8 are connected together and to a conductor 148 by which the PT controller 98 senses light detected by either phototransistor PD1 or PD8. Phototransistors PD2 and PD7 are similarly connected with the collectors of each being connected to a conductor 150. The collectors of phototransistors PD3 and PD6 are also commonly connected to a conductor 152. The collectors of the center phototransistors PD4 and PD5, however, are connected to separate conductors 156 and 154, respectively. Also connected to each of the conductors 148-156 is a corresponding pullup resistor. In the preferred embodiment, the pullup resistors are included in a resistor pack 158. Each of the conductors 148-156 are connected to a connector 170, which is coupled to the PT controller 98 as described below.

Based on the above configuration of the phototransistors PD1 and PD8, only five conductors are required to sample all eight of the phototransistors. Without more information, however, the player tracking controller 98 would be unable to determine which of the two phototransistors commonly connected to a particular conductor, e.g., conductor 148, detected light. For example, if either phototransistor PDI or phototransistor PD8 detect light, the voltage level on conductor 148 will drop from a high voltage of approximately 5 volts to a low voltage of approximately 0.7 volts. Without more information, the player tracking controller 98 would be unable to determine which of the two phototransistors, PD1 or PD8, actually sensed the light. According to the invention, however, the card 120, as shown in FIG. 7A, includes a first slot 150 by which the PT controller 98 can determine which of the two photodetectors detected the light, as described below.

The card 120 includes five rows of slots 152-160. The rows of slots 152-160 are arranged in a matrix with the corresponding slot locations within each of the rows being aligned in columns. Only the first slot 150 of row 152 cannot be aligned with any other slots, i.e., slot 150 is in a column all by itself. The individual slots within the rows of slots 152-160 encode unique player tracking information. Each slot represents a single binary bit in the player tracking information. Either one of two conventions can be used to encode the information. First, a slot can represent a binary 1 and no slot can represent a binary 0. Second, a slot can represent a binary 0 and no slot can represent a binary 1. The player tracking information can include: a unique player identification number, the casino issuing the card, player membership information, etc.

In the preferred embodiment, the card includes five rows of slots each having a maximum number of nine individual slots, thereby producing 45 possible slots. The first row of slots 152, however, is not used to encode player tracking information, but instead is used to synchronize the sampling of the player tracking information by the player tracking controller 98. Thus, only 36 slots are used to encode player tracking information in the preferred embodiment. This still allows 2^36 possible combinations, which is more than adequate.

The PT controller 98 uses the first row 152 to synchronize the sampling as follows. The PT controller 98 continuously samples the outputs of PD4 and PD5 looking for a slot. If a slot is detected on either PD4 and PD5 and no other slots are detected by any other phototransistors the PT controller 98 determines that the detected slot must be slot 150. The PT controller 98 then continuously samples the output of the phototransistor that detected slot 150. Once a new slot is detected by that phototransistor, the PT controller 98 then samples the outputs of the other phototransistors, i.e., PD1-PD3 and PD6-PD8, on conductors 148, 150 and 152 for slots in of the other rows. Thus, the PT controller 98 synchronizes the sampling of the other rows of slots to the detection of a slot in the first row 152.

It is important for the card reader to detect the orientation of the card in order to correctly interpret the player identification information encoded on the card. The card reader detects the orientation of the card 120 by detecting the slot 150. If slot 150 is detected by phototransistor PD4, then the card reader knows that the card is in the orientation shown in FIG. 7A. In that case, the card reader knows that the player tracking information is actually being detected on phototransistors PD5-PD8, and can interpret the player tracking information accordingly. If, however, phototransistor PD5 detects slot 150, then the card reader knows that the card 120 is oriented 180 degrees from that shown in FIG. 7A. In that case, the card reader knows that the player tracking information is being detected by phototransistors PD1-PD4, and can interpret the information accordingly. The PT controller 98 can simply transpose the player tracking information sensed on conductors 148-152 depending upon the detected orientation of the card. Thus, the card reader according to the invention is able to correctly interpret the player tracking information regardless of how the player inserts the card 120 into the bezel 116 of the card reader. The invention is able to accomplish this with only five conductors between the eight phototransistors PD1-PD8 and the PT controller 98.

The card reader further includes a plurality of light-emitting diodes 142 that are mounted on the printed circuit board 130 and received in the recess 144 of the bezel 116, as shown in FIG. 7C. The LEDs 142 are mounted on the printed circuit board 130 so as to surround the card reader opening 118 as shown in FIG. 6. In the preferred embodiment, the card reader includes 24 dual diodes arranged in pairs. The dual diodes have two separate diodes, each being able to emit a different primary color of light. In the preferred embodiment, the dual diodes emit either red or green light. The dual diodes can also emit a third combination color if the two individual diodes in the dual diode are actuated simultaneously so that the two primary colors combine. In the preferred embodiment, this combination color is approximately orange due to the differences in the intensities of the red and green light.

The dual diodes are essentially treated as two individual diodes. The red diodes R in the dual diodes are driven by a driver circuit 162, while the green diodes G in the dual diodes are driven by another driver circuit 164. The driver circuits 162 and 164 are, in the preferred embodiment, two open collector drivers connected in parallel, as with driver 145. However, other equivalent driver circuits would be apparent to those skilled in the art.

The dual diodes are arranged in pairs with the anodes of one of the dual diodes being coupled to the supply voltage +5 V and the cathodes of the other dual diode being connected to the output of the corresponding driver circuit. Accordingly, the red diodes are commonly driven by driver circuit 162, which is responsive to a signal received from the PT controller 98 on conductor 166. Similarly, the green diodes are commonly driven by driver circuit 164, which is responsive to a signal received from the PT controller 98 on conductor 168. Therefore, the PT controller 98 can selectively actuate the red diodes, the green diodes or both by generating the corresponding signals on conductors 166 and 168.

All of the conductors over which the PT controller communicates with the card reader, i.e., 146-156 and 166-168, are connected to a connector 170 as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7A. The player tracking module 44 then includes a cable 172 that is connected between the connector 170 and the PT controller 98, as shown in FIG. 5.

Although the preferred embodiment of the card reader is an optical card reader, the invention is not limited to such. The lighted bezel can be used in conjunction with any form of card reader such as a magnetic card reader, a bar code reader, etc. The method of providing visual feedback to the player herein described is a general method which can be used with a plurality of cards and card readers.

5. Display

Referring now to FIG. 8, a schematic for the display circuit 102 of the player tracking module 44 is shown. The circuit 102 includes a display controller 174, which in the preferred embodiment is a part number HD6473258P10 manufactured by Hitachi of Tokyo, Japan. Coupled to the display controller 174 is a memory 176 via bus 178. The memory 176, in the preferred embodiment, is a 32 KB SRAM. The memory 176 stores the variables and parameters necessary for the controller 174 to communicate with both the PT controller 98 and the display driver 186. The bus 178 includes the necessary address lines, data lines and control lines to interface in memory 176.

In the preferred embodiment, the display 102 includes a vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) 184, which is organized as a 16×192 display matrix. Such displays are well-known in the art of digital electronics. The VFD 184 is driven by a driver circuit 186, which includes a plurality of individual drivers serially interconnected. In the preferred embodiment, these serial drivers are part number UCN5818EPF-1, manufactured by Allegro Microsystems, Inc. of Worcester, Mass. The driver circuit 186 is connected to the VFD 184 by bus 188, which includes 160 individual conductors. The manner in which the 160 bus lines are connected between the driver circuit 186 and the VFD 184 is known in the art, and is therefore not described in detail herein.

The display controller 174 interfaces with the driver circuit 186 by a plurality of signal lines 190. These signal lines transmit the standard driver interface signals to the driver circuit 186. These signals include: a clock signal CLOCK, serial input data signal SDATA, a frame signal FRAME, a strobe signal STROBE, two output enable signals OE1/ and OE2/, a column clock signal COL CLOCK, and a column output enable signal COL OE/. These signals have well known functions in the display art and are therefor not discussed in detail. The signal names having a “/” represent active low signals while all other signals are active high. The display controller 174 generates these signals in the required sequence in order to serially clock the reformatted display data to the driver circuit. One of ordinary skill in the art could program the display controller 176 to generate these signals in order to display the desired message on the VFD 184 based on the foregoing description.

The display 102 also includes a serial interface 192. The serial interface 192 is the means by which the PT controller 98 communicates a player tracking message to the display 102. In the preferred embodiment, the serial interface 192 includes two opto-isolator circuits: one for the serial send data, the other for the serial transmission data. The display controller 174 is connected to the serial interface 192 over a two conductor serial bus 194, one conductor for receiving serial data from the serial interface 192, the other for transmitting serial data thereto. A connector 196 is also coupled to the serial interface 192. The connector 196 includes four terminals. Two of the connector terminals are dedicated to receiving serial input data and the other two terminals are dedicated to transmitting serial data. A cable (not shown) couples the display 102 to the player tracking module 44 between connectors 196 (FIG. 8) and connector 115 (FIG. 5).

6. Discrete Input Section

The display 102 further includes a discrete input section 198. The discrete input section 198 is an interface between the discrete outputs of a gaming device and the display controller 174 much in the same way that the discrete machine interface 72 allows the data communication node to interface with a gaming device. Although in the preferred embodiment the discrete input section is unconnected to any discrete machine inputs, the discrete input section 198 allows the display 102 to operate as a stand-alone module for gaming devices in certain configurations. The discrete input section provides discrete input signals from an external device to the display controller 174 over a bus 200. The discrete input section 198 includes opto-isolator circuits such as part number TLP620 manufactured by Toshiba Corporation of Tokyo, Japan which provide single-ended input signals to the display controller 174.

D. Personality Board

Referring now to FIG. 9, a personality board 202 is shown in schematic form. The personality board 202 uniquely identifies the gaming device on the network. The personality board 202 indicates the type of gaming device, e.g., slot machine or video poker, including the manufacturer, and provides a unique machine identification number that the host computer can use to uniquely address the gaming device. The personality board 202 allows the devices to be readily removed and reinstalled in the network without any manual reconfiguration by the operator, such as resetting dip switches.

The personality board 202 couples the data communication node 42 to a gaming device. The personality board 202 includes two connectors 204 and 206 and an identification circuit 208. The connector 204 couples to the data communication node 42, as described further below. The connector 206 connects to the particular gaming device. The components shown in FIG. 9 are mounted on a printed circuit board that is mounted inside a connector harness (not shown). The personality board allows the DCN to be easily removed and reinstalled from the network with minimal effort.

The personality board uniquely identifies the machine by providing both a configuration number, which indicates the type of gaming device that is connected to the connector 206 and a unique identification number, which is used by the system 10 to maintain records on the machine. The configuration number includes a six bit binary number which indicates the type of gaming device connected to the personality board 202. Each machine type is assigned a unique configuration number. This configuration number is encoded on lines CNFG0-CNFG5, which are connected to terminals 204Q-204V, respectively, of connector 204. Each line represents one bit of the binary configuration number. The individual lines are either tied to a supply voltage to represent a binary one or to ground to represent a binary zero. The six bit configuration number used in the preferred embodiment can encode up to 2^6 different combinations and, therefore, different machine types. The configuration number for the embodiment shown in FIG. 9 is equal to 3CH.

The configuration lines CNFG0-CNFG5 are coupled to the inputs of parallel to serial converter 86 (FIG. 3) through a connector (not shown). The terminals 204Q-204V of connector 204 have corresponding terminals 85Q-85V of connector 85, as indicated by corresponding lettered suffixes. This same lettering convention is used throughout.

The configuration number is used by the DCN controller 46 as a means of interpreting the discrete input signals received from the machine through connector 206. Individual conductors coupled between connector 204 and 206 are labeled to correspond to the machine type having a configuration number 3CH. For a different machine type having a different configuration number, many of these conductors may have different functions. By providing a unique configuration number, the DCN controller can interpret the signals received on these lines accordingly.

The personality board 202 also includes an identification circuit 208 which provides a unique machine identification number to the data communication node 42. The unique identification number is stored in a nonvolatile memory 210 and provided to a terminal 204N on conductor ID. In the preferred embodiment, the nonvolatile memory 210 is a part number DS2224 manufactured by Dallas Semiconductor of Dallas, Tex. In the preferred embodiment, the nonvolatile memory 210 includes a 32 bit ROM having a factory-lasered unique serial number stored therein. This serial number, i.e., the machine identification number, can be read out of the memory 210 by the DCN controller 46 to uniquely identify the machine connected thereto. The protocol for reading the identification number out of the memory 210, as is described in the data sheet for the part, is well known in the art.

The identification circuit 208 includes a number of discrete components. The memory 210 has a zener diode 212 coupled across the power and ground terminals of 213 and 215 thereof. The identification circuit 202 also includes a first diode 214 coupled between the power terminal 213 and a data output terminal 217. The circuit 208 further includes a second diode 216 coupled between the data output terminal 217 and the ground terminals 215. A resistor 218 is interposed between the data output terminal 217 and the connector terminal 204N. The terminal 204N is coupled to a corresponding terminal 74N of connector 74 (FIG. 4) by a bus 220 (FIG. 2).

The discrete outputs from the machine, e.g., coin in, coin out, etc., are also supplied to the data communication node 42 via bus 220. The bus 220 connects connector 74 of the data communication node 42 and the connector 204 of the personality board 202 such that terminals having corresponding lettered suffixes are connected. For example, terminal 74C of connector 74 is connected to terminal 204C of connector 204 by a individual conductor within bus 220. All the other terminals are similarly connected by the bus 220.

The network interface 49 of the data communication node 42 is also coupled to the personality board by a bus 222, as shown in FIG. 2. Bus 222 includes four conductors which connects the four terminals of connector 51 with four corresponding terminals of connector 204, as indicated by the common lettered suffixes. It is over these four lines that the DCN controller 46 indirectly communicates with the floor controller.

The serial machine interface 60 is also coupled to the personality board 202 by a bus 224, as shown in FIG. 2. The bus 224 includes four conductors which couple four terminals 62DD and 62EE of connector 62 with corresponding terminals 204DD and 204EE, respectively. It is over these four conductors that the DCN controller 46 communicates reconfiguration commands to the machine. The DCN controller transmits data through the terminal 204DD, which is provided to the machine on conductor MACHINE RX. The machine responds to the configuration command on the conductor MACHINE TX. The use of these two conductors will become more apparent in the description of the operation hereinbelow.

Although buses 220, 222, 224 and 226 have been described as separate buses, the individual conductors within these buses could, and are in the preferred embodiment, combined into a single bus that is connected between the data collection node 42 and the personality board 202. To connect the data collection node 42 and the personality board 202 a connector (not shown) is mounted on the data collection node 42 and a mating connector (not shown) is mounted on the personality board 202. The two connectors are then mated together to connect the data collection node 42 to the personality board 202. The personality board is then coupled to the corresponding gaming device by a cable 225 (FIG.2).

E. Bonus Display Drivers

Referring now to FIGS. 10 and 11, two bonus display drivers are shown. The data communication node 42 is designed to support either of the display drivers. The data communication node 42 is coupled to the display driver of FIG. 10 through connector 228. An opto coupler 230 optically isolates the data communication node from a triac circuit 232 which includes a triac 234. One terminal of the triac 234 is connected to a terminal 236B of a connector 236. Another terminal of the triac 234 is connected to a terminal 236C of connector 236. A bonus display such as a light or sound generating means is coupled across terminals 236B and 236C so that the triac 234 could drive the external bonus display responsive to an actuation signal from the data communication node 42.

A second embodiment of the display driver is shown in FIG. 11. In this embodiment, the data communication node 42 is coupled to the driver circuit through connector 238. The driver circuit of FIG. 11 includes a relay 240 operatively coupled to a transistor 242. The relay 240 is a two-position relay which toggles between the two positions responsive to a current passing through transistor 242. The transistor 242 conducts a current responsive to an actuation signal received on terminal 238B from the data communication node 42.

The display drivers are used by the data communication node 42 to activate a display on the gaming device which indicates that the machine is now in a bonus mode or condition.

F. Floor Controller

As shown in FIG. 1, the floor controller is directly connected to both the high speed network 38 and a plurality of gaming devices. The floor controller is responsible for monitoring the activity of each of the gaming devices connected thereto and reporting this activity to the database 32. In addition, the floor controller is responsible for transmitting a reconfiguration command to a selected one or more of the gaming devices during certain bonus conditions. These conditions will be described in detail in the operation section below.

The floor controller is connected to the associated gaming devices by current loop networks. Because of the limitations of the current loop network, only a predetermined number of gaming devices can be supported on any one current loop network. In the preferred embodiment, each current loop network supports up to 64 gaming devices. In order for each floor controller to support more than this predetermined number of gaming devices, each floor controller is equipped with a communication board 246, as shown in FIG. 12. The communication board 246 supports up to 16 separate current loop networks. The board is a standard size card that fits into one of the ISA card slots in the back of the floor controller. The board includes a male edge connector (not shown) which mates with a female back plane connector (not shown) in the floor controller. The back plane connector provides the floor controller CPU data, address, and control lines to the communication board 246 to enable the communication board and the floor controller CPU to communicate.

The communication board 246 includes eight separate microcontrollers 248A-248H. The microcontrollers communicate with the floor controller through ISA bus interface logic 247 over buses 249A and 249B. The microcontrollers are shown in a daisy-chain connection in FIG. 12, but any other equivalent interconnection scheme can be used. The data received from the floor controller microprocessor is passed between the microcontrollers from 248A to 248H, as indicated by the arrows. Each microcontroller is responsible for passing the data along and determining whether the data includes a message for a machine connected to its corresponding current loop networks.

Each microcontroller is responsible for two current loop networks. Each microcontroller communicates with its associated gaming devices via two corresponding current loop networks. Two serial signal lines 251 connect each microcontroller to a current loop driver circuit 250. The driver circuit 250 provides the necessary current drive to support the current loop network. Each pair of serial signal lines 251 has a corresponding pair of current loop lines 253. The current loop driver circuit 250 can either be located on the communication board as shown in FIG. 12 or on a separate printed circuit board (not shown). If located on a separate board, the current loop driver circuit 250 can be connected to the communication board by a cable.

In the preferred embodiment, the last microcontroller 248H is solely responsible for communicating with the floor controller microprocessor. All of the data received from the machines over the various current loop networks are passed along to the microcontroller 248H by the associated microcontroller. The microcontroller 248H analyses the data and determines whether the data needs to be communicated to the floor controller. If not, the last microcontroller records the communication but does not forward the data to the floor controller. This helps off-load some of the floor controller communication processing to the communication board.

II. OPERATION

The above-described system allows a casino in which the system is installed to run promotions on any properly equipped gaming machines while simultaneously gathering player tracking and accounting data from all machines. The system provides the capability for the casino to select which of the plurality of machines are used in any given promotion. The system further allows any number of different promotions to operate simultaneously.

Each promotion involves sending a reconfiguration command from the floor controller to a gaming device that has been selected to be part of a given promotion over the associated network. Upon receipt of the reconfiguration command, the gaming device reconfigures its payout schedule in accordance with the received reconfiguration command. As described above, reconfiguring a gaming device payout schedule, in the preferred embodiment, includes activating a bonus payout schedule that pays out bonus amounts in addition to the amount determined by the device payout table.

A partial list of the promotions according to the invention include, but are not limited to: a multiple jackpot wherein the gaming device reconfigures its payout to be a multiple of its default payout schedule; a bonus jackpot wherein the gaming device reconfigures its payout schedule to payout an additional bonus amount when certain conditions are met; and a progressive jackpot wherein two or more gaming devices are combined in a progressive jackpot having a progressive jackpot payout schedule. In addition to these, many other promotions are possible by the above-described system for controlling and monitoring a plurality of gaming devices.

The system 10 also allows for improved player tracking. As with standard player tracking, the above-described system monitors and reports how many coins are played by each player. The system 10, however, also includes the ability to record how long each player spends at each machine and the number of coins won, games played, and hand jackpots won by each player. All this information is stored on the database, which can be later analyzed for future targeted direct mailing campaigns. The player tracking according to the invention also allows the casino to schedule buses and other groups and measure their profitability. The system also allows for cashless play as well as advanced accounting and security features.

Another feature of the above-described system is jackpot announcements. The jackpot announcement feature displays a message on a reader board or display located in the casino which announces a jackpot as soon as a jackpot is won, i.e., as soon as the reels stop spinning. The floor controller generates the jackpot announcement once a DCN connected thereto indicates a jackpot is won. An example of such a message might be: “Now paying on machine 1342, a jackpot of $300.” With prior art data collection systems, the amount of the jackpot is only known after the payment is made. Even then the system must account for partial pays, hopper empty, etc.

An advantage of the current system over prior art systems is the ability to implement better tournament systems. In a slot tournament, players pay a fee to play. All play during the session is free. The players accumulate credits instead of cash. The person with the most credits at the end of the tournament wins. Games are usually manually altered to provide payouts of 200 to 300% to make the games more fun. The games are altered manually by replacing the read only memory (ROM) in the gaming devices.

One exciting aspect of tournament play is to see who is ahead. No current system can display this information in real time. This is because current systems can only measure winnings as they are added to the credit meter or paid from the hopper (some casinos use tournament tokens instead). Since credits are usually added at a rate of 10 per second, a 1,000 credit win can take 100 seconds to register. Casinos attempting to create display boards showing who is ahead are frustrated by the lag time. The jackpot announcement of the invention allows casinos to display the player with the most credits by comparing the number of credits for each player. This comparison and display is performed real time as each transaction is completed.

In order to implement each of these features, the various computers and microcontrollers each execute software or firmware. This software and firmware routines are described below. These routines are described with reference to accompanying flow charts. These flow charts would enable one of ordinary skill in the art of computer programming to write a corresponding computer program which the computer or microcontroller could execute.

A. Data Communication Node

1. Power Up Procedure

Referring now to FIG. 13, a power up procedure 252 for the data communication node is shown. This procedure is executed by the DCN controller 46 when initially powered up. The first step of the procedure is to validate the RAM to ensure that it is not corrupted and to set up all the DCN hardware. Validating the RAM involves writing known patterns of 1s and 0s to the DCN RAM. This RAM can either be internal to the DCN controller 42 or external as shown in FIG. 2. Setting up the DCN hardware includes initializing timers and interrupts.

Next the DCN controller checks the RAM in step 255 by reading the pattern of 1s and 0s back out of the RAM to ensure that the RAM is fully functional. If the RAM turns out to be defective the DCN controller goes into an endless loop in 256.

2. Reading Unique Identification Number

If the RAM is fully functional, the DCN then reads the unique identification number from the personality board. As described above, this unique identification number is stored in a nonvolatile memory 210 on the personality board. Reading the unique ID number out of the nonvolatile memory involves following the memory manufacturer's interface protocol as specified in the nonvolatile memory data sheet. The unique identification number provides a means for uniquely identifying the gaming device.

After the unique ID has been read from the personality board, the DCN processes the discrete machine inputs in step 260. This step will be described in further detail in Subsection 3, MONITORING GAMING DEVICE DISCRETE INPUT below. After the discrete inputs have been processed in step 260, the DCN processes the machine serial interface in step 262. This step is described further below in Subsection 4, PROCESSING GAMING DEVICE SERIAL INTERFACE. Next, the DCN processes the network interface, i.e., the interface between the DCN and the floor controller connected thereto. The process network interface step 264 is described further below in Subsection 5, PROCESSING NETWORK INTERFACE. Finally, the DCN processes the player tracking interface in step 266. This step is described below in Subsection 6, PROCESSING CARD INSERTION. At the completion of step 266 the DCN loops back to step 260 and continuously, sequentially executes steps 260-266.

3. Monitoring Gaming Device Discrete Input

Referring now to FIG. 14, the DCN step of monitoring the gaming device discrete inputs 260 will now be described. The DCN first reads the discrete inputs on input lines 76 in step 267. One particular set of discrete inputs is shown in FIGS. 4 and 9 for a particular gaming device. The actual discrete inputs present will depend on the machine type, as indicated by the configuration number, which is also read by the DCN controller 46. Most gaming devices provide at least some of the following discrete inputs: coins in, coins out, coins to drop, games played, attendant paid jackpots, slot door, drop door, progressive jackpots, and bill validators. The system supports all of these discrete inputs as well as others.

The DCN keeps track of the machine activity by maintaining several meters in memory. Each meter, in the preferred embodiment, includes six digits. Moreover, to improve the reliability of the system, the DCN maintains redundant backup copies of these meters with an order to replace the original meters in the event that the originals are corrupted. In step 268, the DCN increments the meters as required based on the discrete inputs. The meters are maintained even in the event that the DCN is disconnected from the floor controller. Once the DCN is reconnected to the floor controller, all the activity level information is then available. Step 268 will be discussed further below.

Next, the DCN processes the drop door signal in step 270. The drop door signal DROP DOOR indicates that the drop door on the machine has been opened. This is an important event and is therefore processed separately.

In step 272, the DCN validates the meter values to determine whether the values stored in the meters are valid. The DCN checks whether the meter values are valid in step 274. In the preferred embodiment, a check sum is maintained for each meter value. Thus, the DCN in step 274 checks to see whether the check sum is correct based on the current meter value. If the meter values are okay, the discrete input monitoring step 260 is complete. If the meter values are not valid, the DCN replaces the meter values with the redundant back copy of the meter values in step 278, and then the step 260 is complete.

Referring now to FIG. 15, increment meter step 268 is shown in further detail. The sequence shown in FIG. 15 is repeated for each meter value that has changed. The first step is to adjust the meter value based on the discrete inputs and to calculate the associated check sum. Next, the DCN determines whether the particular meter has an active associated countdown count in step 282. Some games or promotional activities require the player to reach a certain level of activity in order to be eligible for certain bonus points. These countdown counts are used to determine whether the player has achieved this level of activity. For example, the player may be required to play a certain number of coins before being awarded any points. If the countdown count is active, the DCN adjusts the current players count down values in step 284 based on the corresponding adjustment of the associated meter.

In step 286, the DCN sets the current message to the count down message. The count down message indicates to the player when he or she will be eligible for the bonus points. Finally, in step 288 the DCN sets the current bezel color and rate to a count down color and rate. This color and rate information is subsequently transmitted to the player tracking node for processing, as described further below. The countdown color indicates the bezel color and the count down rate indicates that flashing rate of the bezel color displayed during the count down message.

4. Processing Gaming Device Serial Interface

Referring now to FIG. 16, a process 262 for processing the gaming device serial interface is shown. The serial machine interface 60, as shown in FIG. 2, allows the DCN controller 46 to communicate with the gaming device through the personality board. This serial machine interface allows the DCN controller 46 to transmit reconfiguration commands to the gaming device in order to reconfigure the payout schedule of the machine in accordance with the reconfiguration command. In addition, the serial machine interface provides an additional means for determining the activity level of the gaming device. Instead of reading the discrete machine inputs, the DCN controller 46 can transmit a status request command to the machine over the serial interface and the machine can respond back with the requested status information.

Any communication protocol can be used to implement this communication path over the serial machine interface, as is known in the art. An example of one such protocol uses a data packet including a command code, a message sequence number, a CRC, and a variable length message. In the preferred embodiment, either the DCN controller 46 or the machine can initiate communications over the serial machine interface. However, if the machine detects that the DCN is trying to send a message to the machine, the machine must abort its message and attempt to resend the message at a later time.

The preferred embodiment of the system supports many different reconfiguration commands. A partial list of the reconfiguration commands is given below in Table 1. These reconfiguration commands are sent from the DCN controller 46 to the machine over the serial machine interface wherein the machine reconfigures its payout schedule in accordance with the particular reconfiguration command. The reconfiguration commands do not originate with the DCN, instead the reconfiguration commands originate from the floor controller and are transmitted to a particular machine over the associated current loop network or the command can originate at one of the other computers on the high speed network. The DCN is simply responsible for forwarding the reconfiguration command onto the gaming device on receipt of the reconfiguration command over the associated current loop network coupled between the floor controller and the DCN.

Table 1—Examples of Reconfiguration Commands

    • 1. Bonus Pay From Hopper (Coin Format)
    • 2. Bonus Pay to Credit Meter (Coin Format)
    • 3. Bonus Pay from Hopper (Dollar Format)
    • 4. Bonus Pay To Credit Meter (Dollare Format)
    • 5. Add Non-cash outable credits to Game
    • 6. Begin Double Jackpot Time
    • 7. Stop Double Jackpot Time

The actual process of processing the machine serial interface begins in step 292 wherein the DCN polls the machine to determine its level of activity. This polling step includes sending a status message from the DCN to the machine over the serial machine interface. In response, the machine will send a packet of status information indicating the current amount of activity on the machine. The status information included in the response will depend on the type of machine that the DCN is communication with.

The data communication node 42, in step 294, waits for a reply to the status request. If a reply is received, the DCN indicates that the machine is “on line” in step 296 and processes the machine reply in 298. The step of processing the machine reply includes updating the meter values, as done when processing the discrete inputs. After the machine reply has been processed, the process 262 is complete.

If the DCN does not receive a reply from the machine in step 294, the DCN indicates that the machine is “off line”. The DCN will wait for a predetermined amount of time before is deciding that the reply is not received. In the preferred embodiment, this predetermined period is approximately 110 milliseconds.

5. Processing Network Interface

Another step in the DCN power up procedure 252 is the step of processing the network interface 264. This step is described with reference to FIGS. 17-19. The network interface refers to the current loop that connects the particular DCN with the associated floor controller. The following description assumes that the DCN has received a valid message from the associated floor controller. Because there are multiple DCNs connected to any one current loop, the floor controller must include some means for addressing a particular machine.

Although each machine includes a unique identification number which could be used as the actual address for each DCN on the current loop, it is unnecessary to use the unique identification as the actual address because there are only a limited number of DCNs connected to each current loop. Accordingly, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the floor controller uses a shorthand token representation of the DCN's unique identification number to address the DCN. In the preferred embodiment, a single byte address is used to address a DCN on any given current loop. This one-byte address allows up to 256 DCNs to be supported on any given current loop network. In the preferred embodiment, however, only 64 such DCNs are connected to a single current loop and therefore the single byte address is more than adequate. The single byte address substantially reduces the amount of traffic on the current loop network by reducing the number of bytes from four in the unique identification number to one for the shorthand token representation.

The floor controller is responsible for generating the unique single byte address for each data communication node on a given current loop network. The process of assigning unique single byte addresses to the DCNs is described below in Section C.

Once all the DCNs have been assigned a unique address, the DCN can begin monitoring the current loop network for messages addressed to it. If the DCN detects a message addressed to it, the DCN executes step 264. The DCN first checks to see whether the message is valid in step 304. This check is done by computing the CRC value of the message and comparing it to the CRC included with the message. If the two CRCs match, the message is valid and the DCN processes the network message in step 306. Processing the network message is described further below with reference to FIGS. 18 and 19. Once the message has been processed, the DCN sends a reply back to the floor controller over the current loop network in step 308. The actual substance of the reply will depend on the message received in step 306. If the message is invalid, the DCN does not reply,

Referring now to FIG. 18, the first step of processing the network message is to determine what type of message was sent from the floor controller in step 312. There are three basic types of messages that the floor controller sends to the DCN. The first is a request for data from the DCN. If this type of message is detected the DCN builds the data requested and transmits the data in a reply message. The main use of this message type is to gather status and meter information from the DCN.

Another type of message is one including configuration data for the DCN. This message allows the floor controller to implicitly set the DCN's memory to a fixed value. This message is used to override the DCN's internal variables, e.g., to get a DCN out of a lock-up condition, or to download new firmware to the DCN for execution. On receiving this type of message, the DCN simply overwrites its memory with the configuration data included in the configuration message in step 316. The DCN then builds an appropriate acknowledgment and transmits this acknowledgment message to the floor controller in step 320.

The other type of message is one sent in response to a DCN request. The DCN processes this data in step 318, which is described further in FIG. 19. If the message includes either the configuration data or the data in response to a DCN request, the DCN builds an acknowledge message in step 320 and transmits this message to the floor controller.

The step of processing a floor controller message sent in response to a DCN request will now be described with reference to FIG. 19. The first step of processing this type of message is for the DCN to determine what type of data is included in the message. Once again there are three types of data that can be included in this message type: a reconfiguration command, card data, or other minor data. The DCN makes this determination in step 324 by analyzing one of the bytes in the data packet of the message. This byte will be referred to herein as the command byte. If the command byte indicates that the message contains reconfiguration data, i.e., the command byte equals a reconfiguration command, the DCN stores the reconfiguration data in a predefined data structure in memory. Listed below in Table 2 is an example of a data structure for storing the reconfiguration data

Table 2—Recognition Data Structure

    • 1. Bonus Type
    • 2. Mystery Jackpot Data:
      • A. Number of coins to award
      • B. Number of seconds to award
      • c. Pay award to
    • 3. Bonus Time Data
      • A. Jackpot Multiplier
      • B. Jackpot Payout Limitations
      • C. Number of Seconds to Keep Bonus Time Active
      • D. Minimum Activity Level

The bonus type field of the data structure indicates the type of bonus state the machine is to be placed in. Examples of potential bonus modes include progressive/nonprogressive, multiple jackpot, or mystery jackpot. If the mystery jackpot is indicated, the mystery jackpot data included in the structure specifies the conditions under which the mystery jackpot is paid out. The mystery jackpot can be set to payout, e.g., after a certain number of coins in, handle pulls, which is specified by subfields of the mystery jackpot data.

The bonus time jackpot is a promotion wherein the machine pays out more than that dictated by its default payout schedule. In one embodiment of the bonus time promotion, the payout schedule of the machine can be modified to be a multiple of its default to payout schedule, as specified in subfield (A) of the bonus time data. This promotion can be used to encourage gaming activity during off-peak hours, e.g., midnight to 4 a.m. on weeknights. Alternatively, the bonus time promotion can be activated on a random basis. The timing of the multiple jackpot is specified by the casino on one of the computers connected to the network. The bonus time data also specifies the conditions under which the player becomes eligible for the bonus time jackpot. The subfield (B) of the bonus time data specifies whether the player is eligible for the bonus time data only if the player is playing the maximum coin in the machine. Subfield (C) limits the bonus time promotion to a predetermined number of seconds. This field limits the bonus time promotion to a predetermined number of seconds; if the player does not hit a jackpot within this specified time period, the bonus time promotion concludes. The minimum activity level can also be specified in subfield (D). This field can be used to specify the minimum activity level required by the player in order to be eligible for the bonus time jackpot. For example, the player can be required to play at least 20 coins over the last three minutes in order to be eligible for the bonus time jackpot. An indicator light on the player's machine can be used to indicate when the player reaches the minimum activity level and thereby becomes eligible for the bonus time jackpot.

In another embodiment of the bonus time promotion, a bonus amount is awarded in addition to the payout according to the default of the payout schedule of the machine. The amount of the bonus jackpot is specified in subfield (E) of the bonus time data. For example, this bonus time promotion might include five bonus amounts of $10, $25, $50, $100 and $500, which is specified by subfield (E). When a player hits a particular jackpot, whichever bonus amount is specified by the bonus amount subfield this amount is automatically paid out in addition to the payout amount determined by the machine's default payout schedule. This bonus time promotion can also be used in combination with subfields (C) and (D) to specify the conditions under which the player is eligible for this bonus time jackpot award.

After the DCN has stored the reconfiguration data in step 326, the DCN will then send the appropriate reconfiguration command to the machine over the serial machine interface in step 328. The machine, responsive to the received reconfiguration command, reconfigures its payout schedule in accordance with the received reconfiguration command. For example, if the reconfiguration command specifies a multiple jackpot condition, the machine will reconfigure its payout to be a multiple of its default payout schedule. The machine will reconfigure its payout schedule in a similar manner for the other bonus types.

The other type of data that can be included in a response from a DCN request is card data or player tracking data. This data is sent to the DCN in response to a status message from the DCN to the floor controller wherein the status message indicates that a player card has been inserted. Included in this message is the card ID number detected by the card reader. In response to this status message the floor controller will transmit a card insertion message to the DCN. The card insertion message includes information associated with the particular player ID number. An exemplary card insertion message data packet is listed below in Table 3.

Table 3—Card Insertion Messgae Data Packet

    • 1. Card Identification Number
    • 2. Player First Name
    • 3. Player Last Name
    • 4. Current Point Balance
    • 5. Casino Code

Upon receipt of the card insertion message, the DCN stores the player's name and points in order for this information to be displayed on the VFD display associated with the player tracking node. Then, a DCN sets the current message to a data received message in step 334. Finally, a DCN sets the current bezel color and bezel rate to a data received bezel color and bezel rate in step 336. The bezel color specifies the bezel color to be displayed by the card reader and the bezel rate specifies the flashing rate of the card reader LEDs. This bezel information is subsequently transmitted to the player tracking node for processing thereby.

The final data type that can be included in the message sent from the floor controller in response to a DCN request is generically classified as other minor data. This data includes general system or DCN specific information such as display information.

6. Processing Player Tracking Interface

The next step in the DCN process is processing of the player tracking interface 266. The DCN maintains a variable that indicates what message is to be sent to the player tracking node. This variable is referred to as the current message variable. Before transmitting a message to the player tracking node, the DCN first checks this variable to see which of a plurality of messages should be sent to the player tracking node.

The process 266 begins in 340 by sending the current message to the player tracking node that is specified by the current message variable. In addition to the current message, the DCN sends the bezel color and bezel rate information to the player tracking node. The bezel color and bezel rate information could have been specified by the floor controller or by the DCN itself.

Next, the DCN determines the card status in step 342. If there is no card inserted in the card reader, the DCN sets the current message variable to an attract message. This message specifies that the player tracking node is to display a message which will attract players to the machine. Similarly, the DCN sets the current bezel color and bezel rate to an attract bezel color and rate in step 346. This attract color and rate is part of the attract message that will be sent to the player tracking node when the current message is sent.

If the DOCN determines that a good card has been inserted in the card reader, the DCN processes the valid card in step 350. This step is described further below with reference to FIG. 21.

If, however, the card status indicates that a bad card has been inserted, i.e., an invalid card number, the DCN sets the current message variable to specify a card error message in 352 and the DCN sets the current bezel color and bezel rate to a card error color and rate in 354. This card error information is included with the card error message that is sent to the player tracking node when the current message is sent.

7. Processing Card Insertion

Referring now to FIG. 21, the process 350 for processing a valid card insertion is shown. The first step that the DCN executes is to determine whether the card data corresponding to the valid card has been received from the floor controller in step 356. If not, the DCN builds a network request message for the player name and points associated with the card ID number in step 358. Next, the DCN sets the current message variable to specify a card inserted message is to be transmitted in step 360. Finally, the DCN sets the current bezel color and rate to a card inserted color and rate, which indicates to the player that the system is still processing the card number. This information is sent to the player tracking node when the current message is sent.

If the card data has been received from the floor controller, the DCN then determines in step 366 whether player tracking has started for the particular player. If player tracking has not yet started, the DCN sets the current message variable to the data received message in step 368 and sets the current bezel color and rate to data received color and rate in step 370. If player tracking has started, the DCN processes the player tracking in step 372, as described with reference to FIG. 22.

Processing player tracking 372 begins with the step of determining whether the player has received new points in 374. These points can be considered roughly as the equivalent of “frequent flyer miles” used by airlines. These points allow the system to run promotionals whereby individuals are given points or credit associated with their card that can be redeemed toward the purchase of goods or services offered by the casino. Typically these points are redeemed at a redemption counter in the casino for meals or clothing, for example. The points, therefore, are an additional inducement to encourage play.

The player tracking system of the invention allows the casino to determine how and when the player is issued points. The casino can specify the type and number of coins that must be played before a player is awarded a given number of points. The system uses this specified information to inform the player of his or her progress towards receiving additional points. The system encourages play by informing the player of how many additional coins must be played before receiving additional points. For example, a player who is only one coin away from receiving points, but who desires to stop playing, may decide to play “one last coin” in order to receive the points. The system informs the player by displaying a message on the vacuum florescent display indicating how many coins the player is away from receiving additional points.

Referring now to FIG. 22, player tracking 372 begins with the step of determining whether the player has received new points in 374. If no new points have been received, the DCN sets the current message variable to specify a countdown message in step 376 and sets the current bezel color and bezel rate to a countdown bezel color and rate in step 378. The countdown bezel color and rate indicates the player's progress towards being awarded additional points.

If new points have been received, such as where the player has played a given number of coins, the DCN sets the current message variable to a points won message in step 382 and sets the current bezel color and rate to a points won color and rate in step 384. The points won message informs the player of the number of points won.

The above-described tracking process provides a means for providing visual feedback to the player inserting the card into the card reader. By modifying the bezel color and bezel rate, the data communication node provides immediate feedback to the player concerning the proper insertion of the card. If the player inserts the card properly into the card reader so that the card reader senses a valid user identification number, the card reader provides positive visual feedback to the user by illuminating the bezel. On the other hand, if the user improperly inserts the card so that the card reader cannot read the user identification number, the card reader can provide negative visual feedback to the player by illuminating the bezel with a different color and/or flashing rate. In the preferred embodiment, this positive visual feedback includes flashing the green LEDs to produce a flashing green signal around the card reader opening. The negative visual feedback includes flashing the red LEDs. A third combination color is used during the processing of the player tracking information. This process provides immediate feedback to the player concerning the insertion of the card in the card reader.

B. Player Tracking Module

The system described above allows for improved player tracking by recording each and every machine transaction including: time of play, machine number, duration of play, coins in, coins out, hand paid jackpots and games played. The player tracking is conducted over the same network as the accounting data is extracted. This allows the invention to provide bonusing to certain individual players as well as during certain times. As with standard player tracking, the above-described system monitors and reports how many coins are played by each player. The system according to the invention, however, also includes the ability to record how long each player spends at each machine and the number of coins won, games played, and hand jackpots won by each player. The system is able to record all this information because the it operates on a transaction by transaction basis. Each transaction, whether it be a coin in, a handle pull, etc., is recorded by the system. Other prior art systems simply compile the player tracking information at the completion of play.

All the transaction information is stored on the database, which can be later analyzed for future targeted direct mailing campaigns. The player tracking according to the invention allows the casino to schedule buses and other groups and measure their profitability. Because the system records each transaction, the casino can reconfigure their casinos to better match the tastes and demands of their customers.

The improved player tracking according to the invention also allows the casino to calculate theoretical wins exactly because the system always includes the most current information. The operation of the player tracking procedure is described below.

1. Power Up Procedure

The operation of the player tracking module will now be described with reference to FIG. 23 where the powerup process 400 for the player tracking node is shown. As in the data communication node, the player tracking node first validates the RAM and sets up its associated hardware in step 402. Next, the player tracking node tests the RAM in step 404 to determine whether the RAM is functioning properly. If not, the player tracking node, i.e., player tracking controller, terminates its program in an error condition in step 406. If the player tracking RAM is fully functional, the player tracking node sequentially executes steps 408-414. In step 408 the player tracking controller processes the DCN interface between the player tracking controller and the DCN controller. In step 410 the player tracking controller updates the player tracking display. In step 412 the player tracking controller updates the bezel. Finally, the player tracking controller processes the card reader in step 414. Each of these steps will now be described further below.

2. Processing DCN Interface

Referring now to FIG. 24, the steps for processing the DCN interface are shown. First, the player tracking controller checks for a new message received from the DCN in step 416. If a new message has been received, the player tracking controller overwrites its current message buffer with the new message and updates the bezel color and rate values with those contained in the new current message. Then, the player tracking controller builds a card status reply message in step 420. The card status message indicates whether a card has been inserted and if so whether the card was a good card or a bad card, i.e., the card was read properly by the card reader. If a valid card, the card status reply message also includes the identification number encoded on the card. This step might also involve transposing the number encoded on the card depending on the orientation in which the card was inserted into the card reader. This card status reply message in then sent to the DCN in step 422.

3. Processing Display Update

The process of updating the player tracking display is shown in FIG. 25 at 410. This process begins with the player tracking controller scanning the display message for display attribute information. Examples of such display attribute information is given below in Table 4. Each display attribute specifies a different graphic mode for the player tracking display.

Table 4—Display Attribute Informatoin

    • 1. Flash Rate
    • 2. Center Display
    • 3. Set Display Intensity
    • 4. Use Small Lower Font
    • 5. Use Small Upper Font
    • 6. Use Normal Large Font
    • 7. Set Pause Time
    • 8. Set Scroll Speed
    • 9. Center and Melt
    • 10. Center and Scroll Down
    • 11. Center and Scroll Up
    • 12. Scroll Down and Stop
    • 13. Scroll UP and Stop
    • 14. Scroll Left and Stop and End of Message
    • 15. Scroll Down
    • 16. Scroll Up
    • 17. Scroll Right
    • 18. Scroll Left
    • 19. Reverse Video
    • 20. Normal

The player tracking controller then determines whether any such attribute information is found in the display message. If so, the player tracking controller sets up the display driver to incorporate the graphics mode specified by the attribute information. The player tracking controller then strips out any display attribute information from the display message in step 432 because the display attribute information is embedded in the display message. The remaining data in the display message is the actual text to be displayed by the player tracking display, e.g., the player's name. The player tracking controller then sends this text to the display in step 434, which is then displayed by the player tracking display.

4. Processing Bezel Update

The player tracking node is also responsible for updating the bezel, both in terms of its color and flashing rate. This process 412 is shown in FIG. 26. The first step in processing the bezel update is to determine to bezel color as specified by the DCN and then drive the appropriate LEDs in the card reader. As described above, the preferred embodiment of the card reader includes dual diodes having two primary colored diodes that can be driven separately or in combination to produce three different colors.

Next, the process determines the bezel rate as specified by the DCN. In a first case, the bezel rate is zero or off and thus the player tracking controller turns the LEDs off in step 442 in this case. If the bezel rate specifies a flashing rate, the player tracking controller flashes the bezel at the appropriate bezel rate in step 442. Flashing the bezel involves turning the LEDs on and off at the specified rate. This can be accomplished by a timer interrupt or a timing loop executed by the player tracking controller. The final option is that the rate can be infinite or effectively a solid bezel color. In this case, the player tracking controller simply leaves the card reader LEDs on in step 446. This completes the processing bezel update process 412.

5. Processing Card Reader

The next process step for the player tracking node is to process the card reader. This process 414 is shown in FIG. 27. The first step is for the player tracking controller to determine the card status in 450. In the preferred embodiment, the card status is determined by comparing the checksum of the card, as read off the card by the card reader, to a computed checksum of the data read off the card. Other methods of determining card status can be used as well depending on the type of card reader employed.

If the player tracking controller determines that a valid card was inserted in the card reader, the player tracking controller sets a card status variable equal to good card. This card status is then subsequently transmitted to the DCN controller. Then, the player tracking controller sets a card ID variable equal to the identification number read by the card reader in step 454. The card status and the card ID provide the DCN with sufficient information to instigate the player tracking.

If, on the other hand, the card reader indicates that the card was read improperly or that the card is an invalid card for the card reader, the player tracking controller sets the card status variable to bad card in step 458 and the card ID variable is cleared in step 460. If neither a valid or invalid card condition was detected in 450, the player tracking controller sets the card status variable to no card in step 462 and clears out the card ID in 460.

C. Floor Controller

1. Power Up Procedure

Referring now to FIGS. 28-32, the process 464 operable on the floor controller will now be described. The process 464 is shown in FIGS. 28-32 in flow chart forms. These flow charts would enable one of ordinary skill in the art to implement the process in computer software using an appropriate computer programming language.

The floor controller process 464 begins at step 466 by opening the database tables in the file server. As described above, the file server includes a commercially-available database program which stores the machine activity information as well as player tracking information and associated system characteristic parameters. This step 466 can also include fetching some or all of these system characteristics in order to trigger certain events such as bonus jackpots, as described below.

In step 468, the floor controller terminates any active player tracking sessions in the database. Because player tracking may have been in progress when the floor controller became inoperable, when the floor controller powers up or becomes operable, there may be player tracking sessions initially active. In this step, the floor controller terminates any such active player tracking sessions in order to place the database in an initial state.

Another step that the floor controller executes after becoming operable is to place an initial machine search message in an output message queue 470. This search message is used by the floor controller to determine which machines are connected to the floor controller. This output message is subsequently transmitted to all of the machines coupled to the floor controller using a global message format, as described below with reference to FIG. 31. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the message handling is through the use of message queues. Furthermore, the preferred embodiment is both an output queue for outgoing messages from the floor controller to the machines and an input message queue for messages coming from the machines to the floor controller. Queues are well-known data structures in the art of computer science and are therefore not further discussed herein. Alternatively, the message-handling could be done without the use of the queues. In such an embodiment the outgoing messages would be sent immediately rather than being queued, and any incoming messages would be processed immediately.

The bulk of the work performed by the file server process 464 is performed in message processing step 472. In this step, the floor controller processes all messages sent to or received from the machines connected thereto. This step will be described further below with references to FIGS. 29 through 31.

The process 464 also includes a system monitoring step 474. This system monitoring step 474 administers certain system-wide events. These system-wide events include the counting-related events and bonusing events. The floor controller continuously checks to see whether any of these events have been triggered. If any event has been triggered, such as a bonusing event, the floor controller takes the appropriate action to handle the event. The event may be triggered by the time and day or by user intervention or other event. The system monitoring step 474 will be described further below with reference to FIGS. 32 and 33.

The final step in process 464 is for the floor controller to check for a termination condition in step 476. In the preferred embodiment, the floor controller checks to determine whether an ESCape key as pressed. If an ESC key was pressed, the floor controller terminates the process 464. If no ESC key was pressed, the floor controller loops back to step 472 wherein the message-processing step and the system monitoring step are repeated. The floor controller continues in the loop 472-476 until the termination condition is sensed.

2. Message Processing

As described above, the floor controller acts as a gateway between the machines connected thereto and the file server, as shown in FIG. 1. The floor controller is responsible for forwarding the machine activity received from the various machines to the database. The floor controller accomplishes this communication through the use of messages. The message processing step 472 is shown in more detail in FIG. 29.

The first step in processing the messages is for the floor controller to send any messages that are queued-up in the output message queue to the appropriate data communication node in step 480. As described above, the output message queue is a simple data structure that is used to store any pending messages. Included in the message is a destination address by which the floor controller can determine which of the plurality of data communication nodes to send the message to. Next the floor controller receives any incoming messages from the data communication nodes coupled to the floor controller in step 482. Once an incoming message has been received, the floor controller parses through the message data included in the incoming message in steps 484 through 486. In the preferred embodiment, the floor controller parses through the message data one byte at a time. Thus, in step 484 the floor controller reads the next byte in the incoming message, and in step 486 the floor controller checks to see whether this is the last byte in the message. In the preferred embodiment, the message includes a message length field which indicates the number of data bytes included in the message. In this case, a floor controller in step 486 checks to see whether the number of bytes read in step 484 is equal to the number of bytes specified by the message length field.

Once the input message data has been parsed out of the incoming message, the floor controller takes the appropriate match in response to the message data in step 488. This step is described further below with reference to FIGS. 30 and 31. Following the message-handling step 488, the floor controller checks in step 490 to determine whether any response is pending. The floor controller makes this determination by checking a transactions-in-progress structure which indicates whether the floor controller needs to respond to any previous message. If a response is pending, the floor controller queues up an appropriate outgoing message in the output message queue in step 492. Otherwise, the floor controller completes the message processing step 472.

Referring now to FIG. 30, the message-handling step 488 is shown in more detail. The message-handling step begins by verifying that the message data corresponds to a valid message in step 496. In the preferred embodiment, the message includes a cyclical redundancy check (CRC) by which the floor controller can determine whether the message is valid or corrupt. Only if the message is valid will the floor controller perform any additional message-handling steps. The floor controller also parses through the message in step 496 to determine what type the message is. The message type determines the appropriate floor controller action. In the preferred embodiment, the messages include a command code which indicates the type of message.

The first type of message can be one which includes new meter information. The floor controller checks in step 498 to determine whether the message includes this type of information. If the message includes new meter information, the floor controller saves the new meter information locally in step 500. The floor controller maintains local copies of the meter information in order to minimize the amount of traffic on the high-speed network. Because the machine meters change so rapidly, forwarding this new meter information on to the file server each time one of these meters is altered would produce an excessive amount of network traffic on the high-speed network. Therefore, in the preferred embodiment, the floor controller saves this new meter information locally in step 500 and only forwards the new information on to the file server after a predetermined amount of time has elapsed.

Another type of message is one which requests data. The floor controller checks in step 502 to determine whether the message type is one requesting data. Typically, these data requests will be for player tracking information such as where a player inserts a card into a card reader whereupon the data communication associated therewith sends the identification number encoded on the card to the floor controller requesting the player tracking data associated with the player identification number. If the floor controller detects a data request in step 502, the floor controller looks up the requested data in the database on the file server in step 504. Also, in step 504, the floor controller marks a response pending in the transactions in progress structure to indicate that this requested data needs to be sent back to the DCN. As described above, the floor controller queues up outgoing messages responsive to the transactions in progress structure.

Another message type is one used by the floor controller to establish new machine addresses. The floor controller periodically checks to determine whether any new DCN has been coupled to its associated current loop networks in order to assign a unique address to that machine. In step 506, the floor controller checks to see whether the incoming message is in response to such a process. If the incoming message is in response to a machine search, the floor controller assigns a new machine address to the responding machine in step 508. The entire process of assigning new machine addresses is described below with reference to FIG. 31.

Finally, the floor controller in step 510 handles any miscellaneous messages. These miscellaneous messages are used primarily for debugging and trouble-shooting the machines.

3. Assigning Gaming Device Addresses

As described above, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the floor controller uses a shorthand token representation of the DCN's unique identification number to address the DCN. In the preferred embodiment, a single byte address is used to address a DCN on any given current loop. This one-byte address allows up to 256 DCNs to be supported on any given current loop network. In the preferred embodiment, only 64 such DCNs are connected to a single current loop network and therefore the single byte address is more than adequate. The single byte address substantially reduces the amount of traffic on the current loop network by reducing the number of bytes from four in the unique identification number to one for the shorthand token representation.

The floor controller is responsible for generating the unique single byte address for each data communication node on a given current loop network. The process 508 of assigning unique addresses to the DCNs on the current loop network is shown in FIG. 31. The process begins by defining a range of unique identification numbers in step 512. Initially this will be a large range.

Next, the floor controller sends out a message to all of the DCNs on the current loop network in step 514. The floor controller communicates with the DCNs by using a standard communication protocol. In the preferred embodiment, this protocol defines a message format including a destination ID, a source ID, a message length, a data packet and a CRC. Other message formats could be used as well. Using this format, the floor controller can communicate with all of the DCNs on the current loop network by using a global destination address in the message. This global destination address would indicate to the DCNs that this message is intended for all DCNs on the current loop network. This global message would include two unique identification numbers that, taken together, define the range of unique identification numbers established in step 512.

The individual DCNs then checks to see whether their unique identification number falls within this range. If a DCN's unique identification number falls within this range and the DCN does not have an address assigned thereto, the DCN then responds to this global message by sending a reply message in response that includes the unique identification number of that DCN. In the event that more than one DCN has a unique identification number that falls within this range a network collision will occur and the message will be corrupted. The process 508 checks for this condition in step 516. This condition is indicated by an invalid CRC in the message.

In the event of a network collision, the floor controller can limit the range of unique identification numbers by repeating step 512 in the hope of eliminating this network contention.

If the response has a valid CRC, the floor controller assigns a unique address to the responding DCN, as identified by the unique identification number in the response, in step 518. The floor controller then transmits this address along with the corresponding unique identification number in an assignment message to all of the DCNs using a global destination address in step 520. The DCNs then process this message and in the event that the unique identification number included in the message corresponds to the DCN's unique identification number, the DCN adopts the address included in the message. Once the DCN has been assigned an address in this manner, the DCN will interpret all subsequent messages having a destination address equal to the assigned DCN address as being directed to that DCN. The above-described address assignment sequence is repeated for each of the remaining DCNs on the current loop network in step 522. The floor controller continues this process until the entire range of unique identification numbers has been covered and no more network collisions occur.

4. System Monitoring

Referring now to FIG. 32, the system monitoring step 474 will now be described. The floor controller is now responsible for monitoring certain system-wide conditions to determine whether certain events need to occur. The system monitoring step also handles request for particular machine information. Thus, in step 524, the floor controller determines whether a new request has been placed in the data base for such particular machine information. If such a request has been placed, the floor controller responds to the special request for data in step 526 by sending a message to the particular machine requesting the required information. Once the required information has been received, the floor controller processes this information accordingly.

The floor controller also monitors the locally-stored meter information in step 528. If the locally-stored information is changed, the floor controller saves the latest information to the data base in step 530. As described above, the floor controller saves the meter information locally in order to minimize the traffic to the file server over the high speed network.

The floor controller also monitors the system for certain event triggers in step 532. These triggers can be stored in the data base and fetched by the floor controller during its power-up procedures. These triggers indicate if and when certain events occur. Examples of event triggers include: the drop period, the end-of-day, the bonus period, etc. If an event trigger has occurred, the floor controller handles the event in step 534.

The handle event step 534 is shown in more detail in FIG. 33. The events can basically be bifurcated into accounting events and bonusing events. Accounting events refer to the data communication activity of the system. The accounting events are typically triggered by a certain time of day such as the end of day or the drop period. If an accounting event has been triggered, the floor controller performs the required data base operations in step 538. This step involves updating all of the locally-stored meter information and storing the updated meter information into the data base.

The other type of event can be referred to as a bonusing event. The floor controller checks to see whether the event is a bonusing event in step 540. The bonusing events can also be triggered by the time of day. For example, the bonusing event may be triggered from midnight to 4:00 am. on weekdays. These bonusing periods can be specified in the data base. If the triggered event is a bonusing event, the floor controller inserts a corresponding reconfiguration message in the output message queue in step 542. The reconfiguration message includes a reconfiguration command that is sent to an appropriate machine. The machine, upon receiving the reconfiguration command, reconfigures its payout schedule in accordance with the received reconfiguration command. According to the invention, there are many different reconfiguration commands to implement a multiplicity of different bonusing events. One reconfiguration command specifies that the machine should reconfigure its payout schedule to be a multiple of its default payout schedule. This reconfiguration command can also specify that the multiple payout schedule should be limited to a predetermined percentage of the coins in. This reconfiguration command can further specify that the multiple payout schedule should be limited to only when the maximum coins are played. This reconfiguration command can further specify that the multiple payout schedule should be limited to payouts in a specified range. This reconfiguration command can also specify the multiple payout schedule should payout only when a predetermined level of player activity is reached.

Another reconfiguration command allows any number of machines on the network to be combined in a common jackpot having a common jackpot payout schedule, wherein the reconfiguration command reconfigures the selected machines to payout in accordance with the common jackpot payout schedule. In this case, the reconfiguration message would be queued up for each of the selected machines to be combined in a common jackpot. One example of a common jackpot is a progressive jackpot. Unlike the prior art progressive jackpot systems, however, the progressive jackpot according to the invention is not limited to a predetermined number of machines. In the prior art progressive jackpot systems, a bank of machines are connected to a common progressive jackpot controller and only those machines can be included in the progressive jackpot. In contrast, any machine on the network, including those connected to other floor controllers can be combined into a common progressive jackpot. Moreover, the number of progressive jackpots is not limited by the number of floor controllers since one floor controller can manage more than one progressive jackpot.

Another reconfiguration command permits the system to implement so-called “automatic mystery jackpots.” These “mystery” jackpots allow a machine to payout a mystery jackpot even when a jackpot was not won. Instead, the reconfiguration command can specify that the mystery jackpot is to occur after a certain number of coins, a certain number of handle pulls, or a variety of other conditions specified by the reconfiguration commands. These mystery bonuses provide the casino with another way to induce additional gaming activity.

5. Bonus Control

Referring now to FIG. 34, a method 550 for controlling the conditions under which the above-described bonus activities are activated is shown. It is essential for the system to have complete control over the amount and conditions under which a bonus is paid out in order to insure the profitability of the bonusing system. The method 550 described below provides the required control.

The method 550 begins in step 552 by disabling or turning off the bonuses in the individual machines. This is accomplished by sending a message to the individual DCNs to turn off or deactivate bonusing. Next, the floor controller monitors the activities of the individual machines connected thereto. This step includes monitoring the coins in and bonuses paid for the individual machines, as described above. In step 556, the floor controller modifies a bonus pool by a predetermined percentage of all coins played. The bonus pool is essentially a pool of monetary resources that can be allocated for bonus awards. In the preferred embodiment, a predetermined percentage of the monetary value of the coins played are added to the bonus pool. Also in this step, any bonuses paid by the gaming devices are also measured and subtracted from the bonus pool. The use of the bonus pool will become more apparent when the other steps are described hereinbelow.

In step 558, the floor controller determines whether or not bonusing is active. If bonusing is active, the floor controller next determines whether the bonus pool amount has dropped below a predetermined minimum level called the “turn-off” level in 560. This minimum amount or floor can be set by the casino and provides a buffer to account for large bonus awards and/or multiple bonus awards that could cause the bonus payout to exceed the bonus pool. Therefore, if the bonus pool drops below the turn-off level, the method 550 branches back to step 552 and turns off bonusing. As will described further below, the bonusing remains off until such time as the bonus pool builds up past another minimum level called the “turn-on” level.

Returniing to step 558, if the bonus is currently not active, the floor controller determines at step 562 whether the bonus pool has reached a predetermined turn-on level. This turn-on level can also be set by the casino and provides a buffer above the turn-off level to insure that the bonusing does not behave erratically, i.e., bonusing rapidly switching between on and off. If the bonus pool is not above the turn-on level, bonusing is again turned off in step 552.

If the bonus pool has reached the turn-on level, the floor controller checks to see whether other bonus conditions are met at step 564. These bonus conditions can include, but are not limited to, a minimum period of time since the last bonus activation, a minimum level of play in the time period prior to the bonus pool reaching the turn on level, a predetermined time of day, or other predetermined conditions. These conditions give the casino additional control over the bonusing promotions. If the conditions are not met, the method 550 branches back to step 552 where the bonusing is again turned off. If, however, the conditions are met in step 564, the bonus is turned on at step 566 and the method 550 branches to step 554 where the machine activity is again monitored.

In the preferred embodiment, the method 550 is embodied in software that is executed by each of the floor controllers in the system. These floor controllers are then responsible for activating or deactivating the bonusing for the individual machines connected thereto. The system allows the floor controller to have multiple bonus pools and to have certain of the machines associated with a given bonus pool. Thus, the floor controller can implement multiple bonusing promotions simultaneously.

This system also allows for machines connected to different floor controllers to be combined into a single bonusing promotion. In this case, one of the floor controllers assumes primary responsibility for managing the bonus pool while the other floor controllers act as intermediaries between the primary floor controller and the machines connected to the other floor controllers. Thus, the system according to the invention allows for much greater flexibility in running bonusing promotionals than heretofore possible. Prior art systems required certain predetermined machines to be connected into a bank for any given bonus award such as a progressive bonus. The system according to the invention allows any machine in the casino to be combined in a bonus type situation. The system also insures that the bonusing promotionals will operate substantially in the black, i.e., the bonus pool is greater than the bonus payouts.

Having described and illustrated the principles of the invention in a preferred embodiment thereof, it should be apparent that the invention can be modified in arrangement and detail without departing from such principles. For example, although an Ethernet network was described in the preferred embodiment of the invention, other high-speed networks such as wireless networks could be used in place thereof. I claim all modifications and variation coming within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

Claims (49)

1. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer comprising:
selecting a plurality of the gaming devices;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the selected gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played to a bonus pool;
issuing a command over the network including data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event;
storing the command in a memory connected to a controller associated with only one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of gaming device activity from the gaming device to the controller;
transmitting a pay command from the controller to the gaming device upon the occurrence of the predetermined event; and
paying the bonus via the gaming device responsive to receipt of the pay command.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein said bonus pool comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the predetermined event comprises effecting a wager at one of said selected gaming devices which brings the pool to a predetermined level.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said selected gaming devices comprise a group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said selected gaming devices comprise a first group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network and wherein said method further comprises:
selecting a second group of gaming devices;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the second group of gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played on the second group of gaming devices to a second bonus pool; and
issuing a second command over the network to cause a second bonus to be paid from the second pool via one of said gaming devices in the second group upon the occurrence of a second predetermined event.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein said second bonus pool comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the second predetermined event comprises winning a jackpot at one of said gaming devices in the second group.
6. The method of claim 4 wherein the second group of gaming devices comprise a group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network.
7. The method of claim 6 wherein said first and second groups of gaming devices include different gaming devices.
8. The method of claim 4 wherein said method further comprises:
storing the second command in a second memory connected to a second controller associated with a second one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of activity of the second gaming device from the second gaming device to the second controller;
transmitting a second pay command from the second controller to the second gaming device upon the occurrence of the second predetermined event; and
paying the second bonus via the second gaming device responsive to receipt of the second pay command.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein the step of using the network to track the amount of money played on the selected gaming devices occurs after the step of selecting a plurality of the gaming devices.
10. The method of claim 5 wherein said second bonus comprises a multiple of the jackpot.
11. The method of claim 10 wherein said first-mentioned bonus comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the first-mentioned predetermined event comprises effecting a wager at one of the gaming devices in the first group which brings the first-mentioned pool to a predetermined level.
12. The method of claim 1 wherein said method further includes using the network to track the activity of all of the gaming devices in the network substantially simultaneously with all of the preceding steps.
13. The method of claim 1 wherein said host computer includes a user-operated input device and wherein selecting a plurality of the gaming devices comprises effecting action at the input device.
14. The method of claim 13 wherein said method further includes associating each gaming device with a unique address code and wherein effecting action at the input device comprises identifying the selected gaming devices with their respective associated address codes.
15. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer comprising:
detecting a player of the gaming devices;
transmitting the amount of money played at each gaming device by the player from the gaming device to the host computer;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played by the player on all of the gaming devices to a bonus pool containing allocations resulting only from money played by the player; and
issuing a command over the network to cause the pool to be paid by a gaming device played by the player upon the occurrence of a predetermined event.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein said bonus pool comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the predetermined event comprises effecting a wager at one of the gaming devices which brings the pool to a predetermined level.
17. The method of claim 15 wherein the step of detecting a player of the gaming devices comprises entering a unique player identification card into a card reader operatively connected to one of the gaming devices and to the network.
18. The method of claim 15 wherein issuing a command over the network to cause the pool to be paid by a gaming device played by the player upon the occurrence of a predetermined event comprises issuing a command over the network upon the occurrence of a predetermined transaction at the gaming device played by the player.
19. The method of claim 15 wherein allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played by the player on all of the gaming devices to a bonus pool comprises allocating only money played by the player to the bonus pool and wherein said method further includes:
transmitting the amount of money played at a first gaming device by the player from the first gaming device to the host computer;
transmitting the amount of money played at a second gaming device by the player from the second gaming device to the host computer; and
issuing a command over the network to cause the pool to be paid by said second gaming device upon the occurrence of said predetermined event.
20. The method of claim 19 wherein issuing a command over the network to cause the pool to be paid by said second gaming device upon the occurrence of said predetermined event comprises issuing a command over the network upon the occurrence of a predetermined transaction at said second gaming device.
21. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer comprising:
selecting a plurality of the gaming devices;
issuing a command over the network including data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event;
storing the command in a memory connected to a controller associated with only one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of gaming device activity from the gaming device to the controller;
transmitting a pay command from the controller to the gaming device upon the occurrence of the predetermined event; and
paying the bonus via the gaming device responsive to receipt of the pay command.
22. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer having a user-operated input device comprising:
preselecting less than all of the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network responsive to a user-effected action at the input device;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the preselected gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played to a bonus pool; and
issuing a command over the network to cause a bonus to be paid from the pool by one of said preselected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event.
23. The method of claim 22 wherein said preselected gaming devices comprise a first group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network and wherein said method further comprises:
preselecting a second group of gaming devices responsive to a user-effected action at the input device;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the second group of gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played on the second group of gaming devices to a second bonus pool; and
issuing a command over the network to cause a second bonus to be paid from the second pool via one of said gaming devices in the second group upon the occurrence of a second predetermined event.
24. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer comprising:
selecting a plurality of the gaming devices;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the selected gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played to a bonus pool; initiating a bonus period after the bonus pool exceeds a predetermined level;
providing data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event;
storing the data in a memory connected to a controller associated with only one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of gaming device activity from the gaming device to the controller;
initiating the bonus period;
transmitting a pay command from the controller to the gaming device upon the occurrence of the predetermined event; and
paying the bonus via the gaming device responsive to receipt of the pay command.
25. The method of claim 24 wherein the predetermined event comprises a predetermined transaction at the gaming device.
26. The method of claim 25 wherein said predetermined transaction comprises making a wager at the gaming device.
27. The method of claim 25 wherein said predetermined transaction comprises a jackpot at the gaming device.
28. The method of claim 24 wherein providing data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event comprises providing data causing a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices only if predetermined minimum gaming device activity is achieved.
29. The method of claim 24 wherein said predetermined event comprises transmission of a pay command from the host computer to the controller.
30. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer comprising:
selecting a plurality of the gaming devices;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the selected gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played to a bonus pool;
generating a message including data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event;
transmitting the message over the network;
storing the message in a memory connected to a controller associated with only one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of gaming device activity from the gaming device to the controller;
transmitting a pay command from the controller to the gaming device upon the occurrence of the predetermined event; and
paying the bonus via the gaming device responsive to receipt of the pay command.
31. The method of claim 30 wherein said bonus pool comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the predetermined event comprises effecting a wager at one of said selected gaming devices that brings the pool to a predetermined level.
32. The method of claim 30 wherein said selected gaming devices comprise a group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network.
33. The method of claim 30 wherein said selected gaming devices comprise a first group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network and wherein said method further comprises:
selecting a second group of gaming devices;
using the network to track the amount of money played on the second group of gaming devices;
allocating a predetermined percentage of the money played on the second group of gaming devices to a second bonus pool; and
generating a second message to cause a second bonus to be paid from the second pool via one of said gaming devices in the second group upon the occurrence of a second predetermined event.
34. The method of claim 33 wherein said second bonus pool comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the second predetermined event comprises winning a jackpot at one of said gaming devices in the second group.
35. The method of claim 33 wherein the second group of gaming devices comprises a group of gaming devices made up of less than all the gaming devices interconnected by the computer network.
36. The method of claim 35 wherein said first and second groups of gaming devices include different gaming devices.
37. The method of claim 33 wherein said method further comprises:
storing the second message in a second memory connected to a second controller associated with a second one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of activity of the second gaming device from the second gaming device to the second controller;
transmitting a second pay command from the second controller to the second gaming device upon the occurrence of the second predetermined event; and
paying the second bonus via the second gaming device responsive to receipt of the second pay command.
38. The method of claim 30 wherein the step of using the network to track the amount of money played on the selected gaming devices occurs after the step of selecting a plurality of the gaming devices.
39. The method of claim 34 wherein said second bonus comprises a multiple of the jackpot.
40. The method of claim 39 wherein said first-mentioned bonus comprises a progressive jackpot and wherein the first-mentioned predetermined event comprises effecting a wager at one of the gaming devices in the first group that brings the first-mentioned pool to a predetermined level.
41. The method of claim 30 wherein said method further includes using the network to track the activity of all of the gaming devices in the network substantially simultaneously with all of the preceding steps.
42. The method of claim 30 wherein said host computer includes a user-operated input device and wherein selecting a plurality of the gaming devices comprises effecting action at the input device.
43. The method of claim 42 wherein said method further includes associating each gaming device with a unique address code and wherein effecting action at the input device comprises identifying the selected gaming devices with their respective associated address codes.
44. A method of operating gaming devices interconnected by a computer network to a host computer comprising:
selecting a plurality of the gaming devices;
generating a message including data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event;
transmitting the message over the network;
storing the message in a memory connected to a controller associated with only one of the gaming devices;
transmitting data indicative of gaming device activity from the gaming device to the controller;
transmitting a pay command from the controller to the gaming device upon the occurrence of the predetermined event; and
paying the bonus via the gaming device responsive to receipt of the pay command.
45. The method of claim 44 wherein the predetermined event comprises a predetermined transaction at the gaming device.
46. The method of claim 45 wherein said predetermined transaction comprises making a wager at the gaming device.
47. The method of claim 45 wherein said predetermined transaction comprises a jackpot at the gaming device.
48. The method of claim 44 wherein generating a message including data establishing criteria to cause a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices upon the occurrence of a predetermined event comprises providing data causing a bonus to be paid from the pool via one of said selected gaming devices only if predetermined minimum gaming device activity is achieved.
49. The method of claim 44 wherein said predetermined event comprises transmission of a pay command from the host computer to the controller.
US09574632 1994-10-12 2000-05-16 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices Expired - Lifetime USRE38812E1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08322172 US5655961A (en) 1994-10-12 1994-10-12 Method for operating networked gaming devices
US08465717 US5836817A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US09574632 USRE38812E1 (en) 1994-10-12 2000-05-16 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09574632 USRE38812E1 (en) 1994-10-12 2000-05-16 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08465717 Reissue US5836817A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
USRE38812E1 true USRE38812E1 (en) 2005-10-04

Family

ID=23253727

Family Applications (23)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08322172 Expired - Lifetime US5655961A (en) 1994-10-12 1994-10-12 Method for operating networked gaming devices
US08465717 Expired - Lifetime US5836817A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08465942 Expired - Lifetime US5741183A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08467793 Expired - Lifetime US5820459A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08467072 Expired - Lifetime US5702304A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08465915 Expired - Lifetime US5752882A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08843411 Expired - Lifetime US6319125B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1997-04-15 Method apparatus for promoting play on a network of gaming devices
US08922046 Expired - Lifetime US6257981B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1997-09-02 Computer network for controlling and monitoring gaming devices
US08998285 Expired - Lifetime US6162122A (en) 1994-10-12 1997-12-24 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US09086964 Expired - Lifetime US6254483B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1998-05-29 Method and apparatus for controlling the cost of playing an electronic gaming device
US09373034 Expired - Lifetime USRE43727E1 (en) 1994-10-12 1999-08-11 Method for operating networked gaming devices
US09425544 Expired - Fee Related US6565434B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1999-10-22 Method and apparatus for promoting play on a network of gaming devices
US09574632 Expired - Lifetime USRE38812E1 (en) 1994-10-12 2000-05-16 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US09573470 Expired - Lifetime USRE37885E1 (en) 1994-10-12 2000-05-16 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US09827870 Expired - Fee Related US7749077B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2001-04-06 Method and apparatus for operating multiple games on a network of gaming devices
US09878111 Expired - Lifetime US7798899B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2001-06-06 Method and apparatus for controlling the cost of playing an electronic gaming device
US10366036 Expired - Fee Related US6910964B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2003-02-12 Selective indication of a bonus at a gaming device with player input
US10443685 Expired - Fee Related US6832958B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2003-05-21 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US10932615 Expired - Lifetime US8172682B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2004-09-02 Computer network and method for changing the pay schedules of gaming devices
US11118163 Abandoned US20050209005A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2005-04-29 Software downloadable on a network for controlling gaming devices
US11380879 Abandoned US20060183529A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2006-04-28 Method and Apparatus for Operating Networked Gaming Devices
US11380895 Abandoned US20060172804A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2006-04-28 Method and Apparatus for Operating Networked Gaming Devices
US11580667 Abandoned US20070032301A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2006-10-12 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices

Family Applications Before (12)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08322172 Expired - Lifetime US5655961A (en) 1994-10-12 1994-10-12 Method for operating networked gaming devices
US08465717 Expired - Lifetime US5836817A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08465942 Expired - Lifetime US5741183A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08467793 Expired - Lifetime US5820459A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08467072 Expired - Lifetime US5702304A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08465915 Expired - Lifetime US5752882A (en) 1994-10-12 1995-06-06 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US08843411 Expired - Lifetime US6319125B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1997-04-15 Method apparatus for promoting play on a network of gaming devices
US08922046 Expired - Lifetime US6257981B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1997-09-02 Computer network for controlling and monitoring gaming devices
US08998285 Expired - Lifetime US6162122A (en) 1994-10-12 1997-12-24 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US09086964 Expired - Lifetime US6254483B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1998-05-29 Method and apparatus for controlling the cost of playing an electronic gaming device
US09373034 Expired - Lifetime USRE43727E1 (en) 1994-10-12 1999-08-11 Method for operating networked gaming devices
US09425544 Expired - Fee Related US6565434B1 (en) 1994-10-12 1999-10-22 Method and apparatus for promoting play on a network of gaming devices

Family Applications After (10)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09573470 Expired - Lifetime USRE37885E1 (en) 1994-10-12 2000-05-16 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US09827870 Expired - Fee Related US7749077B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2001-04-06 Method and apparatus for operating multiple games on a network of gaming devices
US09878111 Expired - Lifetime US7798899B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2001-06-06 Method and apparatus for controlling the cost of playing an electronic gaming device
US10366036 Expired - Fee Related US6910964B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2003-02-12 Selective indication of a bonus at a gaming device with player input
US10443685 Expired - Fee Related US6832958B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2003-05-21 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices
US10932615 Expired - Lifetime US8172682B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2004-09-02 Computer network and method for changing the pay schedules of gaming devices
US11118163 Abandoned US20050209005A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2005-04-29 Software downloadable on a network for controlling gaming devices
US11380879 Abandoned US20060183529A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2006-04-28 Method and Apparatus for Operating Networked Gaming Devices
US11380895 Abandoned US20060172804A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2006-04-28 Method and Apparatus for Operating Networked Gaming Devices
US11580667 Abandoned US20070032301A1 (en) 1994-10-12 2006-10-12 Method and apparatus for operating networked gaming devices

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (23) US5655961A (en)
WO (1) WO1996012262A1 (en)

Cited By (189)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020099749A1 (en) * 2001-01-22 2002-07-25 Atsushi Shimbo Modular arithmetic apparatus and method selecting a base in the residue number system
US20020155871A1 (en) * 2001-03-26 2002-10-24 Celona Anthony P. Video poker game and method
US20020177480A1 (en) * 2001-04-04 2002-11-28 Rick Rowe Method and apparatus for tracking game play
US20020187834A1 (en) * 2001-04-04 2002-12-12 Rick Rowe System, method and interface for monitoring player game play in real time
US20030149786A1 (en) * 2002-02-06 2003-08-07 Mark Duffy Efficient counter retrieval
US20040023710A1 (en) * 2000-10-12 2004-02-05 Mcgahn Steven P. Gaming device having an unveiling award mechanical secondary display
US20040152518A1 (en) * 2003-01-09 2004-08-05 Aruze Corp. Network game system, network game server, and advertisement displaying method
US20040149817A1 (en) * 2002-11-06 2004-08-05 Koji Kuroiwa Bill handling apparatus and method for transmitting code information
US20040229698A1 (en) * 2003-05-13 2004-11-18 Clifton Lind Dynamically configurable gaming system
US20040229684A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-11-18 Blackburn Christopher W. Gaming management service in a service-oriented gaming network environment
US20040229699A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-11-18 Gentles Thomas A. Service-oriented gaming network environment
US20040243849A1 (en) * 2003-03-06 2004-12-02 Blackburn Christopher W. Authorization service in a service-oriented gaming network environment
US20040248645A1 (en) * 2003-03-17 2004-12-09 Blackburn Christopher W. Accounting service in a service-oriented gaming network environment
US20050059472A1 (en) * 2003-09-11 2005-03-17 Joshi Shridhar P. Gaming machine with multi-level progressive jackpot
US20050079911A1 (en) * 2001-11-26 2005-04-14 Konami Australia Pty Ltd Linked jackpot controller
US20050227769A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2005-10-13 Morrow James W Gaming device network managing system and method
US20060068906A1 (en) * 2004-09-16 2006-03-30 James Morrow User interface system and method for a gaming machine
US20060111178A1 (en) * 2004-09-16 2006-05-25 Bally Gaming, Inc. System-level bonus game and related methods
US20060142086A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2006-06-29 Blackburn Christopher W Progressive service in a service-oriented gaming network environment
US20060178186A1 (en) * 2005-02-04 2006-08-10 Multimedia Games, Inc. Configurable gaming machine and method for configuring games in a gaming machine
US20060264257A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-11-23 Jaffe Joel R Gaming machine having gaming loyalty features
US20060287098A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2006-12-21 Morrow James W System and method for gaming-content configuration and management system
US20070060332A1 (en) * 2005-08-15 2007-03-15 Anderson Peter R Gaming machine having additional features for tracked players
US20070069460A1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2007-03-29 Hein Marvin A Method for Remapping a Game Wheel
US20070082737A1 (en) * 2004-09-16 2007-04-12 Bally Gaming International, Inc. User Interface System and Method
US20070087811A1 (en) * 2004-01-07 2007-04-19 Igt Electronic game apparatus and method providing a secondary game triggered apart from a primary game
US20070105618A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-10 Steil Rolland N Secure identification devices and methods for detecting and monitoring access thereof
US20070111798A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2007-05-17 Robb Harold K Controlled access switch
US20070111799A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2007-05-17 Robb Harold K Controlled access switch
US20070117634A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2007-05-24 Hamilton Garry L Store and Forward Patron Account Messaging Method
US20070117633A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2007-05-24 Hamilton Garry L Store and Forward Patron Account Messaging System
US20070167208A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2007-07-19 Acres John F Randomly enabled bonus game with controllable frequency of occurence
US20070213121A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Waterleaf Limited Wager games with bonus play promotions, bonus play game mode, and pay table
US20080064502A1 (en) * 2006-06-13 2008-03-13 Igt Server based gaming system and method for selectively providing one or more different tournaments
US20080064492A1 (en) * 2006-09-13 2008-03-13 Jeroen Oosthoek System and method for rewarding players based on personal interests or attributes
US20080070688A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-20 John Loehrer Real-time gaming system having scalable database
US20080076573A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2008-03-27 John Loehrer Network-based game system
US20080090652A1 (en) * 2006-10-16 2008-04-17 Kuehling Brian L Progressive controller
US20080176645A1 (en) * 2004-08-20 2008-07-24 Igt Player tracking instruments having multiple communication modes
US20080176647A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2008-07-24 Acres-Fiore, Inc. Method and apparatus for selectively indicating win proximity
US20080207313A1 (en) * 2007-02-27 2008-08-28 Acres-Fiore, Inc. Method and apparatus for indicating win proximity
US20080275769A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Shao Billy Jye-En Network-based interactive entertainment center
US20080274790A1 (en) * 2001-08-17 2008-11-06 Igt Class of feature event games suitable for linking to multiple gaming machines
US20080311980A1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2008-12-18 Igt Method and apparatus for competitive bonus games based upon strategy or skill
US20090011826A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2009-01-08 Acres-Fiore, Inc. Bonus with Increasing Proximity of Occurrence
US20090023490A1 (en) * 2007-07-19 2009-01-22 Waterleaf Limited Pre-paid game cards and lottery tickets providing access to online electronic games
US20090075728A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2009-03-19 Acres-Fiore, Inc. Proximity meter manipulation on a gaming event
US7507156B2 (en) 2004-06-04 2009-03-24 Igt Gaming device providing an opportunity to receive awards which vary with different non-max bets
US20090082099A1 (en) * 2004-09-16 2009-03-26 Bally Gaming International, Inc. User Interface System and System-Controlled Bonus System
US20090093299A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2009-04-09 Acres-Fiore, Inc. Recent result display indicia for gaming device
US20090098932A1 (en) * 2007-10-13 2009-04-16 Douglas Ronald Longway Apparatus and methodology for electronic table game system
US20090111566A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Waterleaf Limited Display of bonus game progression in reel-type games
US20090117969A1 (en) * 2005-07-06 2009-05-07 Englman Allon G Wagering game system with networked gaming devices
US20090124332A1 (en) * 2007-11-09 2009-05-14 Igt Gaming system and method having configurable bonus game triggering outcomes
US20090143136A1 (en) * 2006-05-24 2009-06-04 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering Game System Having Bonus Game Configurations
US20090215523A1 (en) * 2008-02-26 2009-08-27 Acres-Fiore Patents Method and apparatus for selectively indicating win probability
US20090247267A1 (en) * 2008-03-20 2009-10-01 Acres-Fiore Patents Bonus with proximity of occurrence related to base game outcomes or payback percentage
US20090270168A1 (en) * 2006-06-30 2009-10-29 Wms Gaming Inc. Progressive Game Eligibility And Winning
US20090298577A1 (en) * 2006-02-07 2009-12-03 Wms Gaming Inc. Wager gaming network with wireless hotspots
US7644861B2 (en) 2006-04-18 2010-01-12 Bgc Partners, Inc. Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US7651392B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2010-01-26 Igt Gaming device system having partial progressive payout
US7654896B2 (en) 2005-09-06 2010-02-02 Igt Gaming system which provides multiple players multiple bonus awards
US20100029369A1 (en) * 2006-11-10 2010-02-04 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with dynamically added sub-symbols
US20100041472A1 (en) * 2006-11-10 2010-02-18 Gagner Mark B Wagering game award system
US7666093B2 (en) 2004-08-03 2010-02-23 Igt Gaming method and device involving progressive wagers
US7666081B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2010-02-23 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US20100048283A1 (en) * 2006-11-10 2010-02-25 Wms Gaming Inc. Parameter adjustment in a wagering game
US20100075746A1 (en) * 2006-09-12 2010-03-25 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming Machine with Separately Selectable Wagering Games
US7690977B2 (en) 2005-09-06 2010-04-06 Igt Gaming system and method for providing multiple players multiple bonus awards
US20100087256A1 (en) * 2006-09-22 2010-04-08 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming Network with Associated Community/Progressive Features
US7713124B2 (en) 2005-09-06 2010-05-11 Igt Gaming system and method for providing group play with divided bonus features
US7722464B2 (en) 2005-09-06 2010-05-25 Igt Gaming system which provides multiple players multiple bonus awards
US7727070B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2010-06-01 Igt Method and apparatus for authenticating and verifying communication on a network of gaming devices
US7749077B2 (en) 1994-10-12 2010-07-06 Igt Method and apparatus for operating multiple games on a network of gaming devices
US7753784B2 (en) 2005-09-06 2010-07-13 Igt Gaming device having progressive awards and supplemental awards
US7780520B2 (en) 2006-03-15 2010-08-24 Igt Gaming device having multiple different types of progressive awards
US7780523B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2010-08-24 Igt Server based gaming system having multiple progressive awards
US20100216544A1 (en) * 2007-11-05 2010-08-26 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system having cycling eligibility for supplemental features
US7789755B2 (en) 2006-11-06 2010-09-07 Igt Gaming system and method having award distribution using shares
US7794322B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2010-09-14 Igt System for awarding a bonus to a gaming device on a wide area network
US20100255912A1 (en) * 2007-11-01 2010-10-07 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system having graphical user interface for configuration of wagering games
US7811172B2 (en) 2005-10-21 2010-10-12 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless lottery
US20100261521A1 (en) * 2007-11-09 2010-10-14 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system having tools for categorizing wagers and metering performance of wagering games and supplemental features
US20100291998A1 (en) * 2008-01-14 2010-11-18 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system having tools for pairing wagering games with available progressive games
US7857699B2 (en) 2006-11-01 2010-12-28 Igt Gaming system and method of operating a gaming system having a bonus participation bidding sequence
US20110014971A1 (en) * 2007-07-18 2011-01-20 Ward Matthew J Gaming System Having Operator Configurable Supplemental Features
US20110014975A1 (en) * 2008-02-21 2011-01-20 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system having displays with integrated image capture capablities
US7892093B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2011-02-22 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US7905778B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2011-03-15 Igt Server based gaming system having multiple progressive awards
US7905777B2 (en) 2005-08-04 2011-03-15 Igt Methods and apparatus for auctioning an item via a gaming device
US7934993B2 (en) 2006-10-16 2011-05-03 Igt Secure progressive controller
US20110111828A1 (en) * 2009-11-12 2011-05-12 Igt Gaming systems, gaming devices and methods with volatility control games
US20110111826A1 (en) * 2009-11-11 2011-05-12 Igt Gaming system and method for providing symbol combinations with dynamic awards
US7942737B2 (en) 2000-09-07 2011-05-17 Igt Gaming device having a game with multiple selections and progressive game incrementation
US7963845B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2011-06-21 Igt Gaming system and method with multiple progressive award levels and a skill based determination of providing one of the progressive award levels
US7963847B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2011-06-21 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US7976379B2 (en) 2007-11-09 2011-07-12 Igt Gaming system and method having configurable bonus game triggering outcomes
US7985133B2 (en) 2007-07-30 2011-07-26 Igt Gaming system and method for providing an additional gaming currency
US20110196990A1 (en) * 2010-02-09 2011-08-11 Honeywell International Inc. Systems and methods for auto addressing in a control network
US8021230B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2011-09-20 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US20110230260A1 (en) * 2000-12-22 2011-09-22 Morrow James W Universal Game Monitoring Unit and System
US8070597B2 (en) 2006-08-03 2011-12-06 Igt Gaming device and method having multiple progressive award levels and a secondary game for advancing through the progressive award levels
US8070604B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2011-12-06 Cfph, Llc System and method for providing wireless gaming as a service application
US8079904B2 (en) * 2004-08-20 2011-12-20 Igt Gaming access card with display
US8092302B2 (en) 2008-11-12 2012-01-10 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method providing tiered progressive bonusing system
US8092303B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2012-01-10 Cfph, Llc System and method for convenience gaming
US8092297B2 (en) 2007-11-07 2012-01-10 Igt Gaming system and method for providing a bonus based on number of gaming machines being actively played
US8096874B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2012-01-17 Igt Gaming system and method having progressive awards with meter increase events
US8105149B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2012-01-31 Igt Gaming system and method providing venue wide simultaneous player participation based bonus game
US8113939B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2012-02-14 Igt Gaming device and method providing relatively large awards with variable player participation levels
US8118662B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2012-02-21 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing player selection of modifiers to game components
US8128491B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2012-03-06 Igt Server based gaming system having multiple progressive awards
US8152630B2 (en) 2008-11-13 2012-04-10 Igt Gaming system and method having bonus event and bonus event award in accordance with a current wager and one or more accumulated bonus event points
US8162746B2 (en) 2007-09-28 2012-04-24 Igt Gaming system and method configured to change the odds of a player obtaining a winning game outcome or a designated game outcome for a play of a game without changing the paytable of the game
US8162756B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2012-04-24 Cfph, Llc Time and location based gaming
US8172686B2 (en) 2006-08-08 2012-05-08 Wms Gaming Inc. Configurable wagering game manager
US8197337B2 (en) 2007-10-29 2012-06-12 Igt Gaming system and method for providing multi-level personal progressive awards
US8202158B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2012-06-19 Wms Gaming Inc. Apparatus to pass a value based parameter for a wagering game
US8216065B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2012-07-10 Igt Gaming system having multiple adjacently arranged gaming machines which each provide a component for a multi-component game
US8231453B2 (en) 2009-08-25 2012-07-31 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a player an opportunity to win a designated award based on one or more aspects of the player's skill
US8251791B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2012-08-28 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US8292720B2 (en) 2009-05-29 2012-10-23 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method providing competitive wagering games
US8292741B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2012-10-23 Cfph, Llc Apparatus, processes and articles for facilitating mobile gaming
US8308567B2 (en) 2003-03-05 2012-11-13 Wms Gaming Inc. Discovery service in a service-oriented gaming network environment
US8313371B1 (en) * 2000-12-20 2012-11-20 Bally Gaming, Inc. Method and apparatus for awarding component prizes in a gaming environment
US8319601B2 (en) 2007-03-14 2012-11-27 Cfph, Llc Game account access device
US8342947B2 (en) 2009-11-13 2013-01-01 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for determining an outcome of a secondary game based on one or more events which occur in association with a primary game
US8357039B2 (en) 2009-01-29 2013-01-22 Wms Gaming, Inc. Configuring and controlling wagering game compatibility
US8360887B2 (en) 2006-02-09 2013-01-29 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game server availability broadcast message system
US8376836B2 (en) 2008-11-07 2013-02-19 Igt Server based gaming system and method for providing deferral of bonus events
US8397985B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2013-03-19 Cfph, Llc Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8419546B2 (en) 2009-08-31 2013-04-16 Igt Gaming system and method for selectively providing an elimination tournament that funds an award through expected values of unplayed tournament games of eliminated players
US8435111B2 (en) 2009-11-13 2013-05-07 Igt Gaming systems, gaming devices and methods for providing progressive awards
US8491381B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2013-07-23 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a multiple player, multiple game bonusing environment
US8504617B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2013-08-06 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US8500548B2 (en) 2007-11-08 2013-08-06 Igt Gaming system and method for providing team progressive awards
US8510567B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2013-08-13 Cfph, Llc Conditional biometric access in a gaming environment
US8506400B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2013-08-13 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming system with alerts
US8517818B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2013-08-27 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a multiple player, multiple game bonusing environment
US8517819B2 (en) 2005-09-07 2013-08-27 Bally Gaming, Inc. System gaming
US8523665B2 (en) 2006-10-11 2013-09-03 Igt Gaming system and method having multi-level mystery triggered progressive awards
US8529349B2 (en) 2004-09-16 2013-09-10 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US8529341B2 (en) 2004-07-27 2013-09-10 Igt Optically sensitive display for a gaming apparatus
US8535158B2 (en) 2004-09-16 2013-09-17 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US8545313B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2013-10-01 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a multiple player, multiple game bonusing environment
US8568218B2 (en) 2005-09-07 2013-10-29 Bally Gaming, Inc. System gaming
US8581721B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2013-11-12 Cfph, Llc Game access device with privileges
US8613658B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2013-12-24 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming system with user profiles
US8628405B2 (en) 2004-10-15 2014-01-14 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system having exchangeable bonus token accumulation-redemption feature
US8645709B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2014-02-04 Cfph, Llc Biometric access data encryption
US8721436B2 (en) 2012-08-17 2014-05-13 Wms Gaming Inc. Systems, methods and devices for configuring wagering game devices based on shared data
US8784195B1 (en) 2003-03-05 2014-07-22 Bally Gaming, Inc. Authentication system for gaming machines
US8784197B2 (en) 2006-11-15 2014-07-22 Cfph, Llc Biometric access sensitivity
US8790177B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2014-07-29 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a multiple player, multiple game bonusing environment
US8814669B2 (en) 2005-12-08 2014-08-26 Igt Systems and methods for post-play gaming benefits
US8827796B2 (en) 2012-01-16 2014-09-09 Cork Group Trading Ltd. Display of symbol accumulation in reel-type games
US8840018B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2014-09-23 Cfph, Llc Device with time varying signal
US8840462B2 (en) 2005-09-07 2014-09-23 Bally Gaming, Inc. Tournament bonus awards and related methods
US8956231B2 (en) 2010-08-13 2015-02-17 Cfph, Llc Multi-process communication regarding gaming information
US8974302B2 (en) 2010-08-13 2015-03-10 Cfph, Llc Multi-process communication regarding gaming information
US8986121B2 (en) 2002-09-13 2015-03-24 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US8986107B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2015-03-24 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a multiple player, multiple game bonusing environment
US8992326B2 (en) 2006-09-06 2015-03-31 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US9047733B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2015-06-02 Igt Gaming system and method for providing multiple level progressive awards with increased odds of winning higher level progressive awards
US9053602B2 (en) 2005-02-16 2015-06-09 Igt Flexible determination of progressive awards
US9064375B2 (en) 2003-10-20 2015-06-23 Igt Method and apparatus for providing secondary gaming machine functionality
US9082260B2 (en) 2004-09-16 2015-07-14 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US9082257B2 (en) 2011-09-30 2015-07-14 Igt Gaming system and method providing a community selection game providing bonus game selection
US9100397B2 (en) 2012-07-23 2015-08-04 Honeywell International Inc. BACnet MS/TP automatic MAC addressing
US9098968B1 (en) 2014-02-12 2015-08-04 Igt Gaming system and method for accumulating and redeeming community game tokens
US9117342B2 (en) 2004-09-16 2015-08-25 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US9183693B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2015-11-10 Cfph, Llc Game access device
US9196124B2 (en) 2012-01-16 2015-11-24 Cork Group Trading Ltd. Nudge features in reel-type games
US9306952B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2016-04-05 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US9342956B2 (en) 2012-02-24 2016-05-17 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for shifting progressive award contribution rates
US9390585B2 (en) 2013-07-17 2016-07-12 Igt Gaming system and method for providing team play benefits
US9430898B2 (en) 2007-04-30 2016-08-30 Patent Investment & Licensing Company Gaming device with personality
US9466170B2 (en) 2002-09-13 2016-10-11 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked gaming system communication protocols and methods
US9514605B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2016-12-06 Igt Gaming system, gaming device and method for providing a multiple player, multiple game bonusing environment with a multiple player coin drop game
US9514606B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2016-12-06 Bally Gaming, Inc. Wagering game with mystery bonus triggers
US9558629B2 (en) 2013-09-19 2017-01-31 Igt Gaming system and method for providing a plurality of chances of winning a progressive award
US9640017B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2017-05-02 Igt Gaming system and method employing rankings of outcomes from multiple gaming machines to determine awards
US9685039B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2017-06-20 Igt Gaming system and method which provides players an opportunity to win a progressive award
US9767652B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2017-09-19 Bally Gaming, Inc. Automatic wagering game generator
US9875618B2 (en) 2014-07-24 2018-01-23 Igt Gaming system and method employing multi-directional interaction between multiple concurrently played games
US9911286B2 (en) 2003-10-20 2018-03-06 Igt Electronic gaming device which determines play information
US9916735B2 (en) 2015-07-22 2018-03-13 Igt Remote gaming cash voucher printing system
US10026269B2 (en) 2016-09-22 2018-07-17 Igt Gaming systems and methods for providing progressive awards
US10032338B2 (en) 2015-09-23 2018-07-24 Igt Gaming system and method providing a gaming tournament having a variable average expected point payout

Families Citing this family (1632)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA1245361A (en) * 1984-06-27 1988-11-22 Kerry E. Thacher Tournament data system
US6959800B1 (en) * 1995-12-15 2005-11-01 Cummins-Allison Corp. Method for document processing
US7904187B2 (en) 1999-02-01 2011-03-08 Hoffberg Steven M Internet appliance system and method
US8352400B2 (en) 1991-12-23 2013-01-08 Hoffberg Steven M Adaptive pattern recognition based controller apparatus and method and human-factored interface therefore
US6048269A (en) 1993-01-22 2000-04-11 Mgm Grand, Inc. Coinless slot machine system and method
CA2170633A1 (en) * 1993-08-27 1995-03-02 Christopher Russell Byrne Super keno
JPH07271865A (en) 1994-04-01 1995-10-20 Mitsubishi Corp Method for managing copyright of data base
USRE38982E1 (en) 1994-05-13 2006-02-14 Digideal Corporation Gambling game system and methods
US9126102B2 (en) 2002-05-20 2015-09-08 Bally Gaming, Inc. Four-card poker game with variable wager
US9183705B2 (en) 2004-09-10 2015-11-10 Bally Gaming, Inc. Methods of playing wagering games
US5823874A (en) 1994-09-23 1998-10-20 Anchor Gaming Method of playing game and gaming device with an additional payout indicator
US8595502B2 (en) 1995-09-29 2013-11-26 Intarsia Software Llc Data management system
EP0715241B1 (en) 1994-10-27 2004-01-14 Mitsubishi Corporation Apparatus for data copyright management system
US6424715B1 (en) 1994-10-27 2002-07-23 Mitsubishi Corporation Digital content management system and apparatus
US7690043B2 (en) * 1994-12-19 2010-03-30 Legal Igaming, Inc. System and method for connecting gaming devices to a network for remote play
US20130260879A1 (en) 2002-10-09 2013-10-03 Michael W. Saunders System and Method for Connecting Gaming Devices to a Network for Remote Play
US5674128A (en) * 1995-02-21 1997-10-07 Oneida Indian Nation Cashless computerized video game system and method
US7329187B1 (en) 1995-02-21 2008-02-12 Oneida Indian Nation Cashless computerized video game system and method
US7022017B1 (en) 1996-09-25 2006-04-04 Oneida Indian Nation Interactive resort operating system
US6280328B1 (en) 1996-09-25 2001-08-28 Oneida Indian Nation Cashless computerized video game system and method
USRE39666E1 (en) * 1995-04-07 2007-05-29 Global Payment Technologies, Inc. Soft count tracking system
US6321208B1 (en) * 1995-04-19 2001-11-20 Brightstreet.Com, Inc. Method and system for electronic distribution of product redemption coupons
US5818438A (en) 1995-04-25 1998-10-06 Bellsouth Corporation System and method for providing television services
US5803808A (en) * 1995-08-18 1998-09-08 John M. Strisower Card game hand counter/decision counter device
JPH09103540A (en) * 1995-10-11 1997-04-22 Universal Hanbai Kk Game machine
USRE44323E1 (en) 1996-01-19 2013-06-25 Beneficial Innovations, Inc. Method and system for playing games on a network
US5823879A (en) * 1996-01-19 1998-10-20 Sheldon F. Goldberg Network gaming system
US9530150B2 (en) 1996-01-19 2016-12-27 Adcension, Llc Compensation model for network services
US6093100A (en) * 1996-02-01 2000-07-25 Ptt, Llc Modified poker card/tournament game and interactive network computer system for implementing same
US6162121A (en) * 1996-03-22 2000-12-19 International Game Technology Value wheel game method and apparatus
US5788573A (en) * 1996-03-22 1998-08-04 International Game Technology Electronic game method and apparatus with hierarchy of simulated wheels
US8454432B2 (en) * 1996-11-14 2013-06-04 Agincourt Gaming, Llc Method for providing network gaming system
US8235821B2 (en) 1996-11-14 2012-08-07 Bally Gaming, Inc. Progressive controller and TCP/IP in gaming system
US6758755B2 (en) 1996-11-14 2004-07-06 Arcade Planet, Inc. Prize redemption system for games executed over a wide area network
US8944909B2 (en) * 1996-11-14 2015-02-03 Bally Gaming, Inc. Gaming system having a plurality of players and randomly incremented progressive prize
US6112995A (en) * 1996-04-19 2000-09-05 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Card reader
US20060287069A1 (en) * 1996-04-22 2006-12-21 Walker Jay S Method and system for adapting casino games to playing preferences
US7192352B2 (en) 1996-04-22 2007-03-20 Walker Digital, Llc System and method for facilitating play of a video game via a web site
US7033276B2 (en) * 1996-04-22 2006-04-25 Walker Digital, Llc Method and system for adapting casino games to playing preferences
US5897436A (en) * 1996-06-14 1999-04-27 Ptt, Llc Modified poker card game
US5761647A (en) 1996-05-24 1998-06-02 Harrah's Operating Company, Inc. National customer recognition system and method
US6860375B2 (en) 1996-05-29 2005-03-01 Cummins-Allison Corporation Multiple pocket currency bill processing device and method
ES2117943B1 (en) * 1996-06-10 1999-04-01 Cristescu Maria Sa Interconnection system for recreational machines.
DE19624321A1 (en) * 1996-06-18 1998-01-02 Atronic Casino Technology Dist Method for determining a proportional jackpot win
US6244958B1 (en) 1996-06-25 2001-06-12 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method for providing incentive to play gaming devices connected by a network to a host computer
US6287202B1 (en) * 1996-06-28 2001-09-11 Silicon Gaming, Inc. Dynamic tournament gaming method and system
US5971271A (en) * 1996-07-01 1999-10-26 Mirage Resorts, Incorporated Gaming device communications and service system
US5833540A (en) * 1996-09-24 1998-11-10 United Games, Inc. Cardless distributed video gaming system
NL1007380C2 (en) * 1996-10-29 2002-03-05 Aristocrat Leisure Ind Pty Ltd Bonus Time Controller.
US5910048A (en) * 1996-11-29 1999-06-08 Feinberg; Isadore Loss limit method for slot machines
US7485040B2 (en) 1996-12-18 2009-02-03 Walker Digital, Llc Methods and apparatus for advertising in gaming device
US20030114217A1 (en) * 1996-12-30 2003-06-19 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for automatically operating a game machine
US6964611B2 (en) * 1996-12-30 2005-11-15 Walker Digital, Llc System and method for automated play of lottery games
US7607981B2 (en) 1996-12-30 2009-10-27 Walker Digital, Llc System and method for remote automated play of a gaming device
US7771271B2 (en) * 1996-12-30 2010-08-10 Igt Method and apparatus for deriving information from a gaming device
US7828645B2 (en) * 1996-12-30 2010-11-09 Igt Apparatus and methods for facilitating automated play of a game machine
US9489800B2 (en) * 1996-12-30 2016-11-08 Igt Applications for gaming devices in a networked environment
US20060046835A1 (en) * 1996-12-30 2006-03-02 Walker Jay S Methods and apparatus for reviewing game play of a flat rate play session
US7874914B2 (en) * 1996-12-30 2011-01-25 Igt System and method for communicating game session information
US20060035697A1 (en) * 1996-12-30 2006-02-16 Packes John M Systems and methods for facilitating play of lottery games
US6012983A (en) 1996-12-30 2000-01-11 Walker Asset Management Limited Partnership Automated play gaming device
US6634942B2 (en) 1996-12-30 2003-10-21 Jay S. Walker System and method for automated play of multiple gaming devices
US6110041A (en) * 1996-12-30 2000-08-29 Walker Digital, Llc Method and system for adapting gaming devices to playing preferences
US7806763B2 (en) 1996-12-30 2010-10-05 Igt System and method for remote automated play of a gaming device
US20060068903A1 (en) * 1996-12-30 2006-03-30 Walker Jay S Methods and apparatus for facilitating accelerated play of a flat rate play gaming session
US6193608B1 (en) * 1996-12-31 2001-02-27 Walker Digital, Llc Method for motivating players to return to a casino using premiums
USRE38733E1 (en) * 1996-12-31 2005-05-10 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for motivating players to return to a casino using premiums
US6435968B1 (en) * 1997-03-17 2002-08-20 Lawrence J. Torango Progressive wagering system
US7384336B2 (en) * 1997-01-15 2008-06-10 Torango Lawrence J Progressive system and methods
US6241608B1 (en) 1997-01-15 2001-06-05 Lawrence J. Torango Progressive wagering system
US8986105B2 (en) * 1997-02-07 2015-03-24 Douglas M. Okuniewicz Supplemental bonusing system for an electronic gaming device
US9728040B2 (en) * 1997-02-07 2017-08-08 Aim Management, Inc. Printing and dispensing system for an electronic gaming device that provides an undisplayed outcome
US7871325B2 (en) * 1997-02-07 2011-01-18 Okuniewicz Douglas M Means for generating a supplement bonus for an electronic gaming device
US9495824B2 (en) 1997-02-07 2016-11-15 Aim Management, Inc. Lottery system/electronic gaming device interface and gambling game
US5908354A (en) 1997-02-07 1999-06-01 Okuniewicz; Douglas M. Programmable sound card for electronic devices
US6840860B1 (en) * 1997-02-07 2005-01-11 Douglas M. Okuniewicz Printing and dispensing bonusing system for gaming devices
US6039648A (en) * 1997-03-04 2000-03-21 Casino Data Systems Automated tournament gaming system: apparatus and method
US8113935B2 (en) 1997-03-12 2012-02-14 Igt System and method for presenting payout ranges and audiovisual clips at a gaming device
US7241219B2 (en) * 1997-03-12 2007-07-10 Walker Digital, Llc Methods and apparatus for providing entertainment content at a gaming device
US6113495A (en) * 1997-03-12 2000-09-05 Walker Digital, Llc Electronic gaming system offering premium entertainment services for enhanced player retention
US6676127B2 (en) 1997-03-13 2004-01-13 Shuffle Master, Inc. Collating and sorting apparatus
US7077746B2 (en) * 2001-06-05 2006-07-18 Torango Lawrence J Progressive wagering system
US8087996B2 (en) * 1997-03-21 2012-01-03 Igt Method and apparatus for providing a complimentary service to a player
US6139431A (en) 1997-03-21 2000-10-31 Walker Digital, Llc Free long distance calls on slot machines
US20060025206A1 (en) * 1997-03-21 2006-02-02 Walker Jay S Gaming device operable to faciliate audio output via a headset and methods related thereto
US8360865B2 (en) 1997-03-21 2013-01-29 Igt Method and apparatus for providing a complimentary service to a player
US6234896B1 (en) * 1997-04-11 2001-05-22 Walker Digital, Llc Slot driven video story
US8328624B2 (en) * 1997-04-11 2012-12-11 Igt Slot driven video story
US7124426B1 (en) * 1997-04-16 2006-10-17 News Datacom Limited Entertainment system
US5938200A (en) 1997-04-22 1999-08-17 Gamescape, Inc. Wagering game of chance
US6203429B1 (en) 1997-04-23 2001-03-20 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine with bonus mode
US6375569B2 (en) 1997-05-09 2002-04-23 Acres Gaming, Inc. Operation of gaming machines in a linked bonus prize winning mode
US6165071A (en) * 1997-05-20 2000-12-26 Casino Data Systems Method and apparatus for gaming in a series of sessions
US6071190A (en) 1997-05-21 2000-06-06 Casino Data Systems Gaming device security system: apparatus and method
US6935947B1 (en) 1997-05-23 2005-08-30 Ptt, Llc Slot machine game having a plurality of ways for a user to obtain payouts based upon matching two or more symbols drawn from the symbol matrix during one or more spins (“Pair' em Up”)
US20060089195A1 (en) * 1997-06-23 2006-04-27 Walker Jay S Systems, methods and apparatus for offering an extension of a flat rate play session based on an ending credit balance
US8360857B2 (en) 1997-06-23 2013-01-29 Igt Systems, methods and apparatus for facilitating a flat rate play session on a gaming device and example player interfaces to facilitate such
US20070087818A1 (en) 2001-11-02 2007-04-19 Walker Jay S Apparatus, systems and methods for facilitating a negative credit balance of a gaming device
US7862424B2 (en) * 1997-06-23 2011-01-04 Igt Methods and apparatus for facilitating a flat rate play session and for extending same
US20110014963A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2011-01-20 Igt Methods and apparatus for facilitating blackjack flat rate play sessions
US7140964B2 (en) 1997-06-23 2006-11-28 Walker Digital, Llc Gaming device for a flat rate play session and a method of operating same
US6113492A (en) * 1997-06-30 2000-09-05 Walker Digital, Llc Gaming device for operating in a reverse payout mode and a method of operating same
US6227972B1 (en) 1997-07-01 2001-05-08 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for expiration of prepaid slot machine plays
US7086947B2 (en) 1997-07-01 2006-08-08 Walker Digital, Llc Systems and methods for facilitating play of a casino game via expiring prepaid plays of the casino game
US20050054431A1 (en) * 1997-07-03 2005-03-10 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for providing instructions to gaming devices
US20020123376A1 (en) * 1997-07-07 2002-09-05 Walker Jay S. System and method for providing reward points for casino play
US6379247B1 (en) * 1997-07-07 2002-04-30 Walker Digital, Llc Method and system for awarding frequent flyer miles for casino table games
US7056215B1 (en) 1997-07-08 2006-06-06 Aristocrat Leisure Industries Pty Ltd. Slot machine game and system with improved jackpot feature
DE19729769A1 (en) * 1997-07-11 1999-01-14 Cardiogene Gentherapeutische S Transfection system, its preparation and use in somatic gene therapy
US6089975A (en) * 1997-07-16 2000-07-18 Dunn; Jerry B. Electronic gaming apparatus with means for displaying interactive advertising programs
US6511377B1 (en) * 1997-08-07 2003-01-28 Casino Data Systems Cashless gaming system: apparatus and method
US6135884A (en) * 1997-08-08 2000-10-24 International Game Technology Gaming machine having secondary display for providing video content
US6186895B1 (en) * 1997-10-07 2001-02-13 Mikohn Gaming Corporation Intelligent casino chip system and method or use thereof
US7905774B2 (en) * 1997-10-08 2011-03-15 Igt Apparatus providing payouts proportional to wagers and methods for operating same
US6912432B1 (en) * 1997-11-04 2005-06-28 Michael J. Shea System and method for remote bowling
US6238288B1 (en) * 1997-12-31 2001-05-29 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for directing a game in accordance with speed of play
US20050029745A1 (en) * 1997-12-31 2005-02-10 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for directing a game in accordance with speed of play
US8021222B2 (en) * 1997-12-31 2011-09-20 Igt Game based on speed of play
US20070001396A1 (en) * 2004-02-02 2007-01-04 Walker Jay S Method and apparatus for directing a game in accordance with speed of play
US20040038740A1 (en) * 1998-01-27 2004-02-26 Muir Robert Linley Multi-platform gaming architecture
US6302790B1 (en) 1998-02-19 2001-10-16 International Game Technology Audio visual output for a gaming device
CA2323444C (en) * 1998-03-11 2016-10-11 Digideal Corporation Automated system for playing live casino table games having tabletop changeable playing card displays and play monitoring security features
US6068552A (en) 1998-03-31 2000-05-30 Walker Digital, Llc Gaming device and method of operation thereof
US7695358B2 (en) 1998-03-31 2010-04-13 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for team play of slot machines
US7905775B2 (en) * 1998-03-31 2011-03-15 Igt Methods and apparatus for operating a gaming device
US7850522B2 (en) 1998-03-31 2010-12-14 Igt Apparatus, systems and methods for facilitating a payout of a gaming device
US6312332B1 (en) 1998-03-31 2001-11-06 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for team play of slot machines
US7364510B2 (en) 1998-03-31 2008-04-29 Walker Digital, Llc Apparatus and method for facilitating team play of slot machines
US7559838B2 (en) * 1998-03-31 2009-07-14 Walker Digital, Llc Gaming device and method of operation thereof
US6142872A (en) 1998-03-31 2000-11-07 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for team play of slot machines
US6712699B2 (en) 1998-03-31 2004-03-30 Walker Digital, Llc Apparatus and method for facilitating team play of slot machines
US7758417B2 (en) * 1998-04-06 2010-07-20 Igt Apparatus and method for facilitating play of a gaming device with a plurality of balances
US5967896A (en) * 1998-04-06 1999-10-19 Walker Asset Management Limited Partnership Method and apparatus for controlling a gaming device having a plurality of balances
US8550900B2 (en) 1998-04-06 2013-10-08 Igt Method and apparatus for influencing cash outs from a gaming device
US6254096B1 (en) 1998-04-15 2001-07-03 Shuffle Master, Inc. Device and method for continuously shuffling cards
US6655684B2 (en) 1998-04-15 2003-12-02 Shuffle Master, Inc. Device and method for forming and delivering hands from randomly arranged decks of playing cards
WO1999054011A1 (en) * 1998-04-17 1999-10-28 Thunderwatch Partnership Group based network system and method of using same
US6364768B1 (en) * 1998-04-28 2002-04-02 Acres Gaming Incorporated Networked gaming devices that end a bonus and concurrently initiate another bonus
US6375567B1 (en) 1998-04-28 2002-04-23 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method and apparatus for implementing in video a secondary game responsive to player interaction with a primary game
US6371852B1 (en) 1998-04-28 2002-04-16 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method for crediting a player of an electronic gaming device
US6607441B1 (en) * 1998-04-28 2003-08-19 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method for transferring credit from one gaming machine to another
US6017033A (en) * 1998-05-05 2000-01-25 Keller; Claude Method of playing a casino game
WO1999060498A1 (en) * 1998-05-18 1999-11-25 Aristocrat Leisure Industries Pty. Ltd. Intelligent input/output control system
US6210275B1 (en) 1998-05-26 2001-04-03 Mikohn Gaming Corporation Progressive jackpot game with guaranteed winner
US7993194B1 (en) * 1998-06-18 2011-08-09 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Limited Method of linking devices to gaming machines
US8096872B2 (en) * 1998-06-22 2012-01-17 Igt Method and apparatus for providing electronic credits at a gaming device without first requiring payment therefor
US6231445B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2001-05-15 Acres Gaming Inc. Method for awarding variable bonus awards to gaming machines over a network
US6837788B2 (en) * 1999-06-23 2005-01-04 Igt Method of playing a dual wagering game
US7147557B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2006-12-12 Scientific Games Royalty Corporation Method of playing a group participation game
US6648753B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2003-11-18 Igt Method of playing a group participation game
US6416408B2 (en) 1998-06-29 2002-07-09 Anchor Gaming Method of playing a group participation game
US6364765B1 (en) * 1998-07-01 2002-04-02 Walker Digital, Llc Electronic amusement device offering secondary game of chance and method for operating same
US6302793B1 (en) 1998-07-02 2001-10-16 Station Casinos, Inc. Multi-property player tracking system
US6758749B2 (en) 1998-07-31 2004-07-06 Radical Gaming Concepts Ltd. Enhanced payout feature for gaming machines
US20020045477A1 (en) 1999-08-03 2002-04-18 Dabrowski Stanley P. Method and apparatus for scrip distribution and management permitting redistribution of issued scrip
US6149521A (en) * 1998-08-25 2000-11-21 Sigma Game, Inc. Video poker game with multiplier card
US6358149B1 (en) 1998-09-11 2002-03-19 Acres Gaming Incorporated Dynamic threshold for pool-based bonus promotions in electronic gaming systems
US6206782B1 (en) * 1998-09-14 2001-03-27 Walker Digital, Llc. System and method for facilitating casino team play
US20040127290A1 (en) * 1998-09-18 2004-07-01 Walker Jay S. Electronic amusement device and method for propagating a performance adjustment signal
CA2343944A1 (en) 1998-09-18 2000-03-30 Mikohn Gaming Corporation Controller-based linked gaming machine bonus system
US6264561B1 (en) * 1998-10-01 2001-07-24 International Game Technology Electronic game licensing apparatus and method
US7008324B1 (en) * 1998-10-01 2006-03-07 Paltronics, Inc. Gaming device video display system
US20040162134A1 (en) * 1998-10-01 2004-08-19 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for enhanced play of a gaming device
US6203430B1 (en) 1998-10-01 2001-03-20 Walker Digital, Llc Electronic amusement device and method for enhanced slot machine play
CA2249900A1 (en) * 1998-10-09 2000-04-09 Loto-Quebec Gain determination method and gaming apparatus therefor
US6219836B1 (en) * 1998-10-14 2001-04-17 International Game Technology Program management method and apparatus for gaming device components
US6805634B1 (en) * 1998-10-14 2004-10-19 Igt Method for downloading data to gaming devices
JP2000135377A (en) * 1998-10-30 2000-05-16 Namco Ltd Game system and information memorizing medium
US6409602B1 (en) 1998-11-06 2002-06-25 New Millenium Gaming Limited Slim terminal gaming system
JP2002537874A (en) * 1998-11-26 2002-11-12 アリストクラト テクノロジーズ オーストラリア プロプライアタリー リミテッド Game console
US6315662B1 (en) * 1998-12-22 2001-11-13 Walker Digital, Llc System and method for automatically initiating game play on an electronic gaming device
US6319122B1 (en) 1998-12-31 2001-11-20 Walker Digital, Llc Electronic amusement device and method for providing payouts based on the activity of other devices
US7361085B2 (en) * 1998-12-31 2008-04-22 Walker Digital, Llc Device and method for providing payouts based on activity and ranks of other gaming sessions
USRE44439E1 (en) 1999-01-07 2013-08-13 Yacob Rafaeli Gambling game system and method for remotely-located players
EP1471980B1 (en) * 1999-01-07 2009-03-18 Yacob Rafaeli Gambling game system and method for remotely-located players
JP3723692B2 (en) * 1999-01-26 2005-12-07 株式会社日立製作所 Monitoring device
US6267671B1 (en) * 1999-02-12 2001-07-31 Mikohn Gaming Corporation Game table player comp rating system and method therefor
US20060287030A1 (en) * 1999-02-26 2006-12-21 Briggs Rick A Systems and methods for interactive game play
US7749089B1 (en) * 1999-02-26 2010-07-06 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Multi-media interactive play system
US6913534B2 (en) 2000-03-02 2005-07-05 Defrees-Parrott Troy Gaming machine having a lottery game and capability for integration with gaming device accounting system and player tracking system
US6685563B1 (en) * 1999-03-05 2004-02-03 John P. Meekins Programmable bonus gaming device having coin-in threhold criteria adapted for interconnection with conventional gaming device
US6468156B1 (en) * 1999-03-08 2002-10-22 Igt Maximum bonus pay schedule method and apparatus for a gaming machine
US6287201B1 (en) * 1999-03-12 2001-09-11 Midway Games West Arcade game with keypad input
JP2000271268A (en) * 1999-03-23 2000-10-03 Aruze Corp Game machine
US6847373B1 (en) 1999-04-16 2005-01-25 Avid Technology, Inc. Natural color matching in a video editing system
CA2365509C (en) * 1999-04-16 2004-09-14 Amtote International, Inc. Methods and apparatus for parimutuel gaming using speech recognition
US6460848B1 (en) * 1999-04-21 2002-10-08 Mindplay Llc Method and apparatus for monitoring casinos and gaming
US7392224B1 (en) 1999-04-23 2008-06-24 Jpmorgan Chase Bank, N.A. System and method of operating a debit card reward program
US20040087370A1 (en) * 1999-04-23 2004-05-06 Tarantino Elia Rocco Gaming system
CA2371063C (en) * 1999-04-23 2012-01-03 Alliance Gaming Corporation A system and method for securely storing and controlling the dispensing of a payout
US7749081B1 (en) * 1999-04-28 2010-07-06 Igt Method and apparatus for displaying player tracking information on an electronic gaming machine display
DE60015764T2 (en) * 1999-05-28 2005-11-03 Nokia Corp. User interface and server for interactive services
US8033913B2 (en) * 1999-06-03 2011-10-11 Igt Gaming machine update and mass storage management
EP1221080A2 (en) * 1999-06-03 2002-07-10 Anchor Gaming Method and device for implementing a downloadable software delivery system
US6508709B1 (en) 1999-06-18 2003-01-21 Jayant S. Karmarkar Virtual distributed multimedia gaming method and system based on actual regulated casino games
US7637814B2 (en) * 1999-06-22 2009-12-29 Igt Processing platform for a gaming machine
GB9918427D0 (en) * 1999-08-04 1999-10-06 Maygay Machines Data transfer devices and methods
US7883407B2 (en) 2000-08-09 2011-02-08 Igt Method of awarding prizes for jackpot and gaming machines based on amount wagered during a time period
WO2001015790A1 (en) * 1999-08-27 2001-03-08 Golden Casket Lottery Corporation Limited A method of and system for operating gaming machines
US6247572B1 (en) 1999-09-03 2001-06-19 Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority Bill validator status detector
US6390473B1 (en) 1999-09-09 2002-05-21 Olaf Vancura Apportionment of pay out of casino game with escrow
EP1218070A4 (en) * 1999-09-13 2003-06-11 Int Game Tech Electronic gaming apparatus and method with variable winning outcome
CA2384385A1 (en) * 1999-09-13 2001-03-22 International Game Technology Gaming apparatus and method with operator-configurable paytables
US6802778B1 (en) * 1999-09-13 2004-10-12 Igt Gaming apparatus and method with operator-configurable paytables
US6746330B2 (en) 1999-09-21 2004-06-08 Igt Method and device for implementing a coinless gaming environment
US6935946B2 (en) * 1999-09-24 2005-08-30 Igt Video gaming apparatus for wagering with universal computerized controller and I/O interface for unique architecture
WO2001024097A1 (en) * 1999-09-29 2001-04-05 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Ltd Multiple venue jackpot system
US7004837B1 (en) * 1999-10-01 2006-02-28 Sierra Design Group Cashless gaming apparatus, system, and method of use
US6683954B1 (en) * 1999-10-23 2004-01-27 Lockstream Corporation Key encryption using a client-unique additional key for fraud prevention
US6409595B1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2002-06-25 International Game Technology Lighted keypad assembly and method for a player tracking system
WO2001033478A1 (en) * 1999-11-04 2001-05-10 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Ltd Gaming machine with eligibility for participation in features
EP1234606A4 (en) * 1999-11-12 2004-07-07 Silaev Alexandr Ivanovitch Interactive gaming method involving bets and device for the implementation thereof
JP2001236081A (en) * 1999-11-12 2001-08-31 Sony Corp Information processor, information processing method and program storage medium
GB2356965B (en) * 1999-12-03 2003-10-08 Ncr Int Inc Self-service terminal
JP4774146B2 (en) * 1999-12-23 2011-09-14 パナソニック株式会社 Method and apparatus for drilling a smaller pitch than the wavelength by using a laser
US20070072668A1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2007-03-29 Hein Marvin A Remappable Game Wheel
CA2330072C (en) 2000-01-03 2011-10-11 International Game Technology A microcontrolled backlit keypad assembly and method for a gaming machine
US20030199320A1 (en) * 2000-01-07 2003-10-23 Igt Electronic prize fulfillment through intermediate devices
US6488580B1 (en) 2000-01-11 2002-12-03 Skill Safari, Llc Method and apparatus for casino system for, e.g., skill based games
CA2331244C (en) * 2000-01-21 2009-06-30 Anchor Coin, Inc. Method and apparatus for awarding and redeeming promotional points at an electronic game
CA2330421A1 (en) * 2000-01-25 2001-07-25 Ewald Mothwurf Jackpot system
US7445550B2 (en) 2000-02-22 2008-11-04 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Magical wand and interactive play experience
US7878905B2 (en) * 2000-02-22 2011-02-01 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Multi-layered interactive play experience
US6761637B2 (en) 2000-02-22 2004-07-13 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Method of game play using RFID tracking device
US7500917B2 (en) * 2000-02-22 2009-03-10 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Magical wand and interactive play experience
US9446319B2 (en) 2003-03-25 2016-09-20 Mq Gaming, Llc Interactive gaming toy
US6932707B2 (en) * 2000-02-24 2005-08-23 Labtronix Concept Inc. Method of choosing and distributing enhanced odds
US20070129139A1 (en) * 2000-02-29 2007-06-07 Igt On demand prize/bonus system
US6857959B1 (en) 2000-02-29 2005-02-22 Igt Name your prize game playing methodology
US7682245B2 (en) 2000-02-29 2010-03-23 Igt Name your prize game playing methodology
US7043641B1 (en) 2000-03-08 2006-05-09 Igt Encryption in a secure computerized gaming system
CA2402389A1 (en) * 2000-03-08 2002-09-19 Shuffle Master, Inc. Computerized gaming system, method and apparatus
US7203841B2 (en) * 2001-03-08 2007-04-10 Igt Encryption in a secure computerized gaming system
US6877745B1 (en) * 2000-03-14 2005-04-12 Walker Digital, Llc Games of chance with player-specified elements
US7147558B2 (en) * 2000-03-22 2006-12-12 Wms Gaming Inc. System and method for dispensing gaming machine credits in multiple different media of monetary exchange
JP2001265839A (en) * 2000-03-22 2001-09-28 Junichi Yamagishi Method and device for optimum arrangement of object of selection
US8473342B1 (en) 2000-04-05 2013-06-25 Catalina Marketing Corporation Method and system for generating certificates having unique Id data
US7648414B2 (en) * 2000-04-05 2010-01-19 Ods Properties, Inc. Systems and methods for recognizing preferred wagerers
US7883417B2 (en) * 2000-04-07 2011-02-08 Igt Gaming machine communicating system
US8876608B2 (en) * 2000-04-07 2014-11-04 Igt Virtually tracking un-carded or anonymous patron session data
US6676522B2 (en) 2000-04-07 2004-01-13 Igt Gaming system including portable game devices
US7927211B2 (en) * 2002-04-02 2011-04-19 Igt Gaming environment including portable transaction devices
US6682421B1 (en) * 2000-04-07 2004-01-27 Igt Wireless gaming environment
JP2001312468A (en) * 2000-04-28 2001-11-09 Business Network Telecom Corp Network connection control method and connection control system
US20070050256A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2007-03-01 Jay Walker Method and apparatus for compensating participation in marketing research
US7493267B1 (en) * 2000-05-02 2009-02-17 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for compensating participation in marketing research
US7318774B2 (en) * 2000-05-03 2008-01-15 Aristocrat Technologies Austalia Pty. Ltd. Gaming machine-membership reward system
US6565084B1 (en) 2000-06-02 2003-05-20 Milestone Entertainment Games, and methods for improved game play in games of chance and games of skill
US7951002B1 (en) * 2000-06-16 2011-05-31 Igt Using a gaming machine as a server
US7076445B1 (en) * 2000-06-20 2006-07-11 Cartwright Shawn D System and methods for obtaining advantages and transacting the same in a computer gaming environment
US7699699B2 (en) 2000-06-23 2010-04-20 Igt Gaming device having multiple selectable display interfaces based on player's wagers
US7695363B2 (en) 2000-06-23 2010-04-13 Igt Gaming device having multiple display interfaces
US6731313B1 (en) 2000-06-23 2004-05-04 Igt Gaming device having touch activated alternating or changing symbol
FR2810763B1 (en) * 2000-06-27 2002-10-11 Cit Alcatel Device for reading and collecting readable media contactless
US7047338B1 (en) * 2000-07-18 2006-05-16 Igt Configurable hot-swap communication
US6626758B1 (en) 2000-07-25 2003-09-30 Gaming Enhancements, Inc. Random pay gaming method and system
US7811168B2 (en) * 2000-07-25 2010-10-12 Gaming Enhancement, Inc. Random pay gaming system using weighting function with maximum, minimum, and average value
US6641034B1 (en) 2000-08-11 2003-11-04 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Card reader with a light-emitting bezel
US6641035B1 (en) 2000-08-11 2003-11-04 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Card made of fluorescent material and card reader for use with the card
US6604997B2 (en) * 2000-08-17 2003-08-12 Worldwinner.Com, Inc. Minimizing the effects of chance
WO2002017251A3 (en) * 2000-08-18 2003-08-21 Igt Reno Nev Gaming system with player tracking
JP3661992B2 (en) * 2000-08-21 2005-06-22 潤一 山岸 Equipment management system
US7582012B2 (en) * 2000-08-25 2009-09-01 Walker Digital, Llc Methods and apparatus for lottery game play aggregation
US6773345B2 (en) 2000-08-25 2004-08-10 Walker Digital, Llc Systems and methods for lottery game play aggregation
US6960133B1 (en) 2000-08-28 2005-11-01 Igt Slot machine game having a plurality of ways for a user to obtain payouts based on selection of one or more symbols (power pays)
US20040193431A1 (en) * 2000-08-30 2004-09-30 John Campbell Remote gaming system
US6726563B1 (en) 2000-09-08 2004-04-27 Igt Gaming device having a selectively accessible bonus scheme
US6743094B2 (en) 2000-09-22 2004-06-01 Paltronics, Inc. Table bonus game
US7798896B2 (en) 2000-09-27 2010-09-21 Milestone Entertainment Llc Apparatus, systems and methods for implementing enhanced gaming and prizing parameters in an electronic environment
US8727853B2 (en) * 2000-09-27 2014-05-20 Milestone Entertainment, LLC Methods and apparatus for enhanced play in lottery and gaming environments
US6488280B1 (en) * 2000-09-27 2002-12-03 Milestone Entertainment Games, and methods and apparatus for game play in games of chance
US7976389B2 (en) * 2000-09-29 2011-07-12 Igt Method and apparatus for gaming machines with a tournament play bonus feature
US7867085B2 (en) * 2003-01-16 2011-01-11 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine environment having controlled audio and visual media presentation
US6939226B1 (en) * 2000-10-04 2005-09-06 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine with visual and audio indicia changed over time
US7479063B2 (en) * 2000-10-04 2009-01-20 Wms Gaming Inc. Audio network for gaming machines
US20030100359A1 (en) * 2000-10-04 2003-05-29 Loose Timothy C. Audio network for gaming machines
US6974385B2 (en) 2000-10-04 2005-12-13 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine with visual and audio indicia changed over time
US6960136B2 (en) * 2000-10-04 2005-11-01 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine with visual and audio indicia changed over time
US7384339B2 (en) * 2000-10-11 2008-06-10 Igt Frame capture of actual game play
US6863608B1 (en) * 2000-10-11 2005-03-08 Igt Frame buffer capture of actual game play
US9626824B2 (en) * 2000-10-11 2017-04-18 Igt Game result graphical verification on remote clients
US7780517B2 (en) 2000-10-13 2010-08-24 Igt Gaming device having a cash out menu screen and a system and method for enabling a player to retrieve money from a gaming device
US8317616B2 (en) * 2000-10-13 2012-11-27 Rite-Solutions, Inc. System, method, and article of manufacture for multi-player gaming from an off-site location
US7029395B1 (en) * 2000-10-13 2006-04-18 Igt Gaming device having odds of winning which increase as a player's wager increases
US7128652B1 (en) 2000-10-13 2006-10-31 Oneida Indian Nation System, method, and article of manufacture for gaming from an off-site location
US20070072677A1 (en) * 2000-10-13 2007-03-29 Lavoie James R Systems and methods for gaming from an off-site location
US7801736B1 (en) 2000-10-13 2010-09-21 Wms Gaming, Inc. System, method, and article of manufacture for locating and communicating with a patron at a hospitality facility
US6599185B1 (en) * 2000-10-16 2003-07-29 Igt Gaming device having a multiple selection and award distribution bonus scheme
US7470196B1 (en) 2000-10-16 2008-12-30 Wms Gaming, Inc. Method of transferring gaming data on a global computer network
US8790181B2 (en) * 2000-10-17 2014-07-29 Igt Multi-system gaming terminal communication device
US6875110B1 (en) 2000-10-17 2005-04-05 Igt Multi-system gaming terminal communication device
WO2002032517A3 (en) 2000-10-18 2003-03-06 Gaming Systems Internat System and method for casino management
US8556698B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2013-10-15 Igt Executing multiple applications and their variations in computing environments
US8636596B2 (en) * 2000-11-04 2014-01-28 Igt Dynamic player notices for operational changes in gaming machines
US6676515B1 (en) 2000-10-19 2004-01-13 Aristocrat Technologies, Inc. Apparatus and method for a secure ticket actuated gaming system
US7390263B1 (en) 2000-10-19 2008-06-24 Igt Method of implementing cashless play of gaming devices interconnected by a computer network
US20040180721A1 (en) * 2000-12-21 2004-09-16 Igt Gaming terminal data repository and information distribution system
US6852029B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2005-02-08 Aristocrat Technologies, Inc. Method for retrofitting gaming machines to issue and redeem tickets
US9251647B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2016-02-02 Igt Remote configuration of gaming terminals
US6645077B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2003-11-11 Igt Gaming terminal data repository and information distribution system
US20090011819A9 (en) * 2000-10-20 2009-01-08 Marcel Huard Method and apparatus for the rewarding of the interest of a user in an activity
US7066781B2 (en) 2000-10-20 2006-06-27 Denise Chapman Weston Children's toy with wireless tag/transponder
US6932702B1 (en) * 2000-10-30 2005-08-23 Gary Harris Device and method for configuring a slot machine having a hot streak phase
US6962531B2 (en) * 2000-11-03 2005-11-08 Harrah's Operating Company, Inc. Automated service scheduling system
US7765121B2 (en) * 2000-11-03 2010-07-27 Harrah's Operating Company, Inc. Automated service scheduling system based on customer value
US6729961B1 (en) * 2000-11-03 2004-05-04 Igt Method for displaying an interactive game having a pre-determined outcome
US20020115490A1 (en) * 2000-11-14 2002-08-22 Fredrick Burnet Accounting system for arcade games
US6852031B1 (en) * 2000-11-22 2005-02-08 Igt EZ pay smart card and tickets system
CN1256693C (en) * 2000-11-27 2006-05-17 株式会社三协精机制作所 Card gate mechanism for card reader
US20080214300A1 (en) * 2000-12-07 2008-09-04 Igt Methods for electronic data security and program authentication
US7127069B2 (en) * 2000-12-07 2006-10-24 Igt Secured virtual network in a gaming environment
US7972214B2 (en) 2000-12-07 2011-07-05 Igt Methods and devices for downloading games of chance
US20070136817A1 (en) * 2000-12-07 2007-06-14 Igt Wager game license management in a peer gaming network
US7168089B2 (en) * 2000-12-07 2007-01-23 Igt Secured virtual network in a gaming environment
US7515718B2 (en) * 2000-12-07 2009-04-07 Igt Secured virtual network in a gaming environment
WO2002060546A8 (en) 2000-12-19 2003-03-06 Bradley W Johnson Video table game apparatus, system, and method of use
US8317601B1 (en) * 2000-12-20 2012-11-27 Bally Gaming, Inc. Bonus game points in a gaming environment
US6758757B2 (en) * 2000-12-20 2004-07-06 Sierra Design Group Method and apparatus for maintaining game state
US7682244B1 (en) 2000-12-20 2010-03-23 Bally Gaming, Inc. High granularity promotion-based awards and use in gaming environments
US6872137B2 (en) * 2000-12-22 2005-03-29 Tara Chand Singhal Method and apparatus for an educational game and dynamic message entry and display
US6969320B2 (en) * 2001-01-10 2005-11-29 Multimedia Games, Inc. Distributed account based gaming system
US7156738B2 (en) 2001-01-16 2007-01-02 Igt Casino gambling machine with bonus round award redemption
EP1384213A2 (en) * 2001-01-22 2004-01-28 IGT-UK Limited Management system for entertainment machines
US20060080175A1 (en) * 2001-02-02 2006-04-13 International Game Technology Player scoring for customizing a game of chance on a gaming machine
US7186181B2 (en) * 2001-02-02 2007-03-06 Igt Wide area program distribution and game information communication system
US6749510B2 (en) * 2001-02-07 2004-06-15 Wms Gaming Inc. Centralized gaming system with modifiable remote display terminals
US7419425B1 (en) * 2001-02-15 2008-09-02 Bally Gaming, Inc. Shared secondary game station and system
US20020115487A1 (en) * 2001-02-16 2002-08-22 Wells William R. Gaming device network
US6857961B2 (en) 2001-02-21 2005-02-22 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Method, apparatus and article for evaluating card games, such as blackjack
WO2002069289A3 (en) * 2001-02-21 2004-02-05 Int Game Tech Apparatus and method for a gaming unit that changes with time
US6685568B2 (en) 2001-02-21 2004-02-03 Mindplay Llc Method, apparatus and article for evaluating card games, such as blackjack
US7988559B2 (en) * 2001-03-08 2011-08-02 Igt Computerized gaming system, method and apparatus
US20040102238A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2004-05-27 Taylor William A. Method for session play gambling games
US7462103B2 (en) * 2001-03-22 2008-12-09 Igt Gaming system for individual control of access to many devices with few wires
US7722453B2 (en) * 2001-03-27 2010-05-25 Igt Interactive game playing preferences
US7918738B2 (en) 2001-03-27 2011-04-05 Igt Interactive game playing preferences
JP2002282417A (en) * 2001-03-27 2002-10-02 Konami Co Ltd Game machine, game interruption method and program
US8480466B2 (en) 2001-03-27 2013-07-09 Igt Method and apparatus for previewing a game
US6979266B2 (en) * 2001-03-30 2005-12-27 Igt Method and apparatus for downloading peripheral code
US20070060394A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2007-03-15 Igt Downloading upon the occurrence of predetermined events
US20030087691A1 (en) * 2001-04-04 2003-05-08 Daryn Kiely Method and system for issuing and using gaming machine receipts in secondary game
US7033272B1 (en) 2001-04-09 2006-04-25 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method for implementing a secondary game in a gaming machine
US6860811B1 (en) 2001-04-09 2005-03-01 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method for implementing a secondary game in a gaming machine
WO2002089935A1 (en) * 2001-04-11 2002-11-14 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for remotely customizing a gaming device
US7654897B2 (en) * 2001-04-11 2010-02-02 Wms Gaming Inc. Bonus accumulator for a wagering game
US6394902B1 (en) 2001-04-18 2002-05-28 Igt Gaming device having different sets of primary and secondary reel symbols
US6722985B2 (en) * 2001-04-19 2004-04-20 Igt Universal player tracking system
US6682423B2 (en) 2001-04-19 2004-01-27 Igt Open architecture communications in a gaming network
US6935957B1 (en) 2001-05-14 2005-08-30 Barona Tribal Gaming Authority Method and system for wireless validation of gaming vouchers
US6786824B2 (en) 2001-05-25 2004-09-07 Igt Method, apparatus, and system for providing a player with opportunities to win a feature event award
US6652378B2 (en) 2001-06-01 2003-11-25 Igt Gaming machines and systems offering simultaneous play of multiple games and methods of gaming
US7651394B2 (en) * 2001-06-06 2010-01-26 Paltronics, Inc. Randomly awarded progressive jackpots
US7390256B2 (en) 2001-06-08 2008-06-24 Arl, Inc. Method, apparatus and article for random sequence generation and playing card distribution
US8262090B2 (en) 2001-12-13 2012-09-11 The United States Playing Card Company Method, apparatus and article for random sequence generation and playing card distribution
US7837557B2 (en) * 2001-06-11 2010-11-23 Igt Method and apparatus for communicating with a player of a networked gaming device
US20030013516A1 (en) * 2001-06-13 2003-01-16 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for offering and providing consolation prizes
US8282475B2 (en) * 2001-06-15 2012-10-09 Igt Virtual leash for personal gaming device
EP1401546A4 (en) 2001-06-15 2006-11-02 Walker Digital Llc Method and apparatus for planning and customizing a gaming experience
US7918728B2 (en) * 2001-06-15 2011-04-05 Igt Personal gaming device and method of presenting a game
US20060211493A1 (en) * 2001-06-15 2006-09-21 Walker Jay S Systems and methods for customized gaming limits
US8087988B2 (en) * 2001-06-15 2012-01-03 Igt Personal gaming device and method of presenting a game
US6991544B2 (en) 2001-06-21 2006-01-31 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Method, apparatus and article for hierarchical wagering
US7037195B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2006-05-02 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method and apparatus for awarding a bonus on a network of electronic gaming devices during a pre-determined time period
US20060247034A1 (en) * 2001-07-02 2006-11-02 Schneider Richard J Method and apparatus for awarding a bonus on a network of electronic gaming devices during a pre-determined time period
US7008321B2 (en) * 2001-07-10 2006-03-07 Igt Method and system for issuing and using gaming machine receipts
US6620046B2 (en) 2001-07-10 2003-09-16 Igt Method and system for funding and awarding bonuses in a gaming environment
US7008320B2 (en) * 2001-07-10 2006-03-07 Igt Gaming machine with receipt generation capabilities
US20030013532A1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2003-01-16 Rick Rowe Method and apparatus for providing information via gaming machine player tracking device
US20030013512A1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2003-01-16 Rick Rowe Bonus system and method of awarding a bonus
US20030013527A1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2003-01-16 Rick Rowe Method and apparatus for directing information to particular game players
US6533661B2 (en) * 2001-07-23 2003-03-18 Bestco, Inc. Gaming machine
US6485367B1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2002-11-26 Wms Gaming Inc. Self-learning gaming machine
US6908387B2 (en) * 2001-08-03 2005-06-21 Igt Player tracking communication mechanisms in a gaming machine
US7927212B2 (en) * 2001-08-03 2011-04-19 Igt Player tracking communication mechanisms in a gaming machine
US7112138B2 (en) * 2001-08-03 2006-09-26 Igt Player tracking communication mechanisms in a gaming machine
US20030027635A1 (en) * 2001-08-03 2003-02-06 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for generating directives for personnel
US8210927B2 (en) * 2001-08-03 2012-07-03 Igt Player tracking communication mechanisms in a gaming machine
US8784211B2 (en) * 2001-08-03 2014-07-22 Igt Wireless input/output and peripheral devices on a gaming machine
US7617151B2 (en) * 2001-08-06 2009-11-10 Igt Alternative player tracking techniques
US7162036B2 (en) 2001-08-06 2007-01-09 Igt Digital identification of unique game characteristics
US6685567B2 (en) * 2001-08-08 2004-02-03 Igt Process verification
US7901289B2 (en) 2001-08-09 2011-03-08 Igt Transparent objects on a gaming machine
US6887157B2 (en) * 2001-08-09 2005-05-03 Igt Virtual cameras and 3-D gaming environments in a gaming machine
US8002623B2 (en) 2001-08-09 2011-08-23 Igt Methods and devices for displaying multiple game elements
US7367885B2 (en) 2001-08-09 2008-05-06 Igt 3-D text in a gaming machine
US7909696B2 (en) * 2001-08-09 2011-03-22 Igt Game interaction in 3-D gaming environments
US8267767B2 (en) 2001-08-09 2012-09-18 Igt 3-D reels and 3-D wheels in a gaming machine
US20050054439A1 (en) * 2001-08-10 2005-03-10 Igt Wide area gaming and retail player tracking
US8430749B2 (en) 2001-08-10 2013-04-30 Igt Dynamic casino tracking and optimization
US8608548B2 (en) * 2002-06-12 2013-12-17 Igt Intelligent wagering token and wagering token tracking techniques
US8616984B2 (en) * 2002-06-12 2013-12-31 Igt Intelligent player tracking card and wagering token tracking techniques
US7946917B2 (en) * 2001-08-10 2011-05-24 Igt Flexible loyalty points programs
US20060046842A1 (en) * 2001-08-10 2006-03-02 Igt Ticket redemption using encrypted biometric data
US7993197B2 (en) * 2001-08-10 2011-08-09 Igt Flexible loyalty points programs
US8065394B2 (en) * 2001-08-20 2011-11-22 Bally Gaming, Inc. Local game-area network method
US6935951B2 (en) * 2001-09-04 2005-08-30 Igt Electronic signature capability in a gaming machine
WO2003023647A1 (en) * 2001-09-10 2003-03-20 Igt Method for developing gaming programs compatible with a computerized gaming operating system and apparatus
US6890259B2 (en) * 2001-09-10 2005-05-10 Igt Modular tilt handling system
US20030078101A1 (en) * 2001-09-18 2003-04-24 Acres Gaming Incorporated Player specific game system
US7785194B2 (en) * 2001-09-18 2010-08-31 Igt Player specific rewards
US6896618B2 (en) * 2001-09-20 2005-05-24 Igt Point of play registration on a gaming machine
US7611409B2 (en) * 2001-09-20 2009-11-03 Igt Method and apparatus for registering a mobile device with a gaming machine
US7699703B2 (en) * 2001-09-20 2010-04-20 Igt Method and apparatus for registering a mobile device with a gaming machine
US20050143169A1 (en) * 2001-09-20 2005-06-30 Igt Direction interfaces and services on a gaming machine
US6712698B2 (en) 2001-09-20 2004-03-30 Igt Game service interfaces for player tracking touch screen display
US20030060264A1 (en) * 2001-09-21 2003-03-27 Chilton Ward W. Gaming device providing tournament entries
US7066814B2 (en) 2001-09-21 2006-06-27 Igt Gaming device having regenerating multiple award opportunities
US20030064807A1 (en) * 2001-09-25 2003-04-03 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for linked play gaming
US9626837B2 (en) 2001-09-26 2017-04-18 Milestone Entertainment Llc System for game play in an electronic environment
US8393946B2 (en) * 2001-09-26 2013-03-12 Milestone Entertainment Llc Apparatus and method for game play in an electronic environment
US6884170B2 (en) * 2001-09-27 2005-04-26 Igt Method and apparatus for graphically portraying gaming environment and information regarding components thereof
US20030060270A1 (en) * 2001-09-27 2003-03-27 Binkley Wesley A. Articulating gaming terminals, systems including such terminals, and methods
US20030069071A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-04-10 Tim Britt Entertainment monitoring system and method
US7338372B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2008-03-04 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Reconfigurable gaming machine
US6902481B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2005-06-07 Igt Decoupling of the graphical presentation of a game from the presentation logic
US8167723B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2012-05-01 Bally Gaming, Inc. Reconfigurable gaming display and system
US20030064811A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-04-03 Greg Schlottmann Gaming device with write only mass storage
US20080220880A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2008-09-11 Bally Gaming, Inc. Trusted Cabinet Identification System
US8708828B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2014-04-29 Igt Pluggable modular gaming modifiers and configuration templates for gaming environments
US7931533B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2011-04-26 Igt Game development architecture that decouples the game logic from the graphics logics
US20070287541A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2007-12-13 Jeffrey George Tracking display with proximity button activation
US6599193B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2003-07-29 Igt Progressive gaming device
US20080318685A9 (en) * 2005-09-12 2008-12-25 Oak Steven R Controlled access layer system and method
US7753373B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2010-07-13 Shuffle Master, Inc. Multiple mode card shuffler and card reading device
US6575832B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-06-10 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method for implementing scheduled return play at gaming machine networks
EP1827632A4 (en) * 2004-09-30 2010-04-14 Bally Gaming Inc System-level bonus game and related methods
US8919775B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2014-12-30 Bally Gaming, Inc. System for billing usage of an automatic card handling device
US8337296B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2012-12-25 SHFL entertaiment, Inc. Method and apparatus for using upstream communication in a card shuffler
US8500556B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2013-08-06 Bally Gaming, Inc. Two-wire exchange system
US8157644B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2012-04-17 Igt Apparatus and methods for implementing bonuses in gaming machine networks using weighted pay tables
US8616552B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2013-12-31 Shfl Entertainment, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for an automatic card handling device and communication networks including same
US6846238B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2005-01-25 Igt Wireless game player
US9367985B2 (en) 2003-09-12 2016-06-14 Konami Gaming, Inc. System for providing an interface for a gaming device
US20080220879A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2008-09-11 Bally Gaming, Inc. Trusted Cabinet Identification Method
US6863611B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2005-03-08 Bally Gaming, Inc. Two wire exchange system
US8011661B2 (en) 2001-09-28 2011-09-06 Shuffle Master, Inc. Shuffler with shuffling completion indicator
US20050082750A1 (en) * 2001-09-28 2005-04-21 Shuffle Master, Inc. Round of play counting in playing card shuffling system
US7901291B2 (en) * 2001-09-28 2011-03-08 Igt Gaming device operable with platform independent code and method
GB0427297D0 (en) * 2001-09-28 2005-01-19 Acres Gaming Inc Method for implementing scheduled return play at gaming machine networks
US7972208B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2011-07-05 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
US8292722B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2012-10-23 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Slot machine and control method of game
US8342936B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2013-01-01 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
JP2003111889A (en) 2001-10-02 2003-04-15 Aruze Corp Game server, game machine and game managing method
US8096870B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2012-01-17 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Gaming machine capable of bet of monetary value as a condition for acquisition of insurance pay
US7985131B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2011-07-26 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
US8177623B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2012-05-15 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Slot machine and control method of game
US8371926B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2013-02-12 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
US8083580B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2011-12-27 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
US8172664B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2012-05-08 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Slot machine and control method of game
US8083579B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2011-12-27 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
US20080064473A1 (en) * 2001-10-02 2008-03-13 Aruze Corp. Slot machine and control method of game
US8021225B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2011-09-20 Universal Entertainment Corporation Gaming machine
US8062118B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2011-11-22 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
JP2003111888A (en) * 2001-10-02 2003-04-15 Aruze Corp Game server, game machine and game managing method
US8033907B2 (en) 2001-10-02 2011-10-11 Universal Entertainment Corporation Slot machine and control method of game
US7887410B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2011-02-15 Universal Entertainment Corporation Gaming machine
US20080214275A1 (en) * 2001-10-02 2008-09-04 Aruze Corp. Slot machine and control method of game
US20080102930A1 (en) * 2001-10-02 2008-05-01 Aruze Gaming America, Inc. Gaming device
US20080318657A2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2008-12-25 Aruze Corporation Gaming machine
US8025563B2 (en) * 2001-10-02 2011-09-27 Universal Entertainment Corporation Gaming machine
US7371168B2 (en) 2001-10-05 2008-05-13 Igt Gaming apparatus and method of gaming including interactive gaming symbols for producing different outcomes
JP2003111890A (en) * 2001-10-05 2003-04-15 Aruze Corp Game server, game managing method and game machine
JP2003111897A (en) * 2001-10-09 2003-04-15 Aruze Corp Game server, game machine, game managing server and game managing method
JP2003117053A (en) * 2001-10-12 2003-04-22 Aruze Corp Game server, game managing method and game machine
US20030073495A1 (en) * 2001-10-16 2003-04-17 D'amico Michael H. Local database gaming system techniques
US7628691B2 (en) * 2001-10-17 2009-12-08 Luciano Jr Robert A Dynamic paytable for interactive games
JP2003117070A (en) * 2001-10-17 2003-04-22 Aruze Corp Game machine, game server and game management method
US20030073496A1 (en) * 2001-10-17 2003-04-17 D'amico Michael H. Gaming system customer service techniques
US7048628B2 (en) * 2001-10-18 2006-05-23 Acres Gaming Incorporated Networked gaming devices using bonus token to effectuate bonus awards
US7892088B2 (en) * 2001-10-18 2011-02-22 Steve Brandstetter Gaming device having a second separate bonusing event
US6832956B1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2004-12-21 Acres Gaming Incorporated Sequential fast-ball bingo secondary bonus game for use with an electronic gaming machine
US6793577B1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2004-09-21 Acres Gaming Incorporated Gaming machine having multi-ended pointer for quasi-deterministic play (“pick-a-prize”)
JP2003126343A (en) * 2001-10-22 2003-05-07 Aruze Corp Game server, game machine and game managing method
CN100417419C (en) 2001-10-26 2008-09-10 贝勒医学院 Composition and method to alter lean body mass and bone properties in a subject
DE10155944A1 (en) * 2001-11-14 2003-05-22 Atronic Int Gmbh Device for change of gain values ​​achievable on a coin-operated entertainment machines
US7632184B2 (en) * 2002-10-21 2009-12-15 Atronic International Gmbh Free game bonus round for gaming machines
US7780516B2 (en) * 2002-10-21 2010-08-24 Atronic International Gmbh Free game bonus round for gaming machines
US8231460B2 (en) * 2002-10-21 2012-07-31 Spielo International Austria GmbH Enhanced play mode in a gaming machine based on contributions from player's wagers
US7614958B2 (en) * 2001-11-16 2009-11-10 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Interactive quest game
US8266212B2 (en) * 2001-11-23 2012-09-11 Igt Game talk service bus
US7297062B2 (en) * 2001-11-23 2007-11-20 Cyberview Technology, Inc. Modular entertainment and gaming systems configured to consume and provide network services
CA2469839A1 (en) * 2001-11-26 2003-06-05 Igt Pass-through live validation device and method
US6869361B2 (en) * 2001-11-29 2005-03-22 Igt System, apparatus and method employing controller for play of shared bonus games
US6780111B2 (en) 2001-11-30 2004-08-24 Igt Method, apparatus and system for perpetual bonus game
US7169041B2 (en) 2001-12-04 2007-01-30 Igt Method and system for weighting odds to specific gaming entities in a shared bonus event
US7390257B2 (en) * 2001-12-06 2008-06-24 Igt Programmable computer controlled external visual indicator for gaming machine
US8734226B2 (en) * 2001-12-12 2014-05-27 Bgc Partners, Inc. Systems and methods for assisting in game play and wagering
US7452273B2 (en) 2001-12-12 2008-11-18 Cantor Index, Llc Method and apparatus for providing advice regarding gaming strategies
US7677969B2 (en) * 2001-12-12 2010-03-16 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty. Limited Bill acceptor for a gaming machine
US6890255B2 (en) 2001-12-17 2005-05-10 Igt Multiple wheel roulette game
WO2003052668A1 (en) * 2001-12-18 2003-06-26 Mobilesoft (Aust) Pty Ltd Remote monitoring
US7112139B2 (en) * 2001-12-19 2006-09-26 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine with ambient noise attenuation
US6837793B2 (en) * 2001-12-19 2005-01-04 Igt Method and apparatus for gaming machines with a quasi-competition play bonus feature
US6902478B2 (en) * 2001-12-19 2005-06-07 Igt Method and apparatus for an interactive bonus game
US20030119576A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2003-06-26 Mcclintic Monica A. Gaming devices and methods incorporating interactive physical skill bonus games and virtual reality games in a shared bonus event
US7052392B2 (en) 2001-12-31 2006-05-30 Igt Method and apparatus for providing an advantage to a player in a bonus game
JP4101519B2 (en) * 2002-01-07 2008-06-18 コナミゲーミング インコーポレーテッド The method of the gaming machine, the gaming machine management system and a game machine
US6890260B2 (en) * 2002-01-08 2005-05-10 Igt Illuminated player tracking card for a gaming apparatus
US7892089B2 (en) * 2002-01-11 2011-02-22 First Principles, Inc. Entrance-exchange structure and method
US7316616B2 (en) * 2002-01-16 2008-01-08 Igt Gaming system license management
US6729956B2 (en) * 2002-01-18 2004-05-04 Igt Gaming apparatus with player tracking capabilities
US7407434B2 (en) * 2002-01-18 2008-08-05 Case Venture Management, Llc Method and apparatus for a secondary game played in conjunction with a primary game
US9267144B2 (en) * 2002-01-23 2016-02-23 Monsanto Technology Llc Plastid transformation of maize
US7297059B2 (en) * 2002-01-24 2007-11-20 Progressive Gaming International Corporation Progressive gaming system and method having fractional progressive jackpot awards
US20030149619A1 (en) * 2002-02-01 2003-08-07 Tim Stanley Multi-property enterprise promotions
US6776715B2 (en) * 2002-02-01 2004-08-17 Igt Method and apparatus for providing a personal wide area progressive for gaming apparatus
US20030148812A1 (en) * 2002-02-01 2003-08-07 Paulsen Craig A. Gaming system and gaming method
US6843725B2 (en) * 2002-02-06 2005-01-18 Igt Method and apparatus for monitoring or controlling a gaming machine based on gaming machine location
EP1474214B1 (en) 2002-02-06 2011-04-06 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Method, apparatus and article employing multiple machine-readable indicia on playing cards
US6886829B2 (en) 2002-02-08 2005-05-03 Vendingdata Corporation Image capturing card shuffler
US20040043806A1 (en) * 2002-02-08 2004-03-04 Keith Kirby Online vehicle collection and play activity
EP1336942A3 (en) 2002-02-13 2004-12-15 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty. Ltd. Gaming machine with wagering features
US20050040006A1 (en) * 2002-02-20 2005-02-24 Prashanth Kodela Table game validation and event audit system
US7494413B2 (en) 2002-02-20 2009-02-24 Igt Slot machine game having a plurality of ways for a user to obtain payouts for one or more additional pay lines formed by the appearance of special symbols in a symbol matrix
US6745887B2 (en) * 2002-02-20 2004-06-08 Jcm American Corporation Gaming table validator assembly
US20050126881A1 (en) * 2002-02-20 2005-06-16 Iannello Richard J. Counter/tabletop alignment note feeder with plunger
US8221224B2 (en) 2002-02-28 2012-07-17 Igt Method for distributing large payouts with minimal interruption of a gaming session
US6984175B2 (en) 2002-02-28 2006-01-10 Igt Electronic payout administration method and system
US7722466B2 (en) * 2002-03-06 2010-05-25 Wms Gaming Inc. Integration of casino gaming and non-casino interactive gaming
US8597116B2 (en) 2002-03-12 2013-12-03 Igt Virtual player tracking and related services
US6997803B2 (en) 2002-03-12 2006-02-14 Igt Virtual gaming peripherals for a gaming machine
US20030176216A1 (en) * 2002-03-13 2003-09-18 Mike Storey Universal bonus trigger for a gaming machine
JP3466596B2 (en) * 2002-03-13 2003-11-10 コナミ株式会社 Network game system
US7198571B2 (en) * 2002-03-15 2007-04-03 Igt Room key based in-room player tracking
JP2003273255A (en) * 2002-03-19 2003-09-26 Mitsubishi Electric Corp Non-volatile semiconductor memory, storage method thereof, and manufacturing method thereof
US7179173B2 (en) 2002-03-25 2007-02-20 Nbgs International Inc. Control system for water amusement devices
US20040033833A1 (en) * 2002-03-25 2004-02-19 Briggs Rick A. Interactive redemption game
US7500915B2 (en) * 2002-03-28 2009-03-10 Igt Method and apparatus for rewarding multiple game players for a single win
US8540562B2 (en) * 2002-03-29 2013-09-24 Igt Advantage bingo bonus
US7785193B2 (en) * 2002-03-29 2010-08-31 Igt Cashless bonusing for gaming machines
US6908390B2 (en) * 2002-03-29 2005-06-21 Igt Apparatus and method for a gaming tournament network
US8025569B2 (en) * 2002-03-29 2011-09-27 Igt Simulating real gaming environments with interactive host and players
US20030187736A1 (en) * 2002-04-02 2003-10-02 David Teague Patron tracking system
US20050027721A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2005-02-03 Javier Saenz System and method for distributed data warehousing
WO2003085579A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2003-10-16 Venture Catalyst Incorporated System and method for customer contact management
WO2003085483A3 (en) * 2002-04-03 2004-06-10 Venture Catalyst Inc Information processing system for targeted marketing and customer relationship management
US6967566B2 (en) 2002-04-05 2005-11-22 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Live-action interactive adventure game
US20070066396A1 (en) 2002-04-05 2007-03-22 Denise Chapman Weston Retail methods for providing an interactive product to a consumer
US20030195037A1 (en) * 2002-04-11 2003-10-16 Vt Tech Corp. Video gaming machine for casino games
US20030195043A1 (en) * 2002-04-11 2003-10-16 Vt Tech Corp. System and method for live interactive remote gaming using casino-based proxies
US20040005918A1 (en) * 2002-04-16 2004-01-08 Walker Jay S. Gaming device methods and apparatus employing audio/video programming outcome presentation
US8801517B2 (en) * 2002-04-16 2014-08-12 Igt Method and apparatus for optimizing the rate of play of a gaming device
US8702492B2 (en) * 2002-04-16 2014-04-22 Igt Methods and apparatus for employing audio/video programming to initiate game play at a gaming device
US8025566B2 (en) * 2003-04-16 2011-09-27 Igt Gaming device methods and apparatus employing audio/video programming outcome presentation
US7467999B2 (en) * 2002-04-18 2008-12-23 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for outputting apparent and actual outcomes of a gaming device
US20050090314A1 (en) * 2002-04-18 2005-04-28 Nassef George J.Jr. Worldwide casino tour promotion and acceptance system and method
US20040127277A1 (en) 2002-10-09 2004-07-01 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for authenticating data relating to usage of a gaming device
US20040005919A1 (en) * 2002-04-18 2004-01-08 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for enabling a player to select features on a gaming device
US20060217194A1 (en) * 2002-04-18 2006-09-28 Walker Jay S Method and apparatus for managing performance of multiple games
WO2003089091A1 (en) * 2002-04-18 2003-10-30 Walker Digital, Llc False outcomes in a gaming device
US7416485B2 (en) * 2002-04-18 2008-08-26 Walker Digital, Llc Methods and apparatus for managing an account to fund benefits for a player
US8172671B2 (en) * 2002-04-19 2012-05-08 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for facilitating play of a gaming device
WO2003089086A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2003-10-30 Walker Digital, Llc Method for employing flat rate play
WO2003089078A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2003-10-30 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for linked play gaming with combined outcomes and shared indicia
US7871323B2 (en) * 2003-03-03 2011-01-18 Igt Method and apparatus for providing regular entrance into a bonus game
WO2003089085A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2003-10-30 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for providing a time based payment from a gaming device
US7563167B2 (en) 2002-04-19 2009-07-21 Walker Digital, Llc Gaming device method and apparatus employing modified payouts
US8113946B2 (en) * 2002-04-19 2012-02-14 Igt Method and apparatus for providing a time based payment from a gaming device
US20030228906A1 (en) 2002-04-19 2003-12-11 Walker Jay S. Methods and apparatus for providing communications services at a gaming machine
WO2003089084A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2003-10-30 Walker Digital, Llc Managing features on a gaming device
US7815503B2 (en) 2003-02-26 2010-10-19 Igt Method and apparatus for play of a game with negative outcomes
US6923724B2 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-08-02 Igt Gaming system allowing location determination of a gaming unit in a casino
US20030203755A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2003-10-30 Shuffle Master, Inc. Encryption in a secure computerized gaming system
WO2003093921A3 (en) * 2002-04-30 2003-12-31 Martin Moshal System for playing a game
US7037191B2 (en) 2002-05-01 2006-05-02 Igt Gaming device having multiple pay slots
US20040002369A1 (en) * 2002-05-06 2004-01-01 Walker Jay S. Method and apparatus for modifying a game based on results of game plays
US20030211884A1 (en) * 2002-05-08 2003-11-13 Michael Gauselmann Gaming machine with hidden jackpot
US20030212597A1 (en) * 2002-05-10 2003-11-13 Igt Multi-level point accumulation for a player tracking system and method
US6884173B2 (en) * 2002-05-14 2005-04-26 Atronic International Gmbh Configuration technique for a gaming machine
US7285049B1 (en) * 2002-05-17 2007-10-23 Sierra Design Group Universal overlay games in an electronic gaming environment
GB0211501D0 (en) * 2002-05-20 2002-06-26 Barcrest Dev B V Entertainment machines
US20040014645A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2004-01-22 Advisys, Inc. Increased delivery of a nucleic acid construct in vivo by the poly-L-glutamate ("PLG") system
DE60327282D1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2009-06-04 Nidec Sankyo Corp Manual card reader
US20080269153A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2008-10-30 Ruxandra Draghia-Akli Increased stability of a dna formulation by including poly-l-glutamate
US6887154B1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2005-05-03 Sierra Design Group Shared progressive gaming system and method
US6916244B2 (en) * 2002-06-05 2005-07-12 Cyberscan Technology, Inc. Server-less cashless gaming systems and methods
US6939234B2 (en) * 2002-06-10 2005-09-06 Wms Gaming, Inc. Dynamic configuration of gaming system
US7311605B2 (en) * 2002-06-12 2007-12-25 Igt Player tracking assembly for complete patron tracking for both gaming and non-gaming casino activity
US8979646B2 (en) * 2002-06-12 2015-03-17 Igt Casino patron tracking and information use
EP1372122A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2003-12-17 Yeong Gil Moon Wire/wireless internet lottery system using random-number generator
US20050278215A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2005-12-15 Seele Jr Norvell D Consumer reward system
US7485043B2 (en) 2002-06-19 2009-02-03 Igt Elimination games for gaming machines
US6884174B2 (en) * 2002-06-26 2005-04-26 Igt Communication protocol for gaming system configuration
US7909699B2 (en) * 2002-06-27 2011-03-22 Igt Scan based configuration control in a gaming environment
US7918730B2 (en) 2002-06-27 2011-04-05 Igt Trajectory-based 3-D games of chance for video gaming machines
US7455591B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2008-11-25 Igt Redundant gaming network mediation
US7780526B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2010-08-24 Igt Universal system mediation within gaming environments
US20040002377A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2004-01-01 Realtime Gaming, Inc. Slot machine enhancement
US7454784B2 (en) * 2002-07-09 2008-11-18 Harvinder Sahota System and method for identity verification
JP3586269B2 (en) * 2002-07-16 2004-11-10 株式会社コナミオンライン Network service system and point transfer system
EP1383096A3 (en) * 2002-07-17 2005-08-24 Novomatic AG Method and apparatus for gaming
US7988553B2 (en) * 2002-07-17 2011-08-02 Igt Method and apparatus for enrolling gaming device players into a player-tracking system
US7264545B2 (en) * 2002-07-31 2007-09-04 Igt Gaming device having selectable revealed award values
US7674184B2 (en) 2002-08-01 2010-03-09 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Interactive water attraction and quest game
US7029400B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2006-04-18 Creative Kingdoms, Llc Interactive water attraction and quest game
US7169052B2 (en) 2002-08-05 2007-01-30 Igt Personalized gaming apparatus and gaming method
US8277314B2 (en) * 2006-11-10 2012-10-02 Igt Flat rate wager-based game play techniques for casino table game environments
US6805633B2 (en) * 2002-08-07 2004-10-19 Bally Gaming, Inc. Gaming machine with automatic sound level adjustment and method therefor
US20040033832A1 (en) * 2002-08-13 2004-02-19 Gregg Solomon Casino money handling system
US20040032086A1 (en) * 2002-08-13 2004-02-19 Robert Barragan Gaming machine promotional system and method of use
US6892938B2 (en) * 2002-08-13 2005-05-17 Mandalay Resort Group Gaming system and method for completing a transaction associated with a gaming machine
US7255645B2 (en) * 2002-08-21 2007-08-14 Progressive Gaming International Corporation Equalizing different jackpot games with frequent pays
US7674182B2 (en) * 2002-08-22 2010-03-09 Atronic International Gmbh Progressive jackpot gaming system
US7591726B2 (en) * 2002-08-22 2009-09-22 Igt Gaming device having discounted activations or wagers
US7967675B1 (en) * 2002-08-22 2011-06-28 Bally Gaming, Inc. Fixed pool bonus method and apparatus
JP2004094482A (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-25 Omron Corp Recording medium recording device and transaction device
US7972213B2 (en) * 2002-09-04 2011-07-05 Igt Method and apparatus for player communication
US20040048657A1 (en) * 2002-09-05 2004-03-11 Michael Gauselmann Gaming machine with selectable features
US20040048644A1 (en) * 2002-09-06 2004-03-11 Peter Gerrard Gaming device having a progressive award funded through skill, strategy or risk gaming event
US8083585B2 (en) * 2002-09-10 2011-12-27 Igt Apparatus and method for copying gaming machine configuration settings
US7131909B2 (en) * 2002-09-10 2006-11-07 Igt Method and apparatus for managing gaming machine code downloads
GB0504421D0 (en) * 2002-09-10 2005-04-06 Acres Gaming Inc Method and device for collecting and reporting data
US6830515B2 (en) * 2002-09-10 2004-12-14 Igt Method and apparatus for supporting wide area gaming network
US7306519B2 (en) * 2002-09-12 2007-12-11 Igt Gaming device having free game keno
US7104889B2 (en) * 2002-09-13 2006-09-12 Igt Method of using a rule based script to describe gaming machine payout
US6918831B2 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-07-19 Igt Method and apparatus for independently verifying game outcome
US20040053694A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2004-03-18 Rick Rowe Casino open network system architecture
US20040053681A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2004-03-18 Acres Gaming Incorporated System for electronic game promotion
US8403745B2 (en) * 2002-09-16 2013-03-26 Igt System controlled player-related bonuses in gaming machines
US7682238B2 (en) * 2002-09-16 2010-03-23 Igt Method and apparatus for payout in a gaming machine
US7766744B2 (en) * 2002-09-17 2010-08-03 Igt Method and apparatus for providing customizable player bonuses
US7980936B2 (en) * 2002-09-30 2011-07-19 Igt Apparatus and method for player interaction
US7108605B2 (en) * 2002-09-30 2006-09-19 Igt EPROM file system in a gaming apparatus
US7824264B2 (en) * 2002-09-30 2010-11-02 Igt Random bonus prize shown on the system display
JP2004135970A (en) * 2002-10-18 2004-05-13 Aruze Corp Game machine, server, and program
US20040077408A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2004-04-22 D'amico Michael H. Gaming award method and apparatus
GB0706321D0 (en) * 2002-11-01 2007-05-09 Igt Reno Nev Player specific rewards
WO2005034053A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2005-04-14 Acres Gaming Incorporated Player specific rewards
US8162666B2 (en) * 2002-11-12 2012-04-24 Tyler Parham Multi-player secondary gaming method and system
WO2004059552A1 (en) * 2002-12-19 2004-07-15 Diebold, Incorporated Cash dispensing automated banking machine with user interface illumination devices
US7470191B2 (en) * 2002-12-20 2008-12-30 Tech Link International Entertainment Ltd. Responsible gaming system
US7473179B2 (en) * 2002-12-20 2009-01-06 Techlink International Entertainment Ltd. Retro-fit responsible gaming system
US7803053B2 (en) 2003-01-08 2010-09-28 Igt System for real-time game network tracking
US20040142744A1 (en) * 2003-01-08 2004-07-22 Acres Gaming Incorporated Mobile data access
US20040142747A1 (en) * 2003-01-16 2004-07-22 Pryzby Eric M. Selectable audio preferences for a gaming machine
US7364508B2 (en) * 2003-01-16 2008-04-29 Wms Gaming, Inc. Gaming machine environment having controlled audio and visual media presentation
US7367886B2 (en) * 2003-01-16 2008-05-06 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming system with surround sound
US7367449B2 (en) * 2003-01-21 2008-05-06 Kaminski Scott T Case with two sides and interlocking latch
US20040142750A1 (en) * 2003-01-22 2004-07-22 Acres Gaming Incorporated Method and apparatus for use of a network by a casino
US20040171419A1 (en) * 2003-02-05 2004-09-02 Walker Jay S. Electronic amusement device and method for enhanced slot machine play
US7955169B2 (en) * 2003-02-13 2011-06-07 Igt Method and apparatus for offering a flat rate gaming session with time extension awards
US8313374B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2012-11-20 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine having improved audio control architecture
WO2004077368A3 (en) * 2003-02-21 2005-05-12 V Maximillian Garcia Method and apparatus for setting game parameters
US8142272B2 (en) * 2004-02-23 2012-03-27 Igt Method and apparatus for facilitating entry into bonus rounds
US7329183B2 (en) 2003-02-21 2008-02-12 Igt Central determination gaming system where the same seed is used to generate the outcomes for a primary game and a secondary game
US6988946B2 (en) 2003-02-21 2006-01-24 Igt Central determination gaming system with a central controller providing a game outcome and a gaming terminal determining a presentation of the provided game outcome
US7618323B2 (en) * 2003-02-26 2009-11-17 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine system having a gesture-sensing mechanism
US20040166936A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-08-26 Rothschild Wayne H. Gaming machine system having an acoustic-sensing mechanism
US20040166940A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-08-26 Rothschild Wayne H. Configuration of gaming machines
US20070004505A1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2007-01-04 Walker Jay S Method and apparatus for providing regular entrance into a bonus game
US20040174254A1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2004-09-09 Siwa Angelito D. Industrial timer unit and control unit
US7347778B2 (en) * 2003-03-03 2008-03-25 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine system having automatic reporting feature
US20040176159A1 (en) * 2003-03-04 2004-09-09 Walker Jay S Systems and methods for executing games employing bonus amounts based on bonus characteristics
WO2004079671A3 (en) * 2003-03-04 2006-05-18 James A Jorasch Multiplayer gaming device and methods
US20040185937A1 (en) 2003-03-04 2004-09-23 Aruze Corporation Wireless communication terminal unit, gaming machine, information managing apparatus and gaming system
US7291069B2 (en) * 2003-03-06 2007-11-06 Igt Central determination gaming system with a game outcome generated by a gaming terminal and approved by a central controller
US7699697B2 (en) * 2003-03-07 2010-04-20 Bally Gaming, Inc. Bonus game simulating auctions
US20090048012A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2009-02-19 Bally Gaming, Inc. Networked Gaming System and Method Providing Multiple Group Play Awards Based on Different Criteria
US8414397B2 (en) * 2003-03-17 2013-04-09 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming terminal network with a message director
US7341522B2 (en) 2003-03-21 2008-03-11 Unirec Co., Ltd. Game system with gaming machine interconnected to a cellular phone
US7850524B2 (en) * 2003-03-25 2010-12-14 Wms Gaming Inc. Progressive jackpot game with special bonus
US7963843B2 (en) 2003-03-28 2011-06-21 Oneida Indian Nation Cashless gaming system and method with monitoring
GB0307299D0 (en) * 2003-03-29 2003-05-07 Comfort John J Remote security and audit system
US8197344B2 (en) * 2003-04-08 2012-06-12 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming terminal data monitoring network
US20070060316A1 (en) * 2003-04-09 2007-03-15 Stargames Corporation Party Limited Communal slot system and method for operating same
US9208655B2 (en) * 2003-04-30 2015-12-08 Konami Gaming, Inc. Gaming machine and methods of allowing a player to play gaming machines having synchronized symbols
US9092949B2 (en) * 2003-04-30 2015-07-28 Konami Gaming, Inc. Gaming machine and methods of allowing a player to play gaming machines having synchronized symbols
US7384335B2 (en) * 2003-04-28 2008-06-10 Igt Bonus award for gaming machines using selectable scripts
GB0310924D0 (en) * 2003-05-13 2003-06-18 Igt Uk Ltd Entertainment machines
US20040230509A1 (en) * 2003-05-14 2004-11-18 Iddings Cara L. Method for corroborating a gaming jackpot payment
US7192348B2 (en) 2003-05-20 2007-03-20 Igt Central determination gaming system which provides a player a choice in outcomes
GB0311671D0 (en) * 2003-05-21 2003-06-25 Waterleaf Ltd Betting terminal with logging facility
GB0311670D0 (en) * 2003-05-21 2003-06-25 Waterleaf Ltd Betting terminal with watchdog facility
US20040235553A1 (en) * 2003-05-23 2004-11-25 Hideaki Iwamoto Gaming machine and gaming system with a plurality of gaming machines
US7097562B2 (en) 2003-06-03 2006-08-29 Wms Gaming Inc. Peer-to-peer distributed gaming application network
GB0312811D0 (en) * 2003-06-04 2003-07-09 Oneida Indian Nation Cashless gaming system and method with monitoring
GB2403329B (en) 2003-06-06 2006-05-31 Igt Uk Ltd Entertainment machines
US20040254012A1 (en) * 2003-06-10 2004-12-16 D'amico Michael H. Progressive jackpot communication techniques
US7341518B2 (en) * 2003-06-13 2008-03-11 Olympian Gaming Llc Cashless slot machine and/or amusement device with special features
US7410422B2 (en) * 2003-06-13 2008-08-12 Harrah's Operating Company, Inc. Unified player rewards
US20040254005A1 (en) * 2003-06-13 2004-12-16 Michael Shackleford Method, apparatus, and computer readable storage medium for improved tracking of casino players
US8512118B2 (en) 2003-06-19 2013-08-20 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Limited Cashless reservation system
US20070032295A1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2007-02-08 Muir Robert L Cashless reservation system
US8795051B2 (en) 2003-06-19 2014-08-05 Robert Linley Muir Cashless reservation system
US7399227B2 (en) 2003-06-23 2008-07-15 Igt Central determination gaming system with a keno game
US7134959B2 (en) * 2003-06-25 2006-11-14 Scientific Games Royalty Corporation Methods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US8635643B2 (en) * 2003-06-30 2014-01-21 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. System and method for providing interactive media content over a network
US9466179B2 (en) * 2003-07-02 2016-10-11 Bally Gaming, Inc. Gaming machine having a community game with side wagering
US7662040B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2010-02-16 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine having a community game with side wagering
US7780531B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2010-08-24 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine having a community game with side wagering
US7229353B2 (en) * 2003-07-02 2007-06-12 Atlantic City Coin & Slot Service Company, Inc. Method and apparatus for cashless gaming
US7963846B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2011-06-21 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine having multiple level progressive feature with player controlled outcome
US20050239545A1 (en) * 2003-07-14 2005-10-27 Bruce Rowe Programmatic control of gaming devices
US8490973B2 (en) * 2004-10-04 2013-07-23 Shfl Entertainment, Inc. Card reading shoe with card stop feature and systems utilizing the same
US8511684B2 (en) * 2004-10-04 2013-08-20 Shfl Entertainment, Inc. Card-reading shoe with inventory correction feature and methods of correcting inventory
US7434805B2 (en) * 2003-07-17 2008-10-14 Shuffle Master, Inc Intelligent baccarat shoe
US7933448B2 (en) * 2005-06-13 2011-04-26 Shuffle Master, Inc. Card reading system employing CMOS reader
US7407438B2 (en) * 2003-07-17 2008-08-05 Shuffle Master, Inc Modular dealing shoe for casino table card games
US20060063577A1 (en) * 2003-07-17 2006-03-23 Shuffle Master, Inc. System for monitoring the game of baccarat
US7029009B2 (en) 2003-07-17 2006-04-18 Shuffle Master, Inc. Playing card dealing shoe with automated internal card feeding and card reading
US7213812B2 (en) * 2003-07-17 2007-05-08 Shuffle Master, Inc. Intelligent baccarat shoe
US7264241B2 (en) 2003-07-17 2007-09-04 Shuffle Master, Inc. Intelligent baccarat shoe
US20050113166A1 (en) * 2003-07-17 2005-05-26 Shuffle Master, Inc. Discard rack with card reader for playing cards
US8118305B2 (en) * 2003-07-17 2012-02-21 Shuffle Master, Inc. Mechanized playing card dealing shoe with automatic jam recovery
US7769232B2 (en) * 2003-07-17 2010-08-03 Shuffle Master, Inc. Unique sensing system and method for reading playing cards
US7764836B2 (en) 2005-06-13 2010-07-27 Shuffle Master, Inc. Card shuffler with card rank and value reading capability using CMOS sensor
EP1668532A4 (en) * 2003-07-18 2006-11-08 Paltronics Australasia Pty Ltd An apparatus and method for awarding a prize
CA2475164A1 (en) * 2003-07-22 2005-01-22 Acres Gaming Incorporated Celebration pay
GB0416305D0 (en) * 2003-07-22 2004-08-25 Acres Gaming Inc Celebration pay
US7314408B2 (en) 2003-07-23 2008-01-01 Igt Methods and apparatus for a competitive bonus game with variable odds
CA2575926C (en) * 2003-08-04 2014-02-25 Advisys, Inc. Canine specific growth hormone releasing hormone
US20050033616A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-02-10 Ezrez Software, Inc. Travel management system providing customized travel plan
US20050037834A1 (en) 2003-08-11 2005-02-17 Stern Kenneth O. Apparatus and method for memorization poker
US7470186B2 (en) 2003-08-12 2008-12-30 Igt Gaming device having a game with sequential display of numbers
US7717788B2 (en) * 2003-08-14 2010-05-18 Harrah's Entertainment, Inc. Progressive promotional marketing system
US8591338B2 (en) * 2003-08-18 2013-11-26 Igt System and method for permitting a tournament game on different computing platforms
US7798901B2 (en) * 2003-08-18 2010-09-21 Igt Tournament gaming method and system
US8002630B2 (en) * 2003-08-18 2011-08-23 Igt Tournament game system and method using a tournament game card
US20050049048A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-03 Wilder Richard L. Method and apparatus for controlling multiple games with one or more processors
US7192208B2 (en) 2003-09-02 2007-03-20 Futurelogic, Inc. Rewritable card printer
US9773373B2 (en) 2004-09-01 2017-09-26 Milestone Entertainment Llc Systems for implementing enhanced gaming and prizing parameters in an electronic environment
US7789748B2 (en) * 2003-09-04 2010-09-07 Igt Gaming device having player-selectable music
US20050054438A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2005-03-10 Rothschild Wayne H. Universal personal identifier for accessing patron information at a gaming venue
WO2005025701A3 (en) * 2003-09-05 2005-05-12 Bally Gaming Int Inc Systems, methods, and devices for monitoring card games, such as baccarat
US7909693B2 (en) * 2003-09-08 2011-03-22 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Ltd. Gaming system for tracking player activity during virtual sessions at a gaming machine
US20050059480A1 (en) * 2003-09-11 2005-03-17 Konami Gaming, Inc. System and method for awarding incentive awards to a player of a gaming device
US20060135253A1 (en) * 2004-09-10 2006-06-22 Jeffrey George Gaming system and method for providing entry to a contest
US20050060231A1 (en) * 2003-09-11 2005-03-17 Konami Gaming, Inc. Gaming incentive system and method of redeeming bonus points
US20070026941A1 (en) * 2003-09-12 2007-02-01 Block Rory L Restricted-access progressive game for a gaming machine
US7494414B2 (en) 2003-09-12 2009-02-24 Igt Gaming device having a card management system for the management of circulating data cards
US8057296B2 (en) 2003-09-12 2011-11-15 Igt Gaming device including a card processing assembly having vertically-stacked card holders operable with thermally-printable data cards and portable card changeover machines
US20070259714A1 (en) * 2003-09-12 2007-11-08 Block Rory L Player Identification Feature for Restricted-Access Wagering Games
US20070060319A1 (en) * 2003-09-12 2007-03-15 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming network for use in a restricted-access progressive game
US7857700B2 (en) * 2003-09-12 2010-12-28 Igt Three-dimensional autostereoscopic image display for a gaming apparatus
WO2005038731A3 (en) * 2003-09-12 2006-06-22 Aristocrat Technologies Au Adaptive display system and method for a gaming machine
WO2005032673A3 (en) * 2003-09-12 2005-07-07 Christopher W Blackburn Gaming system using single player-identification card for performing multiple functions
US8814652B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2014-08-26 Igt Bingo game with multicard patterns
EP1671289A1 (en) 2003-09-15 2006-06-21 Igt Multi-player bingo game with game-winning award selection
JP2007517535A (en) 2003-09-15 2007-07-05 アイジーティー Multi-player Bingo game with a progressive jackpot
US7946915B2 (en) 2003-09-15 2011-05-24 Igt Multi-player bingo game with real-time game-winning pattern determination
US20070106553A1 (en) * 2004-09-15 2007-05-10 Jordan Richard J Pari-mutuel betting with bonus feature
WO2005029814A3 (en) * 2003-09-15 2005-06-02 Acres Gaming Inc Player specific network
US7959509B2 (en) 2003-09-15 2011-06-14 Igt Multi-player bingo game with optional progressive jackpot wager
US7614948B2 (en) 2003-09-15 2009-11-10 Igt Multi-player bingo with slept awards reverting to progressive jackpot pool
EP1664988A4 (en) * 2003-09-15 2009-06-24 Igt Reno Nev Pari-mutuel betting with bonus feature
US8057292B2 (en) 2003-09-15 2011-11-15 Igt Draw bingo
US7731581B2 (en) 2003-09-15 2010-06-08 Igt Multi-player bingo game with multiple alternative outcome displays
US8753188B2 (en) 2003-09-15 2014-06-17 Igt Multi-player bingo game with multi-level award amount pattern mapping
WO2005029279A3 (en) 2003-09-16 2005-06-09 Acres Gaming Inc Method and apparatus for awarding individual or group point multiplication
CN1874826A (en) 2003-10-01 2006-12-06 现金系统公司 Multi-function cashless gaming ATM
US9437073B2 (en) 2004-10-01 2016-09-06 Everi Payments Inc. System and method for integrated multiple source player cash access
EP1682237A1 (en) 2003-10-08 2006-07-26 ARL, Inc. Method, apparatus and article for computational sequence generation and playing card distribution
EP1677879B1 (en) * 2003-10-16 2008-01-09 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Method, apparatus and article for determining an initial hand in a playing card game, such as blackjack or baccarat
US7780525B2 (en) 2003-10-17 2010-08-24 Igt Systems and methods for determining a level of reward
US9564004B2 (en) * 2003-10-20 2017-02-07 Igt Closed-loop system for providing additional event participation to electronic video game customers
US7335106B2 (en) 2003-10-20 2008-02-26 Las Vegas Gaming, Inc. Closed-loop system for displaying promotional events and granting awards for electronic video games
US9582963B2 (en) 2003-10-20 2017-02-28 Tipping Point Group, Llc Method and system for gaming machine accounting
US8721449B2 (en) 2003-10-20 2014-05-13 Tipping Point Group, Llc Method and system for paragame activity at electronic gaming machine
CN1871052A (en) * 2003-10-21 2006-11-29 帕尔特罗尼克斯澳大利亚股份有限公司 An apparatus and method for allocating a prize
US20060058090A1 (en) * 2004-09-13 2006-03-16 Pokertek, Inc. System and method for playing an electronic card game
US20060058082A1 (en) * 2004-09-13 2006-03-16 Pokertek, Inc. System and method for providing a card tournament using one or more electronic card table
US7229359B2 (en) 2003-10-24 2007-06-12 Henry, Schooley & Associates, L.L.C. Continuous water ride
JP2005152546A (en) * 2003-10-28 2005-06-16 Aruze Corp Game system and game managing method
US20050090305A1 (en) * 2003-10-28 2005-04-28 Robert Silva Apparatus and methods for continuous game play during a lockup in a gaming apparatus
JP2005152547A (en) * 2003-10-29 2005-06-16 Aruze Corp Game system
US7736236B2 (en) 2003-11-07 2010-06-15 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Method, apparatus and article for evaluating card games, such as blackjack
US20050107163A1 (en) * 2003-11-13 2005-05-19 Nguyen Binh T. Methods and apparatus for providing an electronic operational event trail for a gaming apparatus
US7315426B2 (en) * 2003-12-05 2008-01-01 University Of Pittsburgh Metallic nano-optic lenses and beam shaping devices
US7867081B2 (en) * 2003-12-08 2011-01-11 Igt System for join-up incentive messaging and bonusing
US20050137017A1 (en) * 2003-12-09 2005-06-23 Systems In Progress Holding Gmbh Electronic gaming system
US20060030409A1 (en) * 2003-12-09 2006-02-09 Systems In Progress Holding Gmbh Data management device within an electronic gaming device and a method for monitoring electronic gaming devices
US20050130732A1 (en) * 2003-12-12 2005-06-16 Rothschild Wayne H. Random bonus delivery mechanism for a gaming system
US7708638B2 (en) * 2003-12-17 2010-05-04 Multimedia Games, Inc. Method, apparatus, and program product for detecting money laundering activities in gaming systems
US8286203B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2012-10-09 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. System and method for enhanced hot key delivery
US7364091B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2008-04-29 Scientific Games International, Inc. Embedded optical signatures in documents
US7384338B2 (en) * 2003-12-22 2008-06-10 Wms Gaming, Inc. Gaming system having player-profile input feature for maintaining player anonymity
US7740538B2 (en) * 2004-01-08 2010-06-22 Igt Matching bonusing method using a player tracking card
US20050153768A1 (en) * 2004-01-08 2005-07-14 Igt Gaming machine bonusing method utilizing a player tracking card
EP1706853A1 (en) * 2004-01-14 2006-10-04 Igt Network gaming system management
US7384337B2 (en) * 2004-01-15 2008-06-10 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game providing rewards independent from gaming session
US7704137B2 (en) 2004-01-20 2010-04-27 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine with feature triggering scheme
US8515789B1 (en) 2004-01-29 2013-08-20 Jennifer Kutcher Lendler Method for optimizing revenue or profit of a gambling enterprise
US7686689B2 (en) * 2004-02-10 2010-03-30 Wms Gaming, Inc. Basic wagering game having a continuously modified pay table
JP2005224304A (en) * 2004-02-10 2005-08-25 Aruze Corp Game medium dispenser
US7513828B2 (en) * 2004-02-17 2009-04-07 Igt Gaming device having secondary game played in parallel with primary game
GB0403705D0 (en) * 2004-02-19 2004-03-24 Waterleaf Ltd Gaming facility and method of operation thereof
WO2005081958A3 (en) 2004-02-23 2007-01-25 Wagerworks Inc Bonus structures for multi-outcome/multi-bet gambling games
WO2005082480A1 (en) * 2004-02-26 2005-09-09 Wms Gaming Inc. Method and apparatus for utilizing tickets to progress game play in a gaming machine
EP1721290A1 (en) * 2004-02-26 2006-11-15 Paltronics Australasia Pty Limited A method or apparatus for allocating a player's contribution in a gaming apparatus between a plurality of games
US20050215313A1 (en) * 2004-03-03 2005-09-29 Stargames Corporation Pty Limited Communal gaming jackpot method
US7641555B2 (en) * 2004-03-04 2010-01-05 Wms Gaming Inc. Method and apparatus for automated configuration of gaming machine operating parameters
US7744468B2 (en) * 2004-03-15 2010-06-29 Igt Event calendar at electronic gaming device
WO2005089374A3 (en) * 2004-03-15 2006-04-06 Scott A Boyd Method and apparatus for awarding a bonus via a cashless network
US20050206083A1 (en) * 2004-03-17 2005-09-22 Gold Steven T Poker-type game having adjustable payouts and method therefor
US7306516B2 (en) * 2004-03-29 2007-12-11 Alex Iosilevsky Electronic game table
US7980938B2 (en) 2004-03-29 2011-07-19 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with video lottery bonus game
WO2005099425A3 (en) 2004-03-30 2005-12-29 Wms Gaming Inc Wagering game providing free game play as a progressive award
US7314411B2 (en) * 2004-04-01 2008-01-01 Multimedia Games, Inc. Player action incentive arrangement for gaming systems
EP1763385A4 (en) * 2004-04-07 2009-01-07 Walker Digital Llc Methods and apparatus for facilitating usage of a supplemental ticket at a gaming device
US8221223B2 (en) 2004-04-07 2012-07-17 Igt Methods, systems and apparatus for facilitating cashout options at a gaming device
US20060148559A1 (en) * 2004-04-07 2006-07-06 Jordan R J Electronic gaming account service center
CA2562147A1 (en) * 2004-04-07 2005-10-27 Igt Global content management over network for gaming machine
US7324973B2 (en) * 2004-04-16 2008-01-29 Video Gaming Technologies, Inc. Gaming system and method of securely transferring a monetary value
US20050261056A1 (en) * 2004-05-07 2005-11-24 Smolucha Walter E Method of using non-monetary chattel in gaming machines
US8118667B2 (en) * 2006-02-08 2012-02-21 Scientific Games Holdings Limited Multiplayer gaming incentive
JP2007536025A (en) * 2004-05-10 2007-12-13 パルトロニクス オーストラレーシア ピーティーワイ リミテッド Method and apparatus for providing a plurality of game
CN1956754A (en) * 2004-05-10 2007-05-02 帕尔特罗尼科澳大拉西亚私人有限公司 A method or apparatus for determining performance data in a gaming system
RU2006143645A (en) * 2004-05-10 2008-06-20 Пэлтроникс Острэйлэйшиа Пти Лимитед (Au) A method and apparatus for awarding a prize
EP1761317A4 (en) 2004-05-10 2009-04-01 Paltronics Australasia Pty Ltd A system and method for providing a plurality of games
CN101010124A (en) * 2004-05-10 2007-08-01 帕尔特罗尼科澳大拉西亚私人有限公司 System and method for supporting multiple games
WO2005113089A1 (en) * 2004-05-13 2005-12-01 Wms Gaming, Inc. Wagering game machine audio module interface
WO2005113088A1 (en) 2004-05-13 2005-12-01 Wms Gaming Inc. Bank wagering game
US8038528B2 (en) 2004-05-18 2011-10-18 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with enhanced progressive game
US7771276B2 (en) * 2004-06-02 2010-08-10 Wms Gaming Inc. Method and apparatus for a gaming network architecture
KR100466217B1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2005-01-04 엔에이치엔(주) System for managing divided points in on-line and method thereof
US8241111B2 (en) * 2004-06-17 2012-08-14 Igt Method and apparatus for awarding a mystery promotional ticket
US8684839B2 (en) 2004-06-18 2014-04-01 Igt Control of wager-based game using gesture recognition
US20090131151A1 (en) * 2006-09-01 2009-05-21 Igt Automated Techniques for Table Game State Tracking
US7815507B2 (en) 2004-06-18 2010-10-19 Igt Game machine user interface using a non-contact eye motion recognition device
US8460103B2 (en) 2004-06-18 2013-06-11 Igt Gesture controlled casino gaming system
US20050288083A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 Shuffle Master, Inc. Distributed intelligent data collection system for casino table games
US20050288086A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 Shuffle Master, Inc. Hand count methods and systems for casino table games
US20050288084A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 Shuffle Master, Inc. Casino table gaming system with round counting system
US20050288085A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 Shuffle Master, Inc. Dealer identification system
US7510473B2 (en) 2004-06-30 2009-03-31 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game having progressive amounts represented in various ways
US7611408B2 (en) * 2004-07-08 2009-11-03 Igt System for communicating with a player through a mountable interactive interface
US7365468B2 (en) * 2004-07-20 2008-04-29 Bluway Systems, Llc Motor stator having transposed winding layers
US8128486B2 (en) * 2004-07-21 2012-03-06 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with wager manipulation
US7621814B2 (en) * 2004-07-22 2009-11-24 Scientific Games International, Inc. Media enhanced gaming system
US8029364B2 (en) 2004-07-23 2011-10-04 Wms Gaming Inc. System, method, and apparatus for presenting media in a wagering game machine
US7347775B2 (en) * 2004-07-26 2008-03-25 Mickey Roemer Gaming machines with communication links configured to present bonus games
US20080171586A1 (en) * 2004-07-26 2008-07-17 Mickey Roemer Casino player loyalty system offering random player bonus opportunity
US7713118B2 (en) * 2004-07-26 2010-05-11 Mickey Roemer Timed gaming event
US8690677B2 (en) * 2004-07-26 2014-04-08 Mickey Roemer Method and system for awarding bonuses via telecommunication links
GB2431363B8 (en) 2004-07-28 2010-04-07 Wms Gaming Inc Wagering game having progressive amounts displayedin a matrix
US8353753B2 (en) 2004-07-28 2013-01-15 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with randomly funded progressive amounts
US7695359B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2010-04-13 Igt “Buy a peek” gaming methods and devices
US7955170B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2011-06-07 Igt Providing non-bingo outcomes for a bingo game
US20060025211A1 (en) * 2004-07-30 2006-02-02 Wilday Peter B Gaming system constructions and methods
US7274779B2 (en) * 2004-07-30 2007-09-25 Qwest Communications International, Inc. Telephone to telephone data passing system
US8123606B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2012-02-28 Igt Stud bingo
US20060030397A1 (en) * 2004-08-06 2006-02-09 Wms Gaming Inc. Video gaming machine with player-selectable banner
US20060035705A1 (en) * 2004-08-10 2006-02-16 Jordan R J System and method for delivering mystery awards
US7962362B2 (en) * 2004-08-11 2011-06-14 Canadian Bank Note Company, Limited Promoting customer loyalty
US7942744B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2011-05-17 Igt Virtual input system
US8449379B2 (en) * 2004-08-20 2013-05-28 Igt Wide area loyalty access through independent bonus network
US8419542B2 (en) * 2004-08-20 2013-04-16 Igt Wide area bonusing systems
US20060046852A1 (en) * 2004-08-26 2006-03-02 Rowe Richard E Wide area gaming system
US7311604B2 (en) 2004-09-01 2007-12-25 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming devices that share a multi-outcome display
US20060046838A1 (en) * 2004-09-02 2006-03-02 Igt., A Nevada Corporation Method and system for gaming and e-materials distribution
US7837545B2 (en) 2004-09-03 2010-11-23 Igt Gaming device having an interactive poker game with predetermined outcomes
US20060052154A1 (en) * 2004-09-03 2006-03-09 Boerner Matthew J Electronic bingo game
US8672742B2 (en) * 2004-09-03 2014-03-18 Igt Merchandising and gaming method and system
US8109827B2 (en) * 2004-09-07 2012-02-07 Gtech Rhode Island Corporation Multivendor progressive gaming system
US7883410B2 (en) 2004-09-09 2011-02-08 Konami Gaming, Inc. System and method for establishing a progressive jackpot award
US7461780B2 (en) 2004-09-09 2008-12-09 Global Cash Access, Inc. System and method for checkless cash advance settlement
US8727854B2 (en) 2006-02-23 2014-05-20 Konami Gaming, Inc System and method for operating a matching game in conjunction with a transaction on a gaming machine
US20060066048A1 (en) 2004-09-14 2006-03-30 Shuffle Master, Inc. Magnetic jam detection in a card shuffler
US8568225B2 (en) * 2004-09-16 2013-10-29 Bally Gaming, Inc. User interface system and method for creating and verifying signed content
US20060123339A1 (en) * 2004-09-16 2006-06-08 Dimichele Carmen General purpose user interface system and method
US7896735B2 (en) * 2004-09-16 2011-03-01 Bally Gaming, Inc. Player gaming console, gaming machine, networked gaming system and method
US8348759B2 (en) 2004-09-16 2013-01-08 Bally Gaming, Inc. User interface system and method for a gaming machine
US7524243B2 (en) 2004-09-21 2009-04-28 Igt Central determination poker game
US7686688B2 (en) * 2004-09-22 2010-03-30 Olympian Gaming Llc Method, apparatus, and computer readable storage to determine and/or update slot machine configurations using historical, and/or current, and/or predicted future data
US20060074755A1 (en) * 2004-09-24 2006-04-06 Jeanette Juetten Online loyalty program
US20060079317A1 (en) * 2004-09-24 2006-04-13 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with bonus-game assets that can be preserved for subsequent gaming sessions
US7666088B2 (en) * 2004-09-28 2010-02-23 Igt Methods and apparatus for playing a gaming pool for a feature event bonus game
US20060068898A1 (en) * 2004-09-28 2006-03-30 Darren Maya Game-credit card gaming system and method with incentives
US7740536B2 (en) 2004-09-29 2010-06-22 Igt Gaming device having player selection of scatter pay symbol positions
WO2006039132A1 (en) * 2004-09-29 2006-04-13 Wms Gaming Inc. Gaming machine configuration methods and apparatus
US7585219B2 (en) * 2004-09-30 2009-09-08 Igt Gaming device having a matching symbol game
US8545304B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2013-10-01 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with bonus game triggered by linked terminal
US8075394B2 (en) * 2004-09-30 2011-12-13 Universal Entertainment Corporation Gaming machine and game system
US8172661B1 (en) * 2004-09-30 2012-05-08 Bally Gaming, Inc. Variable payout percentage gaming device and methods of using the same
US7775873B2 (en) * 2004-09-30 2010-08-17 Wms Gaming, Inc. Wagering game with shared payoff based on multiple player selections
US9406188B2 (en) * 2004-10-01 2016-08-02 Gtech Canada Ulc Communication control for progressive game controller to prevent near-concurrent wins
US8113947B2 (en) 2004-10-01 2012-02-14 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with award unlocking feature
US8651939B2 (en) 2004-10-01 2014-02-18 Igt Gaming system having a plurality of adjacently arranged gaming machines and a mechanical moveable indicator operable to individually indicate the gaming machines
US20060084502A1 (en) * 2004-10-01 2006-04-20 Shuffle Master, Inc. Thin client user interface for gaming systems
US7874920B2 (en) * 2004-10-01 2011-01-25 Vms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with unilateral player selection for developing a group
US20060073897A1 (en) * 2004-10-01 2006-04-06 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with group jackpot
US7862427B2 (en) * 2004-10-04 2011-01-04 Igt Wide area progressive jackpot system and methods
US8118663B2 (en) * 2004-10-04 2012-02-21 Cole Kepro International, Llc Method and system for changing the appearance of gaming machines as part of optimizing the number of gaming machines presenting particular games
US8602882B2 (en) 2004-10-04 2013-12-10 Igt Jackpot interfaces and services on a gaming machine
US7631871B2 (en) * 2004-10-11 2009-12-15 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game based on combining player selections with lottery draws to select objects from a third set of indicia
US8043155B2 (en) 2004-10-18 2011-10-25 Igt Gaming device having a plurality of wildcard symbol patterns
US20060084495A1 (en) * 2004-10-19 2006-04-20 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with feature for recording records and statistics
US7265892B2 (en) * 2004-10-19 2007-09-04 Texas Instruments Incorporated Micromirror array devices with light blocking areas
US9478102B2 (en) * 2004-10-20 2016-10-25 Bally Gaming, Inc. Wagering game with alterable-math feature
US8033906B2 (en) * 2004-10-21 2011-10-11 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with invitation for playing a wagering game at a subsequent gaming session
US20060217181A1 (en) * 2004-10-28 2006-09-28 Chantal Jubinville On-line lottery extension game having an instant component and a draw-based component
KR20070084102A (en) 2004-10-28 2007-08-24 사이언티픽 게임스 인터내셔널, 아이엔씨. Lottery game played on a geometric figure using indicia with variable point values
US20060094495A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-04 Philip Gelber Wagering game with competitive multi-tier event
WO2006050484A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-11 Cash Systems, Inc. System and method for performing a financial transaction in an entertainment center
US20060111175A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-05-25 Walker Jay S Method and apparatus for discounting a flat rate gaming session
US20060043668A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-03-02 Walker Jay S Flat rate play contract price adjustments
US20060046841A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-03-02 Walker Jay S Budget-based flat rate play contract parameters
US20060116207A1 (en) * 2004-11-29 2006-06-01 Barona Tribal Gaming Authority Electronic gaming system
US7213811B2 (en) * 2004-12-08 2007-05-08 Scientific Games Royalty Corporation Extension to a lottery game for which winning indicia are set by selections made by winners of a base lottery game
US20060128464A1 (en) * 2004-12-10 2006-06-15 Aruze Corp. Gaming machine and gaming system therefor
US7837547B2 (en) 2004-12-14 2010-11-23 Igt Gaming device having a wagering game wherein a wager amount is automatically determined based on a quantity of player selections
US7575517B2 (en) * 2004-12-15 2009-08-18 Gaming Enhancements, Inc. Techniques for generating random awards using a plurality of average values
US9613491B2 (en) 2004-12-16 2017-04-04 Igt Video gaming device having a system and method for completing wagers and purchases during the cash out process
US20060135254A1 (en) * 2004-12-20 2006-06-22 Alfred Thomas Gaming terminal with special-event wager having different denomination increment than basic wagering game
US20060142079A1 (en) * 2004-12-29 2006-06-29 Igt Universal progressive game pool
US20060205457A1 (en) * 2004-12-31 2006-09-14 Blackburn Christopher W Systems and methods for processing wager gaming messages
US20060148565A1 (en) * 2005-01-04 2006-07-06 Michael Gauselmann Tournament for gaming machines
US7662038B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2010-02-16 Scientific Games International, Inc. Multi-matrix lottery
US7815500B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2010-10-19 Igt Gaming device having a predetermined result poker game
CN101389383A (en) 2005-01-07 2009-03-18 科学游戏程序国际有限公司 Lottery game utilizing nostalgic game themes
US20060154730A1 (en) * 2005-01-11 2006-07-13 Okuniewicz Douglas M Data storage system for an electronic gaming device
JP2008526439A (en) 2005-01-11 2008-07-24 サイエンティフィック ゲイムズ インターナショナル インコーポレイテッド Online lottery game you can buy a selection mark for the supplemental lottery
US20060154721A1 (en) * 2005-01-11 2006-07-13 Okuniewicz Douglas M Electronic gaming device that provides an undisplayed outcome
US7922578B2 (en) * 2005-01-11 2011-04-12 Okuniewicz Douglas M Method for providing an undisplayed outcome of an electronic gaming device
US20060154719A1 (en) * 2005-01-11 2006-07-13 Okuniewicz Douglas M Dynamic scrip account for processing awards from an electronic gaming device
US8337309B2 (en) * 2005-01-11 2012-12-25 Okuniewicz Douglas M Data based awards for an electronic gaming device
US8556708B2 (en) * 2005-01-14 2013-10-15 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with player-determined symbol function
US8133120B2 (en) * 2005-01-18 2012-03-13 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with alternating picks
US20060160605A1 (en) * 2005-01-18 2006-07-20 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with enhanced payline-ordering feature
US7993202B2 (en) 2005-01-18 2011-08-09 Igt Server based meter model softcount and audit processing for gaming machines
US7892092B2 (en) 2005-01-18 2011-02-22 Igt Persistent themed bonus awards for gaming machines
US20060160615A1 (en) * 2005-01-20 2006-07-20 Acres Gaming Incorporated System for table top gaming player interface
US20060166741A1 (en) * 2005-01-24 2006-07-27 Boyd Scott A System for communicating with a player
US7922587B2 (en) 2005-01-24 2011-04-12 Jay Chun Betting terminal and system
US9940778B2 (en) 2005-01-24 2018-04-10 Igt System for monitoring and playing a plurality of live casino table games
US9595159B2 (en) 2013-10-01 2017-03-14 Igt System and method for multi-game, multi-play of live dealer games
US9105146B2 (en) 2005-01-31 2015-08-11 Igt Central determination offer and acceptance game with multiplier
US20060189376A1 (en) * 2005-01-31 2006-08-24 Wms Gaming, Inc. Wagering game with enhancement feature for allowing additional wager during performance of the wagering game
US7481431B2 (en) * 2005-02-01 2009-01-27 Scientific Games International, Inc. Bingo-style lottery game ticket
US7927209B2 (en) 2005-02-07 2011-04-19 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering games with pooling of awards
US8262453B2 (en) 2005-02-09 2012-09-11 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination lottery and raffle game
US20060183540A1 (en) * 2005-02-15 2006-08-17 Shuffle Master, Inc. Casino table gaming system with round counting system
US20060189367A1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2006-08-24 Igt Harm minimization interfaces and services on a gaming machine
US20060205468A1 (en) * 2005-02-28 2006-09-14 Igt, A Nevada Corporation Multi-player bingo game with secondary wager for instant win game
US8834247B2 (en) * 2005-03-01 2014-09-16 Wms Gaming Inc. Video poker wagering game having bonus hands based on qualifying hand
US20060205481A1 (en) * 2005-03-08 2006-09-14 Nrt Technology Corporation Funds controller for gaming or entertainment
US8221210B2 (en) * 2005-03-08 2012-07-17 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game having secondary game with multiplier and second payout
US20060205513A1 (en) * 2005-03-09 2006-09-14 Igt MRAM as nonvolatile safe storage for power hit and ESD tolerance in gaming machines
US7722468B2 (en) * 2005-03-09 2010-05-25 Igt Magnetoresistive memory units as read only memory devices in gaming machines
US8062121B2 (en) 2005-03-09 2011-11-22 Igt Printer interpreter for a gaming machine
US7736234B2 (en) * 2005-03-09 2010-06-15 Igt MRAM as critical event storage for powered down gaming machines
US20060205479A1 (en) * 2005-03-11 2006-09-14 Schultz David B Gaming machine with transposed pay schedule
CA2600931A1 (en) 2005-03-17 2006-09-21 Paltronics Australasia Pty Limited A system and method for implementing a plurality of games
US7549922B2 (en) * 2005-03-17 2009-06-23 Atronic International Gmbh Software security for gaming devices
US20060211490A1 (en) * 2005-03-17 2006-09-21 Falvey Grahame M Security for gaming devices
WO2006101880A3 (en) * 2005-03-17 2009-05-28 Rick A Briggs Interactive challenge game systems and methods
US7874902B2 (en) 2005-03-23 2011-01-25 Scientific Games International. Inc. Computer-implemented simulated card game
US7713121B1 (en) * 2005-03-23 2010-05-11 Bally Gaming, Inc. Shared progressive gaming system and method
US8216061B2 (en) * 2005-03-31 2012-07-10 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering games with unlockable bonus rounds
JP4622635B2 (en) * 2005-04-01 2011-02-02 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Door structure for a vehicle
WO2006116501A8 (en) 2005-04-27 2006-12-14 Scient Games Royalty Corp Game apparatus
US20060247057A1 (en) * 2005-04-28 2006-11-02 Green Anthony E Logic Interface Engine System and Method
US20090124372A1 (en) * 2005-04-29 2009-05-14 Gagner Mark B Asset management of downloadable gaming components in a gaming system
WO2006122044A3 (en) * 2005-05-06 2007-11-15 Gaming Enhancements Inc Techniques for awarding random rewards in a reward program
US7931530B2 (en) * 2005-05-06 2011-04-26 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with time-based bonus
US20060258427A1 (en) * 2005-05-13 2006-11-16 Igt Wide area table gaming monitor and control system
US7654529B2 (en) 2005-05-17 2010-02-02 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
EP1883462A2 (en) * 2005-05-23 2008-02-06 Pokertek, Inc. Host console of an electronic gaming system and method of moving a game controlled by the system
US20060287102A1 (en) * 2005-05-23 2006-12-21 White Gehrig H Administrator tool of an electronic gaming system and method of processing gaming profiles controlled by the system
GB0510441D0 (en) * 2005-05-24 2005-06-29 Igt Uk Ltd Entertainment machines
US20060287034A1 (en) * 2005-05-25 2006-12-21 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game having a player-selectable pay table
US8342956B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2013-01-01 Wms Gaming Inc. Progressive wagering game with funding distribution feature
WO2006130597A3 (en) 2005-05-31 2007-06-14 Allon G Englman Adjustment of awards in progressive system based on wager
US7833094B2 (en) * 2005-06-06 2010-11-16 Wms Gaming Inc. Wagering game with community award based on best selection from all players