USRE25670E - Machine tool with a mechanical cutting tool changer - Google Patents

Machine tool with a mechanical cutting tool changer Download PDF

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Publication number
USRE25670E
USRE25670E US22356962A USRE25670E US RE25670 E USRE25670 E US RE25670E US 22356962 A US22356962 A US 22356962A US RE25670 E USRE25670 E US RE25670E
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United States
Prior art keywords
relay
contact bar
movement
spindle
positioning
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
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Inventor
John A Hansen
Charles A Parske
Kurt A Riedel
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Kearney and Trecker Corp
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Kearney and Trecker Corp
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US72039558 priority Critical patent/US2952170A/en
Application filed by Kearney and Trecker Corp filed Critical Kearney and Trecker Corp
Priority to US22356962 priority patent/USRE25670E/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of USRE25670E publication Critical patent/USRE25670E/en
Expired legal-status Critical Current

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23QDETAILS, COMPONENTS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR MACHINE TOOLS, e.g. ARRANGEMENTS FOR COPYING OR CONTROLLING; MACHINE TOOLS IN GENERAL CHARACTERISED BY THE CONSTRUCTION OF PARTICULAR DETAILS OR COMPONENTS; COMBINATIONS OR ASSOCIATIONS OF METAL-WORKING MACHINES, NOT DIRECTED TO A PARTICULAR RESULT
    • B23Q3/00Devices holding, supporting, or positioning work or tools, of a kind normally removable from the machine
    • B23Q3/155Arrangements for automatic insertion or removal of tools, e.g. combined with manual handling
    • B23Q3/157Arrangements for automatic insertion or removal of tools, e.g. combined with manual handling of rotary tools
    • B23Q3/15706Arrangements for automatic insertion or removal of tools, e.g. combined with manual handling of rotary tools a single tool being inserted in a spindle directly from a storage device, i.e. without using transfer devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23BTURNING; BORING
    • B23B39/00General-purpose boring or drilling machines or devices; Sets of boring and/or drilling machines
    • B23B39/16Drilling machines with a plurality of working-spindles; Drilling automatons
    • B23B39/20Setting work or tool carrier along a circular index line; Turret head drilling machines
    • B23B39/205Turret head drilling machines
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S279/00Chucks or sockets
    • Y10S279/90Adapted for automatic tool changer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/51Plural diverse manufacturing apparatus including means for metal shaping or assembling
    • Y10T29/5104Type of machine
    • Y10T29/5105Drill press
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/51Plural diverse manufacturing apparatus including means for metal shaping or assembling
    • Y10T29/5152Plural diverse manufacturing apparatus including means for metal shaping or assembling with turret mechanism
    • Y10T29/5154Plural diverse manufacturing apparatus including means for metal shaping or assembling with turret mechanism tool turret
    • Y10T29/5157Sliding tool holder
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T408/00Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool
    • Y10T408/13Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool with randomly-actuated stopping means
    • Y10T408/14Responsive to condition of Tool or tool-drive
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T408/00Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool
    • Y10T408/36Machine including plural tools
    • Y10T408/37Turret of tools
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T408/00Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool
    • Y10T408/52Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool with work advancing or guiding means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T408/00Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool
    • Y10T408/65Means to drive tool
    • Y10T408/675Means to drive tool including means to move Tool along tool-axis
    • Y10T408/6771Means to drive tool including means to move Tool along tool-axis with clutch means
    • Y10T408/6774Means to drive tool including means to move Tool along tool-axis with clutch means including plural speed drive
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T483/00Tool changing
    • Y10T483/17Tool changing including machine tool or component
    • Y10T483/1733Rotary spindle machine tool [e.g., milling machine, boring, machine, grinding machine, etc.]
    • Y10T483/179Direct tool exchange between spindle and matrix
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T483/00Tool changing
    • Y10T483/17Tool changing including machine tool or component
    • Y10T483/1733Rotary spindle machine tool [e.g., milling machine, boring, machine, grinding machine, etc.]
    • Y10T483/179Direct tool exchange between spindle and matrix
    • Y10T483/1793Spindle comprises tool changer
    • Y10T483/1795Matrix indexes selected tool to transfer position

Description

Oct. 27, 1964 J. A. HANSEN ETAL Re. 25,670
MACHINE TOOL WITH A MECHANICAL CUTTING TOOL CHANGER 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed March 10, 1958 INVENTORS 6 u w "r w 5 "A W HD 4&4 n y Maw JVCK. v:
oct. 27, 1964 HANSEN ETAL Re. 25,670
MACHINE TOOL WITH A MECHANICAL CUTTING TOOL CHANGER 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Original Filed March 10, 1958 S C R i m n w -31 m 6 w m? m fls m &4 n A xy Jam Y B Oct. 27, 1964 J HANSEN ETAL Re. 25,670
MACHINE TOOL WITH A MECHANICAL CUTTING TOOL CHANGER Original Filed March 10, 1958 5 SheetsSheet 4 Af/arn@y Oct. 27, 1964 J. A. HANSEN ETAL 25,570
MACHINE TOOL. WITH A MECHANICAL CUTTING TOOL CHANGER Original Filed March 10, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 4 75 J?! a 480 A/ 15 7)? I 482 9/ 1 I r #98 I 496 I 4K9? 4,40 g] I I 472 -INVENTORS Joim A Hansen BY Char/es A, Pars/re Karl Afifaoci A forngy United States Patent 25,670 MACHINE TOOL WITH A MECHANICAL CUTTING TOOL CHANGER John A. Hansen, Granhy, Conn., and Charles A. Parske and Kurt A. Riedel, Milwaukee, Wis., assignors to Kearney & Trecker Corporation, West Allis, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Original No. 2,952,170, dated Sept. 13, 1960, Ser. No. 720,395, Mar. 10, 1958. Application for reissue Sept. 13, 1962, Ser. No. 223,569
18 Claims. (Cl. 77-25) Matter enclosed in heavy brackets appears in the original patent but forms no part of this reissue specification; matter printed in italics indicates the additions made by reissue.
This invention relates generally to machine tools and more particularly to an improved machine tool especially adapted to rapidly effect a change of rotary cutting tools to enable the machine to perform several different machining operations on one or more workpieces in rapid succession.
It is a general object of the present invention to provide an improved machine tool incorporating a mechanical cutting tool changer.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a machine tool with a cut-ting tool changer especially adapted to present different types of rotary cutting tools for utilization by the machine with a mechanism for automatically connecting the selected cutting tool to a drive mechanism for rotating the cutting tool.
Another object is to provide an improved machine tool with a cutting tool changer adapted to make available a substantial quantity of different cutting tools for operation with the machine to enable the machine to rapidly perform .a succession of different machining operations.
Another object is to provide an improved machine tool employing a rotary cutter and incorporating l2. tool changer that functions to change the cutting tool in the machine with rapidity while requiring a minimum of etfort on the part of the operator.
Another object is to provide a machine tool which has a variety of rotary cutting tools immediately available and automatically positions and connects a selected one of the cutting tools for rotation by the power drive of the machine and operates to position and feed the selected rotating cutting tool toward a workpiece for performing a machining operation while maintaining the driving connection.
Another object is to provide a machine tool with a mechanical tool changer having a number of cutting tools available for selective operation with the machine, the machine being operable to position the selected tool in three mutually transverse paths relative to a workpiece.
A further object is to provide a machine tool having a mechanical cutting tool changer, the machine being capable of automatic operation and incorporating suitable hydraulic and electrical interlocks that serve to control its operation in the event of a malfunctioning of a portion of the mechanism for the purpose of preventing damage to the machine, the cutter or the workpiece.
According to this invention the improved machine tool comprises a base rotatably supporting a drum, the drum being also rectilinearly movable on the base in two mutually transverse paths. A plurality of bores are formed in the drum with the axes of the bores being parallel to the axis of the drum and equally spaced along a circle adjacent to the periphery of the drum. Each of the bores contains a tool carrying spindle that is rotatably mounted in a quill which is slidably carried within the bore for the purpose of rendering the spindle axially adjustable. A cutting tool is attached to the forward end of each of the Re. 25,671 Reissued Oct. 27, 1964 spindles while a clutch element is secured to the oppr site end. The drum is indexable to bring any one of th spindles and its associated cutting tool into operating pos tion and when so located, the clutch element carried b the spindle will be in alignment with a cooperating clutc element connected to be driven by a variable spee transmission.
The transmission is mounted on a slide that is movabl carried by the machine so that movement of the slide wi produce a like movement of the transmission. The slid is provided with coupling means for coupling the quill of a spindle that has been brought into operating positio to the slide in order that movement of the latter ma operate to adjust the spindle axially in a positioning an feeding movement. The coupling means is arranged s that initial movement of the slide is relative to the spindl for the purpose of moving the transmission and its assc ciated clutch element to move the transmission clutc element into engagement with the spindle clutch elemer for completing a driving connection from the transmis sion to the tool carrying spindle. After the clutch ele ments are engaged, the coupling means operates to connec the spindle for movement with the slide and movemer of the slide will then function to position and feed th spindle and its associated cutting tool relative to a work piece. Upon completion of a machining operation, th spindle may be retracted and the drum may then b indexed to bring a new cutting tool into operating position The foregoing and other objects of this invention, whicl will become more fully apparent from the following de tailed description, may be achieved by means of the ex emplifying apparatus depicted in and set forth in thi specification in connection with the accompanying draw ings, in which:
FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a machine tool in corporating the features of the present invention;
FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary View partly in verti cai section and partly in side elevation illustrating thi arrangement of the drum and the spindle positioning EIIK feed slides when in their forward position;
FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view partly in vertical section and partly in side elevation depicting a drilling and counterboring spindle in its retracted position along with the positioning and feed slides in their fully retracted position;
FIG. 4 is a detail view partly in vertical section anc' partly in side elevation showing a tapping spindle that is carried in one of the bores of the drum illustrated ir FIG. 1;
FIG. 5 is a detail view substantially in rear elevatior illustrating the roller track for retaining the inoperative spindles in their retracted position within the drum;
FIG. 6 is a rear elevational View of the roller track, similar to FIG. 5, but also depicting the opening in the back plate of the track for removing the spindle and their associated quills from the drum;
FIG. 7 is a detail view substantially in side elevation illustrating the mechanism for coupling and operatively locking the located spindle to the positioning and feed slides;
FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic View of the hydraulic circuit incorporated in the machine; and,
FIG. 9 is a diagrammatical showing of the electrical control circuit for controlling the operation of the machine.
Reference is now made more particularly to the drawlugs and specifically to FIG. 1 thereof illustrating a machine tool incorporating the various features of the present invention. As there shown, the machine generally comprises a base 10 which presents a pair of horizontal ways 11 longitudinally disposed along its upper 6! face. The ways 11 are engaged by complementary vs (not shown) formed on the underside of a carriage .erally identified by the reference numeral 12, the vs 11 functioning to slidably support the carriage 12 movement along the bed 10. The carriage 12 com- ;es a horizontal base 13 which is provided with the ys (not shown) along its underside for engagement h the ways 11. The base 13 supports an upstanding umn 14 and an overhanging cap 15 formed on the J61 end of the column 14. the interior face of the column 14 is provided with air of vertical ways 19 that slidably support a saddle for vertical movement. The Vertical movement of saddle 20 is etfected by means of a screw 21 that ournalled at one end in the cap 15 and at its opposite I in the base 13. The screw 21 is in threaded en- ;ement with a cooperating nut (not shown) which is :nred to the saddle 20. Rotation of the screw 21 will refore cause a movement of the saddle 20 along the ys 19 in either direction, depending upon the direcn of rotation of the screw 21, and the screw may be :ated by any suitable means, as for example, the irce of power 22 located on top of a cap 15 above screw 21. The saddle 20 is therefore movable either rtically or horizontally relative to the bed 10. The lower portion of the saddle 20 is disposed directly ave the carriage 13 and extends upwardly therefrom rotatably support the drum 25. The drum 25 funcn to carry a plurality of cutting tools and their asso- Lted spindles for selective operation with the machine. this end, the drum 25 is provided with a plurality bores 26 which serve to rotatably and slidably suprt the spindles in a manner to be subsequently defibed. The bores 26 extend through the entire depth the drum 25 and are equally spaced along a circle jacent to the periphery of the drum with their axes ing parallel to the axis of the drum. A circular shroud is disposed about the rearward portion of the drum protect the operating mechanism. The forward portion of the bed 10 presents an elevated rface for supporting a pair of inverted V-shaped ways i that extend longitudinally thereof for slidably carryg a pallet 31 upon which a workpiece (not shown) 1y be secured in position to be operated upon by one the cutting tools carried by the drum 25. The V-shaped ways 3% are interrupted by a rotary table 1 which presents a pair of V-shaped ways 33 on its upper rface which conform to the ways 30 in spacing and lnfiguration so that they may be aligned therewith to irm continuous ways upon which the pallet 31 may be oved. When the pallet 31 is first moved into operatg position, the ways 33 of the rotary table 32 will be alignment with the ways 3t) of the bed 19. The palt 31 is therefore slid along the ways 39 onto the ays 33 and is secured by suitable means (not shown) the rotary table 32. If necessary, the rotary table may then be revolved and indexed to effect a like ltary movement of the workpiece that is secured to .e pallet 31 so that a machining operation may be perrmed on one or several sides of the workpiece.
It is to be understood that a conventional machine |ol table may be substituted for the pallet and way 'rangement illustrated in the exemplary embodiment. lowever, the pallet and way construction is depicted in rder to disclose a machine which is capable of comletely automatic operation in which the pal'ets 31 with 'orkpieces secured thereto are moved successively by conveyor onto the ways 30 and 33 with each of the allets 31 being secured successively to the rotary table 2. The workpiece on the pallet 31 will then be located t the operating station and may then be operated upon y one or more of the cutting tools carried by the rum 25 to complete the desired machining operation rith the cutting tools that are employed being located uccessively at the operating station by rotating the drum to its appropriate index positionv Such operation of the machine may be performed under the control of recorded information, as for example, the signals received from a punched or magnetic tape.
The manual controls are conveniently supported at the front of the machine on a control panel 38 that is mounted on the exterior end of a horizontal arm 39. The latter, in turn, is pivotally carried by an upstanding post 44] that is secured to the front of the bed 10.
The mounting of the drum 25 on the saddle 20 is clearly shown in FIG. 2, the saddle presenting a forwardly and horizontally extending post 45 that protrudes into a bore 46 concentrically formed in the drum 25. The forward end of the bore 46 is sealed by a closure 47 which is attached to the drum 25 to rotate with it. The interior surface of the closure .7 is provided with a concentric circular recess for receiving a roller bearing 48 in which the post 45 is journalled. The interior end of the drum 25 is rotatably supported by a roller bearing 49 that has its inner race mounted on the post 45 and its outer race in engagement with the body of a spur gear 50. The spur gear 59 is secured to the interior end of the drum 25 by suitable cap screws 51 which extend through the gear into threaded engagement with an annular flange that extends inwardly into the bore 46. The drum 25 is therefore rotatably supported by the twobearings 48 and 49 that serve to render it freely rotatable upon the post 45 which is secured to the saddle 20.
Rotation of the drum 25 may be achieved by revolving a spur gear 55 which is in meshing engagement with a cooperating spur gear 56. The spur gear 56 is keyed to a shaft 57 that is rotatably supported by the saddle 20 and has another gear 58 keyed to its opposite end in position to mesh with the gear 56. The gear 55 is keyed to a shaft 5% that is rotatably supported by the saddle 2t) and is connected to suitable mechanism (not shown) to produce the indexing movement of the drum 25 in well known manner. Rotation of the shaft 59 will produce the desired rotation of the drum 25.
If the drum 25 is to be indexed manually, a simple hand crank may be attached to the shaft 59 for manual operation and a detent mechanism (not shown) may be provided to establish the indexing positions of the drum to establish the operating location for each of the bores 26. The operator may then rotate the hand crank to revolve the drum 25 until the detent mechanism is engaged at the desired index position to place the selected bore 26 at the operating station. On the other hand, the shaft 59 may be connected to a source of power for power operation of the drum 25 and the source of power may be regulated by a control mechanism for automatically effecting the desired indexing movement, as for example, in the manner disclosed in the copending patent application of John A. Hansen, Serial No. 720,- 361, filed March 10, 1958.
In order to provide for automatic operation of the indexing movement of the drum 25, an indicator shaft 63 extends through a bore 64- formed in the post 45 and is rotatably journalled within the post for rotation relative thereto. The shaft 63 is provided with a splined end 65 at its forward extremity to engage a complementary splined hole formed in the closure 47. The splined connection with the closure 47 serves to cause the indicator shaft as to rotate with the drum 25 relative to the post 45 so that the shaft 63 may be connected to indicate the amount of rotation in any well known manher to accommodate either manual or automatic indexing of the drum 25. Thus, for example, if the drum 25 is to be indexed automatically, the shaft 63 may be connected so that its rotation with the drum 25 will serve to produce electrical impulses that will indicate the degree of rotation of the drum Z5 and cooperate with a control circuit to regulate the operation of the source of power so that the desired indexing of the drum 25 is obtained.
Since the apparatus for producing such automatic indexing of the drum 25 is not a part of the present invention, it is not here described or shown and the features of the present invention will operate with any type of indexing mechanism even though it may be a simple manual rotation of the shaft 59.
The drum 25 may be locked in the selected index position by means of a hydraulically actuated locking plunger 70 that is slidably carried by the saddle 20 for selective insertion into any one of a plurality of holes 71 formed in the rear Wall of the drum 25. The number of holes 71 corresponds to the number of bores 26 in the drum with each of the holes 71 being located for receiving the plunger 70 when the drum 25 has been indexed to locate one of the spindles in the bores 26 at the operating station.
One end of the plunger 70 is provided with a piston 72 slidably disposed within a cylinder 73 that is formed in the saddle 20. A pair of conduits 74 and 75 serve to carry hydraulic pressure to and from the cylinder 73 for the purpose of actuating the piston 72 and its associated plunger 70. When it is desired to move the plunger 70 into one of the holes 71 for locking the drum 25 in position, hydraulic pressure is admitted into the right end of the cylinder 73 as viewed in FIG. 2, through the conduit 75 and the exhaust fluid is carried from the left side of the piston 72 through the conduit 74. The plunger 70, of course, is withdrawn from the hole 71 by admitting fluid pressure to the left end of the cylinder 73 through the conduit 74 and the exhaust fluid is then carried from the cylinder 73 by the conduit 75.
In the event the drum 25 is arranged to be indexed manually by manual rotation of the shaft 59, the holes 71 in the drum 25 may also serve to cooperate with a detent mechanism for accurately locating the drum 25 in the indexed positions. Thus, a spring urged ball (not shown) may be carried by the saddle 20 in position to partially enter the holes 71 as the drum 25 rotates, and as the ball is urged by the spring into any one of the holes 71, the ball will yieldably retain the drum 25 in that particular position to properly locate it for placing one of the spindles at the operating station. Additional torque on the shaft 59 will overcome the spring pressure upon the ball to permit further rotation of the drum 25 to the succeeding index position, and actual locking of the drum 25 in the desired position is achieved by actuating the plunger 70 as described to enter one of the holes 71.
The machine illustrated as an exemplary embodiment is arranged to perform drilling, counterboring and tapping operations although it is to be understood that other types of cutting tools may be employed with the structure of the present invention without departing from its spirit and scope. The spindle arrangement illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 is provided to perform both drilling and counterboring operations while the spindle depicted in FIG. 4 is utilized for performing tapping operations.
The drilling and counterboring arrangement comprises a spindle 80 rotatably supported within an inner quill 81 by two ball bearings 82. The inner quill 81 is slidably supported for axial movement within an outer quill 83 which, in turn, is likewise slidably supported for axial movement Within one of the bores 26 of the drum 25. A key 84 is secured to the outer quill 83 by means of screws 85 and is disposed Within a cooperating slot 86 to prevent the outer quill 83 from rotating within the bore 26 without interfering with its axial movement. As clearly shown in FIG. 1, a slot 86 is provided for each of the bores 26 and extends radially from the bore 26 to the periphery of the drum 25. The forward end of the spindle 80 is provided with a suitable chuck 87 for removably securing a cutting tool 88 therein in well known manner. Since the cutting tool 88 is illustrated as being a drill of considerable length in FIGS. 2 and 3, a guide or drill bushing 89 is provided for guiding the drill 88 in its feeding movement, the guide 89 being se- 6 cured by a screw 90 to the exterior end of the outer quill 83.
Power for individually driving the several spindles carried by the drum 25 is derived from a hydraulic motor that is connected to drive a variable speed transmission generally identified by the reference numeral 96. The motor 95 is mounted on a transmission housing 97 which is supported on top of a feed slide 98 so that the transmission 96 will move With the feed slide. The transmission 96 operates to drive an output shaft 99 which is journalled in the transmission housing 97 and functions to drive any one of the spindles that may be selected with the driving connection being made through a clutch generally identified by the reference numeral 101.
The clutch 101 comprises two clutch elements 102 and 103 with the clutch element 103 being secured to the end of the output shaft 99 while a clutch element 102 is attached to the interior end of each of the spindles that are carried Within the several bores 26. Each of the spindles may therefore be connected by the clutch 101 to be rotated by power from the motor 95 and the driving connection may be broken by disengaging the clutch 101 to permit the drum 25 to be indexed for bringing a new spindle to the operating station.
The rate of operation of the motor 95 may be varied by adjustment of a hydraulic flow control valve which is a part of the hydraulic circuit to be subsequently described and which may be adjusted to infinitely vary the rate of operation of the hydraulic motor 95 within prescribed limits. The transmission 96 shown as an exemplary embodiment is a three step transmission, shiftable into three positions to furnish three speed ranges for operation in conjunction with the infinitely variable speed feature of the hydraulic motor 95 so that the spindles may be rotated at infinitely variable rates within a wide range as established by the fixed step transmission operating in conjunction with the infinitely variable rate of operation of the hydraulic motor 95. The particular power train illustrated is a preferred embodiment but it is to be understood that other types of power trains may be provided without detracting from the performance of the features of the present invention.
Shifting of the transmission 96 is effected by the movement of a piston 108 located within a cylinder 109 formed in the transmission housing 97. The piston 108 is provided with a gear rack 110 disposed to mesh with a gear segment formed on the upper edge of a pivotable shifting fork 111. The shifting fork 111 may pivot about a pin 112 and engages a gear cluster 113 which has splined engagement with the output shaft 99 so that the gear cluster 113 may be shifted into three operating positions along the shaft 99 without interrupting its driving connection with the shaft to establish the three speed ranges of the transmission. The gear cluster 113 includes three gears that are adapted to be selectively engaged with three complementary gears keyed to a drive shaft 114. The drive shaft 114 is connected to be driven by the hydraulic motor 95 so that the power from the motor 95 is transmitted through the shaft 114 to the output shaft 99 through the cooperating gears for driving the selected spindle.
Shifting of the gear cluster 113 is effected by actuating the piston 108 into any one of three positions to cause a pivotable movement of the shifting fork 111. If hydraulic pressure is admitted into the right end of the cylinder 109 through a conduit 115 the piston 108 will be moved to the left end of the cylinder 109 to cause a pivoting of the shifting fork 111 for shifting the gear cluster 113 to its extreme rightward position along the splined portion of the output shaft 99 to establish the high speed range of operation. On the other hand, if hydraulic pressure is admitted to the left end of the cylinder 109 through a conduit 116, the piston 108 will be moved to the right end of the cylinder 109 to pivot the ihifting fork 111 in a direction for moving the gear cluster [13 to its extreme leftward position to establish the nedium speed range of operation. The low speed range )f operation is achieved by admitting pressure to both :onduits 115 and 116 to center the piston 198 within the :ylinder 109 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 3. In this nanner, three ranges of operation are provided for op- :rating in conjunction with the infinitely variable rate of operation of the hydraulic motor 95 to provide an infinitely variable nate of rotation of the spindles through a wide range.
The piston 108 is a pressure differential piston to insure that it will be accurately centered when pressure is admitted to both ends of the cylinder 1119. To this end, it is provided with reduced end portions 120 and 121 for slidably receiving sleeves 122 and 123 respectively which operate in well known manner to cause the piston 168 to center itself whenever reasonably equal pressures are admitted into both ends of the cylinder 109.
The upper portion of the piston 108 is provided with a central notch 132 in its upper surface for receiving the plunger of any one of three limit switches 134, 135 and 136 depending upon the position of the piston 108. When the piston 168 is shifted to one of its three positions, the notch 132 will be located to receive the plunger of one of the three limit switches. As the plunger of the limit switch enters the notch 132 it actuates its associated switch to indicate that the desired speed range is established. Thus, when the piston 198 is moved to its extreme rightward position, the plunger of the limit switch 134 will drop into the notch 132 to indicate that the medium speed range has been established in the transmission 96. In like manner, the limit switch 135 indicates that the high speed range is established while the limit switch 136 indicates that the low speed range has been established when its plunger enters the notch 132 as illustrated in FIG. 3.
The feed slide 98 and a positioning slide 142 are slidably carried by the saddle 20, being mounted on ways 143 that are formed on the portion of the saddle 29 that lies beneath the drum 25. The ways 143 cooperate with complementary ways formed on the underside of the feed slide 93 and the positioning slide 142 to slidably support the slides for horizontal cross positioning movement toward and away from the drum 25. The feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 will move together except when effecting a feeding movement in a drilling operation, at which time the feed slide 98 will move relative to the positioning slide to feed the drill into the workpiece.
Power for producing the combined movement of the feed and positioning slides is derived from a hydraulic motor 147 which is connected to drive a screw 148 through a pair of cooperating spur gears 149 that are rotatably supported within a recess formed in a back plate 159 which extends upwardly from the rear portion of the saddle 20 as clearly shown in FIG. 3. The motor 147 is mounted on the back plate 150 and is connected to drive the gears 149. The screw 148 is journalled in the back plate 150 and extends forwardly therefrom into threaded engagement with a split nut 151 that is fixedly secured to the positioning slide 142 within a bore 152. A cooperating bore 153 is also formed in the feed slide 98 for the purpose of providing clearance for the forward end of the screw 148. The nut 151 is of split construction so that it may be adjusted for eliminating back-lash between the screw and the nut in well known manner.
Since the nut 151 is fixed to the positioning slide 142, rotation of the screw 148 will cause a movement of the slide 142 along the ways 143. The feed slide 98 is coupled to the positioning slide 142 to move with it by a piston 158 and its associated connecting rod 159. The piston 153 is disposed within a cylinder 160 formed in the positioning slide 142 and its connecting rod 159 ex tends forwardly through a suitable bore formed in the positioning slide 142 to be attached to the feed slide 98 by means of a pin 161.
Hydraulic pressure is admitted to the cylinder 160 through a pair of conduits 162 and 163 with the conduit 162 being in communication with the left end of the cylinder 160 while the conduit 163 is in communication with the right end of the cylinder 160 as clearly shown in FIG. 3. During operation of the machine, hydraulic pressure is continuously directed into the conduit 162 to admit pressure into the left end of the cylinder 160 as viewed in FIG. 3 for forcing the piston 158 to the right end of the cylinder and thereby couple the feed slide 98 to the positioning slide 142 so that the two slides will move in unison when the hydraulic motor 147 is actuated. It is only during a drill feeding movement that the How of hydraulic pressure in the conduits 162 and 163 is reversed so that the pressure is directed into the conduit 163 to admit it into the right end of the cylinder 166 for forcing the piston 158 to the left end of the cylinder and thereby move the slide 98 leftwardly relative to the positioning slide 142. Upon completion of the feeding movement, the flow of hydraulic pressure into the cylinder 160 is again reversed and maintained to securely couple the two slides together.
The unitary cross positioning movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 is controlled by a plurality of limit switches mounted on the saddle 20 to be actuated by a dog 167 that is attached to the positioning slide 142 to move with it. A cross positioning reverse limit switch 168 presents an upwardly extending spring urged plunger 169 which is forced downwardly by the dog 167 when the slides 98 and 142 arrive at their fully retracted position to actuate the limit switch 168 for terminating the operation of the motor 147 in a manner to be subsequently described. Another limit switch 170 is likewise actuated by the dog 167 for an interval during the final portion of the rearward movement as well as during the initial portion of the forward movement of the slides, and serves to control the flow of hydraulic pressure to the motor 147 so that the rate of operation of the motor is maintained at a creep speed during the interval when the limit switch 170 is actuated by the dog 167. Forward unitary movement of the slides 98 and 142 is limited by a forward limit switch 171 which is actuated by the dog 167 when the slides arrive at their combined forwardmost position to terminate operation of the motor 147 and thereby stop the forward movement of the slides.
The movement of the slides 98 and 142 serves to engage the clutch element 103 with the clutch element 102 of the selected spindle to complete the driving connection from the hydraulic motor 95 for rotating the spindle, and the movement of the slides 98 and 142 further functions to position the selected spindle for performing a machining operation. The simultaneous movement of the slides 98 and 142 by operation of the motor 147 also serves to feed the operating spindle for a counterboring operation, and as previously mentioned, the additional movement of the feed slide 98 relative to the positioning slide 142 serves to feed a selected spindle 80 in a drilling operation. In order to perform these functions, it is necessary for the slides to be coupled to the quills 81 and 83, and to this end a pair of rods or bars 179 and 180 are slidably supported within suitable bores formed in the feed slide 98 beneath the transmission housing 97 as best shown in FIGS. 3 and 7. The rods 179 and 180 are located in the same horizontal plane, in the manner depicted in FIG. 3, but in order to more clearly illustrate the construction, the two rods have been vertically displaced in FIG. 7 so that both rods and their relationship relative to each other may be clearly seen.
The rod 179 is slidably disposed within the bore formed in the feed slide 98 and extends through the feed slide and beyond its rearmost surface where a nut 181 is thread-ed onto its rear end. The nut 181 serves to retain a washer 182 on the rod to provide a bearing surface for one end of a compression spring 183 with the forward end of the spring 183 bearing against the surface of the feed slide 98 as clearly shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The spring 183 therefore serves to urge the rod 179 in a rearward direction to force its end into engagement with the surface of the back plate 150 and operates to retain the end of the rod 179 in engagement with the surface of the back plate 150 during the initial forward movement of the slides 98 and 142 so that the first portion of the combined forward movement of the two slides is relative to the rod 179 for reasons to be subsequently described.
The rod 180 is likewise slidably supported within a bore formed in the feed slide 98 but its rear end is attached to the positioning slide 142 by means of a pin 184. The rod 180 will therefore always move with the positioning slide 142.
The rods 179 and 180 serve as links for coupling the inner quill 81 and the outer quill 83 respectively to the slides 98 and 142 respectively, and are coupled to the quills by means of rollers 189 and 190 respectively. The roller 189 is adapted to be received within a slot 191 formed in the forward portion of the rod 179 as best shown in FIG. 7 while the roller 190 is adapted to be received within a slot 192 formed in the forward portion of the rod 180.
The roller 189 is rotatably supported by a depending bracket 193 that is attached to the periphery of the inner quill 81 by suitable screws. As a result, when the roller 189 is disposed within the slot 191, the inner quill 81 is coupled to the rod 179 for movement therewith. In like manner, the roller 190 is rotatably supported by a depending bracket 194 that is secured to the outer quill 83. The outer quill 83 is therefore coupled to the rod 180 when its associated roller 190 is disposed within the slot 192 of the rod 180. It is therefore apparent that axial movement of the rods 179 and 180 will effect a like movement of the inner quill 81 and the outer quill 83 respectively. Each of the several inner and outer quills 81 and 83 that are located within the bores 26 are provided with the rollers 189 and 190 for engagement with the slots 191 and 192 of the rods 179 and 180. The rollers enter the slots 191 and 192 when the drum 25 is indexed and moves a drilling or counterboring spindle 80 into operating position to couple the operative spindle with the rods 179 and 180 and thereby with the slides 98 and 142. Indexing of the drum 25 cannot take place until the slides 98 and 142, and therefore the rods 179 and 180 and the quills 81 and 83 are in their fully retracted position.
When the quills 81 and 83 are in their fully retracted position as illustrated in FIG. 3, the rollers 189 and 190 are in alignment with an annular track generally identified by the reference numeral 201 and illustrated in FIGS. 2, and 6. The track 201 presents an annular channel 202 for receiving the rollers 189 and 190 when they are moved out of their operative position by rotation of the drum 25. The track 201 is mounted on the saddle so that it is fixed relative to the spindles, and when the rollers 189 and 190 are disposed within the channel 202, the latter serves to prevent lateral movement of the rollers and thereby retains the quills and their associated spindles in the fully retracted position. In order to permit the axial movement of a spindle at the operating station, a front wall of the channel 202 is interrupted to form an opening 203 shown in FIG. 5 and which coincides with the operating position of the spindles. The opening 203 provides clearance for the forward movement of the two rollers 189 and 190 which are associated with a spindle which has been located by the drum at the operating station.
As shown in FIG. 6, a back wall 205 of the channel 202 is provided with an opening 206 opposite the opening 203 to provide clearance to the rear of the spindle for the operation of the clutch 101 and the rods 179 and 180 as well as for the upper portion of the feed slide 98 and the transmission 96. An access opening 207 is also provided in the back wall 205 displaced from the opening 203 for the purpose of withdrawing and replacing the spindles and their associated quills from the bores 26 of the drum 25. The access opening 297 is closed during operation of the machine by a cover plate 212 that is secured to the track 201 by screws 213. When replacement of a spindle in one of the bores 26 is required, the drum 25 is indexed until the spindle to be replaced is in alignment with the opening 207. With the cover plate 212 removed, the spindle and its associated quills may then be withdrawn from the bore 26 through the opening 207.
When the indexing of the drum 25 moves one of the spindles into the operating station, its associated rollers 189 and 199 move into the slots 191 and 192 to couple the inner and outer quills 81 and 83 to the rods 179 and 188 respectively. The hydraulic motor 147 is then actuated to effect a positioning movement of the feed slide 98 and positioning slide 142 simultaneously, and since the rod 180 is connected to the positioning slide 142 by means of the pin 184 it will move with the slide and thereby will cause a like positioning movement of the outer quill 83 by reason of its connections therewith through the placement of the roller 190 in the slot 192.
However, since the rod 179 is slidably supported by the feed slide 98 and is retained in its rearmo-st position by the action of the spring '183, the rod 179 will not move with the initial movement of the two slides but will remain stationary, and since the inner quill 81 is coupled to the rod 179 by means of the roller 189, it too will remain stationary. Because the transmission 96 is mounted on the feed slide 98, its associated clutch element 103 will move with the feed slide toward the clutch element 102 until the clutch elements 102 and 103 are fully engaged to form a driving connection from the hydraulic motor to the spindle 80.
During this initial movement of the two slides, and until the clutch elements 102 and 103 are fully engaged, the limit switch 17 0 will be actuated by the dog 167 to insure that the hydraulic motor 147 is operated at creep speed. It is not until the clutch elements 102 and 183 are fully engaged that the limit switch is released by the dog 167 to permit further movement at a rapid rate if desired. However, while the limit switch 17 0 is actuated by the dog 167, the electrical control circuit is so conditioned, as will be subsequently described, that a rapid rate of movement of the slides 98 and 142 cannot occur.
As a precaution, to prevent further operation of the machine if by some reason the clutch elements 102 and 103 do not move into complete engagement, a limit switch 208 is fixed to the feed slide 98 and connected in the electrical control circuit to prevent further operation of the machine if it is not actuated by engagement of the clutch elements 102 and 103. The limit switch 208 is actuated by moving a spring urged rod 209 to the right as viewed in FIG. 3, against the pressure of a spring 210. The rod 209 is normally urged to its extreme leftward position by the spring 219 and when the clutch elements 102 and 103 become engaged, the bracket 193 abuts the left end of the rod 209 and forces it rightwardly against the pressure of the spring 210 to move an enlarged portion 211 into engagement with the plunger of the limit switch 208 to actuate the limit switch and indicate that proper engagement of the clutch elements 102 and 103 has occurred so that operation of the machine can continue.
After the clutch elements 102 and 103 are fully engaged, it is no longer necessary for the inner quill 81 to remain stationary and it is desired to then effect its forward movement. The front surface of the feed slide 98 will then contact the roller 189 so that further forward movement of the feed slide 98 will cause a like movement of the roller 189 and thereby effect a corresponding movement of the inner quill 81 so that it will then move together with the outer quill 83. Therefore, after the front surface of the feed slide 98 contacts the roller 189, the combined cross positioning movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 will produce a corresponding combined forward positioning movement of the inner quill 81 and the outer quill 83.
During a drilling operation there may be a tendency for the drill to pull the inner quill 81 forwardly relative to the feed slide 98 but this may be avoided by positively coupling the inner quill 81 to the feed slide 98 after the clutch elements 102 and 103 are engaged and after the front surface of the feed slide 98 is in engagement with the roller 189. To this end, the rod 179 which is associated with the inner quill 81 is coupled to the feed slide 98 by means of a vertical plunger 215 that is slidably retained within a vertical bore 216 formed in the feed slide 98 as clearly shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. A roller 217 is rotatably carried by the plunger 215 so that its periphery extends above the upper extremity of the plunger while a similar roller 218 is likewise rotatably carried by the plunger 215 so that its periphery extends beyond the lower extremity of the plunger 215. A recess 219 is formed in the way 143 for receiving the lower roller 218 of the plunger 215 when the feed slide 98 and its associated positioning slide 142 are in the fully retracted position. When the roller 218 is within the recess 219 the upper roller 217 is disposed directly beneath the periphery of the rod 179.
When the roller 218 is located within the recess 219, the plunger 215 is in its depressed position so that the roller 217 is directly beneath and out of engagement with the rod 179. The purpose of the plunger 215 is to couple the rod 179 to the feed slide 98 immediately after the front surface of the feed slide 98 contacts the roller 189 to effect a positive coupling of the quill 81 to the feed slide 98 so that the operating drill cannot pull the inner quill 81 forwardly relative to the feed slide 98.
To this end, the lower roller 218 moves with the feed slide 98 into contact with an inclined wall 220 after the front surface of the feed slide 98 has contacted the roller 189. Continued movement of the feed slide 98 causesthe inclined wall 220 to move the roller 218 and its associated plunger 215 upwardly to move the upper roller 217 into a recess 221 formed in the rod 179. The lower roller 218 then moves out of the recess 219 and rolls along the way 143 to retain the upper roller 217 within the recess 221 for the purpose of positively coupling the rod 179 to the feed slide 98. Such coupling of the rod 179 to the feed slide 98 is maintained until the feed slide 98 is again retracted to permit the roller 218 to drop into the recess 219 which causes the plunger 215 to drop to its depressed position.
If the clutch elements have become properly engaged the hydraulic motor 147 will continue to operate to effect the simultaneous forward movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142, and since the roller 189 disposed within the slot 191 of the rod 179 is in contact with the front surface of the feed slide 98, both rods 179 and 180 will move with the slide to cause a like forward simultaneous movement of the inner quill 81 and the outer quill 83 for the purpose of properly positioning the guide 89 with the spindle and its associated cutter for performing a machining operation. The outer quill 83 is provided to accommodate the guide 89 which is required for drilling operations. It will be noted that during the positioning movement the outer quill 83 moves with the inner quill 81 so that the guide 89 will be positioned adjacent to the workpiece and the feeding movement of the drill will then occur relative to the guide 89 by actuating the inner quill 81 forwardly relative to the outer quill 83. Forward movement of the slides 98 and 142 can continue at either a rapid rate or a creep rate until the dog 167 act-uates the forward limit switch 171 to terminate operation of the motor 147 although such movement may be terminated sooner either man- 12 ually or automatically as in response to a signal from a record.
If a counterboring operation is being performed, the feeding of the counterboring tool into the workpiece is effected by the operation of the hydraulic motor 147 at a creep speed to cause the simultaneous forward movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 to move both quills 81 and 83 forwardly and thereby produce a forward movement of the spindle and its associated counterboring cutter. However, if a drilling operation is being performed, the simultaneous movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 functions to position the guide 89 and the drill relative to the workpiece without actually feeding the drill into the workpiece. Such drill feeding movement is produced by admitting hydraulic pressure into the right end of the cylinder 168 to force the piston 158 to the left as viewed in FIGS. 2 and 3. Such leftward movement of the piston 158 will serve to actuate the feed slide 98 relative to the positioning slide 142 in a forward direction, and since the roller 189 which is carried by the inner quill 81 has been engaged by the front surface of the feed slide 98, the inner quill 81 will move forwardly with the feed slide 98 relative to the outer quill 83 for feeding the drill 88 into the workpiece. Such feeding movement of the feed slide 98 may continue until the piston 158 has reached its leftward limit of travel within the cylinder 168 although it may be terminated sooner either man ually or automatically as in response to a suitable signal from a record when the desired depth of drill feeding has been achieved. The feeding movement will then have been completed and the drill 88 may be withdrawn from the workpiece.
Withdrawal of the drill 88 from the workpiece is pro duced by reversing the flow of hydraulic pressure into the cylinder 160, to cause a rightward movement of the piston 158 and thereby effect a like movement of the feed slide 98 toward the positioning slide 142. The piston 158 will be moved to its extreme rightward location within the cylinder 168, and the hydraulic pressure on the left side of the piston 158 will be maintained for the purpose of coupling the feed slide 98 to the positioning slide 142 so that the two slides will then move as a unit in response to operation of the hydraulic motor 147.
When the piston 158 arrives at its rightward limit of movement within the cylinder 160 to fully retract the feed slide 98 toward the positioning slide 142, a limit switch 225 will be actuated to indicate that the retracting movement has been completed and condition the electrical circuit for subsequent operation. The limit switch 225 is carried by the feed slide 98 for movement therewith and is actuated by an enlarged portion 226 on a rod 227 that is likewise carried by the feed slide 98. The rod 227 is urged to the right, as viewed in FIG. 3, by a spring 228 to force the enlarged portion 226 out of engagement with the plunger of the limit switch 225. However, when the feed slide 98 is fully retracted, the right end of the rod 227 will abut the positioning slide 142 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 3, causing a leftward movement of the rod 227 against the force of the spring 228 to cause the enlarged portion 226 to engage the plunger of the limit switch 225 and force it downwardly for actuating the switch.
Actuation of the limit switch 225 by the enlarged portion 226 indicates that the retraction of the feed slide 98 is completed. The hydraulic motor 147 may then be operated in a reverse direction to cause a further retraction of the feed slide 98 simultaneously with the re traction of the positioning slide 142. Such retracting movement of the two slides operates to likewise retract the inner quill 81 and the outer quill 83 until the rollers 189 and 198 are in alignment with the track 201 so that subsequent indexing of the drum 25 may occur to position another spindle in the operating location. After the inner quill 81 is fully retracted, the retracting move- 13 ment of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 continues to fully retract the outer quill 83. At the same time the roller 218 of the plunger 215 enters the recess 219 to depress the plunger 215 for releasing it from the rod 179 and thereby permit further retraction of the feed slide 98 relative to the rod 179.
The continued retracting movement of the feed slide 98 with the positioning slide 142 then serves to move the clutch element 103 rearwardly and out of engagement with the clutch element 102 to disconnect the spindle 89 from its driving connection with the hydraulic motor 95. Therefore, when the slides 98 and 142 arrive at their fully retracted position, the quills 81 and 83 will likewise be fully retracted so that their associated rollers 189 and 190 are in alignment with the track 281 and the clutch elements 102 and 103 will be fully disengaged to permit an indexing movement of the drum 25 to bring another spindle into operating position.
In order to indicate the distance of movement of the positioning slide 142 relative to the saddle 20, a scale 235 is mounted along the lower edge of the positioning slide 142 to cooperate with a plate 236 that is carried by the saddle to indicate the distance of movement of the positioning slide 142 relative to the saddle 20. In like manner, a scale 237 is mounted on the feed slide 98 to cooper-ate with a plate 238 that is carried by the positioning slide 142 to indicate the distance of movement of the feed slide 98 relative to the positioning Slide 142. In the event that the machine is arranged for automatic operation under the control of a record or other positioning mechanism, the scales 235 and 237 may be replaced by magnetic scales or similar components that cooperate with reading heads. The reading heads. would replace the plates 236 and 238 and operate with the magnetic scales to produce electrical impulses or the like for each small increment of movement of the positioning slide 142 and the feed slide 98 for cooperating with a suitable electrical control circuit for regulating the operation of the two slides in well known manner.
The operation of the mechanism has been described in connection with a drilling or counterboring operation in which a spindle 80 is utilized for rotatably supporting the drilling or counterboring tool. As previously mentioned, the particular exemplary embodiment illustrated in the drawings is also adapted to be utilized for performin-g tapping operations, and because of diilerence in a tapping operation from a drilling or counterbori-ng operation, the spindle and quill arrangement carried within the bores 26 of the drum must be modified to accommodate the operation of the tapping tool.
Such tapping spindle and quill arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 4 and comprises a tapping spindle generally identified by the reference numeral 245. The tapping spindle 245 is rotatably supported within a single quill 246 that is slidably carried within one of the bores 26 of the drum 25. It is to be noted that the single quill 246 is employed with a tapping spindle 245 and the roller 189 is carried by the single quill 246, while the two quills 81 and 83 are required for operation with a drilling and counterboring spindle 80. The tapping quill 246 is provided with a key 247 that is secured to the periphery of the quill by suitable screws 248 and is disposed within the slot 86 formed in the drum 25 contiguous with the bore 26.
The tapping spindle 245 includes a conventional tool retaining chuck 258 at its forward end for removably securing a tapping tool 251 to the forward end of the spindle. The opposite end of the spindle 245 is provided with a splined portion 252 for engagement with a cooperating spline formed in a drive sleeve 253. The sleeve 253 is rotatably supported within the quill 246 by a pair of ball bearings 254 and the clutch element 182 is secured to the sleeve 253 rather than directly to the spindle. The power from the hydraulic motor 95 is theerfore trans mitted through the clutch 101 to the sleeve 253 which, turn, operates to drive the spindle 245 by reason of its 14 connection therewith through the splined portion 252 the spindle being axially movable relative to the sleeve 253 without interrupting the drive connection by reason of the splined engagement therewith.
The spindle 245 is also rotatably carried within the quill 246 by a ball bearing 268 that is mounted for movement with the axial movement of the spindle. The inner race of the ball bearing 268 is disposed between a flange 261 and a collar 262 both of which are secured to the spindle. The outer race of the ball bearing 260 is disposed within an annular bracket 263 which is provided with a tongue 264 that is received within an elongated keyway 265 which serves to prevent rotational movement of the bracket 263 while permitting it to move axially with the movement of the spindle 245. The axial movement of the bracket 263 and its associated ball bearing 268 with the spindle 245 is effected by reason of the location of the inner hace of the ball bearing 260 between the flange 261 and collar 262.
In performing a tapping operation, the axial movement of the spindle 245 for each revolution of the spindle must be accurately maintained in order to conform to the thread that is being formed by the tapping tool 251. Therefore, the spindle 245 is provided with a threaded portion 269 that is in engagement with a nut 270. The feeding movement is eilected by rotating the spindle 245 and its associated threaded portion 269 relative to the nut 270 to produce a forward axial motion of the spindle 245. The nut 278 is provided with a pair of tongues 271 that extend from diametrically opposite points on the periphcry of the nut into the keyway 265 and :a keyway 272 to prevent rotation of the nut 270 while permitting it to move axially within the quill 246.
The tongues 271 bear against the ends of the keyways 265 and 272 and are yieldably retained in engagement with the ends of the keyways by a spring 273 which has one end bearing against the end of the nut 270 and its opposite end bearing against the face of a collar 274 that is threadedly engaged within the bore of the quill 246 to compress the spring 273 suificiently for retaining the tongues 271 of the nut 270 in engagement with the ends of the keyways 265 and 272 with enough force to resist the normal foces developed during tapping operations. However, if the tapping tool should strike an obstruction, the axial force on the nut 270 will increase substantially to overcome the pressure of the spring 273 and move the nut 270 rearwardly within the quill 246.
The lower tongue 271 of the nut 270 is disposed adjacent to a spring urged plunger 279 which is urged upwardly by its cooperating spring into the keyway 265 adjacent to the normal operating position of the lower tongue 271 of the nut 27 8. If the tapping tool 251 strikes an obstruction to move the nut 270 rearwardly within the quill 246', the tongue 271 will move with the nut to engage the plunger 279 and depress it to produce a like downward movement of a spring urged plunger 280 for actuating a tapping safety switch 281 which is carried within a bracket 282, and serves to prevent further forward feeding movement of the spindle 245 when actuated. The bracket 282 is secured to the feed slide 98 to move with it and extends forwardly therefrom. In addition to the safety switch 281, the bracket 282 carries a forward limit switch 283, a reverse limit switch 284, and a spindle identification switch 285.
The plungers of the switches 28 1, 283, 284 and 285 are in axial alignment for actuation by the plunger 280, a spring urged plunger 286, a spring urged plunger 287 and a spring urged plunger 288 respectively which are also mounted in the bracket 282. The plungers 280, 286, 287 (and 288 are carried for sliding axial movement by the upper portion of the bracket 282 and are urged upwardly by their cooperating springs to release their associated switches. The four plungers carried by the bracket 282 are disposed to be actuated downwardly against the force of their cooperating springs to actuate their associated switches by the downward movement of similar spring urged plungers carried by the tapping quill 246.
Thus, the spring urged plunger 280 is depressed to actuate the safety switch 281 by the downward movement of the plunger 279 when the nut 270 is moved rearwardly as previously described. A pair of similar axially slidable plungers 289 and 290 are spring urged upwardly so that their upper ends extend into the keyway 265 of the quill 246 to be actuated by the tongue 264 of the annular bracket 263. When the spindle 245 reaches its forward limit of movement, the tongue 264 contacts the upwardly extending portion of the plunger 289 to move it downwardly against the force of its cooperating spring to, in turn, depress the plunger 286 and thereby actuate the forward limit switch 283 for stopping further forward feeding movement of the spindle. During reverse rotation of the spindle 245 when retracting the tapping tool 251 from the workpiece, the tongue 264 of the bracket 263* moves within the keyway 265 until it engages the upper extremity of the spring urged plunger 290 and forces the plunger downwardly against the force of its cooperating spring to move the cooperating spring urged plunger 2 87 downwardly and thereby actuate the reverse limit switch 284 for stopping further reverse rotation of the spindle 245.
The spindle identification switch 285 is actuated by a fixed plunger 291, that is fixedly carried by the key 247 of the quill 246, whenever the clutch elements 102 and .103 are engaged and a tapping spindle is in operating position, to indicate in the electrical control circuit that a tapping operation is to be performed and condition the electrical control circuit accordingly.
In FIG. 4, the spring urged plungers 280, 286, 287 and 288 are shown slightly offset from the plungers 279, 289,
290 and 291 that are carried by the quill 246 because the clutch elements 102 and 103 are shown as being disengaged. However, as the slides 98 and 142 move forwardly, the bracket 282 moves with the slides and when the clutch elements 102 and 103 become fully engaged, the plungers carried by the bracket 282 are in alignment wlth the plungers carried by the quill 246 so that downward movement of the plungers carried by the quill 246 w1ll produce a like downward movement of their associated plungers carried by the bracket 282 to actuate their cooperating limit switches.
The operation of the slides 98 and 142 when a tapping spindle is in operating position is identical to the operation described in connection with a drilling and counterboring spindle 80, except that the feed slide 98 is not moved forwardly relative to the positioning slide 142 by the piston 158 as is done to feed a drill into the workpiece. Instead, the spindle 245 is rotated to effect the feeding movement by reason of the engagement of its threaded portion 269 with the nut 270. Thus, when the slides 98 and 142 have moved the clutch element 103 into full engagement with the clutch element 102, the front surface of the feed slide 98 engages the roller 189 which is supported by the quill 246 so that further forward motion of the slides 98 and 142 causes a like forward movement of the quill 246 to bring the tapping tool 251 into operating position relative to the workpiece. The spindle 245 will then be rotated to effect its feeding movement.
Since the quill 246 is moving with the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 after the clutch elements 102 and 103 are engaged by a reason of the engagement of the front surface of the feed slide 98 with the roller 189 the bracket 282 being carried by the feed slide 98 will move with the quill 246 at the same rate and the plungers carried by the bracket 282 will therefore remain in alignment with the plungers carried by the quill 246 during the tapping operation so that they may function as described. The four limit switches 281, 283, 284 and 285 operate during tapping operations only, and do not function during any portion of a drilling or counterboring operation.
The hydraulic circuit illustrated in FIG. 8 functions to supply operating pressure and control the operation of the machine. Hydraulic pressure for actuating the piston 108 to shift the transmission 96 into any one of its three speed ranges is obtained from a low pressure pump 301 that draws pressure from a reservoir 302 through a conduit 303 and discharges the fluid intoa conduit 304 leading to a spindle motor creep valve 305. v
The valve 305 includes a slidable plunger 310 which is normally urged to the left as viewed in FIG. 8 by a spring 311. With the plunger 310 in its normal postion as established by the spring 311, the fiow of hydraulic pressure from the conduit 304 is blocked by the plunger 310. Energization of a solenoid coil 312 functions to shift the plunger 310 against the pressure of the spring 311 to bring a passage 313 in registration with the conduit 304 and a conduit 314 that carries the pressure from the conduit 304 to a pair of branch lines 315 and 316. The branch line 316 includes a check valve 317 which permits the flow of fluid through the conduit 316 to a conduit 318 for operating the spindle drive motor at a creep speed. The gears in the transmission 96 will therefore be rotated .at a slow rate to facilitate the shifting of the gears by operation of the piston 108.
Exhaust fluid from the spindle motor 95 flows into a conduit 323 and thence to a branch line 324 through a flow control or throttle valve 325 which may be adjusted to regulate the rate of operation of the spindle motor 95 at creep speed. From the flow control valve 325 the exhaust fluid flows into a conduit 328 which is connected to a port in the valve 305 that registers with a passage 326 when the plunger 310 is in its rightward position. The passage 326 then communicates with a conduit 327 that connects with a return line 330 which functions to carry exhaust fluid back to the reservoir 302.
A portion of the low pressure fluid in the conduit 314 therefore operates the spindle drive motor 95 at a creep speed while the remaining portion is directed through a range selector valve 335 to the cylinder 109 to actuate the piston 108 for shifting the transmission 96 into one of its three speed ranges. To this end, the branch line 315 carrying the low pressure fluid from the conduit 314 is connected to the valve 335 which may be adjusted for actuating the piston 108 into any one of its three operating positions. The valve 335 includes a slidable plunger 336 which is normally centrally located by a pair of oppositely acting springs 337 and 338 that are located within the bore of the valve 335 and act on opposite ends of the plunger 336.
With the plunger 336 in its normal central position as illustrated in FIG. 8, the flow of low pressure fluid from the branch line 315 flows through a passage 339 formed in the valve plunger 336 as well as through a communicating passage 340 which is likewise formed in the plunger 336 but connects with the passage 339. The low pressure fluid therefore flows through both passages 339 and 340 in the plunger 336 with the pressure from the passage 339 flowing into a conduit 341 and the pressure from the passage 340 flowing into a conduit 342. The conduit 341 communicates with the passage 116 to direct the flow of fluid pressure to the left end of the cylinder 109 as viewed in FIG. 8 while the conduit 342 connects with the passage to carry the low pressure fluid to the right end of the cylinder 109. Since hydraulic pressure of substantially equal value is directed into both ends of the cylinder 109, the piston 108 will be centrally located Within the cylinder to shift the transmission 96 to its low speed range in the manner previously described.
The plunger 336 of the valve 335 may be shifted in either direction by energizing either one of a pair of solenoid coils 343 and 344. When the solenoid coil 343 is energized, the plunger 336 will shift to the right to move a pair of parallel passages 34-5 and 346 into operating position in registration with the conduits 341 and 342. When the passages 345 and 346 are thus located, the hydraulic pressure from the branch line 31 will flow through the passage 346 into the conduit 341 to the left end of the cylinder 109 to move the piston 108 to its rightward position within the cylinder 109 for shifting the transmission 96 to its medium speed range. The exhaust fluid from the cylinder 109 will fiow through the passage 115 to the conduit 342 and thence through the passage 345 of the valve 355 into the return line 330 which carries the fluid back to the reservoir 302.
Energization of the solenoid 344, on the other hand, will shift the plunger 336 to the left as viewed in FIG. 8 to bring a pair of passages 352 and 353 into operating position to register with the conduits 341and 342. When the valve plunger 336 is thus moved to its leftward position, the flow of hydraulic pressure from the branch line 315 will flow into the passage 353 and into the conduit 342 which carries the pressure to the right end of the cylinder 109 to actuate the piston 108 in a leftward direction to the left end of the cylinder 109. This movement of the piston 108 will shift the transmission 96 into its high speed range of operation as previously described. The exhaust fluid from the cylinder 189 will flow into the passage 116 and the conduit 341 and thence into the passage 352 formed in the plunger 336 which directs the exhaust fluid into the return line 330 for carrying it back to the reservoir 302.
It is therefore apparent that the range selecter valve 335 serves to control the flow of fluid to cylinder 109 so that the transmission 96 may be shifted into any one of the three speed ranges. Furthermore, the hydraulic circuit is so arranged that the shifting of the transmission cannot occure until the transmission gears are slowly rotated at a creep speed by the spindle drive motor 95 by virtue of the fact that the hydraulic pressure for shifting the piston 108 flows through the spindle motor creep valve 305 which will not admit the flow of hydraulic pressure to the range selector valve 335 until the pressure is likewise directed to the spindle drive motor 95 for actuating it at a creep speed. The rate of movement of the piston 108 may be regulated by adjusting a flow control valve 354 that is connected in the branch line 315 so that the flow of operating pressure to the valve 335 may be regulated for adjusting the rate of movement of the piston 108.
The pressure for actuating the spindle drive motor 95 at a normal operating rate for rotating the tool carrying spindles is derived from a high pressure pump 360 under the control of a spindle motor directional valve 361. The pump 360 draws the fluid from the reservoir 302 through a conduit 362 and then discharge it into a conduit 363 that carries the pressure to the valve 361.
The valve 361 is provided with a slidable plunger 365 that is normally centrally located within the bore of the valve 361 by a pair of springs 366 and 367 that are located within the bore of the valve 361 to exert a pressure on each end of the plunger 365. The central portion of the plunger 365 is provided with a U-shaped pas sage 368 that registers with two ports in the valve 361 to place the pressure line 363 in direct communication with an exhaust line 369 which is connected to the return line 330 to return the fluid to the reservoir 302. The passager 368 therefore serves to by-pass the hydraulic motor 95 and circulates the hydraulic pressure from the pump 360 directly back to the reservoir 302. However, the motor 95 may be operated in either direction by energizing either one of a pair of solenoid coils 370 and 371 which function to move the plunger 365 to the right or to the left respectively, as viewed in FIG. 8, to direct the fluid pressure to the hydraulic motor 95 for opreation in either direction.
When the solenoid coil 370 is energized, the plunger 365 is moved to the right within the bore of the valve 361 to bring two parallel passages 375 and 376 that are formed in the plunger 365 into registration with the pressure line 363 and exhiust line 369 respectively. The pressure from the line 363 will then flow through the passage 375 into the conduit 318 which carries the pres- 18 sure to the hydraulic motor to operate it in the reverse direction. The exhaust fluid is returned from the motor 95 through the conduit 323 and thence through the passage 376 into the exhaust line 369 to flow into the return line 330 that carries it back to the reservoir 302.
When the solenoid coil 371 is energized, the plunger 365 is moved to the left to place a pair of passages 377 and 378 into communication with the pressure line 363 and the exhaust line 369 respectively. The pressure will then flow from the pressure line 363 into the passage 377 and thence to the conduit 323 which carries the pressure to the motor 95 for operating the motor in the forward direction. The exhaust fluid from the motor 95 is returned to the reservoir via the conduit 318, the passage 378, the exhaust line 369 and the return line 330.
The exhaust line 369 includes a check valve 379 which limits the flow of fluid in the line to one direction. The exhaust fiuid in the line 369 flows through a flow control or throttle valve 380 which may be adjusted for regulating the flow of fluid through the exhaust line 369 and thereby control the rate of operation of the motor 95 at operating speed. A pressure switch 381 is likewise connected to be actuated by pressure in the exhaustline 369 to serve as a protection for the machine, the pressure switch being electrically connected in the electrical control circuit to stop the forward motion of the feed and positioning sides 98 and 142 during a drilling and counterboring operation while during a tapping operation the direction of rotation of the spindle is reversed to retract it from the workpiece, the pressure switch 381 being actuated by an excessive drop of pressure in the exhaust line 369.
A relief valve 382 is connected to the lines 318 and 323 which lead to the motor 95, the relief valve 382 serving to relieve the pressure in the line in the event that an excessive pressure should build up in the line during the operation. Suitable check valves 383 and 384 being connected in the lines that lead to the relief valve 382 for directing the flow of pressure to and from the valve for either direction of operation of the hydraulic motor 95.
The feeding movement of the feed slide 98 is actuated by high pressure fluid from the pump 360 directed to the cylinder through a feed control valve 390 which operates to control the flow of fluid to the cylinder 160 for actuating the piston 158 in either direction. The feed control valve 390 includes a slidable plunger 391 disposed within the bore of the valve and normally urged to the left end of the bore by a spring 392. When the valve plunger 391 is in its normal position as established by the spring 392 a pair of parallel passages 393 and 394 are in communication with a pressure branch line 395 and anexhaust line 396 respectively. The hydraulic pressure from the pump 360 will then flow into a pressure line 397 to the pressure branch line 395 and thence to the passage 393 in.the plunger 391. From the passage 393 the flow of pressure continues through a conduit 398, a rapid traverse flow control or throttle valve 399 and through a check valve 401, and thence into the conduit 162 to flow into the left end of the cylinder 160 for moving the piston 158 to the right to retract the feed slide 98 from its forward position.
It will be observed that the spring 392 normally retains the valve 391 in the position shown in FIG. 8 so that the pressure is maintained on the left side of the piston 158 to couple the feed slide 98 to the positioning slide 142 as previously described so that the feed slide 98 will move with the positioning slide 142 upon actuation of the hydraulic motor 147. Furthermore, since the flow of fluid to the left end of the cylinder 160 is always through the rapid traverse flow control valve 399, the retraction of the feed slide 98 will always occur at a rapid rate of travel as distinguished from a feed rate of travel which is established by a separate feed flow control or throttle valve 405 that may be adjusted to regulate the rate of travel in the drill feeding movement.
The feeding movement of the feed slide 98 is initiated )y energizing a solenoid coil 406 to shift the plunger 391 If the valve 390 to the right of the position shown in FIG. l and thereby bring a pair of passages 406 and 407 into .ommunication with the pressure branch line 395 and the eturn line 396 respectively. With the plunger 391 thus IOSltiOl'lCd by the solenoid coil 406, the pressure from the ump 360 will flow through the pressure line 397, the iressure branch line 395, and thence through the passage L06 into the conduit 163 leading to the right side of the ylinder 160. The exhaust fluid will return to the reseroir 302 through the conduit 162 and through the feed low control valve 405 because the check valve 401 will rrevent the flow of exhaust fluid directly into the line 88 but admits the flow of fluid in the opposite direction by-pass the feed flow control valve 405 to enable the eed slide 98 to be retracted at a rapid rate. However, luring the feeding movement, the exhaust fluid is comielled to flow through the feed flow control valve so that he feeding movement occurs at the desired feed rate. rom the feed flow control valve 405 the exhaust fluid ontinues through the rapid traverse flow control valve 99 and the conduit 398 into the passage 407 and thence nto the exhaust line 396 connecting with a return line =08 to return to the reservoir 302.
The pressure in the line 397 from the high pressure ump 360 also serves to operate the cross positioning notor 147 for simultaneously actuating the feed slide 98 nd the positioning slide 142 in their path of movement. The operation of the motor 147 is under the control of a ross positioning directional valve 415. The valve 415 3 provided with a slidable plunger 416 located within the lore of the valve and normally located in its central posiion by a pair of springs 417 and 418 that are disposed on ither side of the plunger 416 to center' it Within the ore of the valve 415.
The plunger 416 is provided with a U-shaped pasage 419 that serves to by-pass the motor 147 when the lunger 416 is in its central or neutral position as illusrated in FIG. 8. With the plunger 416 thus located, he pressure from the line 397 enters the valve 415 and .ows through the U-shaped passage 419 which directs into an exhaust conduit 420 that connects with the eturn line 408 to carry the fluid to the reservoir 302. he exhaust conduit 420 has a creep flow control valve -21 connected in it, the creep flow control valve 421 eing adjustable to regulate the rate of operation of the 1otor 147 at creep speed. The exhaust conduit 420 also lcludes a rapid traverse flow control valve 422 which is djustable to regulate the speed of the motor 147 when he motor is being operated at a rapid traverse rate of peration.
The plunger 416 of the valve 415 may be moved to ither side of its neutral position by energizing either ne of a pair of solenoid coils 427 and 428 for operating 1e hydraulic motor 147 in either direction. Energiza- Ion of the coil 428 will function to shift the plunger '16 to the left side of the bore of the valve 415 to ring a pair of parallel passages 429 and 430 that are ormed in the plunger 416 into communication with the xhaust conduit 420 and the pressure line 397 respective- I. With the passages 429 and 430 thus positioned With- 1 the valve 415, the flow of pressure from the line 397 rill flow through the passage 430 into a conduit 431 onnected to the motor 147 to operate the motor in the everse direction. The exhaust fluid from the motor 147 ill flow into a conduit 432 to the passage 429 of the alve 415 and thence into the exhaust conduit 420 through 1e creep speed flow control valve 421 and the return ne 408 to return to the reservoir 302.
Operation of the motor 147 in the forward direction achieved by energizing the solenoid coil 427 to shift 1e plunger 416 to the right of its central position. Such iovement of the plunger 416 will serve to bring a pair f passages 433 and 434 into registration with the presire line 397 and the exhaust conduit 420 respectively.
The flow of pressure from the line 397 will then proceed through the passage 433 into the conduit 432 connected to the motor 147 to operate the motor 147 in the forward direction. The exhaust fluid from the motor 147 will flow into the conduit 431 to the passage 434 and thence through the exhaust conduit 420 through the creep speed flow control valve 421 to the return line 408 to return to the reservoir 302.
The hydraulic motor 147 may be operated at a rapid rate of operation for actuating the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 at a rapid rate by actuating a creep by-pass valve 435. The creep by-pass valve 435 serves to direct the exhaust fluid from the motor 147 to by-pass the creep speed flow control valve 421 and carry it through the rapid traverse flow control valve 422 so that the rate of operation of the motor 147 is under the control of the rapid traverse flow control valve 422 only.
The creep by-pass valve 435 is provided with a plunger 436 and has a port connected to a conduit 437 and a second port connected to a conduit 438. A spring 439 is disposed within the right end of the bore of the valve 435 to urge the plunger 436 to the-left and thereby block the flow of fluid from the conduit 437 to the conduit 438. When the valve is in this condition, the exhaust fluid from the motor 147 will flow through the creep speed flow control valve 421 to limit the rate of operation of the motor to a creep speed.
However, a solenoid coil 440 may be energized to shift the plunger 436 to the right end of the bore of the valve 435 and thereby bring a passage 441 formed in the plunger 436 into registration with the conduit 437 and the conduit 438. The flow of exhaust fluid from the valve 415 will then by-pass the conduit 420 and the creep speed flow control valve 421 and flow through the conduit 437, the passage 441, the conduit 438 and thence through the rapid traverse flow control valve 422 into the return line 408 so that the motor 147 will operate at a rapid rate as established by the rapid traverse flow control valve 422. It is therefore apparent that the hydraulic motor 147 may be operated in either direction at either a creep speed or at a rapid rate.
A relief valve 445 is connected to the conduits 431 and 432 through suitable check valves 446 and 447 to relieve the pressure in the lines if it should build up excessively. With this arrangement, the relief valve 445 will protect the apparatus from excessive pressure in either the conduit 431 or the conduit 432.
The electrical control circuit for controlling the operation of the machine is illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 9. In the drawing the relay contact bars are shown in their normal position and are connected to their cooperating relays by a broken line to indicate that they are actuated from their normal position upon energization of their associated relays.
Power for operating the machine is derived from a three phase source represented by the lines L L and L which are connected to energize a pair of motors 456 and 457 through a master switch 458 and the normally open contacts of a relay 459. The control circuit illustrated in FIG. 9 is energized by single phase current obtained from a transformer 460 which has its primary coil connected to the lines L and L with its secondary coil being connected to supply power to the control circuit.
The control circuit may be energized by closing a push button switch 461 to complete a circuit from one side of the secondary coil of the transformer 460 through a conductor 462 and a conductor 463 to a relay 464. From the relay 464 the circuit continues through the closed start switch 461 and a normally closed stop switch 465 and through a conductor 466 to the opposite side of the secondary coil of the transformer 460 to complete the circuit. Energization of the relay 464 will serve to close its normally open contact bars 467 and 468 and the closing of the contact bar 467 will establish a holding circuit to maintain energization of the relay 464 by by-passing the open start switch 461. The control circuit is de-energized by opening the normally closed stop switch 465. Closing of the contact bar 468 serves to connect one side of the secondary coil of the transformer 460 to a line 470 while the opposite side of the secondary coil is connected to a line 471 through a conductor 472.
As previously mentioned, the machine may be operated manually or automatically under the control of information obtained from a record such as punched or magnetic tape. If the machine is to be controlled automatically from the information on a record, a manual switch 473 is closed to energize four automatic relays 475, 475A, 4758 and 475C. Energization of these four relays serves to condition the control circuit for automatic operation in response to information from a record while if the operation is to be controlled manually by the operator, the switch 473 is allowed to remain open.
The initial step in the operation is to select the speed range of the transmission 96 by properly positioning the piston 108' within its cylinder 109 as previously described. This may be accomplished automatically by selective energization of a pair of relays 480 and 431 in response to a suitable signal from a record, the relay 480 having a normally closed contact bar 482 while the relay 481 has a normally open contact bar 483. By energizing one, both, or neither of the relays 480 and 481, either one or neither of the solenoid coils 343 and 344 will be energized to establish-either a low, medium or high speed range of operation of the transmission 96.
The speed range of the transmission 96 may also be established manually by manipulating a manual switch generally identified by the reference numeral 490. The manual switch 490 includes three contact bars 491, 492 and 493 which may be closed'individually or in combination by manipulation of the switch to obtain the desired speed range. Thus, the low speed range of operation may be obtained by manipulating the switch to close the contact bar 491 only. Closing of the contact bar 491 will complete a circuit'from the line 470 to the closed contact bar 491, and a normally closed contact bar 496 of the relay 475. Since the speed range is being selected manually through the switch 490, the relay 475 will not be energized so that its associated contact bar 496 will remain closed. The circuit will then continue from the closed contact bar 496 through a relay 498, completing the circuit through the line 471.
Energization of the relay 498 will serve to open its normally closed contact bar 505 and close its normally open contact bars 506, 507 and 508. With the electrical control circuit thus conditioned, neither the solenoid coil 343 nor the solenoid coil 344 will be energized so that the plunger 336 of the range selector valve 335 will remain in its neutral position directing hydraulic pressure to both sides of the piston 108 to center the piston within the cylinder 109 for establishing the low speed range of operation as previously described.
However, as previously described, in order to obtain a flow of pressure to the cylinder 109 through the valve 335 it is necessary to actuate the spindle motor creep valve 305 by energizing the solenoid 312. Energization of the relay 498 does operate to complete a circuit to the solenoid coil 312 for actuating the valve 305. The current flows to the solenoid coil 312 from the line 470 through the closed contact bar 508 and a normally closed contact bar 516 of a relay 517. From the closed contact bar 516 the flow of electrical current continues through the solenoid coil 312 from whence it returns to its source through the line 471. The solenoid coil 312 is therefore energized to actuate the valve 305 and permit the flow of hydraulic pressure to the motor 95 for driving the transmission at a creep speed as Well as to the cylinder 109 through the 22 range selector valve 335 for shifting the transmission to establish the selected low speed range.
When the low speed range is established, the plunger of the limit switch 136 will drop into the notch 132 of the piston 108 as previously described to close the limit switch 136 and thereby indicate that the selected speed range has been established. Closing of the switch 136 serves to complete a circuit from the line 470 to a normally closed contact bar 520 of a relay 521. From the contact bar 520 the fiow of current continues through the closed contact bar 507 and the closed switch 136 and thence to the relay 517. From the relay 517 the current returns to its source through the line 471. Completion of this circuit serves to energize the relay 517 and thereby open its normally closed contact bar 516. Opening of the contact bar 516 breaks the circuit to the solenoid coil 312 to cause the spindle motor creep valve 305 to return to its normal position and terminate the flow of hydraulic fluid to the cylinder 109 since the selected low speed range of operation of the transmission 96 has been established.
In similar manner, the medium speed range of operation of the transmission 96 may beestablished by manipulating the manual switch 490 to close its contact bar 493. The closing of the contact bar 493 will serve to energize the relay 521 by completing a circuit from the line 470 through the closed contact bar 493, a normally closed contact bar 430 of the relay 475, and the relay 521, the flow of current continuing from the relay 521 to return to its source through the line 471. Energization of the relay 521 will cause the opening of its normally closed contact bar 520 and the closing of its normally open contact bars 533 and 534.
Closing of the contact bar 533 will complete a circuit to energize the medium speed range solenoid coil 343, the circuit originating from the line 470 and continuing through the closed contact bar 533, a normally closed contact bar 505 of the relay 498 to the solenoid coil 343 with the current returning to its source from the coil 343 through the line 471. Energization of the coil 343 will serve to shift the plunger 336 of the valve 335 so that the valve will direct fluid pressure to the left end of the cylinder 109 for moving the piston 108 to the right end of the cylinder to establish the medium speed range of operation of the transmission 96.
However, as previously described, in order to obtain a fio-w of hydraulic pressure to the valve 335 for shifting the piston 100 it is necessary that the spindle motor creep speed valve 305 be actuated to operate the spindle motor at a creep speed and admit hydraulic pressure to the range selector valve 335. The valve 305 is actuated by energizing the solenoid coil 312 and since the relay 521 was energized with the closing of the contact 493, its contact bar 534 will close to complete a circuit for energizing the solenoid coil 312. The current for energizing the solenoid coil 312 flows from the line 470 through the closed contact bar 534 to the normally closed contact bar 516. From the contact bar 516 the flow of electrical current continues through the solenoid coil 312 and returns to its source through the line 471. Upon energization of the coil 312 hydraulic fluid will be admitted to the cylinder 109 for shifting the transmission 96 to its medium speed range of operation.
When the selected medium speed range is obtained, the plunger of the switch 134 will drop into the notch 132 formed on the piston 108 to indicate that the speed range has been established. Closing of the limit switch 134 completes a circuit to energize the relay 517. Energization of the relay 517 serves to open its normally closed contact 516 and thereby break the circuit to the solenoid coil 312 for terminating the flow of hydraulic pressure to the range selector valve 335 and therefore to the cylinder 109 and further operation of the machine may proceed.
If it is desired to operate the transmission 96 in its high speed range, the manual switch 490 is manipulated to close the contact bars 492 and 493. With both of these contact bars closed, the relay 498 and the relay 521 are both energized. Energization of the relay 521 serves to close its contact bar 533 and energization of the relay 498 functions to close its contact bar 506 to complete a circuit to the high speed solenoid coil 344. Thus, the current will flow from the line 470 through the closed contact bar 533, and the closed contact bar 506. From the contact bar 506 the flow of current continues to the solenoid coil 344 and returns to its source through the line 471. Energization of the solenoid coil 344 serves to shift the valve plunger 336 to the left within the bore of the valve 335 to direct fluid pressure to the right end of the cylinder 109 for shifting the piston 108 to the left end of the cylinder to establish the high speed range of operation of the transmission 96.
When the high speed range of operation has thus been established, the plunger of the limit switch 135 will drop into the notch 132 formed on the piston 108 to actuate the switch into its closed position indicating that the high speed range of spindle operation has been established. The closing of the switch 135 will complete a circuit for energizing the relay 517 causing this relay to open its contact bar 516 and break the circuit tothe solenoid coil 312 to permit the spindle creep valve 305 to assume its normally closed position and terminate the flow of hydraulic fluid for actuating the piston 108.
It is thus apparent that by manipulating the switch 490 into one of its three positions, the'transmission 96 may be shifted to any one of its three speed ranges. This same shifting may be accomplished automatically from information received from recorded data which will serve to energize the relays 480 and 481 in predetermined combinations to complete the electrical control circuits in the same manner as described for operation of the switch 490.
After the transmission 96 has been shifted to the selected speed range, the relay 517 will remain energized and operation of the machine can commence. With the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 in the fully retracted position, a forward positioning signal from the recorded data will energize a relay 549 if the machine is set for automatic operation. Energization of the relay 549 will close its normally open contact bar 550 to complete a circuit for energizing the solenoid coil 427 which functions to actuate the cross positioning directional valve 415 to initiate operation of the motor 147 for positioning the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 in a forward direction. If the machine is being operated manually, the relay 549 will not be energized, but forward positioning can be initiated manually by manipulating a manual switch 551 to close its contact bar 522 which will also serve to complete the circuit for energizing the solenoid 427.
The current for energizing the solenoid 427 flows from the line 470 into a conductor 553 to the limit switch 170. Since the limit switch 170 is being initially actuated by the dog 167 to retain the motor 147 in creep speed, the current will flow from the switch 170 into a conductor 554 to the pressure switch 381. The pressure switch 381 is likewise actuated by reason of the fact that there is hydraulic pressure in the hydraulic exhaust conduit 369 so that the pressure switch will conduct the current to a conductor 555 and thence to a conductor 556 and a conductor 557 to the feed limit switch 225. The feed limit switch 225 is also actuated by reason of the fact that the feed slide 98 is in its fully retracted position so that the current flows from the limit switch 225 into a conductor 558 and thence through a normally closed contact bar 559 of a relay 560A. From the contact bar 559 the flow of current continues through a conductor 561 to a normally closed contact bar 562 of a relay 563.
Under automatic operation the current will continue from the contact bar 562 through the closed contact bar 550 of the relay 549. However, under manual operation, the current will flow from the contact bar 562 to the closed contact bar 522 of the manual switch 551.. From the contact bar 522 the flow of current continues through a normally closed contact bar 566 of the relay 47513. The current flows from the contact bar 566 through a closed contact bar 568 of the relay 517, the Contact bar 568 being closed by reason of the fact that the relay 517 remains energized after the speed range for the transmission 96 has been established. From the contact bar 568 the flow of current continues through a normally closed contact bar 570 of a relay 571 and thence through the closed cross positioning limit switch 171 to the solenoid coil 427, the current returning to its source from the coil 427 through the line 471.
The initial forward movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 much occur at creep speed until the clutch elements 102 and 103 are fully engaged. After the slides have moved sufiiciently to engage the clutch elements, the dog 167 will release the limit switch so that its contact bar will engage a contact 580 connected to a conductor 581. It is only when the limit switch 170 is thus released that the solenoid coil 440 can be energized to actuate the creep by-pass valve for operating the feed and positioning slides at a rapid rate. The circuit for energizing the coil 440 originates at the line 470 with the current flowing through the conductor 553, the limit switch 170, the conductor 581 and a conductor 582 to a contact bar 583 of the manual switch 551. When the manual switch 551 is manipulated to initiate forward movement of the feed and positioning slides, the contact bar 583 will move upwardly to bridge its upper cooperating contacts so that the current can flow through the contact bar 583 into a conductor 584.
If the machine is being operated manually, the rapid traverse rate of operation of the feed and positioning slides 98 and 142 is initiated by actuating a push button switch 585 to its closed position so that the current will flow through the switch 585 to a normally closed contact bar 587 of the automatic relay 475C and thence to the solenoid coil 440, the current returning to its source from the coil 440 through the line 471.
If the machine is being operated automatically from recorded data, a signal from the record will energize a relay 595 to close its normally open contact bar 596. Under these circumstances, the manual switch 585 will not be closed but the current will flow from the conductor 582, through a normally closed contact bar 598 of a relay 599 and thence to a contact bar 602 of the relay 4750. Since the machine is set for automatic operation, the relay 475C will be energized to close the contact bar 602 which will carry the current to a conductor 603 and thence through the closed contact bar 596 of the relay 595 to the solenoid coil 440, the current returning to its source through the line 471. Thus, the solenoid coil 440 may be energized either automatically by energization of the automatic relay 595, or manually by closing the push button switch 585, and in either case the creep by-pass valve 435 will be actuated to cause the hydraulic pressure to by-pass the creep speed flow control valve and produce the forward positioning of the feed and positioning slides 98 and 142 at a rapid rate.
Although the release of the limit switch 170 by the dog 167 will permit energization of the solenoid coil 440 for positioning of the feed and positioning slides at a rapid rate, all forward movement of the slides will terminate after the limit switch 17 0 is released if the clutch elements 102 and 103 are not fully engaged to actuate the clutch limit switch 208. The actuation of the clutch limit switch 208 upon the engagement of the clutch elements 102 and 103 will complete a circuit for energizing a pair of relays 610 and 610A which, in actual practice, are a single relay but are shown as two relays in FIG. 9 for the purpose of clarifying the drawing.
Upon release of the creep limit switch 170 by the dog 167 and the energization of the relay 610 upon closing of the clutch limit switch 268 with the full engagement of the clutch elements 102 and 103, a spindle verification circuit is completed to condition the electrical control circuit for the particular type of machining operation that has to be performed. If the machine is under manual control, a manual switch 611 must be actuated from the neutral position shown in FIG. 9 to set the circuit for a tapping operation or for a drilling and counterboring operation. The manual switch 611 is provided with two contact bars 612 and 613 both of which are shown open in FIG. 9 inasmuch as the switch is depicted as being. in its neutral position. If a tapping operation is to be performed, the switch 611 is manipulated to close the contact bar 612 while if a drilling or counterboring operation is to be performed, the switch 611 is manipulated in the opposite direction to close the contact bar 613. When the machine is being operated automatically from recorded data the switch 611 is not manipulated and is allowed to remain in its neutral position as illustrated in FIG. 9.
The quill verification circuit originates in the line 470 with the current flowing through the conductor 553, the contact bar of the switch 170 into the conductor 581 and thence to a closed contact bar 614 of the relay 610, the contact bar 614 being closed by virtue of the fact that the relay has been energized with the closing of the clutch limit switch 208. The flow of current continues from the closed contact bar 614 to the spindle identification switch 285.
The switch 285 is illustrated in FIG. 9 in its normal position with its contact bar engaging a contact 616 to indicate that a drilling or counterboring operation is to be performed. However, as previously described, if a tapping spindle is in the operating station, the plunger 291 on the tapping spindle quill 246 will serve to actuate the switch 285 when the clutch elements 102 and 103 are fully engaged. Actuation of the switch 285 will move its contact from the position illustrated in FIG. 9 to engage its cooperating contact 617 and thereby complete a circuit for energizing a tapping relay 560 to condition the electrical control circuit for a tapping operation. If the machine is set for automatic operation, a normally open contact bar 625 of the relay 475C will be closed by virtue of the fact that the relay 475C is energized when the machine is set for automatic operation. The current for energizing the tapping relay 560 will therefore flow from the contact 617 of the switch 285 through the closed contact bar 625 into the relay 560, the current returning to its source from the relay 560 through the line 471.
If the machine is set for manual operation, the contact bar 625 of the relay 475C will be open but a normally closed contact bar 629 of the relay 475C will remain closed and the current will flow from the contact 617 of the switch 285 through the closed contact bar 629 and the closed contact bar 612 of the manual switch 611 to energize the relay 560. Thus, the tapping relay 560 will be energized to condition the circuit for a tapping operation if a tapping spindle is in operating position and the clutch 101 is engaged, the tapping relay 56% being energized for either manual or automatic operation of the machine.
The spindle identification switch 285 will not be actuated if a drilling or counterboring spindle is in operating position and its contact bar will remain in the position shown in FIG. 9 in engagement with the contact 616. Furthermore, if the machine is under manual operation, and a drilling or counterboring operation is to be performed, the manual switch 611 will be manipulated in a direction to close its contact bar 613 so that a drilling relay 635 will be energized. The current will then flow from the contact 616 of the switch 285 to a normally closed contact bar 636 of the relay 475C, the contact bar 636 remaining closed since the relay 4750 is not energized for manual operation of the machine. From the closed contact bar 636 the flow of current will continue through the closed contact bar 613 of the manual switch 611 into a conductor 637 and through a normally closed contact bar 638 of the relay 599' and thence tothe relay 635. From the relay 635 the flow of current continues to the line 471 to return to its source. Energization of the relay 635 will condition the electrical control circuit for manually performing either a drilling or counterboring operation.
Although the relay 635 will be energized for manually performing either a drilling or counterboring operation, it will not be energized for automatically performing a counterboring operation but it will be energized for automatically performing a drilling operation. With the spindle identification switch 285 in the position shown in FIG. 9 to indicate that a drilling or counterboring operation is to be performed, in automatic operation either one of two relays 645 or 646 will be energized by a signal from the recorded data to energize either the relay 635 to condition the circuit for an automatic drilling operation or the relay 599 to condition the electrical control circuit for an automatic counterboring operation. The relay 599 is not energized for manually performing a counterboring operation since the feed and positioning movement required in counterboring will all be performed by manually controlling the operation of the machine.
A normally open contact bar 647 of the relay 475C will be closed if the machine is set for automatic operation. Furthermore, if the recorded data produces a signal calling for a drilling operation, the relay 645 will be energized by such signal to close its contact bar 648. The current will then flow from the contact 616 of the switch 285 through the closed contact bar 647 and the contact bar 643 into the conductor 637 and through the normally closed contact bar 638 of the relay 599 to the relay 635 to energize it. From the relay 635 the current will return to its source through the line 471.
If a counterboring operation is called for by the recorded data, the relay 645 will not be energized but the counterboring relay 646 will be energized by the signal produced from the data to close its associated contact bar 649. Closing of the contact bar 649 will serve to by-pass the contact bar 648 of the relay 645 so that the current will flow from the closed contact bar 647 of the relay 475C into a conductor 650, through the closed contact bar 649 to the relay 599. From the relay 599 the current returns to its source through a normally closed contact bar 653 of the relay 635 to the line 471 to complete the circuit for energizing the counterboring relay 599.
After the electrical control circuit has been conditioned by energization of either the relay 560, the relay 599 or the relay 635 as described, cross positioning of the feed and positioning slides 98 and 142 may be continued. The cycle of operation will vary somewhat for each type of machining operation and it will be first assumed that a counterboring operation under automatic control is to be performed.
In the case of counterboring it is desired that the spindle motor be actuated before the forward positioning of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 occurs. Since the counterboring operation is to be performed automatically under the control of information on a record, the relay 599 will be energizedto close its normally open contact bar 660. Closing of the contact bar 660 serves to complete the circuit for energizing a relay 599A causing it to open its normally closed contact bar 661 and close a normally open contact bar 662. It is to be understood that normally the relay 599 and the relay 599A will be combined into a single unit with the several contact bars under the control of a single 2? :lay. However, for the convenience of illustration, two :parate relays have been shown in the drawings.
With the closing of the contact bar 662 upon energizaon of the relay 599A, a circuit will be completed to nergize the solenoid coil 371 for actuating the spindle rotor directional valve 361 to actuate the spindle drive rotor 95 in a forward direction. The electrical current )1 energizing the solenoid coil 371 flows from the line 70 into a conductor 663 to a normally closed contact ar 664 of the relay 560A. From the contact bar 664 ie flow of current continues to the closed contact bar 62 and thence to the tapping spindle forward limit vitch 283. Since the limit switch 283 is not actuated, its Jntact bar will be in engagement with its cooperating )ntact 668 to permit the flow of current through it to re normally closed contact bar 669 of a relay 670. From le contact bar 669 the flow of current will continue to contact bar 672 of the relay 517 and since the relay 17 was energized when the speed range of the transmison 96 was establish, the normally open contact bar 72 will be closed to permit the flow of current thereirough. From the contact bar 672 the current flows to normally open contact bar 674 of the relay 475C. .gain, however, since the machine is set for automatic peration, the relay 475C will be energized to close its Jntact bar 674. From the contact bar 674, the cur- :nt flows into a conductor 675 and through a relay 680 nd returns to its source through the line 471. Energiation of the relay 680 will cause it to close its normally pen contact bar 682 to complete the circuit to the soleoid coil 371 for operating the spindle motor in a forard direction. At the same time that the relay 680 loses the contact bar 682 it also opens a normally closed antact bar 683 to break the circuit to the solenoid coil 70 which serves to actuate the directional valve 361 for perating the spindle in a reverse direction. Thus, the alenoid coil 370 cannot be energized while the relay 80 is energized for energizing the solenoid coil 371 for perating the spindle motor in a forward direction.
With the spindle motor 95 operating to rotate the pindle in a forward direction for a counterboring operaon, the solenoid coil 427 may be energized to actuate 1e valve 415 for operating the motor 147 to position the :ed slide 98 and positioning slide 142 in a forward diection, such combined forward movement of the feed lide 98 and the positioning slide 142 also serving as a :eding movement in the case of a counterboring operaon for feeding the counterboring tool into the workiece. When the relay 680 was energized to initiate forard rotation of the spindle, it closed an associated ormally open contact bar 688 to complete a circuit for nergizing a relay 680A. Energization of the relay 680A perates to close its normally open contact bar 639 which erves to complete a circuit for energizing the forward ositioning solenoid 427.
The circuit for energizing the solenoid coil 427 origiates with the line 470 and continues through a con uctor 690 to the closed contact bar 689 of the relay 80A. From the closed contact bar the current flows to he contact bar 692 of the relay 610A. The normally pen contact bar 692 is closed by virtue of the energiation of the relay 610A so that the current continues arough the pressure switch 381 and thence through the onductor 555, the conductor 556 and the conductor 557 a the feed reverse limit switch 225. From the switch 25 the current continues through the conductor 558, he closed contact bar 559 of the relay 560A and the onductor 561 to the normally closed contact bar 562 of 1c relay 563.
Since the counterboring operation is being automatially controlled from a record, the relay 549 will be enerized to call for forward positioning movement. The urrent will therefore flow from the closed contact bar 62 through the closed contact bar 550 of the relay 549 'J a closed contact bar 593 of the relay 475B, the contact bar 593 being closed because the relay 4753 is energized inasmuch as automatic operation has been established. From the contact bar 593 the current flows to the contact bar 568 of the relay 517, the contact bar 568 being closed since the relay 517 was energized when the spindle speed range was established.
From the contact bar 568 the current flows through the normally closed contact bar 570 of the relay 571 and thence through the closed forward positioning limit switch 171. From the switch 171 the flow of current continues to the solenoid coil 427, returning to its source through the line 471. In this manner, the forward positioning coil 427 is energized to actuate the positioning directional control valve 415 for directing hydraulic pressure to the motor 147 for moving the feed and positioning slides in a forward direction. If it is desired to effect this movement of the feed and positioning slides at a rapid rate for a portion of the movement, this may be accomplished automatically by a signal from the record that energizes the relay 595 to complete the circuit to the solenoid coil 440 as previously described. In like manner, such rapid rate of movement may be effected manually by actuating the manual push button switch 585 to likewise complete the electrical circuit to the solenoid coil 440.
The forward feeding movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 will continue until the desired depth of counterboring has been obtained. At this point, under automatic operation, the relay 549 will be de-energized in response to a signal from the record and a relay 697 will be energized by the recorded data to close its associated contact bar 698. The opening of the contact bar 550 by de-energiaztion of the relay 549 will serve to de-energize the forward positioning solenoid coil 427, While the closing of the contact bar 698 upon energization of the relay 697 functions to complete a circuit for energizing the reverse positioning solenoid coil 428 for actuating the valve 415 to direct hydraulic pressure to the motor 147 for reverse operation of the motor to effect retraction of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142.
The current for energizing the reverse solenoid coil 428 flows from the conductor 561 into a conductor 699 to the closed cross positioning reverse limit switch 168. From the switch 168 the fiow of current continues to a conductor 701 and a conductor 702 to the closed contact bar 698 of the automatic relay 697. From the closed contact bar 698 the current continues to a closed contact bar 705 of the relay 610, the contact bar 705 being closed by energization of the relay 610 when the clutch 101 is engaged. From the contact bar 705 the flow of current continues through a contact bar 707 or" the relay 475B, the contact bar 707 being closed by energization of the relay 475B when the machine is set for automatic operation. From the contact bar 707 the current continues to the relay 571 and returns to its source through the line 471.
Completion of this circuit serves to energize the relay 571 causing it to close its normally open contact bar 710 and open its normally closed contact bar 570. The current will therefore flow from the contact bar 767 into a conductor 711 and thence through the contact bar 710 through the reverse positioning solenoid coil 428 to return to its source through the line 471. The circuit is therefore completed automatically to energize the reverse positioning solenoid coil 428 to effect a retraction of the feed and positioning slides 98 and 142. The termination of the forward movement of the feed and positioning slides and the initiation of the reverse movement may be effected manually by manipulating the manual switch 551 to open its contact bar 522 and close its contact bar 713. The circuit will then be closed in like manner to energize the reverse positioning coil 428. It will be noted that when the relay 571 is energized for completing the circuit to the coil 428, its normally closed contact 570 is opened to insure that the circuit to the forward positioning solenoid coil 427 is broken.
When the clutch elements 102 and 103 become disengaged by the retraction of the feed and positioning slides 98 and 142, the limit switch 208 will be released to deenergize the relay 610. The contact bar 705 of the relay 610 would then open to break the circuit to the relay 571 for energizing the solenoid coil 428 for retracting the feed and positioning slides. However, a normally closed contact bar 715 of the relay 610 will close to again complete the circuit, the current flowing from the switch 168 to the conductor 701 and a conductor 716 and thence through the closed contact bar 715 to continue as previously described for retaining the solenoid coil 428 in its energized condition. It will be noted, however, that the circuit for energizing the solenoid coil 423 includes the normally closed cross positioning reverse limit switch 168. Therefore, when the feed and positioning slides arrive at their reverse limit of movement, the dog 167 will actuate the limit switch 168 to break the circuit and de-energize the solenoid coil 428 to thereby stop the reverse movement of the feed and positioning slides 98 and 142 to complete the counterboring operation.
In the case of a drilling operation the cycle is slightly different and the quill verification circuit will therefore operate to energize the drilling relay 635 instead of the relay 599 which was energized when a counterboring operation was selected. Energization of the relay 635 will close its normally open contact bar 721 to complete a circuit for energizing an associated relay 635A. Energization of the relay 635A will operate to close its two normally open contact bars 722 and 723. The cross positioning of the feed slide 98 and positioning slide 142 to position a drilling operation will occur in the same manner as occurred for a counterboring operation except that during the positioning movement, the spindle will not be rotating as it was during the counterboring operation.
The electrical circuit for energizing the forward cross positioning coil 427 is the same as existed for a counterboring operation except that the circuit will not originate with the conductor 690 and the contact bar 689 inasmuch as the contact bar 689 will remain open in view of the fact that the spindle motor 95 is not operating. However, the current will flow through a conductor 724 to the contact bar 661 which remains closed in view of the fact that the relay 599A is not energized for a drilling operation. The current will then flow from the closed contact bar 661 to the contact bar 692 and thence proceed through the same circuit previously described to energize the forward cross positioning coil 427 for effecting a forward positioning movement of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142.
In automatic operation the solenoid coil 371 will be energized to initiate rotation of the spindle after the de sired positioning of the drilling tool has been obtained by energizing a relay 725 in response to a signal on the record to close a contact bar 726 associated with the relay 725. If the machine is being operated manually to complete the drilling operation, the solenoid coil 371 is energized by manually closing a push button switch 727.
In automatic operation the current for energizing coil 371 will flow from the line 470 into the conductor 663 and the closed contact bar 664 to the closed contact bar 722 of the energized relay 635A. From the contact bar 722 the flow of current will continue to a conductor 729 and a conductor 730 to the closed contact bar 726 of the automatic relay 725. From the contact bar 726 the current will flow into the switch 283' to the closed contact bar 669 and thence through the closed contact bar 672, the latter being closed by energization of the relay 517 when the transmission speed range was established. From the contact bar 672 the current continues to the closed contact bar 674 which was closed by energization of the relay 475C when the machine was set for automatic operation. From the contact bar 674 the"- fiow of current continues into the conductor 675 and through the relay 680 to return to its source through the line 471. Energization of the relay 680 closes its contact bar 682 to complete the circuit to the coil 371 for actuating the valve 361 to initiate forward rotation of the spindle motor 95.
In manual operation the contact bar 726 of the automatic relay 725 will not be closed but will be by-passed by reason of the fact that a contact bar 731 of the relay 475A will remain closed inasmuch as the relay 475A will not be energized since the machine is not set for automatic operation. From the contact bar 731 the current will flow through the switch 283 and will continue as previously described. In addition, the relay 475C will not be energized for manual operation and contact bar 674 is by-passed by the push button switch 727, the current flowing into a conductor 734 to the closed push button switch 727. From the switch 727 the current continues through a manual spindle stop switch 736 to the relay 680, returning to its source through the line 471. Energization of the relay 680 will close its contact bar 737 to establish a holding circuit for maintaining the relay 630 energized after the push button switch 727 is released, the relay being de-energized manually by actuating the manual stop switch 736. Energization of the relay 680 will, as previously described, also close its contact bar 682 to energize the solenoid coil 371 to initiate forward rotation of the spindle motor 95.
In the case of a drilling operation, the forward cross positioning of the feed slide 98 and the positioning slide 142 may continue until the drill guide 89 is properly positioned relative to a workpiece with the limit of forward movement being established when cross positioning forward limit switch 171 is actuated by the dog 167. Actuation of the limit switch 171 will open it and break the circuit to the solenoid coil 427 to terminate further forward movement of the feed slide 98 and positioning slide 142. Normally, however, such positioning movement will be terminated before the limit switch is actuated by the dog 167, with the circuit to the solenoid coil 427 being interrupted by de-energization of the relay 549 in response to a signal from the record, or if the machine is being operated manually, the positioning movement will be terminated by actuating the manual switch 551 to likewise break the circuit to the solenoid coil 427. In either case, the drill guide 89 will be properly located with respect to the workpiece when the cross positioning movement is stopped and the drilling. operation may then be performed.
The drill feeding movement is obtained by energizing the solenoid coil 406 to actuate the feed control valve 390' to cause it to direct fluid pressure to the right end of the cylinder for moving the piston 158 to the left as viewed in FIG. 3 and thereby effect a feeding movement of the feed slide 98 relative to the positioning slide 142. The circuit for energizing the solenoid coil 406 is completed when a contact bar 740 is closed by energization of the relay 635 when the drilling operation was selected and by closing a contact bar 741 which was closed when the relay 680A is energized to initiate rotation of the spindle. The feeding movement will therefore be initiated immediately after the spindle rotation begins.
The current for energizing the solenoid coil 406 for automatic operation will flow from the line 470 into the conductor 724 to the closed contact bar 661 and the closed contact bar 692 which was closed when the relay 610A was energized upon actuation of the clutch limit switch 208 when the clutch elements 102 and 103 were engaged. From the contact bar 692 the current continues through the pressure switch 381 into the conductor 555 and thence to the closed contact bar 741 of the relay 680A. From the contact bar 741 the current
US22356962 1958-03-10 1962-09-13 Machine tool with a mechanical cutting tool changer Expired USRE25670E (en)

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US22356962 USRE25670E (en) 1958-03-10 1962-09-13 Machine tool with a mechanical cutting tool changer

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CH (1) CH372897A (en)
DE (1) DE1402211A1 (en)
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US5366431A (en) * 1990-12-13 1994-11-22 Uniflo Conveyor, Inc. Automated press brake die transfer system

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US3134276A (en) * 1961-03-02 1964-05-26 Herbert C Abrams Drilling machine
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FR2166741A5 (en) * 1972-01-06 1973-08-17 Berthiez Charles
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US5366431A (en) * 1990-12-13 1994-11-22 Uniflo Conveyor, Inc. Automated press brake die transfer system

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NL236923A (en) 1964-01-27
DE1402211A1 (en) 1968-11-14
CH372897A (en) 1963-10-31
US2952170A (en) 1960-09-13
GB866627A (en) 1961-04-26
NL127562C (en) 1969-06-16

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