USPP18321P2 - Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTB’ - Google Patents

Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTB’ Download PDF

Info

Publication number
USPP18321P2
USPP18321P2 US11/305,255 US30525505V USPP18321P2 US PP18321 P2 USPP18321 P2 US PP18321P2 US 30525505 V US30525505 V US 30525505V US PP18321 P2 USPP18321 P2 US PP18321P2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
willow
qpstb
willow oak
new
variety
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US11/305,255
Inventor
Michael M. Glenn
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Tree Introductions Inc
Original Assignee
Tree Introductions Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US10/791,963 priority Critical patent/US20050198717P1/en
Application filed by Tree Introductions Inc filed Critical Tree Introductions Inc
Priority to US11/305,255 priority patent/USPP18321P2/en
Assigned to TREE INTRODUCTIONS, INC. reassignment TREE INTRODUCTIONS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GLENN, MICHAEL M.
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of USPP18321P2 publication Critical patent/USPP18321P2/en
Active legal-status Critical Current
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Abstract

A Willow Oak tree named ‘QPSTB’ having a dense canopy, dominant central leader, unique red fall color, and relatively fast growth rate, and also capable of being reproduced reliably using softwood cutting methods.

Description

Latin name of genus and species: Quercus phellos.

Variety denomination: ‘QPSTB’.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a new and distinct variety of Quercus phellos, Willow Oak, which has been given the varietal name ‘QPSTB.’

The original tree of this new Willow Oak variety was discovered in 2001 as a chance seedling growing in a cultivated area of a nursery in Oconee County, Ga. It had been purchased as a 12 to 18 inch liner in spring 1995 and at that time planted in a liner field. This tree was transplanted to another field in spring 1997, where it was subsequently discovered in 2001. In December 2003, this tree was transplanted to an observation area where it has remained since that time. It is now 10 years old from a seed. The description of this new Willow Oak variety is based on observations of this original tree and of asexually propagated progeny, produced from softwood cuttings that are being grown at a nursery in Oconee County, Ga.

Common Willow Oak trees are typically a large deciduous tree with a dense, oblong-oval to rounded crown at maturity. On average, it will reach 40 to 60 feet high and 30 to 40 feet wide at maturity, though the largest trees may reach 100 feet in height with an equal spread. Willow Oaks are native to bottomlands, floodplains and adjacent slopes, and rich uplands from New York to Florida, west to Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. It prefers moist, well-drained soil but adapts well to harsh conditions, and are therefore one of the best oaks for the heat, drought, and humidity of the Southeast, while still readily adaptable to the more arid Midwest. Willow Oak species are typically hardy in USDA Zones 5-9, perform best in Zones 6-8, and can survive temperatures as low as −25° F. in (such as Cincinnati, Ohio). Insofar as I am aware, Willow Oak trees which are commercially available are grown from seedling material, creating a high degree of variability in the industry, both in landscape situations and nurseries. Seedling Willow Oak trees are variable in growth rate and habit, typically lacks a central leader, and tends to be open in youth.

This new Willow Oak variety is distinguished from other Willow Oaks known to the inventor by the following unique combination of characteristics: dense canopy, dominant central leader, red fall color (very unique for this species), and relatively fast growth rate. When discovered in 2001, the original tree of this new variety was approximately 15% larger than other Willow Oak trees planted at the same time at the same size in the same group of seedlings.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In 2002, the original tree of this new Willow Oak variety was successfully propagated in Oconee County, Ga. by softwood cuttings at my direction. The progeny have demonstrated that the novel characteristics of this new variety are fixed, stable, and reproduce true to type through asexual propagation. These observations confirm that ‘QPSTB’ represents a new, distinct, and improved variety of Willow Oak as particularly evidenced by the combination of characteristics described above (dense canopy, dominant central leader, unique red fall color, and relatively fast growth rate), which can be asexually propagated reliably using vegetative propagation techniques.

This new variety of Willow Oak is particularly suited for use as a street tree and for filling large areas such as golf courses, commercial sites, and parks. This new Willow Oak variety will provide a uniform, structurally sound tree, and its rapid growth rate will benefit growers who will profit from a faster growing variety of Willow Oak. In addition, my new variety has a unique red fall foliage color. This fall foliage color is absent from common Willow Oak seedlings that have a fall foliage color of yellow, bronze-orange, to yellow-brown.

My new variety differs from another variety of Willow Oak, ‘QPSTA’ (U.S. Plant Pat. No. 13,677), in that the fall foliage of my new variety is colored red compared to yellow-brown fall foliage color on ‘QPSTA’.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying photographs depict the color of the tree and foliage of my new variety as nearly true as is reasonably possible to make the same in a color illustration of this character.

FIG. 1 is a photograph of the original tree of the new variety in fall season leaf.

FIG. 2 is a photograph of the original tree of the new variety during winter season.

FIG. 3 is a close-up of the top side of three single leaves from a tree of the new variety. The US Quarter Dollar in the picture provides a sizing reference.

FIG. 4 is a close-up of the underside of three single leaves of the new variety.

FIG. 5 is a close-up of the top side of five single leaves showing typical fall leaf color of the new variety.

FIG. 6 is a close-up of the underside of five single leaves showing typical fall leaf color of a new variety.

FIG. 7 is a close-up of a typical section of the trunk of the original tree of the new variety.

DETAILED BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION

This invention has not been observed under all possible environmental conditions. The phenotype may vary with variations in growing environment such as temperature, light intensity, day length, rainfall, or nutrient availability, without, however, any variation in genotype. ‘QPSTB’ Willow Oak is currently growing at a nursery in Oconee County, Ga. This particular area of Oconee County has a clay loam soil type, is located in USDA Hardiness Zone 7(a), and receives average yearly rainfall of 50 inches (typically ranged between 30 and 60 inches for any given year).

The following is a detailed description of my new variety of Willow Oak with color terminology in accordance with The Royal Horticultural Society (R.H.S.) Colour Chart published by The Royal Horticultural Society in London, England. This description is based on observations of the original tree growing at a nursery site in Oconee County, Ga.

  • Parentage: Discovered as a chance seedling of unknown origin growing in a cultivated area of a nursery in Oconee County, Ga.
  • Tree shape: Dense canopy and a dominant central leader. (See FIGS. 1 and 2).
  • Tree size: The original tree (11 years old) is about 27 feet high and about 13 feet wide.
  • Trunk: The trunk is typical of the species with a strong central leader (bole). At about age ten, the initially discovered tree had a diameter of about six inches in diameter measured twelve inches above the ground.
  • Bark: Bark is typical of the species, being smooth and gray (RHS 188C) on young trees, and gray (RHS 188C) and, with age, becoming roughened by irregular furrows and thick, more or less scaly ridges (see FIG. 7). Mature bark is grayed green (RHS 198C) in color, also typical of the species.
  • Branching habit: Denser than typical for the species (See FIGS. 1 and 2). Primary branches toward the top of the tree emerge at about a 45 degree angle to the leader and branch angle relative to the trunk tends to increase with age (see branches on lower portion of tree in FIG. 2).
  • Branches: One year old (new growth) branches are approximately ¼ inch in diameter with smooth texture and gray-green (RHS 197C) in color.
  • Foliage: Typical of the species. Leaves are alternate, simple; narrowly elliptical or lance-shaped, 2 to 5½ inches long, ⅓ to 1 inch wide; acute, slightly wavy and entire on margins, usually tipped with a bristle. Both the leaf apex and base are acute in shape. Leaves exhibit a pinnate venation pattern with light-green (RHS 145B) colored veins. Leaves emerge light green (RHS 151A) in spring, becoming darker green (RHS 131D) in summer. On mature leaves, the upper leaf surface (FIG. 3) is dark green (RHS 131D), and the lower leaf surface (FIG. 4) is a slightly lighter green (RHS 141D). Fall color (FIGS. 5 (upper) and 6 (lower)) ranges from a red (RHS 47B) to almost a maroon (RHS 46A) color. A typical petiole is approximately ¼ to ⅜ inch long, approximately 1/16 inch in thickness (diameter), and light green (RHS 145B) in color.
      • Overall shape.—Needle-like.
      • Base.—Pointed, less so than apex.
      • Apex.—Sharply pointed.
      • Surface texture.—Smooth, glaucous.
  • Buds: Typical of the species, being imbricate, ⅛ to ¼ inch long, ovoid, sharp-pointed, chestnut brown (RHS 200D) in color.
  • Flowers: Typical of the species. Willow Oaks, including the variety, are monoecious. Staminate catkins are pendent and clustered. Individual flowers are typically 4- to 7-lobed calyx enclosing about 6 or more stamens. Pistillate flowers are solitary or borne in spikes from axils of new leaves. Individual flowers usually consist of a 6-lobed calyx surrounding an ovary, the whole being partly enclosed in an involucre. Date of initial bloom (in Oconee County, Ga. is approximately April 1, with duration of approximately 10-14 days.
  • Fruit: Typical of the species. The acorn, to date observed only in the original tree, is solitary or paired, about ½ inch or less long and wide, subglobose, enclosed at the base by a thin saucer like cap. The acorn itself has alternating brown (RHS 177A) and black (RHS 200A) bands.
  • Root system: Typical of the species. Oaks typically have coarse root systems, but Willow Oak trees, including the new variety, have a more fibrous root system than other species within the genus.
  • Pest and disease resistance: Appears to be typical of the species; however, it has shown to be more spider mite resistant.
  • Winter hardiness: Not yet determined, due to only being grown and observed in Oconee County, Ga. (USDA Zone 7).

Claims (1)

1. A new and distinct variety of Willow Oak tree named ‘QPSTB,’ substantially as herein illustrated and described, characterized particularly as to novelty by its dense canopy, dominant central leader, unique red fall color, and relatively fast growth rate.
US11/305,255 2004-03-02 2005-12-15 Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTB’ Active 2024-06-03 USPP18321P2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/791,963 US20050198717P1 (en) 2004-03-02 2004-03-02 Willow oak tree named 'QPSTB'
US11/305,255 USPP18321P2 (en) 2004-03-02 2005-12-15 Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTB’

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/305,255 USPP18321P2 (en) 2004-03-02 2005-12-15 Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTB’

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
USPP18321P2 true USPP18321P2 (en) 2007-12-18

Family

ID=34911742

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/791,963 Abandoned US20050198717P1 (en) 2004-03-02 2004-03-02 Willow oak tree named 'QPSTB'
US11/305,255 Active 2024-06-03 USPP18321P2 (en) 2004-03-02 2005-12-15 Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTB’

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/791,963 Abandoned US20050198717P1 (en) 2004-03-02 2004-03-02 Willow oak tree named 'QPSTB'

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20050198717P1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP19922P2 (en) 2006-12-13 2009-04-14 Tree Introductions, Inc. Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTJ’

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN105325245A (en) * 2015-11-03 2016-02-17 钟兴欢 Lowland willow cutting seedling raising method

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP19922P2 (en) 2006-12-13 2009-04-14 Tree Introductions, Inc. Willow oak tree named ‘QPSTJ’

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20050198717P1 (en) 2005-09-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
USPP27269P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-22-1’
USPP21585P2 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF0646’
USPP27288P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-82-3’
USPP25651P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-62-2’
USPP21602P2 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF06419’
USPP25653P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF11-74-5’
USPP27076P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF08-5-10’
USPP28566P2 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF13-42-4’
USPP21539P3 (en) Lantana plant named ‘Chapel Hill Gold’
USPP25627P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘Gator Glory’
USPP25650P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-87-9’
USPP25626P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-35-9’
USPP25652P3 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-6-2’
USPP17367P3 (en) Maple tree (Acer truncatum) variety named ‘Fire Dragon’
USPP25302P3 (en) Acer rubrum named ‘JSC Kingstwo’
USPP27499P2 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-73-5’
USPP28591P2 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF13-26-7’
USPP13524P3 (en) Oak tree named ‘QNFTA’
USPP27117P3 (en) Epipremnum plant named ‘HANSOTI14’
USPP27500P2 (en) Coleus plant named ‘UF12-74-3’
USPP20634P3 (en) Cordyline plant named ‘Sunrise’
USPP17409P2 (en) Koelreuteria plant named ‘CORAL SUN’
USPP11431P (en) Oak tree named `Clemons`
USPP24327P3 (en) Caladium plant named ‘UF-48-5’
USPP24978P3 (en) Crapemyrtle plant named ‘CREC-0077’

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: TREE INTRODUCTIONS, INC., GEORGIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GLENN, MICHAEL M.;REEL/FRAME:017170/0217

Effective date: 20040225

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE