US990410A - Overedging sewing-machine. - Google Patents

Overedging sewing-machine. Download PDF

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US990410A
US990410A US14110103A US1903141101A US990410A US 990410 A US990410 A US 990410A US 14110103 A US14110103 A US 14110103A US 1903141101 A US1903141101 A US 1903141101A US 990410 A US990410 A US 990410A
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needle
looper
thread
spreader
hook
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US14110103A
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John P Weis
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METROPOLITAN SEWING MACHINE Co
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METROPOLITAN SEWING MACHINE Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B1/00General types of sewing apparatus or machines without mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both
    • D05B1/08General types of sewing apparatus or machines without mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both for making multi-thread seams
    • D05B1/18Seams for protecting or securing edges
    • D05B1/20Overedge seams

Description

J. P. WEIS.
OVEREDGING SEWING MACHINE. APPLICATION FILED JAN. so, 1903.
990,410, Patented Apr. 25, 1911.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.
5110011 {Ion W nk w sea J. P. WEIS. OVEREDGING SEWING MACHINE.
' APPLICATION FILED JAN.30, 1903.
Patented Apr. 25, 1911.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 2 awucnto'u J. P. WEIS. OVEREDGING SEWING MACHINE.
APPLIGAIION FILED JAN.30, 1903.
990,41 0, Patented Apr. 25, 1911.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.
/ g-mnmmlw '1' m 11 15 JOHN P. WEIS, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO METROPOLITAN SEWING MACHINE COMIPLI-TY, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.
OVEREDGING SEWING-MACHINE.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Apr. 25,191 1.
Application filed January 30, 1903. Serial No. 141,101.
T 0 all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, JOHN P. l/VEIs, a citizen of the United States, residing in Brooklyn county of Kings, and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Overedging Sewing-ltlachines, of which the following is a description.
This invention relates to chain-stitch sewing machines, of the type wherein is usually employed a looper which enters the loop of needle-thread cast, or thrown-out, by the needle, and manipulates the same in a manner to produce or form a single chainstitch.
Particularly, the invention relates to machines of the chain-stitch type capable of making overedge or binding stitches.
The object of this invention is to provide a chain-stitch overedging machine 'which will be extremely simple in its mechanism; will employ but few cooperating parts, to produce its functions; will use the least possible quantity of thread in binding or overedging; and which will be capable of very high speed.
Another object of this invention'is to provide a chain-stitch machine with a looper capable of operating close to the under side of the cloth-plate, or throat-plate, and engage the thread on the downward movementof the needle at a point and period of time much ahead of and before the time when a loop is ordinarily cast or thrownout by the needle 111 the conventional chamstitch machine.
Another object of this invention is to provide a chain-stitch machine with mechanism for engaging the needle-thread during the descent of the needle, in contradistinct-ion to the cloth-plate may be controlled, as well as the character of the movement of the spreader in its passage from below, up over the cloth-plate.
Other objects of this invention will appear during the course of the following description, and upon them stress will be laid in order to clearly indicate the objects and purposes thereof.
Vith the above objects in view, the invention consists in the parts, elements and combinations hereinafter described and claimed.
In the drawings: Figure l is a front elevation of a machine embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is an end elevation of said machine; Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are views, intended to be merely diagrammatic, showing the three, principal positions of the needle, looper and spreader; Fig. 6 is a section, taken on the line 1 of Fig. 1, showing in detail the connecting device between the looper-actuating rod and the spreader-carrier; Fig. 7 is a section on the line of Fig. 8, showing the construction of the throat-plate; Fig. 8
is a plan of the cloth-plate, showing particularly the structure of the throat-plate; Fig. 9 is a rear elevation of the needle very much enlarged; Fig. 10 is a cross-section thereof on the line 1()10, of Fig. 9, looking in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 11 is a side elevation of the needle very much enlarged; Fig. 12 is a cross section thereof on the line 12-12, of.Fig. 11, looking in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 13 is a rear elevation of the looper; Fig. 14 is a front elevation of the thread; also, thesimplestform of take up, e. g. a thread-guide secured to the upper end of the needle her; also, any simple thread-guide, between the tension and the needle-eye, for properly leading the thread to the latter, which may be found suitable. Moreover, any suitable form of resser-foot neehanismand any suitable form of feeding-mechanisin are employed. Hence, it will be seen that this machine is'reduced to the very simplest form and the least number of parts consistent with good Work.
In the drawings 1, indicates the frame of the machine, it being here noted that the cloth-plate has been omitted from Figs. 1 and 2, in order to clearly disclose the stitchforming elements, the posts for supporting said plate being indicated by 1 2, indicates the needle-bar actuating lever, oscillated on its fulcrum 3, by means of the eccentric strap and rod r, driven by the usual eccentric on the main-shaft 5, of the machine.
6, is the needle-bar; 7, the needle; 8, the resser-bar; 9, the presser-t'oot; 10 those portions of the feeding-mechanism which have been illustrated'in the drawings, and which constitute -a portion of the means for giving longitudinal movement to the feed-bar.
The needle 7, is provided in its face with a longitudinal groove 11, extending from below its eye to its shank portion, this being usual. In its back, the needle is grooved at 12, from its shank portion down to the enlargement or raised portion 13, such raised portion, projection, or hump, being sufficiently prominent to cause the thread extending across the 'same to be separated from the body of the needle between said hump and the eye of the needle 14, thus leaving between the thread and the body of the needle, and between the hump and the eye of the needle, a space or opening into which the point of the hook of the looper may enter to engage the needle-thread on the downward movement of the needle. Said hump may be rendered more. prominent'by depressing or scarfing the body of the needle above the eye, thus throwing the hump into relief; but, this manner of forming the space, for the cooperation of the hook of the looper with the thread, is not essential, ,it being only necessary to so construct the needle that said hook will infallibly engage the thread in the manner stated.
As willbe seen, upon reference to Figs. 10 and 12, the surface of the hump or enlargement is slightly flattened at 15, in order to provide a rest for the thread in its passage along the needle and over the hump to the eye of the needle.
The throat-plate 16, is provided with the usual feed-slot 17, and is also provided with a tongue 18, over which the stitches are formed, and from the free end of which the loops slip during the/progress of the fabric under the action of the feed. A needle aperture 19, is provided in the throatplateat-one side of the tongue, and a notch or recess 20, is provided in the other side of the tongue. The throat-plate is also provided, adjacent the tongue, with a finger 21,
extending oppositely to the tongue, and having a downwardly curved guard 21*. The functions of this finger and guard and also the function of the notch 2() ,"will be hereinafterfully set forth.
The form and structure of the looper are clearly shown in Figs. 13, 14 and 15, and
therein the looper is shown provided with a stem 22, adapted as usual, to be inserted in the socket of the loopercarrier and to be held therein by the usual binding screw. The bod of the looper is indicated by 23, and in tli is connection it may be noted that the body is that portion which extends from tudinally, while the back of the hook is quite prominently convexed, or curved, at 28, from the point 26, t0 the plane of the depression 29. Furthermore, as seen by' Figs. 13 and 15, the hook is curved, or convexed, transversely at 30, from its top to approximately its throat 31. v
v The depression 29, is made in the back of the body of the looper, at the top-thereof and directly in rear, and at the base of the hook 25, this depression being for the reception ofthe spreader, the end of, which normally lies-or stands therein or adjacent thereto, in position to engage the loop of needle-thread, extending from the eye of the needle to and held by the hook in its throat, and extending therefrom across the back of the looperto' the work.
The body of the looper, on its face, just in front of the point of, the hook, is slightly beveled, slabbed, or rounded off at 32, for the purpose of preventing the needle, in its descent, from engaging the body of the looper, which might result in turning the point of the needle or causing it to glance in rear of the point of the hook. Moreover,
as the needle descends and its point passes the portion 32, of the looper, the body of the looper below and forward of the slabbed portion at 32*, deflects the needle laterally so as to prevent the point of the hook from strikin the needle,--which would result in rupturing or injuring the point of the hook and possibly, bending or breaking the needle. is slightly rounded or curved, at 32, this form being given by preference and not from necessity, to afford a nice. finish and. smooth engagement with; the strand of needle-thread, and also to provide agalnst At its tip, on its face, the looper any possibility of the tip of the looper engaging, objectionably, the body of the needle. The tip of the looper is also rounded vertically at its end, by preference, for s nice finish, and for avoiding angles which might objectionably engage the strand of thread.
It will be noted that the thread-engaging hook of my looper is pointed, substantially,
1O longitudinally of the looper-body and in the direction of the shank thereof, this being one of the many peculiarities of the looper andconstituting one of its leading features, inasmuch as such disposition enables the hook to cooperate with the needle during the backward movement of the looper and when the eye of the needle descends only a short distance below the cloth-plate, or throatplate, of the machine, and enables the hook thereof to engage the thread while the needle is moving downwardly and long before it reaches its lower extreme. Moreover, it will be noted that the hook of my looper is projected vertically, or off-set, from the looper-body, thus enabling the looper to'operate nearer the throat-plate, or cloth-plate, and render it possible-for the point of the hook to engage the needle thread instantly the eye of theneedle is below-the plane or path of operation of the said offset hook. This is a leading and important feature of my invention. Again, it will be, noted the looper-body, in advance of the point ofthe hook, is much broadened where'the slabbed portion occurs, these features being provided to enable the needle to properly cooperate with the point of the hook on account of ,the off-set disposition of the latter from its body-portion; that is to say, as the needle 0 descends and the point of the off-set hook approaches the thread-engaging position, the slabbed portion 32 of the-looper presents itself for engagement by the needle, should the latter be bent or otherwise deflected, thus insuring that the needle will descend in the proper path and present its thread in proper position for accurate and certain engagement by the hook of the looper. Hence, it will be observed that though this looper is placed in its carrier in precisely the manner that loopers are ordinarily placed therein, in conventional chain-stitch machines, the thread engaging movement of the looper is its rearward movement, or what would ordinarily be the rearward movement of the looper in the ordinary machine thus the looper engages the needle-thread on its backward instead of its forward, movement and obviates the necessity of awaiting the usual slow retrograde movement on the part of the needle to throw out a loop. To
aid this action of the looper, the hump on the needle hasbeen provided, as above described, and over which the needle-thread 55 extends into the eye of the needle. An
' other important feature of this looper is the relation ofthe point of the hook to the body thereof, which relation is such as to insure the proper and accurate engagement of the point of the hook with the needle-thread the instant the eye passes below the upper edge of the looper-body or the under side of the throat-plate. Still another important feature of this looper is the forward extension, including the tip, which constantly guides the needle whileit is below the throatplate and prevents it at any time from springing into the path of or behind the looper, during the stitch-forming operation, the same being at all times, after the hook has engaged; the needle-thread, in engage ment with said needle. This extension also prevents the strand of the needle-thread loop, .on the forward movement of the looper, which causes said thread to become slack, from twisting or springing in front of the looper in anymanner. This extension also prevents the hook from catching the thread in any other manner than as is intended, viz., on the backward movement of the looper, and the downward movement of the needle. Again, the slabbed, or beveled portion .in front of the hook of the looper, prevents the point of the needle from striking the looperbody, and has the additional function of properly and surely deflecting the needle into position for enabling the hook to engage the needle-thread.
The form of the spreader is not of paramountimportance. It is essential, however, that the same be curved or so formed as to reach over the edge of the throat-plate, as clearly shown in Figs. 3 and 4. Herein, the spreader consists of the shank portion 33, seated and securely held in the socket 34, of the spreader carrier 35.- The spreader is 3 formed with a forwardly extending angular body-portion 36, having at its forward end a forwardly extending, vertically and laterally curved thread engaging finger 37; This form may be clearly seen in the diagrammaticviews as well as in Fig. 2.
The carrier for the spreader is pivoted to the upper end of a link 38, which latter at its lower end is pivoted at 39, to the upper end of the standard/l0, of bracket-piece 41, secured to the frame by screws 42, and 42*, passing through the base of bracket 41, and engaging the frame of the machine. In rear of its pivotal point' the carrier 35, is provided with a rearwardly extending screwthreaded rod 35", adjustable in and connected to the socket-piece 43, of a universal sistingof a screw having a depression in its end and adjustable in the screw-threaded boring in the end of the socket-piece, a jamnut 48, screwing onto the end of said bearing-screw and against the end of the socketpiece, for the purpose of preventing longitudinal movement of the screw. The stem 4.7, of the ball 46, is connected to a clamp 50, by any suitable means, such as the binding screw 51, and which clamp is adjustably secured by screw 49, to the looper-actuating rod 52, connecting the looper-carrier with the depending portion 53, of the needle-bar actuating lever 2, at its forward end said rod being suitably connected to the looper-can rier 54, which in turn is journaled, for oscillation, upon the horizontal bearing 55, spitably supported by the frame of the manne.
The clamp 50, is adjustable longitudinally of the looper-actuating rod, and the socketpiece 43, of the universal joint is adjustable longitudinally of the extension of the spreadencarrier. Hence, it will be observed that the action of the spreader, according to the adjustment of the connection between the same and the looper-actuating rod, can be rendered more or less abrupt or precipitate in its vertical movements and such vertical movement can be regulated in extent. fact, it is the object of this invention to st) actuate thespreader-carrier as to give to the spreader an angular movement consisting of a vertical movement and a forward, substantially horizontal movement, at a right-angle to its vertical movement, and also to regulate the amount of such vertical movement as well as the'extent of the horizontal movement. These results are obtained and the effects produced by the connection between the looper actuating-rod and the spreadercarrier as above described. Moreover, stress is laid upon the means for actuating the spreader-carrier, viz., a direct connection be- J tween the looper actuating-rod and the spreader-carrier, in contradistinction to a connection between said spreader carrier and the depending arm of the needlebar actuating lever, or any of the usual and complicated means for actuating said spreader.
' It will thus be seen that I have produced an overedging machine consisting ofvery few parts and of exceeding simplicity.
The operation of the parts is as follows:
With reference to the diagram to Figs. 3, 4
and 5, it will be noted that three, principal positions are illustrated, Fig. 3, showing the looper in its, extreme forward position, the spreader in its extreme'forwar and upper position and the needle in its extreme upper position; Fig. 4 showing the looper in position just after engaging the needle-thread 60, the needle having just passed its eye below the upper edge of thelooper and its hump just below the throat-plate, and the spreader moving backwardly after having deposited its thread around the shank of the needle; and Fig. 5 the extreme rearward position of the looper, the extreme downward position of the needle, and the extreme downward and backward position of the spreader. It is to be distinctly understood that these views are merely diagrammatic, are much enlargech'and the parts very much separated for the purpose of clearly showing the cooperation of the parts. In other words, it is to be understood that the hook of the looper operates right close up against the under side of the throat-plate, just as close as it is possible to adjust the same without contact therewith; that the needle in its downward movement barely passes its hump below the throat-plate before the hook engages its thread.
The parts are so timed that the needle hardly gets below the cloth-plate before the hook on the looper, on its backward movement, engages the needle-thread, as shown in Fig. 4, and carries it to its rearward extreme and in position for the spreader to engage the same and carry it up over the edge of the work61. Thatis to say, the looper reaches its extreme forward position, Fig-. 3, while the needle is above the cloth-plate, and begins to return to its rearward extreme at the same time the needle begins to descend through the work. In the middle of the travel of the looper the needle has descended below the cloth-plate and thehook of the looper has engaged the needle-thread, Fig. 4. In its extreme rearward position, Fig. 5, the looper has carried the thread b ack into position for engagement by the spreader, which latter has reached its downward and backward extreme and is lying with its point or finger in the depression at the base of the hook preparatory. to rising into engagement with the loop of needle-thread to carry the same up over the edge of the work-and the cloth-plate; In its extreme forward position the spreader has carried the thread beyond the path of the needle, and lies in front of the latter, the thread extending from the last stitch made, back of the needle, over the finger on the. spreader, around in .front of the needle and, down to the under side of the work over the edge of the latter. I When the looper has reached its rearward extreme, Fig. 5, and the spreader is about to ascend and carry the loop of needle-thread above the cloth-plate and over the edge of the work, the form of the loop is substantially triangular, viz., extending from the to the s reader, thus yielding the same without an ue strain for the purpose of furnishing sufficient-for the overedging. When the spreader has reached its forward limit, the looper has likewise reached its forward limit and the needle its upper limit, and as the needle descends the looper moves backward, and the spreader moves backward thus giving up the thread held thereby and allowing it to loosen and bow so that the needle may surely penetrate the same. This strand of the loop now surrounding the needle, on the surface of the goods,and which extends from the needle over the edge of the work to the under side thereof and to the last needle pu'ncture,being somewhat slack, is readily given up to the looper in its backward movement. Thus the overedge loop is drawn with thejproper degree of tension upon the edge of the work. In order to secure the spread of the two strands of the overedge loop on the edge of the work, the notch 20, in the outer edge of the tongue on the throat-plate is provided. As the spreader carries theloop over the edge of the work, the strand thereof lying in the direction of the feed, or nearest the last stitch made, is carried against the tongue just beyond the notch, or between the latter and the '30 end'of the tongue', while the other strand of said loop is carried into thenotch. Hence, as the feed takes place the strandof'thread first mentioned is carried along-f and caused to slide from the tongue, while the second strand mentioned is momentarily retained in and by the notch, or untilthe spreader has reached its forward extreme, and is then drawn from said notch bythe continued feed movement.
40 The downwardly depending guard or support 21*, of the finger 21, on the throat-plate has no effect upon the loop or stitch during ,ordinary sewing; but in chaining-off, viz.,
' making a chain, or series, of stitches inde- 453 pendently of the work, the guard. becomes efleetive .to prevent the strand of the loop, extending from the. last stitch, or chain, to the hook of the looper, from falling downor being carried back from the position necessary for it to assume for the proper engage- *ment of the spreader therewith, in carrying the thread up over the edge of the throatplate. That is to say, when the work is being'stitched' it supports the strand of the loopextending from the last stitch, or chain,
' to the hook of the looper, and such strand is thus held in proper position for accurate engagement by the spreader; but, when chain-v ing-ofi' is accomplished, the work has passed from the tongue 18 on the throat-plate, the stitches are loosely formed over and readily slip from the said tongue, which neither retains nor supports said stitches, and the latter are being formed into a chain, or connected series, independently of the work, the lat- I ter, in consequence, no longer affording a support for .the strand as in overedging.
Hence, it is necessary to provide means, such as the support or guard 21*, which will hold the said strand in substantially the manner that the work does, or so that the spreader can properly engage the same and carry it over the edge of the tongue as in overedging the work. In this operation of chaining-oft,
'ing the notch therein in precisely the man ner as in ordinary sewing or overedging.
Special attention is directed tothis function of my machine, as in the ordinary chain-stitch machine or overedging machine chaining-01f cannot be accomplished, the loops or stitches ordinarily becoming so entangled as to prevent the same. Attention is also directed to the value of chaining-off in chain-stitch machines and in overedging ma- 9d chines; that is to say, when a piece of work has been finished, it is desirable to feed in another piece instantly and without stopping the" machine, or it may be necessary or desirable, after one piece of work has passed through the machine, to run in another piece without cutting the connecting threads. These operations can be accomplished on my machine without breaking or entangling the threads. This is doubly important in highspeed manufacturing machines, as it ena les the machines to be run by power continuously, resulting in a great saving of time and increased output. It will thus be seen that, in addition .to the needle, looper, spreader and special form of throat-plate of my machine, necessary for overedging, the guard or support 22 is the only feature essential to, -and practically constitutes, my
means for chaining-off. Moreover, attention Ila is directed to the character of the'movement of the spreader, which is practically angular instead of curved as is usual; that is to say, in engaging the thread and carrying it vertically the movement is precipitate as previously noted. The reverse movement of the spreader is along substantially the same lines. This angular, or preci itate movement of the spreader is due to t 1e particular manner of actuating the same, and the 1mportance of such movement and of such actuating mechanism will be understood and appreciated when it is considered that the spreader may be located close to the bottom of the.cloth-plate,and close to the edge of- 0 a the stitch-forming and feeding mechanism,
such gage being usual in overedge stitching machines.
Having thus described my invention what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. The combination, in a sewing machine, of a reciprocating thread-carrying needle; a looper confined to movement below the cloth-plate of the machine and having a thread-engaging hook; a spreader cooperating with'the looper below the cloth-plate and the needle above the cloth-plate; and
means for actuating the needle, looper and spreader so that the looper-hook will take the needle-thread while the needle is moving downwardly, and the spreader will take the said thread from the looper and carry it in loop form over the edge of the work into the path of the needle, to form an overedge stitch.
2. The combination, in a sewing machine,
of a reciprocating thread-carrying needle; a
looper confined to movement below the clothplate of the machine and having a threadengaging hook; a spreader cooperating with the looper below the cloth-plate and the needle above the cloth-plate; and means for actuating the needle, looper and spreader so that the hook of the looper, on the backward movement of the latter, and as the needle is moving downwardly, will take the thread from the needle, and the spreader will take the thread from the looper and carry it, in loop form, over the edge of the work into the path of the needle, to form an overedge stitch.
3. The combination, in 'a sewing machine, of a reciprocating thread-carrying needle having an enlargement above its eye providing a rest for the thread in its passage to the eye; a looper confined to operate and co-' o erate with .the said needle below the clothp ate of the machine and having a hook pointing rearwardly; a spreader co6perating with the needle above the cloth-plate and the looper below the cloth-plate; and means for actuating said needle, looper and spreader to cause the hook of the looper to i take the thread from the needle between its eye and enlargement and during the backward movement of the looper, and the spreader to take the thread from the looper and to carry said thread, in loop form, over the edge of the work into the path of the needle, to form an overedge stitch. v
*4. An overedging machine comprising a needle, a looper, and a spreader, the needle having an enlargement above its eye providing a rest for the thread in its passage to the eye, and the looper having a depression; and means for actuating the parts whereby the looper will take the thread directly from the needle between the eye and enlargement, and the s reader will operate in the'depression of the ooper to engage and carry the said needle-thread over the edge of the work.
' 5. An overedgingmachine comprising a needle, a looper, and a spreader, the needle having an enlargement above its eye providing a rest for the thread in its passage to the eye, and the looper havin a hook pointing rearwardly and a depression at the base of the hook; and means for actuating the parts to cause the looper to take the thread directly from the needle between the eye andenlargement, and the spreader to cooperate with the depression in the looper to engage and carry the said needle-thread over the edge of the work.
6. An overedging machine comprising a needle, a 100 er, and a spreader, theneedle having an en argement above its eye providing a rest for the thread in its passage to the eye, and the looper having a hook offset from its body and a depression at the base of the hook; and means for actuating the parts tocause the looper-hook to take the thread directly from the needle between the eye and enlargement, and the spreader to co.-
operate with the depression in the looper to engage and carry the said needle-thread over the edge of the work.
7. A sewing machinecomprisinga vertically reciprocating needle and an oscillating looper, the needle having means above its eye providing a rest for the thread in its passage to the eye and to separate the thread from the needle above its eye, and the looper having a stem and body-portion at substantially a right angle to each other and a hook vertically offset from and carried by the body-portion pointing toward the stem; and means for actuating the parts to cause the hook, during its backward movement, to take the thread directly from the needle above its eye. I
8. The combination, in a sewing machine, of a reciprocating needle; a looper, cooperatin with said needle; a spreader, co operating with said needle and looper; and
means for actuating the needle, looper and spreader, including a reciprocating rod connected to the looper and a connection between said rod and the spreader, said means causing the looper to take the "thread from the needle during the downward movement of the latter,.and causing the spreader to take said thread from the looper andcarry the same, in loop form, over the edgeof the work into the path of the needle, to form an overedge stitch, said movement of the spreader occuring during the forward movement of the looper.
9. A sewing machine having stitch-formingmechanism comprising a needle, looper and spreader; means for actuating the several parts including a reciprocating pitman connected with the looper; and a universal joint connection between said pitman and the spreader for actuating the latter.
-10. A sewing machine comprising a looper and actuating mechanism; a spreader; means connecting the spreader and looper actuating means; and means for adjusting said connection relatively to the looper actuv ating means.
11. The combination, in a sewing machine, of a reciprocating thread-carrying needle; -a. looper, cooperating with the needle, confined to oscillations in a single curved path below the cloth-plate of the machine; a spreader, cooperating with the needle above and the looper below the cloth-plate; and means for actuating the needle, looper and spreader to cause the looper to take the thread from the needle, and the spreader to take the thread from thelooper and carry the same, in loop form, over the edge of the work into the path of the needle, thepat-h of movement of the spreader being from in rear of the looper below the cloth-plate, vertically over the latter to in front of the needle.
' 12. The combination, in a sewing machine, of a reciprocating thread-carrying needle; a looper cooperating with said needle; a
- spreader cooperating with said needle and looper; a' throat-plate, through which the needle reciprocates, having a tongue with a notch in its side; and means for actuating the needle, looper and spreader to cause the looper to take the thread from the needle and the spreader to take said thread from the looper and carry the same, in loop ,form,
over the edge'of the work, with one strand thereof into said notch and the loop into the path of the needle. 7
13;- The combination, in a sewing machine, of a reciprocating thread-carrying needle; a looper cooperating with said needle; a spreader cooperating with said needle and looper; a throat-plate, through which the needle reciprocates, having a depending, thread-supporting guard-finger; and means for actuating the needle, looper and spreader to cause the looper to take the thread from the needle, and the spreader to take said thread from the looper and carry the same, in 100p form, into the path of the needle, the said guard-finger acting as a support for the thread.
14. A stitch-forming mechanism including a needle, looper, spreader, and actuating mechanism therefor, the needle having means above its eye for separating the thread from its body, and the looper having aprojecting hook forenga-ging the needletliread; and a throat-plate having a tongue with a notch in its side in which the spreader lays a strand of the loop of thread ta ken from the hook to the needle.
15. A stitch-formingmechanism includ ing a needle, looper, spreader, actuating mechanism therefor, and a throat-plate having a tongue with a notch in its side; the needle having nieans above its eye for separating the thread from its body, and the looper having a hook to engage the needlethread at the point'of separation; and the actuating mechanism causing, the looper to take the needle-thread, and the spreader to take the thread from the looper and carry it into the notch and over the tongue to the needle. 1
In testimony whereof I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
JOHN P. WEIS.
Witnesses:
CHAS. MOO. CHAPMAN,
MABEL B. HOARE.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3862611A (en) * 1973-12-12 1975-01-28 Maruzen Sewing Machine Sewing machine needle

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3862611A (en) * 1973-12-12 1975-01-28 Maruzen Sewing Machine Sewing machine needle

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