US9495070B2 - Method and apparatus for managing digital media content - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for managing digital media content Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US9495070B2
US9495070B2 US14/108,576 US201314108576A US9495070B2 US 9495070 B2 US9495070 B2 US 9495070B2 US 201314108576 A US201314108576 A US 201314108576A US 9495070 B2 US9495070 B2 US 9495070B2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
user
digital media
view
media content
display
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US14/108,576
Other versions
US20140282263A1 (en
Inventor
Robert S. Pennington
Matthew D. Day
Noah B. Guyot
Daniel Kuo
Jenea B. Hayes
Aaron Tang
David L. Fore
John H. Chuang
Chris Bambacus
Eben Eliason
Chris Moody
Yves Behar
Joshua Morenstein
Christopher Hibmacronan
Naoya Edahiro
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
LITL LLC
Original Assignee
LITL LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US4136508P priority Critical
Priority to US12/170,951 priority patent/US8624844B2/en
Priority to US12/170,939 priority patent/US8289688B2/en
Priority to US12/416,479 priority patent/US20090322790A1/en
Priority to US12/611,282 priority patent/US8612888B2/en
Application filed by LITL LLC filed Critical LITL LLC
Priority to US14/108,576 priority patent/US9495070B2/en
Publication of US20140282263A1 publication Critical patent/US20140282263A1/en
Assigned to CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC reassignment CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AQUENT LLC, LITL LLC, SCOUT EXCHANGE LLC
Assigned to AQUENT, LLC reassignment AQUENT, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: TANG, AARON, FORE, DAVID LIVINGSTONE, BEHAR, YVES, GUYOT, NOAH BRUCE, HAYES, JENEA BOSHART, KUO, DANIEL, PENNINGTON, ROBERT SANFORD HAVOC, DAY, MATTHEW DAVID, ELIASON, EBEN, BAMBACUS, CHRIS, EDAHIRO, NAOYA, HIBMACRONAN, CHRISTOPHER, MORENSTEIN, JOSHUA, MOODY, CHRIS, CHUANG, JOHN H.
Assigned to LITL LLC reassignment LITL LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AQUENT LLC
Assigned to WELLS FARGO CAPITAL FINANCE, LLC reassignment WELLS FARGO CAPITAL FINANCE, LLC AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO PATENT SECUIRTY AGREEMENT Assignors: AGUENT LLC
Publication of US9495070B2 publication Critical patent/US9495070B2/en
Application granted granted Critical
Assigned to AQUENT LLC, LITL LLC, SCOUT EXCHANGE LLC reassignment AQUENT LLC TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS AT REEL/FRAME: 035497/0904 Assignors: CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/0482Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction with lists of selectable items, e.g. menus
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/16Constructional details or arrangements
    • G06F1/1613Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers
    • G06F1/1615Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers with several enclosures having relative motions, each enclosure supporting at least one I/O or computing function
    • G06F1/1616Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers with several enclosures having relative motions, each enclosure supporting at least one I/O or computing function with folding flat displays, e.g. laptop computers or notebooks having a clamshell configuration, with body parts pivoting to an open position around an axis parallel to the plane they define in closed position
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/16Constructional details or arrangements
    • G06F1/1613Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers
    • G06F1/1615Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers with several enclosures having relative motions, each enclosure supporting at least one I/O or computing function
    • G06F1/1616Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers with several enclosures having relative motions, each enclosure supporting at least one I/O or computing function with folding flat displays, e.g. laptop computers or notebooks having a clamshell configuration, with body parts pivoting to an open position around an axis parallel to the plane they define in closed position
    • G06F1/162Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers with several enclosures having relative motions, each enclosure supporting at least one I/O or computing function with folding flat displays, e.g. laptop computers or notebooks having a clamshell configuration, with body parts pivoting to an open position around an axis parallel to the plane they define in closed position changing, e.g. reversing, the face orientation of the screen with a two degrees of freedom mechanism, e.g. for folding into tablet PC like position or orienting towards the direction opposite to the user to show to a second user
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/16Constructional details or arrangements
    • G06F1/1613Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers
    • G06F1/1633Constructional details or arrangements of portable computers not specific to the type of enclosures covered by groups G06F1/1615 - G06F1/1626
    • G06F1/1637Details related to the display arrangement, including those related to the mounting of the display in the housing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/16Constructional details or arrangements
    • G06F1/1613Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers
    • G06F1/1633Constructional details or arrangements of portable computers not specific to the type of enclosures covered by groups G06F1/1615 - G06F1/1626
    • G06F1/1684Constructional details or arrangements related to integrated I/O peripherals not covered by groups G06F1/1635 - G06F1/1675
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/40Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor of multimedia data, e.g. slideshows comprising image and additional audio data
    • G06F16/44Browsing; Visualisation therefor
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/40Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor of multimedia data, e.g. slideshows comprising image and additional audio data
    • G06F16/44Browsing; Visualisation therefor
    • G06F16/447Temporal browsing, e.g. timeline
    • G06F17/30058
    • G06F17/30064
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/04817Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance using icons
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04842Selection of a displayed object
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/0485Scrolling or panning
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/0485Scrolling or panning
    • G06F3/04855Interaction with scrollbars
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/16Constructional details or arrangements
    • G06F1/1613Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers
    • G06F1/1633Constructional details or arrangements of portable computers not specific to the type of enclosures covered by groups G06F1/1615 - G06F1/1626
    • G06F1/1675Miscellaneous details related to the relative movement between the different enclosures or enclosure parts which could be adopted independently from the movement typologies specified in G06F1/1615 and subgroups
    • G06F1/1677Miscellaneous details related to the relative movement between the different enclosures or enclosure parts which could be adopted independently from the movement typologies specified in G06F1/1615 and subgroups for detecting open or closed state or particular intermediate positions assumed by movable parts of the enclosure, e.g. detection of display lid position with respect to main body in a laptop, detection of opening of the cover of battery compartment
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/03Arrangements for converting the position or the displacement of a member into a coded form
    • G06F3/033Pointing devices displaced or positioned by the user, e.g. mice, trackballs, pens or joysticks; Accessories therefor
    • G06F3/0338Pointing devices displaced or positioned by the user, e.g. mice, trackballs, pens or joysticks; Accessories therefor with detection of limited linear or angular displacement of an operating part of the device from a neutral position, e.g. isotonic or isometric joysticks

Abstract

Various aspects and embodiments are directed to a streamlined computer device and a graphical user interface that organizes interface elements into views of computer content for presentation to a user. Various views of digital media content permits users to easily and efficiently access various digital media content. Different views are used to provide an interface that is responsive to configurations of the device and responsive to activity being performed by the user. Aspects include permitting the user to maintain and manage digital media content libraries. According to some embodiments, the libraries comprise user digital media content and references digital media content. Functionality provided to a user can be tailored to the type of content displayed, accessed and/or managed. According to various aspects, methods and systems are provided for accessing and managing digital media libraries on a streamlined computing device with a plurality selectable I/O profiles.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/611,282 entitled “METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANAGING DIGITAL MEDIA CONTENT”, filed on Nov. 3, 2009, is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/170,951 entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed on Jul. 10, 2008; which claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/041,365, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed Apr. 1, 2008, both of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety. Furthermore, this application is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/170,939, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed on Jul. 10, 2008; which claims priority under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/041,365, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed Apr. 1, 2008, both of which applications are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety. Furthermore, this application is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/416,479, filed on Apr. 1, 2009 and entitled “SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR STREAMLINING USER INTERACTION WITH ELECTRONIC CONTENT,” which is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to: U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/170,951 entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed on Jul. 10, 2008, which claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/041,365, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed Apr. 1, 2008; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/416,479 is also a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/170,939, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed on Jul. 10, 2008, which claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/041,365, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed Apr. 1, 2008; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/416,479 also claims priority under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/041,365, entitled “PORTABLE COMPUTER WITH MULTIPLE DISPLAY CONFIGURATIONS,” filed Apr. 1, 2008, all of which applications are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety.

BACKGROUND

1. Field of Invention

The present invention is in the field of computer systems and, more particularly, is directed to methods and apparatus for managing computer-based digital media libraries.

2. Discussion of Related Art

Much of the advancement in contemporary computer systems and services stems from the significant increases in computing power. Hand in hand with those increases, enhanced features sets have developed designed to utilize that computing power. Conventional wisdom suggests that the more features that can be provided to a particular computer user, the better the user's experience will be. As computers have become more powerful and capable of providing more and more features, however, ordinary/typical computer users have not been able to keep up with availability of features and services. Users may become frustrated by the inability to navigate the myriad (sometime unending) configurations and options provided in order to achieve something useful and/or workable to their ordinary use. Many users simply don't take advantage of provided features. Some outright ignore options and features that would simplify the use of their computer system; in some instances because the user lacks experience with new features and doesn't know the feature can be useful.

User frustration is felt not only with respect to the newer more powerful computer systems being offered today, but also frustration abounds with respect to their computer's interaction with the Internet. The present movement on the Internet, often referred to as Web 2.0, also subscribes to conventional thinking in that more and more features are being packed into each and every aspect of the web experience. Often, these on-line services provide very useful opportunities for the users who know how to take advantage of them—online photo management/sharing, online financial services, online marketplaces, online exchanges, web hosting, web development, dating services, social networking to name only a few. However, computer users often simply can't take advantage of all the functionality offered, either the services and features offered by their own computer, or the services and features offered by online providers. The complexity of the interface (both hardware and software) hampers adoption, as does the volume of features offered.

With the proliferation of digital cameras, digital music players and digital video players, more and more people are turning to digital audio and video media. For example, many people have replaced, or at least greatly supplemented, printed photograph albums with digital photos stored on their computer and/or using an online photo service. Similarly, many people use digitally stored music and videos rather than, or in addition to, traditional media such as records, compact discs, video cassettes, etc. However, due to the complexity and volume of digital photography features, services, etc., many users are not taking full advantage of the capabilities and services available to them.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

Accordingly, aspects and embodiments are directed to methods and apparatus for managing digital media content that may provide a user-friendly, streamlined user experience.

Various aspects and embodiments are directed to a streamlined computer device and a graphical user interface that organizes interface elements into views of computer content for presentation to a user. Various views of digital media content permits users to easily and efficiently access various digital media content. Different views are used to provide an interface that is responsive to configurations of the device and responsive to activity being performed by the user. Aspects include permitting the user to maintain and manage digital media content libraries. According to some embodiments, the libraries comprise user digital media content and references digital media content. Functionality provided to a user can be tailored to the type of content displayed, accessed and/or managed. According to various aspects, methods and systems are provided for accessing and managing digital media libraries on a streamlined computing device with a plurality selectable I/O profiles. According to some embodiments, the methods may include displaying a GUI on a device, wherein the GUI comprises at least a plurality of views of digital media content, providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile and in response to activation of a view selector component by a user, executing an association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with digital media content in response to selection, transitioning a display on the computing device to a view of the digital media content, and providing for display of user digital media content and referenced digital media content in the view of the digital media content.

According to one aspect of the present invention, a method for accessing and managing digital media libraries on a streamlined computing device with a plurality selectable I/O profiles is provided. The method comprises displaying a graphical user interface on a computing device, wherein the graphical user interface comprises at least a plurality of views of digital media content, providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile, providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to activation of a view selector component configured to permit a user to select one of the plurality of views, associating at least one of a plurality of visual representations with digital media content, executing the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with digital media content in response to selection, transitioning a display on the computing device to a view of the digital media content in response to the act of executing the association, and providing for display of user digital media content and referenced digital media content in the view of the digital media content. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the method further comprises an act of displaying in the view user digital media content and referenced digital media content in response to the act of executing the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of displaying in the view user digital media content and referenced digital media content includes an act of accessing a reference to remote digital content not controlled by the user in order to display referenced digital content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of associating the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with a remote service provider. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act storing the association between the at least one visual representation with the remote service provider in at least one of a device profile and a user profile.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the method further comprises acts of configuring access to a remote service, and integrating operations provided by the remote service provider into the view of the digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the view comprises at least one of an album view and a timeline view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of displaying digital media content in a body portion of the view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of displaying a toggle element in a header portion of the view, wherein the toggle element transitions the computing device display between the album view and the timeline view upon selection by a user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of displaying emulation controls responsive to selection by the user, and emulating standard computer operations for referenced digital media content displayed in the view, wherein the act of emulating standard computer operations includes an act of determining if the user has authority to perform the standard computer operations, determining the user does not have the authority to perform the standard computer operation on a source of the referenced digital media content, and wherein the act of displaying the emulation controls occurs in response to the determination that the user does not have the authority. According to another embodiment of the invention, the standard computer operation includes an act of deleting digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of altering the view of the digital media content so the digital media content marked for deletion is not displayed within the view.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the method further comprises an act of generating a state entry, associated with at least one of the view and the source of the referenced digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of accessing any state entry for at least one of the view and the source of referenced digital media content, and displaying referenced digital media content according to any state entry requirement. According to another embodiment of the invention, the standard computer operation includes an act of editing referenced digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of generating a state entry reflecting any edits made to the referenced digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of providing an aggregation component configured to permit the user to select a plurality of digital media content, displaying the plurality of digital media content in the body of the view, and permitting the user to perform operations on the plurality of digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of permitting the user to perform operations on the plurality of digital media content includes at least one of a share operation, a create channel operation, and an order prints operation. According to another embodiment of the invention the at least one operation is a share operation, and the method further comprises acts of identifying any state entries for the plurality of digital media content, identifying any remote service settings for the plurality of digital media content, and transmitting a visual representation associated with the plurality of digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the method further comprising acts of permitting the user to share the at least one visual representation, including any associated digital media content with another user, storing shared information in response to an act of sharing by the user, and updating any associated digital media automatically for the another user, wherein the act of updating any associated digital media includes acts of identifying any changes in shared digital media content, wherein changes include at least one of addition of digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation, deletion of digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation, edits of digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation, and updates of information associated with digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprising acts of permitting the user to share the at least one visual representation, including any associated digital media content with another user, transmitting the at least one visual representation associated with the digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of permitting the user to update date information associated with the digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of generating an offset for the updated date information associated with the digital media content, and applying the offset to similar digital media content.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the view is a time view and the method further comprises displaying a timeline navigation control in the body of the view, wherein the timeline navigation control is configured to provide organization segments, the organization segments providing a visual indication of a number of digital media content items in each segment. According to another embodiment of the invention, the timeline navigation control further comprises a handle responsive to a pointer displayed on the computer device, wherein the handle is further responsive to select and drag operations. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of displaying the user interface includes providing a plurality of views of the plurality of visual representations of computer content, and associating the plurality of visual representations of computer content with at least one of the plurality of views, and wherein the each of the plurality of visual representations is responsive to focus and execution, wherein execution includes selection of the visual representation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile includes permitting the user to rotate a display element about a longitudinal axis running along an interface between the display component and a base of the streamlined computing device, wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis up to approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into a laptop mode with one of the plurality of views as a default display, and wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis beyond approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into an easel mode with another one of the plurality of views as a default display.

According to one aspect of the present invention, a computer-readable medium having computer-readable instructions stored thereon that as a result of being executed by a computer, instruct the computer to perform the method for accessing and managing digital media libraries on a streamlined computing device with a plurality selectable I/O profiles, wherein the method comprises displaying a graphical user interface on a computing device, wherein the graphical user interface comprises at least a plurality of views of digital media content, providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile, providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to activation of a view selector component configured to permit a user to select one of the plurality of views, associating at least one of a plurality of visual representations with digital media content, executing the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with digital media content in response to selection, transitioning a display on the computing device to a view of the digital media content in response to the act of executing the association, and providing for display of user digital media content and referenced digital media content in the view of the digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of displaying in the view user digital media content and referenced digital media content in response to the act of executing the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of displaying in the view user digital media content and referenced digital media content includes an act of accessing a reference to remote digital content not controlled by the user in order to display referenced digital content.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the method further comprises an act of associating the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with a remote service provider. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act storing the association between the at least one visual representation with the remote service provider in at least one of a device profile and a user profile. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of configuring access to a remote service, and integrating operations provided by the remote service provider into the view of the digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the view comprises at least one of an album view and a timeline view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of displaying digital media content in a body portion of the view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of displaying a toggle element in a header portion of the view, wherein the toggle element transitions the computing device display between the album view and the timeline view upon selection by a user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of displaying emulation controls responsive to selection by the user, and emulating standard computer operations for referenced digital media content displayed in the view, wherein the act of emulating standard computer operations includes an act of determining if the user has authority to perform the standard computer operations, determining the user does not have the authority to perform the standard computer operation on a source of the referenced digital media content, and wherein the act of displaying the emulation controls occurs in response to the determination that the user does not have the authority.

According to one embodiment of the invention, the standard computer operation includes an act of deleting digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of altering the view of the digital media content so the digital media content marked for deletion is not displayed within the view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of generating a state entry, associated with at least one of the view and the source of the referenced digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an acts of accessing any state entry for at least one of the view and the source of referenced digital media content, and displaying referenced digital media content according to any state entry requirement. According to another embodiment of the invention, the standard computer operation includes an act of editing referenced digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of generating a state entry reflecting any edits made to the referenced digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of providing an aggregation component configured to permit the user to select a plurality of digital media content, displaying the plurality of digital media content in the body of the view, and permitting the user to perform operations on the plurality of digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of permitting the user to perform operations on the plurality of digital media content includes at least one of a share operation, a create channel operation, and an order prints operation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the at least one operation is a share operation, and the method further comprises acts of identifying any state entries for the plurality of digital media content, identifying any remote service settings for the plurality of digital media content, and transmitting a visual representation associated with the plurality of digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the method further comprises acts of permitting the user to share the at least one visual representation, including any associated digital media content with another user, storing shared information in response to an act of sharing by the user, and updating any associated digital media automatically for the another user, wherein the act of updating any associated digital media includes acts of identifying any changes in shared digital media content, wherein changes include at least one of addition of digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation, deletion of digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation, edits of digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation, and updates of information associated with digital media content associated with the at least one visual representation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises acts of permitting the user to share the at least one visual representation, including any associated digital media content with another user, transmitting the at least one visual representation associated with the digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an act of permitting the user to update date information associated with the digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the method further comprises an acts of generating an offset for the updated date information associated with the digital media content, and applying the offset to similar digital media content.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the view is a time view and the method further comprises displaying a timeline navigation control in the body of the view, wherein the timeline navigation control is configured to provide organization segments, the organization segments providing a visual indication of a number of digital media content items in each segment. According to another embodiment of the invention, the timeline navigation control further comprises a handle responsive to a pointer displayed on the computer device, wherein the handle is further responsive to select and drag operations. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of displaying the user interface includes providing a plurality of views of the plurality of visual representations of computer content, and associating the plurality of visual representations of computer content with at least one of the plurality of views, and wherein the each of the plurality of visual representations is responsive to focus and execution, wherein execution includes selection of the visual representation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the act of providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile includes permitting the user to rotate a display element about a longitudinal axis running along an interface between the display component and a base of the streamlined computing device wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis up to approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into a laptop mode with one of the plurality of views as a default display, and wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis beyond approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into an easel mode with another one of the plurality of views as a default display.

According to one aspect of the present invention, a system for accessing and managing digital media libraries with a plurality selectable I/O profiles is provided. The system comprises a display component configured to display a graphical user interface, wherein the graphical user interface comprises at least a plurality of views of digital media content, wherein the plurality of views include at least one of a plurality of visual representations, an execution component configured to transition the graphical user interface between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile, a view selector component configured to transition between the plurality of views in response to activation, a storage component configured to store an association between at least one of a plurality of visual representations and digital media content, wherein the execution component is further configured to execute the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with digital media content in response to selection and transition the display to a view of the digital media content in response to the act of executing the association, and wherein the display component is configured to display user digital media content and referenced digital media content in the view of the digital media content. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the display component is further configured to display in the view user digital media content and referenced digital media content in response to the act of execution of the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured access a reference to remote digital content not controlled by the user in order to permit display of referenced digital content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the storage component further comprises an association between the at least one of the plurality of visual representations and a remote service provider. According to another embodiment of the invention, the storage component includes the association in at least one of a device profile and a user profile. According to another embodiment of the invention, the storage component is further configured to store access information for a remote service and wherein the execution component if further configured to integrate operations provided by the remote service provider into the view of the digital media content.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the view comprises at least one of an album view and a timeline view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the display component is further configured to display digital media content in a body portion of the view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the display component is further configured to display a toggle element in a header portion of the view, wherein the toggle element transitions the computing device display between the album view and the timeline view upon selection by a user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured determine if the user has authority to perform a set of standard computer operations, and wherein the displaying component is further configured to display emulation controls configured to emulate the set of standard computer operations upon a determination that the user does not have the authority to perform the set of standard operations. According to another embodiment of the invention, the standard computer operation includes an act of deleting digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of altering the view of the digital media content so the digital media content marked for deletion is not displayed within the view. According to another embodiment of the invention, the storage component is further configured to store a state entry associated with at least one of the view and the source of the referenced digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured to access any state entry for at least one of the view and the source of referenced digital media content, and wherein the display component is configured to display referenced digital media content according to any state entry requirement. According to another embodiment of the invention, the standard computer operation includes an editing operation for referenced digital media content, and the storage component is further configured to store a state entry reflecting any edits made to the referenced digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the display component is further configured to display an aggregation element configured to permit the user to select a plurality of digital media content, display the plurality of digital media content in the body of the view, and permit the user to perform operations on the plurality of digital media content.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the display component is further configured to permit at least one of a share operation, a create channel operation, and an order prints operation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured to identify any state entries for the plurality of digital media content, identifying any remote service settings for the plurality of digital media content, and transmit a visual representation associated with the plurality of digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system further comprises a share component configured to permit the user to share the at least one visual representation, including any associated digital media content with another user, and an update component update any digital media associated with the shared at least one visual representation automatically for the another user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured to transmit at least one visual representation associated with the digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured to permit the user to update date information associated with the digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the execution component is further configured to generate an offset for the updated date information associated with the digital media content, and apply the offset to similar digital media content. According to another embodiment of the invention, the view is a time view and the display component is further configured to display a timeline navigation control in the body of the view, wherein the timeline navigation control is configured to provide organization segments, the organization segments providing a visual indication of a number of digital media content items in each segment. According to another embodiment of the invention, the timeline navigation control further comprises a handle responsive to a pointer displayed on the computer device, wherein the handle is further responsive to select and drag operations.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the display component is further configured to provide a plurality of views of the plurality of visual representations of computer content and the storage components is configured to store an association between the plurality of visual representations of computer content and at least one of the plurality of views, wherein the each of the plurality of visual representations is responsive to focus and execution, and wherein execution includes selection of the visual representation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system comprises a portable computer system and the portable computer system further comprises a display component including a display screen, a base, a hinge assembly at least partially housed within the base and configured to pivotably couple the display component to the base, wherein the display component is rotatable about a longitudinal axis running along an interface between the display component and the base, wherein, in the closed mode, the display screen is disposed substantially against the base, wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis up to approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into the laptop mode, and wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis beyond approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into the easel mode. According to another embodiment of the invention, the single axis is a longitudinal axis running along an interface between the display component and the base; and wherein the display component is rotatable about the longitudinal axis. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system further comprises a display orientation module configured to control an orientation of the content displayed on the display screen, wherein the orientation of the content displayed on the display screen is configurable among a plurality of orientations relative to the longitudinal axis.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the plurality of orientations comprises a first orientation relative to the longitudinal axis and a second orientation relative to the longitudinal axis, and wherein when display orientation module is configured to automatically display the content in the first orientation when the portable computer is configured into the laptop mode and in the second orientation when the portable computer is configured into the easel mode. According to another embodiment of the invention, the plurality of display modes further comprises a flat mode in which the display component is disposed at an angle of approximately 180 degrees, measured about the longitudinal axis, relative to the base. According to another embodiment of the invention, the plurality of orientations comprises a first orientation relative to the longitudinal axis, a second orientation relative to the longitudinal axis, and a third orientation relative to the longitudinal axis, and wherein, in the flat mode, the orientation of the content displayed on the display screen is configurable among the first, second and third orientations responsive to a user input. According to another embodiment of the invention, the second orientation is 90 degrees relative to the first orientation, and wherein the third orientation is 180 degrees relative to the first orientation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system further comprises a mode sensor configured to detect a degree of rotation of the display component relative to the base and to provide information representative of the degree of rotation, and wherein the display orientation module is configured to automatically adjust the orientation of the content displayed on the display screen responsive to the information from the mode sensor.

According to one embodiment of the invention, the display orientation module is configured to automatically display the content in a first orientation relative to the longitudinal axis responsive to the information indicating that the degree of rotation of the display component is less than approximately 180 degrees relative to the base, and automatically display the content in a second orientation relative to the longitudinal axis responsive to the information indicating that the degree of rotation of the display component is greater than approximately 180 degrees relative to the base, wherein the second orientation is at approximately 180 degrees relative to the first orientation. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system further comprises a mode sensor configured to detect a current display mode of the portable computer; and wherein the display orientation module selects the orientation of the content displayed on the display screen from one of the plurality of orientations relative to the longitudinal axis responsive to the current display mode detected by the mode sensor. According to another embodiment of the invention, wherein the plurality of display modes further comprises a closed mode, and wherein, in the closed mode, the display screen is disposed substantially against the base. According to another embodiment of the invention, rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis up to approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into the laptop model, and wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis beyond approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into the easel mode.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, the display component is rotatable about the longitudinal axis up to approximately 320 degrees from the closed mode. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the longitudinal axis comprises multiple parallel axes, and wherein the hinge assembly is configured to permit rotation of the display component about any of the multiple parallel axes to configure the portable computer between the plurality of display modes. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the system further comprises a scroll wheel disposed at least partially within the base and rotatable about the longitudinal axis, the scroll wheel configured to permit a user to control at least one of operating parameters of the portable computer and the content displayed on the display screen. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the system further comprises a first navigation button disposed on one of the base and the display component and configured to permit the user to manipulate selected content displayed on the display screen. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the display screen is configured to display at least one of a plurality of modes of content, and wherein the navigation button is configured to permit the user to select for display one of the plurality of modes of content.

According to one embodiment of the invention, the first navigation button is user-accessible in each of the laptop mode and the easel mode. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the system further comprises a second navigation button, wherein the first navigation button is disposed on a major surface of the base, and wherein the second navigation button is disposed on a minor surface of the base. According to another embodiment of the invention, the scroll wheel is configured to permit the user to select a mode of content for display on the display screen. According to another embodiment of the invention, the scroll wheel is configured to permit the user to control a volume of sound played by the portable computer. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system further comprises a hinge assembly at least partially housed within the base and configured to rotatably couple the display component to the base. According to another embodiment of the invention, the scroll wheel is disposed at least partially within the hinge assembly. According to another embodiment of the invention, the system further comprises a foot disposed along at least a portion of the base and configured to support the portable computer when in the easel mode.

Still other aspects, embodiments, and advantages of these exemplary aspects and embodiments, are discussed in detail below. Moreover, it is to be understood that both the foregoing information and the following detailed description are merely illustrative examples of various aspects and embodiments, and are intended to provide an overview or framework for understanding the nature and character of the claimed aspects and embodiments. Any embodiment disclosed herein may be combined with any other embodiment in any manner consistent with at least one of the objects, aims, and needs disclosed herein, and references to “an embodiment,” “some embodiments,” “an alternate embodiment,” “various embodiments,” “one embodiment” or the like are not necessarily mutually exclusive and are intended to indicate that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment may be included in at least one embodiment. The appearances of such terms herein are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Various aspects of at least one embodiment are discussed below with reference to the accompanying figures, which are not intended to be drawn to scale. The figures are included to provide illustration and a further understanding of the various aspects and embodiments, and are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, but are not intended as a definition of the limits of the invention. Where technical features in the figures, detailed description or any claim are followed by references signs, the reference signs have been included for the sole purpose of increasing the intelligibility of the figures, detailed description, and/or claims. Accordingly, neither the reference signs nor their absence are intended to have any limiting effect on the scope of any claim elements. In the figures, each identical or nearly identical component that is illustrated in various figures is represented by a like numeral. For purposes of clarity, not every component may be labeled in every figure. In the figures:

FIG. 1 is an illustration of one example of a portable computer, according to aspects of the invention, in a “laptop” configuration;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of one example of a computer system;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of one example of a computer user interface architecture, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 4 is an illustration of another example of a portable computer, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of another example view of digital media content with responsive controls, according to aspects of the invention;

FIGS. 7A-B are block diagrams of examples of single album views of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 9 is an illustration of an example component of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the present invention;

FIG. 10 is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 11 is an illustration of an example responsive component of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIGS. 13A-C are illustrations of examples of a control element displayed in embodiments of views of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 14 is an illustration of an example responsive component of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the present invention;

FIG. 15 is an illustration of an example of a control element displayed in an embodiment of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a block diagram of one example of a view including cards associated with digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIGS. 17A-B are illustrations of examples of views of the back side of a card and associated controls, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 18A is a block diagram of one example view of digital media content including a lens control, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 18B is a block diagram of one example view of digital media content including an example lens selection control, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 19 is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 20A is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content including an example content control, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 20B is a block diagram of one example of a view of digital media content including a contextual control, according to aspects of the invention;

FIGS. 21A-B are examples of logical diagrams of the behavior for an example view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 22 is a perspective view of the portable computer of FIG. 1 in the easel mode, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 23 is an illustration of the portable computer configured into a “frame” mode, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 24 is a block diagram of an example of a page view of a camera card including a progress indicator of an upload in progress, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 25 is a block diagram of an example an intermediate view of a camera card, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 26 is a block diagram of a thumbnail view of a camera card, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 27 is a block diagram of a organizational view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 28 is an illustration of an example view of user controls for digital media content, according to aspects of the invention;

FIG. 29 is an example of a logical diagram of the behavior for an example view of digital media content, according to aspects of the invention; and

FIG. 30 is an illustration of the portable computer configured into a “flat” mode, according to aspects of the invention

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Synergy between services providers can be found and exploited by even the most novice user through streamlined computer systems and user interface presentation. According to one aspect, the interplay between various third party services and computer features can be readily appreciated by even a novice user because the various functionality and features sets are easily accessible through the streamlined access controls and consistent user interfaces. In particular, methods and apparatus are provided to facilitate users leveraging online digital media services offered by third party service providers, as discussed in detail below. For example, aspects and embodiments may allow users to create and manage a digital photography library by providing tools to upload content to an Internet “cloud” and to consume aggregated content from the cloud on their computing device, as discussed further below.

It is to be appreciated that embodiments of the methods and apparatus discussed herein are not limited in application to the details of construction and the arrangement of components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the accompanying figures. The methods and apparatus are capable of implementation in other embodiments and of being practiced or of being carried out in various ways. Examples of specific implementations are provided herein for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to be limiting. In particular, acts, elements and features discussed in connection with any one or more embodiments are not intended to be excluded from a similar role in any other embodiments.

Also, the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. Any references to embodiments or elements or acts of the systems and methods herein referred to in the singular may also embrace embodiments including a plurality of these elements, and any references in plural to any embodiment or element or act herein may also embrace embodiments including only a single element. References in the singular or plural form are not intended to limit the presently disclosed systems or methods, their components, acts, or elements. The use herein of “including,” “comprising,” “having,” “containing,” “involving,” and variations thereof is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items. References to “or” may be construed as inclusive so that any terms described using “or” may indicate any of a single, more than one, and all of the described terms. Any references to front and back, left and right, top and bottom, and upper and lower are intended for convenience of description, not to limit the present systems and methods or their components to any one positional or spatial orientation.

According to one embodiment, methods and apparatus are provided for creating and managing digital media libraries and, in particular, online digital media libraries. The digital media libraries may include, for example, digital photograph collections, digital video collections, digital music collections, etc. The tools and capability for creating and managing these digital media libraries are provided via a computing device, for example, a streamlined device, having a graphical user interface, as discussed below. For example, various aspects may be implemented as specialized software executing in one or more computer systems. In one embodiment, the digital media content (e.g., the photographs, videos and/or audio files) are stored online, and the graphical user interface provides the user with access to services, including online storage of digital media, and features offered by third party service providers, as discussed below.

One example of a streamlined device includes a portable computer that is configurable between a laptop mode (in which the portable computer has a conventional laptop appearance) and an easel mode in which the base of the computer and its display component stand upright forming an inverted “V,” as discussed further herein. Certain aspects and embodiments are directed to a portable computer that is configurable between different operating modes, including a laptop mode (in which the portable computer has a conventional laptop appearance), a flat mode, a frame mode, and an easel mode in which the base of the computer and its display component stand vertically forming an inverted “V,” as discussed further herein. Reference to modes of the computer, modes of the device and intended to include the physical configuration of the portable computer/device. The portable computer is capable of different display formats and functionality in the different modes, and includes a graphical user interface that may work seamlessly with the computer hardware to provide a unified, comfortable, holistic user experience.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is illustrated one example of a portable computer according to aspects of the invention upon and using which methods and apparatus for managing digital media content may be implemented. In FIG. 1, the portable computer 100 is illustrated in the “laptop” mode, with the display component 102 inclined at a viewing angle from the base 104. The display component 102 is pivotably coupled to the base 104 by a hinge assembly (not shown) that allows the display component to be rotated with respect to the base. The hinge assembly may include a single or multiple hinges, which may be any of a variety of hinge types, including, but not limited, to single-axis hinges, multiple-axis hinges, geared hinges, etc. In one example, the hinge assembly allows the display component 102 to be rotated (or tilted) about a longitudinal axis 101 running along an interface between the display component 102 and the base 104, as illustrated in FIG. 1 and discussed further below. The base 104 includes a keyboard 106 and internal electronic components (not shown), such as a central processing unit, memory, and other components necessary to operate the portable computer, as known to those skilled in the art. In some embodiments, the base 104 may also include a touch pad 108 or trackball (not shown) for receiving user commands, as known to those skilled in the art.

In one embodiment, the display component 102 includes a display screen 110, and may also include a camera 112, microphone 114, and infrared receiver 116, as discussed further below. It is to be appreciated that the locations of the camera 112, microphone 114 and infrared receiver 114 are not limited to the example illustrated in FIG. 1, and may be placed in other locations on the display component 102 and/or base 104, as would be recognized by those skilled in the art. The display component 102 may also include cushions 118 that provide soft contact points between the base 104 and the display component 102 when the portable computer is closed. In one example, the cushions 118 are made of rubber. However, it is to be appreciated that the invention is not so limited, and the cushions 118 may comprise materials other than rubber, including, for example, a polymer, felt, or other suitable materials as would be recognized by those skilled in the art.

FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of some components of an example of the portable computer 100, in which various aspects of the present invention may be practiced. For example, various aspects of the invention may be implemented as specialized software executing in one or more computer systems including multiple computer systems communicating over network. As depicted in FIG. 2, the computer 100 includes a processor 210, a memory 220, an interface 240 and a storage system 250. Components of the portable computer 100 may be coupled by an interconnection element 230. The interconnection mechanism 230 enables communications (e.g., data, instructions) to be exchanged between system components of the computer system 100. The interconnection mechanism 230 may include one or more physical busses (for example, busses between components that are integrated within a same machine), or may include any communication coupling between system elements including specialized or standard computing bus technologies such as IDE, SCSI, PCI and InfiniBand. In one example, computer system 100 is implemented without hard drive devices.

The processor 210, which may include one or more microprocessors or other types of controllers, can perform a series of instructions that result in manipulated data. The processor 210 may be a commercially available processor such as an Intel PENTIUM, Motorola PowerPC, SGI MIPS, Sun UltraSPARC, or Hewlett-Packard PA-RISC processor, but may be any type of processor or controller as many other processors and controllers are available. The processor may also execute an operating system that manages at least a portion of the hardware elements included in computer 100. The operating system may be, among others, a Windows-based operating system (for example, Windows NT, Windows 2000 (Windows ME), Windows XP, or Windows Vista) available from the Microsoft Corporation, a MAC OS System X operating system available from Apple Computer, one of many Linux-based operating system distributions (for example, the Enterprise Linux operating system available from Red Hat Inc.), a Solaris operating system available from Sun Microsystems, or a UNIX operating systems available from various sources. Many other operating systems may be used, and embodiments are not limited to any particular operating system. As shown, the processor 210 is connected to other system elements, including a memory 220, by the interconnection mechanism 230.

The memory 220 may be used for storing programs and data during operation of the computer system 200. Thus, the memory 220 may be a relatively high performance, volatile, random access memory such as a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) static memory (SRAM), or Flash memory; however, the memory 220 may include any device for storing data, including a non-volatile storage device. Various embodiments in accord with the present invention can organize the memory 220 into particularized and, in some cases, unique structures to perform the aspects and functions disclosed herein.

Still referring to FIG. 2, the computer 100 also includes one or more interface devices 240 such as input devices, output devices and combination input/output devices. The interface devices 240 may receive input and/or provide output. More particularly, output devices may render information for external presentation. Input devices may accept information from external sources. Examples of interface devices include, among others, the keyboard 106, mouse devices, trackballs, microphone 114, touch screens, printing devices, display screen 110, speakers, network interface cards, etc. The interface devices 240 allow the computer system 200 to exchange information and communicate with external entities, such as users and other systems.

The storage system 250 may include a computer readable and writeable nonvolatile storage medium in which instructions are stored that define a program to be executed by the processor. The storage system 250 also may include information that is recorded, on or in, the medium, and this information may be processed by the program. The instructions may be persistently stored as encoded signals, and the instructions may cause a processor to perform any of the functions described herein. The medium may, for example, be a flash memory. Typically, in operation, the processor causes data to be read from the nonvolatile recording medium into another memory that allows for faster access to the information by the processor than does the medium. This memory is typically a volatile, random access memory such as a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) or static memory (SRAM). The memory may be located in storage 250 as shown, or in memory system 220. The processor 210 generally manipulates the data within the memory 220, and then copies the data to the medium associated with storage 250 after processing is completed. A variety of mechanisms are known for managing data movement between the medium and integrated circuit memory element and the invention is not limited thereto. The invention is not limited to a particular memory system or storage system.

In one embodiment, the computer system does not incorporate mass storage (i.e. a hard drives), instead the system is configured to employ RAM and Flash memory storage. The capacity of the flash memory may be significantly less than traditional mass storage options. Thus in some embodiments, traditional features such a download, have been configured to operate differently for the computer 100. According to another aspect, various operations provides on conventional systems are adapted for streamlined processing. In on example, operations that require large amounts of computer storage are transformed into remote storage requests. In one embodiment, a streamlined device is configured to identify local storage request and transform them into a storage request to an on-line service provider identified in a user and/or device profile. In another embodiment, the system prompts a user to identify a service provider in response to a local request. Various operations may be transformed, including download and print operations, among others.

The computer system may include specially-programmed, special-purpose hardware, for example, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). Aspects of the invention may be implemented in software executing on hardware, hardware or firmware, or any combination thereof. Further, such methods, acts, systems, system elements and components thereof may be implemented as part of the computer system described above or as an independent component.

Although the portable computer 100 is shown by way of example as one type of computer system upon which various aspects and functions may be practiced, aspects of the invention are not limited to being implemented on the computer system as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Various aspects and functions in accord with the present invention may be practiced on one or more computers having a different architectures or components than those shown in FIG. 2.

Computer system 100 may programmable using a high-level computer programming language. Computer system 100 may be also implemented using specially programmed, special purpose hardware. The processor 210 and operating system together define a computer platform for which application programs in high-level programming languages are written. It should be understood that the invention is not limited to a particular computer system platform, processor, operating system, or network. Also, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the present invention is not limited to a specific programming language or computer system. Further, it should be appreciated that other appropriate programming languages and other appropriate computer systems could also be used.

One or more portions of the computer system may be distributed across one or more computer systems coupled to a communications network. For example, various aspects of the invention may be distributed among one or more computer systems (e.g., servers) configured to provide a service to one or more client computers, or to perform an overall task as part of a distributed system. For example, various aspects of the invention may be performed on a client-server or multi-tier system that includes components distributed among one or more server systems that perform various functions according to various embodiments of the invention. In one embodiment, an Internet cloud is maintained on server systems accessible from a plurality of devices. These components may be executable, intermediate (e.g., IL) or interpreted (e.g., Java) code which communicate over a communication network (e.g., the Internet) using a communication protocol (e.g., TCP/IP). It should be appreciated that the invention is not limited to executing on any particular system or group of systems. Also, it should be appreciated that the invention is not limited to any particular distributed architecture, network, or communication protocol.

According to one embodiment, streamlining user interactions with the computer system/device includes representing computer based content in visual representations that render computer operations/behavior in a consistent manner. These visual representations may be rendered as cards, as discussed in more detail below. Different types of cards may be employed to render different types of available content. For example, web based content, may be rendered as a web card that is associated with a mapping to web content. Some web cards map directly to web pages and in response to selection of the web card the computer device executes the mapping and displays a web view of the content. Other cards may be used to provide interactive displays selectable by a user. In another example, system operations are displayed as system cards, which are associated with mappings to system operations, for example communications configurations, and may comprise a settings card, among other system options. Another type of card includes a channel card configured to stream web based content in a manner that allows for summarization of content, while still providing the ability to fully appreciate the summarized content.

Using channel cards according to aspects and embodiments, summarized content may be presented in a manner that permits appreciation and interaction with the summarized content itself. In another example, channel card are configured to present a streamlined view that cannot only be appreciated and interacted, but may be transitioned from one mode of viewing to another without loss of the ability to appreciate and interact with the streamlined view. A more detailed discussion of embodiments and examples of a card-based system for rendering computer based content in visual representations is discussed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/416,479, filed on Apr. 1, 2009 and entitled “SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR STREAMLINING USER INTERACTION WITH ELECTRONIC CONTENT,” which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

As discussed above, according to one embodiment, methods and apparatus are provided for managing digital media libraries via, for example, the computer 100. In one example, the computer 100 includes a streamlined graphical user interface that provides access to the digital media libraries. According to another embodiment, there is a community aspect to the digital media libraries, which includes sharing of digital content, configurations and customizations between users. In particular, sharing may involve the transmission of user interface elements to other users. In one example, a user may share a card and any of its configurations with another user. Access to the shared user interface elements, in some embodiments, facilitates communal computer usage. Content and context retention by user interface elements that can be shared provides unique advantages to the users of the streamlined devices, as discussed further below.

Referring to FIG. 3, there is illustrated a block diagram of one example of an architecture of the portable computer 100 including a streamlined user interface. The user interface includes a “home” screen 310 that displays a plurality of modes of content 320. In the illustrated example, the home screen 310 contains five modes of content 320; however, it is to be appreciated that the home screen may include more or fewer than five modes of content and that the modes of content may differ from the examples discussed below. According to one example, the modes of content 320 accessible via the home screen 310 may include “media” 321, “connect” 322, “web” 323, “applications” 324, and “channels” 325. Using the streamlined user interface, also referred to as a “map” interface, information, programs, features and applications may be grouped into the various modes of content 320. By selecting any mode of content 320, the user may access the content organized within that mode. For example, the media mode 321 may provide access to a media player to play, view, search and organize digital media such as music, video, photos, etc. The web mode 323 may provide access to internet browsing and searching. The channels mode 325 may provide access to different functionality of the portable computer, with the different functions or features defined as different channels. For example, a channel may include a “photo frame” channel in which the portable computer may be configured to display a pre-selected image or set of images, etc. from a digital media library. Some or all of the modes of content 320 may access, retrieve and/or store information on an Internet cloud 330.

From the home screen 310, the user may navigate among the different modes of content 320 and, once a particular mode of content is selected, may navigate within that mode of content. In one example, the home view 310 is comprised of various cards, each card providing access to computer based content. According to one aspect, cards can be thought of as the building blocks of the user interface, providing access to a plurality of views and/or content. Indeed, cards as elements of the graphical user interface, are configured to be shared across users and across other streamlined devices. The ability to employ the features and functions of card based elements may be limited to streamlined devices, although cards and settings may be shared with traditional devices.

Navigation from the home view in and among different modes of content may be accomplished using traditional interfaces, such as the keyboard 106, touchpad 108, a mouse, trackball, joystick, or other interface device. In one embodiment, the portable computer 100 may include additional navigation devices, including a scroll wheel and one or more navigation buttons, as shown, for example, in FIG. 4. In the example illustrated in FIG. 4, the portable computer 100 includes a scroll wheel 120 and two navigation buttons 122, 124. In one example, the scroll wheel 120 is positioned, as shown in FIG. 4, such that it is rotatable about the longitudinal axis 101 (see FIG. 1) running along the interface between the display component 102 and the base 104. According to one embodiment, the portable computer 100 is configurable into various different configuration modes including the laptop mode shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, and an “easel” mode in which the base 104 and the display component 102 stand upright forming an inverted “V,” as discussed further below. Accordingly, positioning the scroll wheel 120 on the longitudinal axis 101 may have certain advantages, including providing accessibility to the scroll wheel in the different configuration modes of the portable computer; however, it is to be appreciated that the scroll wheel may be placed in any convenient or suitable location on the portable computer, not limited to the position shown in FIG. 4. Similarly, positioning the navigation button 122 on the side of the base 104, as shown in FIG. 4, may also provide accessibility in the different configuration modes of the portable computer 100; however it is to be appreciated that the navigation button 122 may be placed in a variety of locations, not limited to the location illustrated in FIG. 4.

As discussed above, in one example, the media mode of content 321 may provide access to a media player to play, view, search and organize digital media such as music, video, photos, etc. Thus, a user may use the media mode of content 321 to create and manage digital media libraries including, for example, collections of digital photographs. According to one embodiment, methods, tools and interfaces are provided to allow users to store, organize, edit, view and share digital photograph collections, as well as video and/or audio collections. These collections may be presented to the user as if stored on local storage associated with the portable computer 100; however, as discussed above, in at least some examples, the digital media content is stored remotely in the cloud 330 (see FIG. 3). Therefore, the portable computer software may include the ability to interact with third party online service providers, as discussed further below. In addition, as discussed above, in one example, the portable computer 100 includes a camera 112 and therefore, methods, tools and interfaces may be provided to allow the user to take and manage photographs and/or video using the camera 112. The portable computer 100 may also be configured to allow an external digital camera (not shown) to be connected to the computer, such that the user may extract photographs and/or videos from the external camera, to store, manage and share using the computer, as discussed further below.

According to one embodiment, the computer 100 is integrated with remote content storage and/or access in the cloud 330. The integration may be provided through third party service providers, in one example photo service FLICKR is integrated with various aspects of the device and/or the device's user interface to provide seamless access to photo content stored by the third party provider. Thus, digital content items, such as photographs, videos, etc. may be displayed on the portable computer, as discussed below, but stored remotely. The integration with remote storage services permits reduced storage capacity on the user device, for example, a portable computer. Reducing and/or eliminating the need for non volatile memory in the computer system is advantageous in that the device itself may be reduced in complexity and any associated cost. In some embodiments, a streamlined device do not incorporate a hard disk drive for storage, providing for any local storage requirement through RAM and Flash memory.

Content may be added to the user's digital medial library in a variety of different ways. For example, digital content items added to the user's account with any online hosting service (e.g., FLICKR, SHUTTERFLY, etc.) the user has registered with the portable computer 100 may be automatically added to the user's digital media library. If a person shares an album with the user via a registered online hosting service, and subsequently updates the shared album to include new items, the new items may be automatically added to the user's digital media library. The user may add content items, such as photographs, directly from web pages using, for example, a “save image” control in the web browser toolbar. In one example, clicking and holding on a particular image on a web page opens a contextual menu providing options for the user to save one or more photographs. For example, clicking a “save multiple photos” option in the contextual menu may prompt the user to click on all displayed images that he/she wishes to save and then click a “done” or “save” control to complete the action. The user may similarly save photographs from an email. As discussed above, in one embodiment, the portable computer 100 does not include local mass storage; instead the digital media content items are stored by an online hosting service. Accordingly, saving of photos from a web page or email may be implemented through the hosting service. The user may also add content items by uploading them from a camera, card reader or USB device, as discussed further below. In one example, the portable computer 100 may be pre-loaded with a selection of stock images that automatically appear in the user's digital media library. The user may delete these stock images; however, if the user's digital media library eve becomes empty, the stock images may be automatically re-added to the library.

According to one embodiment, collections of digital content items, including photographs and videos, may be displayed in any of a plurality of different views. These views may include a time view, an album view, a page view, an intermediate view, and a lens view, each of which is discussed further below. Each view may offer the user particular interaction options, features and benefits, as also discussed below. In the time view, an entire digital media library may be displayed with content items arranged chronologically, regardless of whether or not the content items (e.g., individual photographs or videos) have been assigned to an album. In the album view, individual albums of content items may be displayed. In the album view, those content items not assigned to an album are not displayed. The time view and the album view may be considered the “workhorses” of the digital media aspect of the portable computer 100, allowing a user to quickly and easily locate individual content items and perform actions, such as, share content with others, create channels, and order photograph prints from online service providers. The lens view may offer the user a variety of interactions with the digital media content, as discussed further below. In one example, for some photograph editing functions, such as correcting red-eye, cropping, adjusting contrast, etc., interfaces to online service providers may be supplied, allowing the user to leverage existing features of their online photograph service provider.

Referring to FIG. 5, there is illustrated a block diagram of one example of an album view. In the album view, the screen may include a body portion 550 in which the albums are displayed, and a header 555. In the illustrated example, in the album view, the albums 510 are displayed as a list in the body portion 550, with a scroll bar 515 that allows the user to scroll down to see additional albums that do not fit within the page view. In one example, the list of albums may be sorted by earliest photograph creation date, with the newest on top; however, it will be readily appreciated that numerous other organizations of the albums 510 are possible. A header caption 525 identifies the number of albums present and the total number of photographs contained within the albums. In one example, each album 510 includes a title 530 that identifies the album. The title 530 may be created by the user and may be descriptive of the photographs contained within the album. Each album 510 may also include a caption 535 that identifies information about the album. For example, the caption 535 may indicate the number of photographs in the album as well as the date range of the photographs in the album. For each album 510 there may be displayed a preview photograph 540, which may be, for example, a photograph selected by the user (e.g., a representative or favorite photograph), or a default selected photograph, for example, the first photograph in the album. Each photograph in the album may be displayed as a thumbnail 545. In the header 555, there may be displayed user-selectable “buttons” 560, 565 which allow the user to select between the time view and the album view, for example, by clicking (e.g., using a mouse, the touchpad, the scroll wheel, or a navigation button) on the button corresponding to the desired view.

According to one embodiment, the album view allows the user to access and view albums of their own photographs, as well as albums shared with them by other users, for example, through an online photo-sharing service. As discussed above, in one embodiment, only photographs (or other digital content items) that have been assigned an album by the user will be displayed in the album view. The computer 100 may include software that automatically creates a default album for any unsorted/unassigned photographs found on the computer. In one example, this default album is not displayed in the album view. Many online photo hosting services require the use of albums and do not allow a photo to be saved to the service without being assigned to an album. However, this requirement may not be meaningful to users who are used to having many photographs in the real world which are not associated with an album. Accordingly, the digital media system may automatically create the default album to store otherwise unsorted content items.

Still referring to FIG. 5, the thumbnails 545 provide the user with a preview of the individual photographs contained in the album. In one embodiment, when the user “hovers” over a particular thumbnail 545, the preview photograph 540 changes to display that thumbnail. The thumbnail may also increase slightly. Hover indicates the movement of a pointer, typically represented by a white arrow on the computer system display, over a particular item on the display screen, such as a thumbnail 545.

In one example, when the user hovers over a thumbnail, album controls may appear, as shown in FIG. 6. Referring to FIG. 6, the album controls 610 may include options to share an album (e.g., control 612), and to edit the album using a third party service provider (e.g., control 614). In one example, albums that are shared from within the album view may be shared as channel cards, but may also appear in the recipient's album view. As discussed above, in one example in which the photographs are stored on the cloud 330 (see FIG. 3), using a third party service provider website (for example, FLICKR; SHUTTERFLY; SNAPFISH, etc.), the control 614 for editing the album may automatically display the name of the service provider. If selected (e.g., clicked on) by the user, the edit control 614 may automatically open a web card to the album on the service where it is stored. In one example, the edit control 614 may only appear for albums of the users own photographs, and not for albums that have been shared with the user by another user, for which the user may not have editing privileges. The album controls 610 may also include a control 616 for “dissolving” the album and a control 618 for deleting the album. Selecting the dissolve control 616 may remove the album, but retain the album contents in the user's digital media library. If the user selects the delete album control 618, the album and its contents may be deleted from the user's digital media library, after a warning/confirmation message is displayed to the user. In one example, if the user selects the share control 612 to share an album with another person, any changes the user has made to the album (e.g., removing a content item) are retained when the other person views the shared album.

According to one embodiment, when the user clicks on (or otherwise selects) an individual photograph thumbnail 545, or on the preview photograph 540 in a particular album 510, a single album view may be displayed. In one example of the single album view, the album thumbnails 545 in the selected album 510 grow larger and arrange themselves in a horizontal list, as shown in FIG. 7A. In the single album view illustrated in FIG. 7A, the user sees larger previews 710 of the photographs in the selected album. The user may navigate back and forth among the items in the album by hovering over the left or right edges of the list, optionally over a scroll indicator 720, to scroll the list of preview images 710. In one example, the speed of the scrolling depends on where the cursor is in the active area. For example, the closer the cursor is to the edge of the screen, the faster the scroll. In one embodiment, when the user is scrolling left or right through the album, the horizontal list of previews 710 tilts to show perspective, as shown in FIG. 7B. In one example, in the tilted view, the images scroll automatically and the speed of the scrolling action corresponds to the maximum scrolling speed that would be available manually, e.g., if the cursor were as close to the edge of the screen as possible. In another example, the degree of tilt corresponds to the scrolling speed. For example, the more tilted the view, the faster the scroll. A scroll indicator 720 may indicate the direction of the scroll. Clicking on an individual item in the single album view may zoom that item into an intermediate view, as discussed further below. In the intermediate view, the user may still see hints of the other images in the album in the background, thus providing context for the zoomed-in item. Clicking on the item in the intermediate view may enlarge the item into a full screen view, as discussed further below.

In one embodiment, clicking on the background 730 returns the user to the album view shown in FIG. 5. In one example, the background 730 includes the users other albums. Thus, clicking on the background may mean clicking on another album; however, even in this case, clicking on the other album in the background 730 may still return the user to the album view, rather than to a single album view of the clicked-on album in the background. This may simply navigation for the user, particularly where the majority of the background belongs to other albums, such that if clicking on one of the background albums jumped to that album, the user would find it difficult to return to the overall album view of FIG. 5.

As discussed above, an alternative to the album view is the time view. According to one embodiment, in the time view, the entire contents of the user's digital media library is displayed, even if items are not organized into albums. The digital content items in the digital media library may be arranged chronologically (e.g., in the order they were taken for photos and videos) in columns from top to bottom, left to right, or in rows from left to right, top to bottom. It is to be appreciated that other arrangements of the digital content items may also be implemented. An example of the time view is illustrated in FIG. 8. Similar to the album view, the time view may comprise a body portion 810 and a header 820. As shown in FIG. 8, in the body portion 810 of the time view, preview images 830 of each item in the digital media library is displayed. As discussed above, the preview images are arranged in columns and rows. A timeline 840 may supply a navigation control that allows the user quick access to the content in the digital media library and a visual indication of the number of items in the library. In one embodiment, the digital content items in the user's digital media library are stored, using a service offered by a third party service provider (e.g., FLICKR, SHUTTERFLY, SNAPFISH, etc.) in the cloud 330 (see FIG. 3). Thus, the preview images displayed in the time view may be visual representations of remotely stored content.

Referring to FIG. 9, there is illustrated an example of the timeline 840 that may be displayed in the time view. In the illustrated example, the timeline includes three rows of tick marks 910 that correspond to the three rows of preview images 830 displayed in the body portion 810 of the time view illustrated in FIG. 8. It is to be appreciated, however, that the preview images 830 may be displayed in any number of rows, not limited to three rows, and therefore, the timeline 840 may include any corresponding number of rows of tick marks 910, not limited to three rows. Scroll controls 920 may be provided to allow the user to scroll through the timeline using a cursor. In one example, superimposed over the timeline 840 are markers 930 for individual months and years, as shown in FIG. 9. In addition, the timeline may include a “handle” 940 which indicates the section of timeline that corresponds to the preview images 830 displayed in the body portion 810. In one example, clicking anywhere on the timeline 840 moves the handle 940 to that point in time and changes the display of preview images 830 accordingly. According to one embodiment, the timeline 840 is not linear. Instead, the length between tick marks 910 on the timeline corresponds to the number of digital content items in the digital media library for that period of time. Thus, the spacing between markers 930 for different months or years may provide a visual indication of the number of content items in that month or year. For example, if the media library contains 300 content items (e.g. photographs and/or videos) for March 2007 and 100 content items for April 2007, the space allocated to March 2007 on the timeline 840 may be three times greater than the space allocated to April 2007.

The timeline 840 may also provide a visual indication of new content recently added to the digital media library. For example, when another person shares an album with the user, or when the user uploads new photographs and/or videos from a camera, a new content indicator 950 may be displayed in the timeline 840. In one example, the new content indicator 950 includes highlighting or changing the color of the tick marks 910 corresponding to the newly added content items. The new content indicator 950 may persist for a predetermined time period, or until the user acknowledges the new content. For example, when an album is shared with the user, the new content indicator 950 may persist until the user acknowledges the shared card notification, as discussed further below. In another example, when the user uploads new content to the library, the new content indicator 950 may persist until the user closes/cancels an “upload complete” notification, as also discussed further below.

There may be multiple ways in which a user can navigate in the time view. For example, if the user hovers over the left or right edge of the timeline 840, the timeline may scroll to reveal more of the timeline. In one example, if this scrolling causes the handle 940 to bump against the edge of the visible timeline, the handle remains on the edge and the content in the body 810 displayed changes accordingly. In this manner, the handle 940 is always visible. As discussed above, clicking on the timeline 840 may bring the user directly to the corresponding time frame. In one example, if the user clicks on the timeline 840, thereby jumping to a new point in time, a brief animation, such as the “wall” of preview images 830 in the body 810 tilting and scrolling, may be displayed. The user may also click on and drag the handle 940 to scroll through the preview images 830. In one example, clicking and dragging the handle 940 will similarly cause the wall of preview images 830 to tilt and scroll. As discussed above with reference to the album view, the degree of tilt may correspond to the speed of the scroll, and the direction of the tilt may correspond to the direction of the scroll.

As discussed above with reference to the single album view, clicking on a particular preview image 710 or 830 may cause the display to navigate to the intermediate view. In one example, in the intermediate view, the selected image is enlarged and comes to the foreground of the screen, while the remaining preview images 710, 830, recede into the background. Referring to FIG. 10, in one example, the unselected preview images slide left and right so that a few may be seen at the edges of the screen, providing context for the selected image, as discussed above. The enlarging of the selected image and receding of the remaining images may be animated, providing the user with a visual experience as the view changes to the intermediate view. To return to the previous view, i.e., either time view or single album view, the user may click anywhere on the background 1010, even on one of the receded images 1015.

Referring to FIG. 10, in one example, the intermediate view includes a caption area that displays a caption 1020 for the item 1025. The caption 1020 may be editable if the item 1025 belongs to the user. If the user has not yet entered a caption for the item, a message, such as “click here to enter a caption for this photo/video,” may be displayed in the caption area. If the item belongs to another person, i.e., is in an album that has been shared with the user, the caption 1020 may be set by the other person and therefore may not be editable by the user. The date the item was taken may also be displayed in a date area 1030. The intermediate view may include navigation controls 1035 which allow the user to step through items in the digital media library or album, for example, depending on whether the user entered the intermediate view from the time view or single album view, while remaining in the intermediate view. The intermediate view may also include a toolbar 1040 that provides access to a number of actions that may be performed on the item 1025. In one example, the contents of the toolbar 1040 depends on whether the item belongs to the user or is an item that has been shared with the user, and on the type of item (e.g., whether the item is a photograph or video).

In one embodiment, clicking on the item 1025 in the intermediate view further zooms into the image, presenting it a full-screen view. If the item 1025 is a video, the video may start playing automatically. Moving the cursor may cause a control bar to be displayed, as discussed above, to allow the user to stop and start the video, and to navigate forwards and backwards within the video. The control bar may disappear if the cursor remains still for a predetermined period of time, for example, a few seconds. In one example, in the full screen view, only the image (photo or video) is shown; that is, the view does not include a header or other information which may distract the user from the image itself. If the item 1025 is a photograph, by default, the full screen view may include no controls, and no indication whether comments are available. In one example, if the user moves the pointer (e.g., using a mouse) to the edge of the screen, the left/right navigation control indicators appear as in other views. The user may also use the arrow keys or other keyboard keys or other input devices to cycle through images in the full screen view. In one example, clicking anywhere on the photo or video (or using another input mechanism, for example, pressing the Escape key) will return to the intermediate view.

Historically and to present, the interface on digital cameras can be difficult to set or change and thus it is not uncommon for the date stamp of photographs and/or videos taken with the camera to appear incorrectly in the user's digital media library. Correct dates, however, may be critical to the success of time view and potentially also to many features of the digital media functionality of the portable computer 100. Therefore, in one example, the date setting may be adjustable for items in the digital media library. In one example, if the user hovers over the date area 1030 for an item in the intermediate view, an indication may be provided that the date is editable. For example, the color of the date may change, and/or the date area may be highlighted. Clicking the date may cause controls for editing the date to become available. For example, as shown in FIG. 11, the date area may display scrollable fields for the month (1045), day (1050), and year (1055), along with a save button 1060. The user may change the date by clicking the scroll arrows for each field, selecting a desired date for the item 1025. According to one embodiment, once the user makes the correction, the user may be prompted to adjust the dates for all items that were taken with the same camera and uploaded in the same session. Thus, the digital media program may identify all the items that are likely to have dates offset by the same amount as the item just corrected, and offer to correct the date(s) of these item(s) by the same offset. For example, a prompt to the user may read: “I have identified [#] other items taken with the same camera and saved at the same time as this [photo/video]. Would you like me to correct the date for these items as well?” with the options “Yes, please” and “No, thanks” for the user to select. In one example, “No, thanks” is the default.

According to one embodiment, for content items that belong to the user, date corrections may propagate throughout their computer network. Thus, if the user corrects the date on a content item that has previously been shared with another user, the corrected date is reflected on the other user's display. This propagation of corrections may be effected because the digital content items, and associated data, such as date, caption, etc., may be stored in the cloud 330, as discussed above. Thus, when the other user views the shared content item, they are viewing a visual representation of digital content stored in the cloud, rather than a locally stored digital content item. Some online digital photograph and/or video services do not permit editing of dates associated with the stored photographs and/or videos. In addition, a user may wish to edit the date associated with a shared item, for which they may not have editing privileges. Thus, although in some instances it may be preferable to save date corrections to the hosting photo/video service, if this is not possible, date corrections may be locally stored on the portable computer 100 for display purposes. In this instance, date corrections will be reflected when the user views the digital content item on the portable computer 100, but will not propagate to other users viewing shared items.

Referring again to FIG. 10, as discussed above, the intermediate view includes a toolbar 1040 that includes one or more controls 1065 that may be used to manipulate the item 1025. In one embodiment, the toolbar 1040 contains controls 1065 including “add to pick list,” “add/view comments,” and “rotate.” The “add to pick list” and “add/view comments” controls are discussed below. The rotate control rotates the item 1025 90 degrees, either clockwise or anti-clockwise. The direction of rotation may be pre-set (i.e., rotation is always in the same direction) or may be user-selectable. If possible, the rotation may be stored with the item 1025 on the appropriate online photo/video hosting service, bur if not, the change may be stored locally and affects only the user's view of the item 1025. If the item 1025 belongs to the user, the toolbar may further include an edit control 1070 and a delete control 1075.

In general, photo editing can be grouped into two broad categories, namely editing that alters the content of an image (such as cropping, red-eye, removal, and adjusting the contrast), and editing that alters the display of an image (such as rotation, creation date, and view/hide). In one embodiment, the digital media aspect of the portable computer 100 may encourage users to leverage existing services (offered by their online photo hosting service) for the former, via the edit control 1070, while supplying tools for the latter. In one example, the edit control 1070 may display a message similar to “edit on [service],” where the [service] is the name of the third party hosting service that stores the user's digital media library in the cloud 330 (for example, FLICKR). Clicking on the edit control 1070 may open a web card for the item 1025 on the user's hosting service, allowing the user to edit the item, as discussed further below. In some instances, the user will not have the appropriate access to perform either type of editing operations on many of the images in their media library, either because the particular image does not belong to the user, or because the photo hosting service does not support the particular editing action. According to one embodiment, the digital media aspect of the portable computer 100 allows the user to perform display edits on any digital content item in their digital media library regardless of whether or not that edit function is available via the library hosting service. For example, the user may rotate any photo or video in their digital media library, using the rotate control discussed above, even if this rotation is only available on the user's display on the portable computer 100 and does not affect the underlying data stored in the cloud 330.

Similarly, the function of the delete control 1075 may vary depending on various factors. If the item 1025 belongs to the user, the delete control 1075 may allow the user to delete the item from their digital media library. If the item 1025 does not belong to the user, the delete control 1075 may be replaced in the toolbar 1040 by a “remove” control (not shown). The remove control allows the user to remove items from their digital media library that do not belong to them, without affecting the underlying data in the cloud. Thus, the underlying data may remain in the cloud, since the user does not have permission to actually delete the item), but the item is removed from the user's view on the portable computer 100. Thus, the user may make local changes to their own data that are not reflected on the underlying media library hosting service, thus allowing the user to customize and enhance their own viewing experience.

Still referring to FIG. 10, if the item 1025 is a video, the toolbar 1040 may include additional video controls (not shown), such as “play” and “stop” or “pause.” The video controls may also include a video play timeline with a click-and-drag “scrubber” that identifies the current playpoint in the video in relation to the length of the view, and also allows the user to navigate through the video.

As discussed above, in one embodiment, one of the controls 1065 in the toolbar 1040 is a “comments” control, that allows the user to add and/or view comments associated with the item 1025. If comments are available for the item 1025, a comments icon 1080 may be displayed on the item, for example, in an upper corner of the item. In one example, in the intermediate view, the comments icon 1080 shows the number of comments available for the item 1025. If the user clicks the comments control in the toolbar 1040 of the intermediate view, the item 1025 turns over to reveal a “back side” showing existing comments and allowing the user to add/edit comments. In one example, an animation of the item 1025 turning over is provided.

Referring to FIG. 12 there is illustrated one example, of a “back view” of the item 1025. The back view includes a preview image 1210 of the item 1025, along with an “add comments” area 1220 where the user can type a new comment. Comments may also be added by persons with whom the user (or someone else) has shared the item 1025. Thus, existing comments 1230 may be displayed, along with a user image 1240 selected by the person leaving the comment and an identifier 1250 which provides identifying information for the comment, such as the name of the person who left the comment and the date and time the comment was left. In one example, the back view includes a “from” selector 1260 which allows the user to select to display only comments from a particular person or group of persons. If the user types a comment into the add comments area 1220, an “add comment” button 1270 may be displayed. Clicking the add comment button 1270 may add the user's comment to the item 1025. Clicking a “done” button 1280 may turn the item 1025 back over, returning the user to the intermediate view. In one example, the navigation controls 1035 remain available in the back side view, allowing the user to navigate backwards and forwards through the digital medial library, displaying the back side (comments) view for each item. In one example, clicking in the background 1010 turns the item 1025 back over and then exits the intermediate view, returning the user to either the single album view or time view. An animation of these steps occurring may be displayed during the transition from the comments view, through the intermediate view, to the single album or time view.

In one example, a small comments icon 1080 is also displayed in the corner of those preview images 710 (in the single album view) or 810 (in the time view) for which comments are available. Clicking on the comments icon 1080 may bring up the comments view for the associated content item. In one example, clicking on the comments icon 1080 in one of these views causes an animation to be displayed, the animation including zooming into the intermediate view for the selected preview image 710, 810, and turning the item 1025 over, as discussed above.

As discussed above, in one embodiment, one of the controls 1065 in the toolbar 1040 is an “add to pick list” control. The pick list is an organization tool that allows the user to gather together a group of digital content items for a particular action. For example, in the pick list, the user may collect content items to be shared with another user, used to create a custom channel, as discussed further below, or for which the user wishes to buy prints or access some other service provided by the online library hosting service. According to one embodiment, the pick list appears when the user adds a content item to the pick list, and may remain visible until the user clears the list. For example, FIG. 13A illustrates an example of the single album view, with the pick list 1310 displayed across the top of the view. Similarly, FIG. 13B illustrates an example of the time view displaying the pick list 1310. It is to be appreciated that although the pick list 1310 is shown in FIGS. 13A and 13B located near the top of the screen, below the header 555, 820, its location is not limited to the illustrated example, and the pick list may be displayed elsewhere on the screen, for example, along the bottom of the screen, or vertically along one side of the screen.

According to one embodiment, the pick list 1310 comprises one or more thumbnails 1320 corresponding to the content items added to the pick list, as shown in FIGS. 13A and 13B. The thumbnails 1320 may be arranged in the order in which the content items were added to the pick list 1310. In one example, the thumbnails 1320 cannot be re-ordered by the user. Navigation controls 1330 allow the user to scroll through the pick list 1310. Referring to FIG. 13C, there is illustrated one example of a pick list 1310 including pick list controls 1340. The pick list controls 1340 may allow the user to perform any of a number of actions on the pick list 1310 and on the content items contained in the pick list. For example, the pick list controls 1340 may include options to order prints, to share the items in the pick list, to add a channel, and/or to clear and close the pick list. In one example, selecting the clear and close control empties the pick list 1310 and removes it from display; however, the content items in the pick list may not be deleted from the digital content library. Hovering over a particular thumbnail 1320 a (as indicated by pointer 126) may increase the size of that thumbnail, as shown in FIG. 13C, and reveal a delete icon 1350. In one example, hovering on the delete item causes a tip to be displayed, indicating that clicking the delete icon 1350 will cause the content item to be deleted from the pick list. In one example, clicking on the delete icon 1350 deletes the content item from the pick list 1310, but not from the user's digital media library. Clicking elsewhere (i.e., not on the delete icon 1350) on the thumbnail 1320 a may cause the associated content item to open in the intermediate view. If the user was in the time view (FIG. 13B), the timeline 840 may scroll in the background and the handle 940 moves as appropriate. If the user was in the album view and clicks a thumbnail 1320 in the pick list 1310, the background of the intermediate view may reflect the appropriate album. In one example, if the user is in the album view and clicks on a thumbnail 1320 in the pick list 1310 that happens to be unsorted (i.e., not associated with an album), the display may switch to the time view.

According to one embodiment, hovering on a preview image 710 (in the single album view) or 830 (in the time view) will cause the preview image to enlarge slightly and two controls to appear, as shown in FIG. 14. The pointer 126 indicates the user hovering on the preview image 1410. These controls may include a delete icon 1420 and an “add to pick list” button 1430. If comments are available for the content item associated with the preview image 1410, the comments icon 1080 may also be displayed. Clicking on the “add to pick list” button 1430 adds the content item to the user's pick list 1310. Clicking on the delete icon 1420 deletes the content item from the user's digital media library. In one example, clicking the delete icon 1420 also causes an informational “bubble” (not shown) to appear, letting the user know that the content item has been deleted. The bubble may remain on the screen for certain time period, for example, a few seconds, and may include an undelete button, giving the user the ability to undo the deletion of the content item. Conventional “undo” actions, such as pressing “CTRL-z” may also undo the deletion of the content item. The effect of deleting a content item on the underlying data in the cloud 330 may depend on whether the content item belongs to the user, or is an item that has been shared with the user by someone else. For example, if the content item belongs to the user, then deleting it may also delete the content item from the library stored by the online hosting service. If the content item belongs to someone else, deleting it in the user's digital medial library may remove the “map” or reference to that item, such that it is no longer displayed in the user's media library, but does not affect the underlying data in the cloud 330.

Referring again to FIG. 13C, in one example, clicking a “share” button in the pick list controls 1340 Clicking the Share button in the Pick List launches a share bubble 1360, as shown in FIG. 15. The share bubble 1360 may include several fields, including a name field 1362 where the user may name the content item or group of content items to be shared, and fields where the user may either select from the pre-set list of persons (field 1364) those persons with whom the user wishes to share the items, or enter one or email addresses (field 1366) of persons with whom the items are to be shared. The share bubble 1360 may also include a comments field 1368 where the user may enter comments about the items being shared or a message to the person(s) with whom the content items are being shared. Clicking the “share” button 1370 may complete the share action. A “cancel” button 1372 may be provided to cancel the share action; alternatively, simply clicking anywhere not on the share bubble 1360 may also cancel the share action. A similar share bubble may also appear when the user selects the share album control 612 in the album view discussed above.

The pick list controls 1340 may also include an “order prints” button to allow the user to order prints of the photographs in the pick list 1310. According to one embodiment, clicking “order prints” button from the pick list 1310 shows the user options for ordering (such as print size, number of prints, etc.), and then places the order using information previously collected from the user, for example, during initial configuration of the portable computer 100. According to another embodiment, clicking the “order prints” button from the pick list 1310 opens an ordering panel that provides the user with options for ordering prints from any of a variety of online photo service providers. The ordering panel may include weblinks that allow the user to navigate to the websites of the online photo service providers. The ordering panel may also include a “stop” or “cancel” button. In another embodiment, clicking the “order prints” button from the pick list 1310 automatically opens a webpage of the online photo hosting service where the user's digital media library is stored. Thus, the user may order the desired prints (or other merchandise) directly from the hosting service on which they are stored. In one example, using the “order prints” control does not clear the content items from the pick list 1310 in case the user wishes to perform another action with the items.

According to one embodiment, the pick list controls 1340 may also include a control to create or add a channel. In one example, selecting the create a channel control in the pick list 1310 creates a channel card containing the content items in the pick list. As discussed above, according to one aspect, streamlining the presentation and integration of features and services available through the portable computer 100 includes developing consistent visual representations of available content (whether on the computer 100 or from third party service providers). In one embodiment, system features and web features are consistently presented as cards for the user to interact with to achieve their computer objectives. In some embodiments, cards comprise part of an interface layer between a computer user and a user's computer based objective and/or computer operation. Thus, the cards form a part of the structure of the graphical user interface between a computer system and the user to provide access to a plurality of views and/or content. In various embodiments, cards are configured to be context and/or content sensitive. Thus, the cards are selectable visual representations that are mapped either to computer functions or available computer content. Some examples of cards include web cards that map to views of web content including web pages, channel cards that map to customized views of content including web based content and picture and video content, and system cards that map to system functionality. In one example, system cards are configured to represent activities that have been specifically designed such as for example, a digital media card.

Referring to FIG. 16, in one embodiment, the home view 310 (see FIG. 3) is configured to manage and organize cards. Thus, in one example, the home view 310 includes a body 1610 in which a plurality of cards 1620 are arranged. The home view 310 may also include a header 1630 which displays a home indicator 1640, letting the user know that they are in the home view, 1640, and optionally includes a web search bar 1650, providing the user direct access to searching on the Internet. The home view 310 provides a simple and convenient mode of navigating through the features and content accessible through the device by organizing and managing cards. In some embodiments, channel cards provide additional features that enable a user to better interact with web based content, and in another example, channel cards provide interactive views by utilizing different content presentations provided by a web source. Thus, consistent user interfaces are used to access web based content, even content and applications provided by third parties.

According to one aspect, cards may have common features to promote user acceptance and improve adoption of different cards, while providing familiar a form. In one example, most cards are configured with a similar anatomy, and may comprise certain common elements described with reference to illustrated examples. According to one aspect, different cards types displayed in the home view are clearly defined by color scheme and appearance, while at the same time maintaining a similar format. For example the similar format includes header placement and sizing, display of tools, title and frame size. In one embodiment, a color scheme configured to differentiate card types provides for web cards with white headers with the content displayed on the web card showing as a thumbnail of the current state of the page. Channel cards may be configured with black headers, and the content presented in the channel card may comprise a simplified representation of the associated media or web content. System cards may be shown either with blue headers or grey headers.

According to one embodiment, the digital media aspect of the streamlined device is presented as and accessed through a system card 1620 a. The digital media system card 1620 comprises a header 1660 running along the top of the card which identifies it as the digital media card, and a body 1670 which displays an image of one of the digital content items in the user's digital media library. In one example, the image displayed in the body 1670 is selected at random from the user's digital media library and may change periodically, for example, every few seconds or minutes. From the home view 310, selecting (e.g., by clicking) the digital media card 1620 navigates to either the time view or the album view of the user's digital media library. The default view may be set in the card options, as discussed further below.

As discussed above, when the user selects the “create a channel” control in the pick list 1310, a channel card is created containing the content items in the pick list. The channel creation process may be animated. In one example, when the user clicks the control button, the system zooms out of the digital media library view to the home view 310, scrolls to the end of the displayed cards 1620 (if necessary), and shows the new channel card appearing, then scrolls back (if necessary) to where the digital media card 1620 a is displayed in the home view, and zooms back into digital media view from which the user clicked on the control in the pick list 1310. The whole animation may take a brief time; short enough to not be too annoying to the user, but long enough not to cause the user any vertigo.

According to one embodiment, the user may also create channel from online photo services (such as SMUGMUG or KODAK GALLERY). In one example, when the user creates a channel from one of these services, the option may be given to save the photographs to the user's digital media library. If the user decides to add the photographs to the digital media library, new photographs subsequently added to the feed from the online service may also be added to the digital media library. This automatic updating stops (i.e., no more photographs are added) if the user deletes the channel card or transforms it into a web card. Similarly, the user may transform a web card of an online photo service (such as FLICKR or SHUTTERFLY) into a channel card using the card options discussed below. In one example, when the user creates a channel card from one of these photo services, the option is again given to add the contents of the channel card to the user's digital media library. This allows the user to get the benefit of an aggregated media library on the portable computer, but without automatically cluttering it up with unwanted images. Content subsequently added to the channel may also be added to user's digital media library. If the user deletes the channel card or transforms it back into a web card, new content is no longer added to the digital media library, but the existing content may not be removed.

Referring again to FIG. 16, the cards 1620 may include an “options” icon 1680 in the header 1660. In one embodiment, when card configurations and/or card options are selected by a user (if available), e.g., by clicking the card options icon 1680, a consistent animation is presented to the user. For example, selection of a card's options may cause an animation displaying the flipping of the card and the revelation of user selectable options. In one example, if the user clicks the card options icon 1680, there is presented a visualization of the card turning over, similar to the animation/visualization of the item 1025 turning over to display the comments view discussed above. On the “back side” of the card 1620 the user may see various options which may differ depending on the type of card. Referring to FIG. 17A, there is illustrated one example of the back side of a card 1620. In the illustrated example, the card 1620 includes a header 1710 that displays an identifying field 1715 and optionally a logo or image 1720, to identify the card to the user. In an example of a web card, the identifying field 1715 may include the name of the associated website and optionally some description of the card. For example, a web card for an online news service may display the name of the news service along with a description such as “local news” or “news headlines” that identifies the card for the user. The available options for the card 1620 are shown in the body 1725 of the card.

In the illustrated example, the body 1725 of the back side of the web card 1620 b shows an option 1730 for transforming the card into a channel card, and vice-versa. In the example of a web card, if the user checks the option 1730, the web card is recast into a channel card. Unchecking the option 1730 transforms the channel card back into a web card. The option 1730 may be displayed permanently checked for cards that are always available as channel cards (e.g., the digital media card 1620 a, as shown in FIG. 17B), and may be missing for cards that are not available as channels, for example, some system cards. In the example of the digital media card 1620 a, the option 1730 may include an option to show the card as a channel using a particular lens. Thus, for the digital media card 1620 a, the control 1730 may read “Show as channel using [lens], as shown in FIG. 17B.” A lens is a customized visualization for computer content, as discussed further below.

Still referring to FIG. 17A, channel cards may include an option 1735 to show the card in a screensaver. Typically the screensaver option 1735 is not an available option for other card types; however, the digital media system card 1620 a does permit its content to be displayed in the screensaver. In one example, the digital media card 1620 a is added to the screensaver mode by default. In the channel view (discussed below) and screensaver mode, the digital media system selects photographs randomly from the user's digital media library. This allows the portable computer 100 to function like a smart digital picture frame by default when the device is idle. According to one example, new channel cards are configured to not display in screensaver mode by default and therefore, the option 1735 is not checked for new channel cards.

The card options may also include share information/controls 1740. The shared information 1740 may include a “shared to/from” line which provides information on the user or device from which or with which the card was shared. Hovering over the “shared from” line causes the device to display an informational bubble with a list of people to whom the card was shared. Other options may be employed for displaying shared from information. Other options may include linking to a display list for share from information, and in some embodiments may include displaying the shared entities on the back of the card without selecting the “shared from” line. In such embodiments a maximum number of shared entities may be displayed before requiring selection of a more control. The more control expands on the list of shared entities to provide for listings that do not fit within the space provided on the back of a card. A “shared to” line may provide information about whether and to whom the card has been shared. According to one embodiment, system cards can not be shared, thus no shared to information is displayed. By default the “shared to” line does not display until a card has been shared. In one example, hovering over the shared to line causes the device to display an informational bubble with the list of people to whom the card has been shared. Other options may be employed for displaying shared to information. Other options may include linking to a display list for share to information, and in some embodiments may include displaying the shared entities on the back of the card without selecting the “shared to” line. In such embodiments a maximum number of shared entities may be displayed before requiring selection of a more control (not shown). The more control expands on the list of shared entities to provide for listings that do not fit within the space provided on the back of a card. Optionally the more control may cause the device to display an information bubble containing the remaining shared entities and/or all the shared entities. The share information 1740 may also display the number of times the card has been shared. As discussed above, the user may share content items from the pick list 1310 with other users. In one example, sharing items from the pick list operates similar to sharing a channel card that contains only photographs and videos. The recipient receives a channel card on their streamlined device (or an email with a link to the channel card on a website if the recipient does not have a streamlined device.

Still referring to FIG. 17A, for some cards the card options may further include a delete control 1745 which removes the card 1620 from the home view 310. The delete control 1745 is typically not available for system cards, which typically can not be deleted by the user. The card 1620 may also show a “last updated” field 1750 that displays update information. For example, for a web card that streams news or other online content, the update field 1750 may display the last time the feed was updated, for example, “last updated 3 minutes ago” or “last updated at [date/time].” A “done” button 1755 may be provided that allows the user to turn the card 1620 back over to the front side view when the user is finished viewing/changing the card options. In one example, clicking the “done” button 1755 causes the system to display an animation of the card 1620 flipping over to show front side and zooming back out to the home view 310.

As discussed above, another view of the digital media library which may be offered to the user is the lens view. The lens view is a group of visualizations, or “lenses,” that the user can choose from and which offer the user different ways in which to experience and interact with their digital media libraries. The content displayed and the interactions available may depend on the individual lens. In one example, all or at least some of the lenses allow the user to add a particular picture to the pick list 1310. The pick list may or may not be displayed in the lens view. In one example, lenses support passive viewing, i.e., they do not require user interaction to be effective since they can be applied to the channel view and screensaver mode.

According to one embodiment, by default, channel cards are displayed in the channel page view according to a pre-determined visualization. For channels that comprise photographs and videos, including the digital media card 1620 a, and channels created from online photo services such as FLICKR or SHUTTERFLY, lenses are also available to modify the visualization of the channel. According to one embodiment, the channel page view is the zoomed-in computer implemented expression of a channel card. The channel page view may be invoked by clicking on the channel card. A channel page view may present a unique view into content made available through a website. The channel page view employs visualizations similar to corresponding visualization on channel cards but the large format of the view allows for a better display of content, and provides for increased interaction with users. The channel page view also comprises a mapping from the display content to the source from which the content is derived. The channel page view comprises a number of elements that are maintained across the channel page views of different content, although in some examples additional features may be provided to address unique aspects of the content being viewed. An example of a channel page view is the album view illustrated in FIG. 5.

As discussed above, and referring to FIG. 17B, for the digital media card, the channel control may read: “Show as channel using [lens]” to allow the user to select a particular lens. The lens button 1760 may display the name of the currently selected lens. Clicking the lens button 1760 reveals controls, for example, a drop-down menu, for selecting a lens. In one example, when the user clicks on the drop-down menu to select a lens, the card 1620 a and drop-down menu remain visible, but the rest of the home view 310 becomes obscured by a preview of the selected lens. Lenses may also be selected from any of the time view, album view, intermediate view, or lens view of the user's digital media library. For example, referring to FIG. 18A, there is illustrated an example of the time view showing the lens button 1760. The lens button 1760 displays the name of the currently selected lens. In one example, clicking on the lens button 1760 will switch to the lens view and show the current lens. Referring to FIG. 18B, there is illustrated an example of a lens view. The lens view includes a header 1810 and a body 1820 in which an image 1025 of the content item is displayed. The lens button is shown as a drop-down menu 1830, as discussed above, revealing a list of available lenses. The drop-down menu may be displayed responsive to the user clicking the arrow 1840 on the lens button. As the user moves through the list, an instant preview of the highlighted lens may appear in the body 1820 of the screen. Selecting a new lens from the list makes it the current lens, and changes the text on the lens button 1760 (see FIG. 18A) to match.

One example of a lens is the slideshow lens. In one embodiment, in a channel page view, the slideshow lens automatically shows random images from the user's digital media library in the full screen view. Each image may be displayed for a predetermined period of time, for example, a few seconds. In another example, the images are shown as a forward moving series, as shown in FIG. 19. In the example in FIG. 19, the front image 1910 is shown for a few seconds, then replaced with the next image 1920 and the series “shifts forward” with a new image being added at the back of the line. In one example, the images displayed are selected from a particular album, and the system automatically scans through all the images in the album, randomly or in sequence. The photo display restarts again at the beginning when the end of the photo content is reached. From the slideshow, the user may navigate to any image in the digital media library.

FIG. 21A, illustrates an example logical diagram of the behavior for the slideshow lens in the channel view. From channel page view 2110, selection of a menu button causes the device to display a content menu 2120, over the present channel page view. Selection of the menu button from the content menu, causes the device to display the selected content item in a channel page view 2502. The menu button may be a clickable button displayed on the screen (not shown in FIG. 19) or may be a hardware button, such as a button on the keyboard 106 (see FIG. 1) or one of the navigation buttons 122, 124 discussed above. In one example, from the channel page view 2110, operation of the scroll wheel 120 (see FIG. 4), causes the device to display a channel selector view 2130. The channel selector may allow the user to select different albums or different channels for display. It is to be appreciated that the navigations discussed in reference to examples of navigating through photo content in the channel page view and slideshow lens may be similarly applied to channel page views of cards other than the digital media card, optionally using lenses other than the slideshow lens.

In one embodiment, if the user presses the menu button while looking at a particular item, a content menu for the album to which that item belongs is displayed, as shown in FIG. 20A. In one example, the content menu 2010 is configured to be responsive to manipulation of the embedded scroll wheel 120 discussed above. Manipulation of the scroll wheel 120 progress through the displayed content menu 2010, and in response the system displays the selected content in the full view with preview text appearing below. Manipulation of the scroll wheel 120 causes the system to scroll through the photos in the current album. In one embodiment, the content menu 2010 transitions between selections by rendering the apparent movement of the entire content menu either to the left of the right depending upon the orientation of the manipulation of the scroll wheel 120. Alternatively, the content menu is also responsive to arrow keys on the keyboard 106. Depressing an arrow key causes the system to display the apparent movement of the content menu 2010 to the next item. In one example, if the image 1025 belongs to more than one album, the system shows the content menu for the first album. If the item does not belong to any album, the system may show the content menu for unsorted images. In another example, pressing and holding the menu button may cause a content menu to be displayed, allowing the user to scroll through and select a particular album. A prompt 1930 may be displayed, as shown in FIG. 19, providing the user with instructions for changing the album.

According to one embodiment, if the user presses and holds the menu button, a contextual menu 2020 of all of the albums in the digital media library appears, as shown in FIG. 20B. The user may then use the scroll wheel 120 to navigate to any of the albums. The contextual menu 2020 may display the title of the albums, along with a representative, first or random thumbnail 2030 of a content item in the album. In one example, pressing the menu button opens the selected album, showing the first image in full screen and proceeding to show the rest as usual.

According to one embodiment, channels for displaying video content and/or audio content operate with a different logical flow. In one example, additional interactivity is required to allow a user to, for example, stop a video, start a video from the middle, among other options. According to one embodiment, the streamlined device must be able to accommodate routine operations through manipulation of only a scroll wheel and a mouse, for example when the device is in an easel mode. It is to be appreciated that in other configurations the logical flow for the behavior of the channel view may be different, and may take advantage of addition input/output devices available in other device modes. Shown in FIG. 21B, is an example of a logical flow for device/UI functionality, during the normal operation of a channel view of video content. At 2140 shown is a channel page view of video content. Select of button (e.g. one of the navigation buttons 122, 124), causes the device to display a contextual menu 2145. The Contextual menu 2145 may include a visual representation of selectable options 2150. The selectable options 2150 rendered may include at least a rewind/fast forward selector, resume selection, other episodes, etc. Selection of the rewind/fast forward selector invokes a timeline controller 2155 shown in the content page view 2160. In one example, the time line controller 2155 is responsive to rotation of the scroll wheel 120, providing fast forward in one direction and rewind in the other. From 2160, selection of a navigation button causes the device to return the view to channel page view 2140. Selection of “resume” from the options 2150 also causes the device to return the view to channel page view 2140. Selection of other episodes from 2150 causes the device to invoke a content menu 2165, which provides a selector view of available content for the channel. Selection of content 2170 from the selector view 2165 causes the system to play the selected content in channel page view 2140. From channel page view 2140, the device displays a channel selector 2175, in response to operation of the scroll wheel 120. The logical flow illustrated may be used for interactions with audio content as well, for example, to control playing of .mp3 or other audio files.

As discussed above, in one embodiment, the portable computer is configurable into different modes, including a laptop mode (in which the portable computer has a conventional laptop appearance), a flat mode, a frame mode, and an easel mode in which the base of the computer and its display component stand vertically forming an inverted “V,” as discussed above. It is be appreciated that different user interface architectures may be invoked in response to different device modes. For example, a portable computer in laptop mode may display a home view 310 as discussed with respect to FIG. 16, whereas when configured in Easel mode, user may be presented with a channel page view, for example, the slideshow view discussed above.

Referring to FIG. 22, there is illustrated an example of the portable computer 100 configured into the easel mode. To convert the portable computer 100 from the laptop mode (or closed position) into the easel mode, the display component 102 may be folded away from the base 104, in the same direction as to open the computer (i.e., to configure the computer from the closed position into the laptop mode) such that the base 104 and the display component 102 form an inverted “V” shape with the bottom of the base and the back of the display component face another, as illustrated in FIG. 22. In the easel mode, the display screen 110 is visible and accessible on one side of the portable computer 100 and the keyboard 106 (not shown in FIG. 22) is visible and accessible on the other side. Having the portable computer 100 be configurable between different modes supports the presentation of computer content using visual representation optimized for different viewing modes. In particular, ones of the visual representations are configured to display in a “lean forward” user viewing mode and a “lean backward” viewing mode. In one example, a lean forward user viewing mode includes a user typing at a keyboard of a laptop computer. In another example, a lean backward user viewing mode includes a user viewing a television from a distance. One should appreciate that the examples provided are illustrative and are not intended to be limiting. The configurable portable computer 100 permits a user to select a device configuration most suited to a particular user viewing mode. According to one embodiment, the easel mode of the device permits improved “lean back” interactions with computer content. In other words, the easel mode makes it easier to view the streamlined device's display from distances greater than conventionally used with laptop computers.

According to one embodiment, the function or display content and/or display orientation of the portable computer may vary when the portable computer is configured from the laptop mode into the easel mode, or vice versa. Thus, selection of a lean backward user viewing mode at triggers the portable computer 100 to transition to a content display that improves user interaction in that mode. For example, in response to configuring the device into the easel mode, the computer system display may transition to a channel viewing mode. The channel viewing mode is configured to present computer content, in large footprint displays, and further is designed to streamline user interaction with the streamlined device by permitting access through a first I/O profile associated with the streamlined device in easel mode. The first I/O profile in easel mode may consist of a scroll wheel and a selector button. In some embodiments, the first I/O profile may include a volume control. In another example, for at least some activities within at least some modes of content (e.g., viewing a photograph or video), when the portable computer 100 is configured into the easel mode, the display may automatically adjust to “full screen view” (i.e., the displayed image or video is displayed on the full screen size, rather than in a window) to allow for comfortable viewing.

In addition, in one embodiment, when the portable computer 100 is configured into the easel mode, the visual display on the display screen 110 is automatically rotated 180 degrees such that the information appears “right-way-up,” even through the display screen is upside-down compared to when the portable computer is in the laptop mode. Thus, a user may simply “flip” the portable computer 100 into the easel mode and immediately be able to comfortably view information on the display screen 110, without having to access display screen controls to adjust the orientation of the visual display. The ability to configure the portable computer 100 into either the laptop mode or the easel mode provides enhanced functionality. For example, when the portable computer 100 is not being actively used, the user may configure the portable computer into the easel mode, and program the portable computer to act as a digital photo frame, displaying one or more photos of the user's choice. In the easel mode, the portable computer 100 may occupy a smaller footprint on a surface than in the laptop or closed modes because the base 104 and display component 102 are upright, as illustrated in FIG. 22. In addition, because the portable computer can act as a passive information and/or entertainment device, such as a photo frame, as discussed above, the portable computer may provide a useful function even when not being actively used by the user, and may do so (in the easel mode) without taking up much surface area.

In another example, the portable computer 100 may be configured into a “frame” mode, as illustrated in FIG. 23, in which the portable computer is placed on a surface 2310 with the keyboard 106 “face down” on the surface 2310 and the display 110 facing upward. In the frame mode, the display component 102 may be at a similar orientation, and angle 2320, with respect to the base component 104 as in the easel mode. However, rather than the base component 104 and display component 102 being oriented vertically with respect to the surface 2310, as in the easel mode (in which the portable computer forms an inverted “V” as discussed above), in the frame mode, the base component 104 may lie flat on the surface 2310, as shown in FIG. 23. In one example, software and/or hardware protection may be provided for the keyboard to prevent keys from being pressed (or to prevent the portable computer from responding to pressed keys) when the portable computer is in the frame mode.

According to some embodiments, the streamlined computer system/device includes a plurality of I/O devices that a user needs to operate and transitions between modes (e.g. frame and easel) triggers the presentation of different I/O profiles to the computer user. One should appreciate that the various I/O profiles can be selected through physical configuration of the device. By providing the user the ability to change from a first I/O profile to another, at will, improves the user experience and permits the user to dynamically select a preferred I/O profile best suited to the user's present need. According to one embodiment, user selection of I/O profile includes transitioning from a lean back mode to a lean forward mode and vice versa. In one embodiment, the user's computer device is configured to have multiple I/O profiles that can be selected by physically manipulating the orientation of the computer device itself.

According to one aspect, streamlining user interactions with the computer system/device includes representing computer based content in visual representations that render computer operations/behavior in a consistent manner. The visual representations are adapted to permit easy user interaction even upon selection of a first I/O profile or the change in selection of an I/O profile. According to one embodiment, the visual representations are rendered as cards. Different types of cards may be employed to render different types of available content. For example, web based content, may be rendered as a web card that associated with a mapping to web content. Some web cards map directly to web pages and in response to selection of the web card the computer device executes the mapping and displays a web view of the content. Other cards may be used to provide interactive displays selectable by a user. In another example, system operations are displayed as system cards, which are associated with mappings to system operations, for example communications configurations, and may comprise a settings card, among other system options. Another type of card includes a channel card configured to stream web based content in a manner that allows for summarization of content, while still providing the ability to fully appreciate the summarized content.

In one example, a streamlined hardware device provides for (in comparison to typical desktop and laptop systems) a reduced user input platform as a first I/O profile, comprising in one configuration a scroll wheel and a button interface. Other I/O profiles are available for user selection by manipulation of the device itself. In one embodiment, an easel mode presents the user with the first I/O profile and by rotating the computer device about a longitudinal axis; the user may select a second I/O profile, including a keyboard (e.g. laptop mode). The transition from one I/O profile to another may also cause the computer device to alter its display. In one example, the user interface provided to the user is responsive to selection of device mode and/or selection of I/O profile.

It is to be appreciated that reducing the number of I/O device achieves simplicity of design and ease of operation by the user, and at the same time may increase the complexity of the graphical user interfaces needed to support interaction with systems and third parties that anticipate, rely on, or expect additional I/O devices. Streamlining device operation by the user is balanced against sophistication of user the interface required to enable user interaction with the same features used with additional I/O devices. According to one embodiment, the user interface layer provides simplified accessibility based on the device's I/O platform, and for some embodiments, the user interface layer is responsive to device configurations that change the device's I/O capabilities. In other embodiments, the user interface is responsive to changes in the device's mode. In some examples, changes in device mode and changes I/O profile will occur together, however, in other examples a change in mode or a change in I/O profile will not require a corresponding change in profile or mode respectively.

Referring to FIG. 30, there is illustrated another configuration of the portable computer 100, referring to as the “flat” mode. In the flat mode, the display component 102 may be rotated (or opened) to approximately 180 degrees with respect to the base component 104, such that the base component and display component lay flat on a surface, with the keyboard 106 and display screen 110 exposed, as shown in FIG. 30. Unlike the easel and frame modes, in which the keyboard may be concealed and not easily accessible, in the flat mode, the keyboard is accessible and usable. In addition, as discussed above, the visual display on the display screen 110 may be automatically rotated to accommodate comfortable viewing of information by persons located in different positions relative to the base component 104 or display component 102. The visual display on the display screen 110 may also be manually adjusted by a user using, for example, the keyboard 106, touch pad 108 or mouse (not shown), scroll wheel 122 or navigation buttons (not shown). For example, if a user (located at position A) wishes to display information for a person located opposite the user (at position B), the visual display may be rotated (automatically or manually) 180 degrees such that the information appears “right-way-up,” to the person at location B, even through the display screen 110 is upside-down for that person. Similarly, in another example, the visual display may be rotated (automatically or manually) 90 degrees such that the information appears “right-way-up,” for a person at location C. In one example, a user can “toggle” the visual display among various orientations. For example, a user at location A may have the visual display facing themselves while using the keyboard 106 or other controls to change or access information on the display, then toggle the display orientation 180 or 90 degrees to display the information for persons at locations B or C.

According to another aspect, system and interface streamlining may be employed with devices of multiple configurations. In some embodiments, multiple configurations include a traditional configuration, for example, a configuration similar to a laptop device, and also include new configurations, for example, an easel mode. Some examples of streamlined devices have the ability to change between traditional configurations and other configurations. The change between configurations may change the I/O profile of the device and hence impact the user's interaction with the device itself and any content displayed on the device. In one embodiment, the user interface is responsive to changes in configuration. In another embodiment, the user interface is responsive to changes in I/O profile.

According to another aspect, the streamlining of the user's multi-media experience incorporates the device the user uses to interact with multi-media sources, whether the sources are on-line or provided by the device itself. Streamlining of the device includes developing consistent user interfaces for the user to access all features presented. The device's graphical user interface layer is customized to the I/O interfaces provided. In one example a device is provided in the form of a portable computer configurable between a laptop mode (in which the portable computer has a conventional laptop appearance) and an easel mode in which the base of the computer and its display component stand upright forming an inverted “V,” a closed mode, a laptop mode, an easel mode, a flat mode and a frame mode. According to one embodiment, each of the display modes may employ different I/O profiles.

In some embodiments, multiple configurations include a traditional configuration, for example, a configuration similar to a laptop device, and also include new configurations, for example, an easel mode. Some examples of streamlined devices have the ability to change between traditional configurations and other configurations. The change between configurations may change the I/O profile of the device and hence impact the user's interaction with the device itself and any content displayed on the device. In one embodiment, the user interface is responsive to changes in configuration. In another embodiment, the user interface is responsive to changes in I/O profile.

Referring again to FIG. 16, the computer system may include various system cards that map to computer functionality. Functionality mapped to by system cards may include, for example, a communications card, for configuring wireless access of the device, bookmarks for presenting conventional styled web page bookmarks, and a camera card for providing for configuration and operation of a camera, either embedded in the device upon construction, or incorporated through for example a USB port. According to one embodiment, a camera system card 1622 may provide a user with an easy way to get digital photographs and/or videos off their digital camera and stored safely in the cloud 330 with their online hosting service. The camera card may provide information and support during each stage of the process: before, during and after a digital camera is connected to the portable computer 100 and the content items uploaded to the cloud 330.

Digital cameras typically present themselves to computers as storage devices. In many cases, the portable computer 100 may not be able to distinguish between a digital camera, a memory card reader, a USB drive, or other attached storage devices. Therefore, according to one embodiment, the camera card treats all such devices in the same way. Thus, the camera card may support the upload of images and videos regardless of the type of devices on which they are stored. Accordingly, although the following discussion may refer primarily to a camera, the term “camera” is intended to be synonymous with digital camera, card reader, USB drive, or other attachable storage device.

According to one embodiment, when a camera is attached to the portable computer 100, the camera card becomes available in a channel view, where it displays images on the card using the slideshow lens. However, it will be appreciated that the camera card may also become available in the home view or another view, and may display the images using a lens and/or view other than the slideshow lens. When no camera is attached to the portable computer, the camera card may nonetheless be visible in the home view 310. Selecting the camera card may “open” the card into a “page view” (i.e., the card is viewed full screen) and may display instructions/information about connecting a camera to the portable computer 100. When a camera is first attached to the portable computer 100, the system may zoom into the camera card and present the user with several options. For example, the user may be able to upload all the images from the camera to the online photo hosting service, allowing the system to create default albums. Alternatively, the user can customize the upload by adjusting albums and selecting from multiple online services, as discussed further below. In another example, the user can simply view the images that are on the camera, without necessarily initiating an upload. In one embodiment, while photos and/or videos are being uploaded to the cloud 330, the user can continue to review images on the camera card. As discussed further below, the user may also see the upload progress both in the camera card and in the digital media card 1620 a. The presence of a camera attached to the portable computer need not constrain the user's access to the rest of the system. The user may simply navigate away from the camera card to interact normally with the portable computer and use its other functions.

Referring to FIG. 24, there is illustrated an example of a page view of a camera card 1622 showing an upload of images 2410 in progress. The camera card 1622 includes a header 2415 and a body 2420 in which the images 2410 are displayed. The header may include information that identifies the card 1622 as the camera card and, when a camera is connected to the portable computer 100, information 2425 that identifies the connected camera (e.g., a make/model of the camera). The header may also include status information 2430 that tells the user the current activity being performed by the camera card, for example, “saving new photos and/or videos.” The header may also include a “stop” control 2435 that allows the user to stop the saving/upload process, as well as a display control 2440 that allows the user to, for example, cause the camera card to display the images 2410 using the slideshow lens. In the body 2420, a status indicator 2445 may inform the user of the progress of the save/upload process. For example, the status indicator 2445 may tell the user that 34 of 70 content items have been processed and the save is 50% complete.

In one embodiment, clicking on an individual image 2410 on the camera card 1622, regardless of the stage of the upload process, may bring the user to the intermediate view, as shown in FIG. 25. The other images re-arrange themselves to form a horizontal line of images sorted by the date the items were taken with older items to the left. The intermediate view for the camera card 1622 is similar to the intermediate view for the digital media card 1620 a discussed above. In one example, in the intermediate view for the camera card 1622, the user options may include the ability to edit a caption for the selected image 2410 a by typing into the caption field 2450. The date field 2455 displays the date of the image underneath the caption area. In one example, if the user clicks on the date field 2455, it becomes editable, allowing the user to correct the date in case the camera does not have the correct date, as discussed above. If the user corrects the date and saves the changes, the system may then prompt the user to see whether it should change the dates for the rest of the contents of the camera by the same offset. The intermediate view of the camera card 1622 may also include a rotate option 2460 which may allow the user to rotate the image 2410, as also discussed above. In one example, each click on the rotate button 2460 rotates the image (either clockwise or anti-clockwise) by 90 degrees, and the user may thus click as many times as necessary to rotate the image by the desired amount. A delete option 2465 deletes the item from the camera card, after prompting the user to confirm the delete. As in intermediate view in the digital media application, the user can navigate between photos and videos by clicking on the left or right navigation bars 2470, or by using the arrow keys or other controls as would be recognized by those skilled in the art. In one example, clicking anywhere on the image 2410 shows the image full-screen. The header 2415 may also include controls for deleting items (control 2475), creating a new album (control 2480) and saving (control 2485), each of which is discussed further below.

When no camera is connected to the portable computer 100, or when the system does not see a camera, it may be in one of two states: normal or interrupted upload (discussed below). According to one embodiment, in the normal state, the camera card 1622 on the home view 310 displays a generic camera image, and selecting the camera card may display some helpful information about how to connect a camera to the portable computer, as discussed above. By placing the camera card on the home view 310, even when no camera is connected, the capabilities of the camera card application are highlighted. For example, a user, upon seeing the camera card, may be reminded to connect a camera to the portable computer, making it more likely that the user will use the portable computer for managing digital media content items.

According to one embodiment, when a user attaches a camera to the portable computer 100, the user sees an animation of the system going to the home view 310, scrolling as necessary to the page containing the camera card 1622 (which may show thumbnails of the content of the camera), then zooming into the camera card. In one example, if the user has already selected the camera card and is viewing the camera card in the page view prior to connecting the camera, this animation may not show. Once in the page view for the camera card, the user can see the contents of the attached camera, and may be given options for what can be done with the content on the camera. These options may be displayed, for example, in a bubble that appears over the line of images 2410. In one example, the options include a simple save and an advanced save. The simple save option may save the contents of the camera card to the user's online photo hosting service with automatically created albums. If the user has registered more than one online hosting service, the user may select the desired service from a drop-down menu. The advanced save option provides the user with the opportunity to manipulate the automatically saved sets, delete photos, and/or save photos to multiple online hosting services, as discussed further below.

In the page view, as shown for example in FIG. 24, the user can interact with the images on the camera. This interaction may be similar to interacting with digital content items in the time view or album view discussed above. As discussed above, the user is free to interact normally with the entire system even when a camera is attached, and is not required to first complete any action associated with the camera card. For example, if the user returns to the home view 310 without initiating an upload of images, the camera card 1622 shows thumbnails 2620 of the images on the attached camera, as shown for example in FIG. 26. The header 2415 of the camera card may also display the number 2610 of new content items on the camera.

According to one embodiment, once a user has connected a camera to the portable computer 100 and is brought to the camera card, the user may rely on the system to create albums by selecting the simple save option. The upload process then begins, as discussed further below, using automatically-generated albums and saving images to the user's registered online photo hosting service. If there is more than one photo hosting service associated with the portable computer, the simple save option may default to the service that was used during the last upload. Some existing photo hosting services do not support video content. Accordingly, the portable computer may provide video storage services, either locally or through the cloud 330. Accordingly, users may have more than one service associated with the portable computer 100; however, the difference between the photo hosting service and the video hosting service may be seamlessly transparent to the user. In one example, in the simple save mode, by default, “delete items from the camera when they are safe” is checked. If a user prefers to leave the images on the camera, the user can uncheck this box before initiating the simple save option.

As discussed above, in one embodiment, the system may save the user time and effort by automatically organizing digital content items, including photos and videos, into albums. In one example, albums are created by date, with photos and videos taken on the same day going into a single album. If a set of photos are close in time (e.g., are taken within 90 minutes or so of each other) but span two days, the album may span those two days as well. For example, it may not be uncommon to see images taken just before and just after midnight on New Year's Day, and these images may be grouped into a single album. In one example, automatically generated albums may not contain fewer than a predetermined number of images, for example, five images. In the case that fewer than five photos for a single date are on the camera (or if there are fewer than 5 photos total on the camera), the photos may appear in the unsorted photos area discussed below. In one example, the default name of the automatically generated album is the date (or date range) on which the content items were taken.

As discussed above, an alternative to the simple save option is the advanced save option. Selecting the advanced save option may bring the user to a “choose & organize” screen, an example of which is illustrated in FIG. 27. From the “choose & organize” screen, the user may organize digital content items before uploading them. Referring to FIG. 27, in one example, the “choose & organize” screen has four main areas, namely, albums 2710 which may appear at the top of the list and comprise automatically generated albums and/or albums that the user creates manually; unsorted photos 2715, videos 2720; and previously uploaded content 2725 which may appears at the end of the list. The “choose & organize” screen may also display a new content indicator 2730 which tells the user the number of new photos and videos on the camera. In one embodiment, automatically generated albums (discussed further below) are arranged in chronological order starting with the newest album at top. It is to be appreciated that although only one album 2710 is shown in FIG. 27, the “choose & organize” screen may display any number of albums. A scroll bar (not shown) may be used to scroll up and down the page if there are more albums than can be displayed at one time on the screen. In one example, if the user corrects the date of items in an automatically generated album, the album date may update to reflect the change, and the order of the albums in the list may be automatically updated. Each album 2710 includes an album title 2735 and thumbnails 2740 of the content items included in the album. When the user hovers over any part of an album 2710, that album may become active. When an album 2710 is active, the album title 2735 becomes an editable field, and a “dissolve album” button (not shown) is revealed. In one example, clicking the “dissolve album” button causes all the photos from that album to be placed into the unsorted photos area 2715.

According to one embodiment, “unsorted photos” (i.e., those not associated with an album) are displayed in the unsorted photos area 2715. The unsorted photos area 2715 includes a header 2745 identifying the area to the user, and also includes thumbnails 2740 of all items included in the unsorted photos area. In one example, when the camera is first attached, the unsorted photos area 2715 may be empty. A user can drag individual photos out of albums 2710 into the unsorted photos area 2715. As discussed above, a user can also click the “dissolve album” button (not shown) on an album 2710, thereby sending all the photos in that album to the unsorted photos area 2715. The user can also drag photos from the unsorted photos area 2715 into an album 2710. The videos area 2720 may similarly include a header 2745 identifying the area to a user, and thumbnails 2740 of an image of each video.

In one embodiment, if a user clicks the “new album” control button 2480 in the header 2415, a new album is added to the top of the list, pushing other albums down. When the new album appears, the title 2735 of the album may be pre-populated with “new album,” but this title may also be selected/active so that the user can simply start typing to replace it. The user can then drag individual photos from other albums or from the unsorted photos area 2715 into the new album. The new album control 2480 may also be selected from the intermediate view, as shown in FIG. 25.

From the “choose & organize” screen a user may also delete items, such as, for example, out-of-focus or unflattering photos. In one example, the camera card supports batch deletion. This process may also provide the user with a safety net, making it more difficult to delete a content item by accident. In one example, when the user hovers over an individual thumbnail 2740, a check box labeled “delete” (or similar language) appears, and once the user checks the box, the image dims. The check box (without the “delete” label) may remain visible after it is checked, even if the user moves the cursor away from the item, making it very visually clear how to reverse the action. Un-checking the box may return the item to full saturation. When the user marks one or more items for deletion, the control buttons 2480 and 2485 in the header 2415 may be replaced with an “unmark all” option. The “delete all” control 2475 may remain or be replaced with “delete marked items.” If user selects the “unmark all” control, all the items marked for deletion are unmarked. Selecting the delete control 2475 deletes the marked items and the thumbnails 2740 are removed from view. The remaining thumbnails 2740 may then rearrange themselves appropriately. The user can also delete items from the intermediate view shown in FIG. 24. In some cases, the camera (or other media device) that the user connects to the portable computer 100 may be locked or otherwise write-protected, making deletion impossible. In this case, the delete buttons (in the header 2415 and overlayed onto the thumbnails 2740) are dimmed, and information may be included in the header 2415 that indicates that the camera is locked. In this state, if the user hovers over the dimmed “delete all” button 2475 in the header 2415, a message may be displayed, such as “no deletion possible because the memory card is locked.”

Still referring to FIG. 27, the user may move digital content items among different albums 2710 and to and from the unsorted photos area 2715. For example, the user can drag photos between albums 2710, from albums 2710 to the unsorted photos area 2715, or from the unsorted photos area into albums. When the user drags a photo, other thumbnails 2740 on the screen rearrange themselves to accommodate the added/removed item. In one example, because videos are saved separately from photos, the user may not be able to drag videos from the video area 2720 into albums 2710. Similarly, the user may not drag a photo into the video area 2720. In one example, if the user attempts to drags a photo to an unavailable location (such as the videos area 2720 or previously uploaded items area 2725), the photo snaps back to its original location.

In one embodiment, if the user has previously uploaded items from a camera, but elected not to delete them, they appear in the “previously saved” area 2725. If there are no items that have been previously uploaded from the user's camera, the previously saved area 2725 may not appear. The previously saved area 2725 includes a header 2750 which identifies the area to the user, and may also display the number of previously uploaded content items that are on the camera. The previously saved area 2725 may initially not display thumbnails of the items, but instead display a “show items” button 2755. Clicking the “show items” button 2755 may reveal thumbnails of the previously uploaded items. The user may then select individual items to delete, or may drag photos from this area into albums 2710 or drag videos to the videos area 2720. If the user drags an item to an album 2710, the underlying behavior of the system on upload depends on the associated online photo hosting service. For services that use an “image stream” concept and therefore allow individual images to appear in multiple albums (e.g., FLICKR), the image may be added to the album using the camera card interface, but not uploaded again. For other services, the image may be uploaded again into the new album.

According to one embodiment, clicking on a thumbnail 2740 brings the user to the intermediate view, shown, for example, in FIG. 25. Clicking anywhere in the background may return the user to the standard view of the “choose & organize” screen. When the user has organized the digital content items to his/her satisfaction, the user may click the “save . . . ” control 2485 in the header 2415. In one example, clicking the save control 2485 causes a modal page bubble 2810 to appear, providing the user with options for saving, as shown in FIG. 28. The user may elect to save or not save each individual album, as well as unsorted photos and videos using the check boxes 2815. In the illustrated example, a check box is included with each column header to allow the user to quickly select all items in that column. If the user has registered more than one photo or video host service, a column may be provided for each service, identified by name. The user may then elect to save each individual album to one, all, or none of the services, using the appropriate check boxes. In one example, the system warns the user about potential restrictions a photo host service may place on videos (e.g., size, format, etc.), allowing the user to use that information in selecting where the videos are to be saved. A check box 2830 may be provided to given the user the option of whether or not the system will delete items from the attached camera after the items have been safely uploaded. In one example, deleting the items upon successful upload is selected by default. If the user does not select a service for a set of items (e.g., one or more albums, unsorted photos, or videos), the system will leave those items—they will not be uploaded, but they will also not be deleted from the camera. In this case, the information about the album (e.g., its contents and title) may be retained until the camera is disconnected from the portable computer. Thus, once the upload process for the rest of the items is complete and the user returns to the “choose & organize” screen, the album is still as the user arranged it. The bubble 2810 may further include a “cancel” button 2840 to allow the user the cancel the upload and return to the “choose & organize” screen, and a “save” button 2850 to initiate the upload process.

According to one embodiment, once the user initiates the upload process, by selecting either the simple save or advanced save option, the portable computer 100 begins uploading the digital content items to the cloud 330. As discussed above, the user may see the progress of the upload on the camera card. The user may also upload digital content items from within the digital media card 1620 a. For example, the user may use the time view or album view to locate content items to upload, for example, to a social networking site or another online hosting service. In one example, the upload may be initiated from the user's pick list discussed above. Whether the upload is initiated from the camera card or the digital media card, the user may see information regarding the status of the upload, for example, whether each content item has been saved, how much progress has been made on the upload, which online hosting service the content item is being uploaded to, etc. In one example, during upload, the camera card displays the images being uploaded, with the current image shown enlarged. In one example, the user can interact with the images during the upload process. This interaction may behave similarly to the single album view in the digital media application discussed above.

In one example, all content uploaded on the user's behalf may be marked as “private” or the equivalent on their photo hosting service. This default behavior protects the user's privacy and keeps others from viewing the user's content without the user's permission. It is to be appreciated; however, that other default options may be implemented, and the user may be prompted to identify content as private or public, or equivalents thereof.

According to one embodiment, if the user has elected to have images deleted from the camera after upload, then each content item is deleted as soon as it is uploaded into the cloud 330. In one example, the user can still see the content items in the context of the camera card, however, until the camera is disconnected from the portable computer 100. Referring to FIG. 24, in one example, if the user clicks the “Stop saving” button 2435 in the header 2415, the upload stops and the system then returns the user to the initial screen as though the camera had just been attached. In this instance, content items that have already been uploaded and deleted from the camera are no longer included. The content item that was in process when the user clicked the “Stop saving” button 2435 will not have been deleted from the camera yet and may therefore appear. In another example, if the user had elected not to delete content items from the camera (e.g., by unchecking box 2830, content items that have already been uploaded may appear in the previously saved area 2725.

Once the upload is complete (i.e. the digital content items are safely stored in the cloud 330), the system may display an informational bubble letting the user know it is safe to remove the camera. The user may then be returned to the camera card page view (if the simple save option was used) or to the “choose & organize” screen if the advanced save option was used. In either case, the system recognizes that the content items have been uploaded. If the content items have been deleted from the camera, they no longer appear in “choose & organize” screen, and if they have been left on the camera they appear in the previously saved area 2725. Once the camera is disconnected, or the user navigates away from the camera card after an upload, the newly uploaded content items may become indistinguishable from previously stored items in the digital media library.

In some instances, the upload process may be interrupted before it is complete. For example, the camera may run out of power, the portable computer may lose its connection to the cloud, or the user may disconnect the camera before the upload is complete. In one example, in the event of an interrupted upload, the camera card displays a warning and information about the state of the upload and/or camera. From the page view of the camera card, the user may elect to stop the upload or cancel the message, returning the system to the “no camera connected” state. In one example, if the user elected to stop the upload and subsequently reconnects the camera, the camera card will behave as though it were the first time that camera is being connected. Alternatively, if the user elected instead to cancel the “saving interrupted” message, the camera card may resume uploading the digital content items the next time the user connects the camera. If the user has taken some new photos during the time when the camera was disconnected and then reconnected, the new photos may be automatically uploaded when the camera is reconnected. Alternatively, the use may be given the option to upload the new photos or not, or may navigate to the “choose & organize” screen to select certain photos for upload. Any digital content items not uploaded may remain on the camera and be treated as new photos the next time the camera is connected to the portable computer.

As discussed above, in one embodiment the portable computer 100 is configurable into an easel mode. One example of the camera card behavior when a camera is connected to the portable computer in the easel mode is shown in diagrammatic form in FIG. 29. In this example, the camera card becomes the current channel 2910 and a camera menu 2920 is displayed to give the user the opportunity to save the contents of the camera (2930) or view the contents as a slideshow (2940). In one example, the save behavior is similar to the simple save behavior discussed above in that the system may save new items using automatically generated albums. In another example, if the user elects to save the contents of the camera, the upload begins. In one example, each content item is shown in full screen as it uploads, with an indication of its progress. In one example, the portable computer will not enter the screensaver mode during an upload. As in other examples discussed above, the user may continue to interact with the system during the upload. For example, the user may view other channels, and can navigate back to the camera card channel to view the progress of the upload. Once the upload is complete, a notification may be displayed to the effect that it is safe to disconnect the camera. In one example, this notification remains as long as the camera is still attached to the portable computer, but may be displayed in a corner or other unobtrusive location. In one example, when the user disconnects the camera, the camera card is no longer available as a channel. According to one embodiment, if an upload has been interrupted and the user reconnects the camera to the portable computer in the easel mode, the upload resumes in the background without notification. If there are no new images on the camera, the user may only be given the option to see a slideshow of the images on the camera.

Having thus described several aspects of at least one embodiment, it is to be appreciated various alterations, modifications, and improvements will readily occur to those skilled in the art. Such alterations, modifications, and improvements are intended to be part of this disclosure and are intended to be within the scope of the invention. Accordingly, the foregoing description and drawings are by way of example only, and the scope of the invention should be determined from proper construction of the appended claims, and their equivalents.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A method for accessing and managing digital media libraries on a streamlined computing device with a plurality of selectable I/O profiles, the method comprising:
displaying a graphical user interface on a computing device, wherein the graphical user interface comprises at least a plurality of views of digital media content;
providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile;
providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to activation of a view selector component configured to permit a user to select one of the plurality of views;
associating at least one of a plurality of visual representations with digital media content;
executing the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with digital media content in response to selection;
transitioning a display on the computing device to a view of the digital media content in response to the act of executing the association; and
providing for display of user digital media content and referenced digital media content in the view of the digital media content wherein the act of providing for transition between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile includes:
permitting the user to rotate a display component about a longitudinal axis running along an interface between the display component and a base of the streamlined computing device;
wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis up to approximately 180 degrees from a closed mode configures the streamlined computing device into a laptop mode with one of the plurality of views as a default display; and
wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis beyond approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the streamlined computing device into an easel mode with another one of the plurality of views as a default display.
2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the view comprises at least one of an album view and a timeline view.
3. The method according to claim 2, further comprising an act of displaying digital media content in a body portion of the view.
4. The method according to claim 2, further comprising an act of displaying a toggle element in a header portion of the view, wherein the toggle element transitions the computing device display between the album view and the timeline view upon selection by a user.
5. The method according to claim 2, further comprising acts of:
displaying emulation controls responsive to selection by the user; and
emulating standard computer operations for referenced digital media content displayed in the view, wherein the act of emulating standard computer operations includes:
an act of determining if the user has authority to perform the standard computer operations,
determining the user does not have the authority to perform the standard computer operation on a source of the referenced digital media content, and wherein the act of displaying the emulation controls occurs in response to the determination that the user does not have the authority.
6. The method according to claim 5, wherein the standard computer operation includes an act of deleting digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of altering the view of the digital media content so the digital media content marked for deletion is not displayed within the view.
7. The method according to claim 6, further comprising an act of generating a state entry, associated with at least one of the view and the source of the referenced digital media content.
8. The method according to claim 7, further comprising acts of:
accessing any state entry for at least one of the view and the source of referenced digital media content; and
displaying referenced digital media content according to any state entry requirement.
9. The method according to claim 5, wherein the standard computer operation includes an act of editing referenced digital media content, and the method further comprises an act of generating a state entry reflecting any edits made to the referenced digital media content.
10. The method according to claim 2, further comprising acts of:
providing an aggregation component configured to permit the user to select a plurality of digital media content;
displaying the plurality of digital media content in the body of the view; and
permitting the user to perform operations on the plurality of digital media content.
11. The method according to claim 10, wherein the at least one operation is a share operation, and the method further comprises acts of:
identifying any state entries for the plurality of digital media content;
identifying any remote service settings for the plurality of digital media content; and
transmitting a visual representation associated with the plurality of digital media content, any state settings, and any remote service settings to another streamlined device user.
12. The method according to claim 2, wherein the view is a time view and the method further comprises:
displaying a timeline navigation control in the body of the view, wherein the timeline navigation control is configured to provide organization segments, the organization segments providing a visual indication of a number of digital media content items in each segment.
13. The method according to claim 12, wherein the timeline navigation control further comprises a handle responsive to a pointer displayed on the computer device, wherein the handle is further responsive to select and drag operations.
14. A system for accessing and managing digital media libraries with a plurality of selectable I/O profiles, the system comprising:
a display component configured to display a graphical user interface, wherein the graphical user interface comprises at least a plurality of views of digital media content, wherein the plurality of views include at least one of a plurality of visual representations;
an execution component configured to transition the graphical user interface between the plurality of views in response to selection of an I/O profile;
a view selector component configured to transition between the plurality of views in response to activation;
a storage component configured to store an association between at least one of a plurality of visual representations and digital media content;
wherein the execution component is further configured to execute the association with the at least one of the plurality of visual representations with digital media content in response to selection and transition the display to a view of the digital media content in response to the act of executing the association, and wherein the execution component is further configured to permit a user to rotate the display component about a longitudinal axis running along an interface between the display component and a base of the system, wherein the rotating of the display component about a longitudinal axis up to approximately 180 degrees from a closed mode configures the portable computer into a laptop mode with one of the plurality of views as a default display and wherein rotating the display component about the longitudinal axis beyond approximately 180 degrees from the closed mode configures the portable computer into an mode with another one of the plurality of views as a default display; and
wherein the display component is configured to display user digital media content and referenced digital media content in the view of the digital media content.
15. The system according to claim 14, wherein the display component is configured to display at least an album view and a timeline view and wherein the display component is further configured to display options for selecting the album view and the timeline view in a user interface.
16. The system according to claim 15, wherein the display component is further configured to displaying a toggle element in a header portion of the view, wherein the toggle element transitions the computing device display between the album view and the timeline view upon selection by a user.
17. The method according to claim 16, wherein the display component is further configured to generate the view to include the header portion at the top of a display and body portion in the lower portion of the display wherein the display component is configured to present the digital media content in the body portion of the view.
18. The system according to claim 14, wherein the display component is further configured to:
display emulation controls responsive to selection by the user; and
emulate standard computer operations for referenced digital media content displayed in the view, wherein emulating standard computer operations includes executing operations to:
determine if the user has authority to perform the standard computer operations,
determine the user does not have the authority to perform the standard computer operation on a source of the referenced digital media content, and wherein the act of displaying the emulation controls occurs in response to the determination that the user does not have the authority.
19. The system according to claim 18, further comprising an act of generating a state entry, associated with at least one of the view and the source of the referenced digital media content.
20. The system according to claim 19, further comprising acts of:
accessing any state entry for at least one of the view and the source of referenced digital media content; and
displaying referenced digital media content according to any state entry requirement.
US14/108,576 2008-04-01 2013-12-17 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content Active 2028-12-08 US9495070B2 (en)

Priority Applications (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US4136508P true 2008-04-01 2008-04-01
US12/170,951 US8624844B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2008-07-10 Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US12/170,939 US8289688B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2008-07-10 Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US12/416,479 US20090322790A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-04-01 System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US12/611,282 US8612888B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-11-03 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US14/108,576 US9495070B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-12-17 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/108,576 US9495070B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-12-17 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US15/280,928 US20170090699A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2016-09-29 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/611,282 Continuation US8612888B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-11-03 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15/280,928 Continuation US20170090699A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2016-09-29 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140282263A1 US20140282263A1 (en) 2014-09-18
US9495070B2 true US9495070B2 (en) 2016-11-15

Family

ID=42312510

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/611,282 Active 2031-02-02 US8612888B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-11-03 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US14/108,576 Active 2028-12-08 US9495070B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-12-17 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US15/280,928 Pending US20170090699A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2016-09-29 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/611,282 Active 2031-02-02 US8612888B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-11-03 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15/280,928 Pending US20170090699A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2016-09-29 Method and apparatus for managing digital media content

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US8612888B2 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9880715B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2018-01-30 Litl Llc System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US9927835B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2018-03-27 Litl Llc Portable computer with multiple display configurations

Families Citing this family (144)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8655309B2 (en) 2003-11-14 2014-02-18 E2Interactive, Inc. Systems and methods for electronic device point-of-sale activation
JP5137188B2 (en) * 2008-02-08 2013-02-06 アルパイン株式会社 Information retrieval method and apparatus
US20090204885A1 (en) * 2008-02-13 2009-08-13 Ellsworth Thomas N Automated management and publication of electronic content from mobile nodes
US8612888B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-12-17 Litl, Llc Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US8577957B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-11-05 Litl Llc System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US8074173B2 (en) * 2008-05-08 2011-12-06 Microsoft Corporation Associating input with computer based content
US8904306B1 (en) * 2008-06-12 2014-12-02 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Variable speed scrolling
US8108777B2 (en) 2008-08-11 2012-01-31 Microsoft Corporation Sections of a presentation having user-definable properties
US10127524B2 (en) 2009-05-26 2018-11-13 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Shared collaboration canvas
JP4727755B2 (en) * 2009-10-06 2011-07-20 シャープ株式会社 Electronic document processing apparatus, electronic document display apparatus, electronic document processing method, electronic document processing program, and recording medium
US20110119578A1 (en) * 2009-11-17 2011-05-19 Schwartz Michael U Method of scrolling items on a touch screen user interface
US20110138306A1 (en) * 2009-12-03 2011-06-09 Cbs Interactive, Inc. Online interactive digital content scrapbook and time machine
AU2009251137B2 (en) * 2009-12-23 2013-04-11 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method for Arranging Images in electronic documents on small devices
US8707048B2 (en) * 2009-12-24 2014-04-22 Ebay Inc. Dynamic pattern insertion layer
US9460068B2 (en) * 2010-02-03 2016-10-04 Google Inc. Narrative-based media organizing system for transforming and merging graphical representations of digital media within a work area
US9053472B2 (en) * 2010-02-26 2015-06-09 Red Hat, Inc. Offering additional license terms during conversion of standard software licenses for use in cloud computing environments
US20110213719A1 (en) * 2010-02-26 2011-09-01 James Michael Ferris Methods and systems for converting standard software licenses for use in cloud computing environments
FR2958425B1 (en) * 2010-03-31 2012-06-08 Valeo Systemes Thermiques Human-machine interface with smooth superior surface
US20110258556A1 (en) * 2010-04-16 2011-10-20 Microsoft Corporation Social home page
US8938753B2 (en) 2010-05-12 2015-01-20 Litl Llc Configurable computer system
US9436219B2 (en) 2010-05-12 2016-09-06 Litl Llc Remote control to operate computer system
US10068287B2 (en) 2010-06-11 2018-09-04 David A. Nelsen Systems and methods to manage and control use of a virtual card
US9185326B2 (en) 2010-06-11 2015-11-10 Disney Enterprises, Inc. System and method enabling visual filtering of content
JP5462094B2 (en) * 2010-07-07 2014-04-02 株式会社ソニー・コンピュータエンタテインメント Image processing apparatus and image processing method
WO2012011635A1 (en) * 2010-07-20 2012-01-26 Lg Electronics Inc. Computing device and displaying method at the computing device
US8694686B2 (en) 2010-07-20 2014-04-08 Lg Electronics Inc. User profile based configuration of user experience environment
US8667112B2 (en) 2010-07-20 2014-03-04 Lg Electronics Inc. Selective interaction between networked smart devices
WO2012011639A1 (en) 2010-07-20 2012-01-26 Lg Electronics Inc. Electronic device, electronic system, and method of providing information using the same
CN101944021B (en) * 2010-08-30 2014-01-08 田文清 Method and system for realizing graphical user interface
US9396464B2 (en) * 2010-09-14 2016-07-19 Ncr Corporation Updating multi-media content in a digital download kiosk
US20120068940A1 (en) * 2010-09-20 2012-03-22 Pixart Imaging Inc. Electronic device
EP2442237A3 (en) * 2010-09-27 2012-05-09 Research In Motion Limited Actionable media items
US20120096369A1 (en) * 2010-10-19 2012-04-19 ClearCare, Inc. Automatically displaying photos uploaded remotely to a digital picture frame
US20120102403A1 (en) 2010-10-22 2012-04-26 Robert Sanford Havoc Pennington Video integration
US9292149B2 (en) 2010-10-22 2016-03-22 Litl Llc Method and apparatus for public computing
US10127697B2 (en) * 2010-10-28 2018-11-13 Kodak Alaris Inc. Imaging product selection system
US20120110453A1 (en) * 2010-10-29 2012-05-03 Microsoft Corporation Display of Image Search Results
US8676891B2 (en) 2010-11-01 2014-03-18 Google Inc. Visibility inspector in social networks
US8595062B2 (en) * 2010-11-15 2013-11-26 Nintendo Of America Inc. Systems and/or methods for fraud detection in award point programs
US9454341B2 (en) * 2010-11-18 2016-09-27 Kodak Alaris Inc. Digital image display device with automatically adjusted image display durations
US20120151397A1 (en) * 2010-12-08 2012-06-14 Tavendo Gmbh Access to an electronic object collection via a plurality of views
US20120151341A1 (en) * 2010-12-10 2012-06-14 Ko Steve S Interactive Screen Saver Method and Apparatus
US9864612B2 (en) 2010-12-23 2018-01-09 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Techniques to customize a user interface for different displays
JP5736933B2 (en) * 2011-04-21 2015-06-17 ソニー株式会社 Electronic device, control method thereof, and program
US8904289B2 (en) * 2011-04-21 2014-12-02 Touchstream Technologies, Inc. Play control of content on a display device
USD817979S1 (en) * 2011-04-25 2018-05-15 Sony Corporation Display panel or screen with graphical user interface
US9557885B2 (en) 2011-08-09 2017-01-31 Gopro, Inc. Digital media editing
US20130073705A1 (en) * 2011-09-20 2013-03-21 Honeywell International Inc. Managing a home area network
US8682973B2 (en) 2011-10-05 2014-03-25 Microsoft Corporation Multi-user and multi-device collaboration
US9544158B2 (en) 2011-10-05 2017-01-10 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Workspace collaboration via a wall-type computing device
US9996241B2 (en) * 2011-10-11 2018-06-12 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Interactive visualization of multiple software functionality content items
US10198485B2 (en) 2011-10-13 2019-02-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Authoring of data visualizations and maps
US8875051B2 (en) 2011-12-08 2014-10-28 Microsoft Corporation Dynamic navigation bar for expanded communication service
US9645724B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2017-05-09 Facebook, Inc. Timeline based content organization
US9235317B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2016-01-12 Facebook, Inc. Summary and navigation of hierarchical levels
US9557876B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2017-01-31 Facebook, Inc. Hierarchical user interface
USD790566S1 (en) 2012-04-24 2017-06-27 Google Inc. Display panel with animated graphical user interface
USD791152S1 (en) * 2012-04-24 2017-07-04 Google Inc. Display screen with graphical user interface
USD782508S1 (en) 2012-04-24 2017-03-28 Google Inc. Display screen with animated graphical user interface
TW201346704A (en) * 2012-05-03 2013-11-16 Infopower Corp Method for switching display interfaces
US20130300697A1 (en) * 2012-05-14 2013-11-14 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Method and apparatus for operating functions of portable terminal having bended display
USD742905S1 (en) * 2012-05-25 2015-11-10 Maria Francisca Jones Display panel with graphical user interface
USD742904S1 (en) * 2012-05-25 2015-11-10 Maria Francisca Jones Display panel with graphical user interface
USD727342S1 (en) * 2012-06-05 2015-04-21 P&W Solutions Co., Ltd. Display screen with graphical user interface
US20130332526A1 (en) * 2012-06-10 2013-12-12 Apple Inc. Creating and sharing image streams
US9207840B2 (en) * 2012-07-06 2015-12-08 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for modifying a scrollbar handle according to characteristics of displayed items being scrolled
US9092455B2 (en) 2012-07-17 2015-07-28 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Image curation
TWI486794B (en) * 2012-07-27 2015-06-01 Wistron Corp Video previewing methods and systems for providing preview of a video to be played and computer program products thereof
USD723057S1 (en) 2012-08-07 2015-02-24 Microsoft Corporation Display screen with animated graphical user interface
US9836548B2 (en) 2012-08-31 2017-12-05 Blackberry Limited Migration of tags across entities in management of personal electronically encoded items
WO2014056122A1 (en) * 2012-10-08 2014-04-17 Intel Corporation Method, apparatus and system of screenshot grabbing and sharing
USD746838S1 (en) * 2012-11-06 2016-01-05 Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. Display panel or screen with a graphical user interface
USD755211S1 (en) * 2012-11-28 2016-05-03 Lg Electronics Inc. Display screen with graphical user interface
US9128977B2 (en) * 2012-12-21 2015-09-08 Dropbox, Inc. Enhancing event summaries of synced online content management system interactions
US9128932B2 (en) * 2012-12-21 2015-09-08 Dropbox, Inc. Condensing event markers
AU350141S (en) 2013-01-04 2013-08-13 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Display Screen For An Electronic Device
USD734355S1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2015-07-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable electronic device with graphical user interface
USD741896S1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2015-10-27 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD741356S1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2015-10-20 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
AU350316S (en) * 2013-01-04 2013-08-23 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Display Screen For An Electronic Device
USD772253S1 (en) * 2013-02-19 2016-11-22 Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. Display panel or screen with an animated graphical user interface
US20140280303A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Rhapsody International Inc. Replacing equivalent content items
US20140282146A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Use of perspective to improve visual information density
JP6115256B2 (en) * 2013-03-29 2017-04-19 ブラザー工業株式会社 Image display control device, image display control method, and image display control program
USD757065S1 (en) * 2013-06-05 2016-05-24 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD758417S1 (en) * 2013-06-10 2016-06-07 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
US9514331B2 (en) * 2013-07-03 2016-12-06 Facebook, Inc. Privacy model for shared collections of content on a social networking system
CA152536S (en) * 2013-08-14 2014-03-31 Sony Computer Entertainment Inc Display screen
USD736811S1 (en) * 2013-08-19 2015-08-18 Barktech, LLC Display screen with graphical user interface
USD766253S1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2016-09-13 Google Inc. Display panel or portion thereof with a graphical user interface component
USD752079S1 (en) * 2013-10-15 2016-03-22 Deere & Company Display screen with graphical user interface
US20150142684A1 (en) * 2013-10-31 2015-05-21 Chong Y. Ng Social Networking Software Application with Identify Verification, Minor Sponsorship, Photography Management, and Image Editing Features
WO2015081805A1 (en) * 2013-12-02 2015-06-11 乐视致新电子科技(天津)有限公司 Television, and method and device for processing a play record thereof
USD772278S1 (en) * 2013-12-18 2016-11-22 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD754171S1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2016-04-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD755202S1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2016-05-03 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD754678S1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2016-04-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
JP2015156187A (en) * 2014-02-21 2015-08-27 ソニー株式会社 Information processing apparatus, system, information processing method, and program
US10366140B2 (en) * 2014-03-26 2019-07-30 Lead Intelligence, Inc. Method for replaying user activity by rebuilding a webpage capturing content at each web event
USD773498S1 (en) * 2014-04-30 2016-12-06 Yahoo! Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with a graphical user interface
US9830388B2 (en) 2014-04-30 2017-11-28 Excalibur Ip, Llc Modular search object framework
US9535945B2 (en) 2014-04-30 2017-01-03 Excalibur Ip, Llc Intent based search results associated with a modular search object framework
USD773497S1 (en) * 2014-04-30 2016-12-06 Yahoo! Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with a graphical user interface
USD776140S1 (en) 2014-04-30 2017-01-10 Yahoo! Inc. Display screen with graphical user interface for displaying search results as a stack of overlapping, actionable cards
USD781873S1 (en) * 2014-05-01 2017-03-21 Shanghai Holaverse Network Technology Co. Ltd. Display screen with an animated graphical user interface
USD760275S1 (en) * 2014-06-11 2016-06-28 Le Shi Zhi Xin Electronic Technology (Tianjin) Limited Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
US10423703B1 (en) * 2014-06-26 2019-09-24 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Detection and rendering of endnotes in digital content
US10324733B2 (en) 2014-07-30 2019-06-18 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Shutdown notifications
US9787576B2 (en) 2014-07-31 2017-10-10 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Propagating routing awareness for autonomous networks
US9836464B2 (en) 2014-07-31 2017-12-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Curating media from social connections
US10254942B2 (en) 2014-07-31 2019-04-09 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Adaptive sizing and positioning of application windows
US9414417B2 (en) 2014-08-07 2016-08-09 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Propagating communication awareness over a cellular network
USD794647S1 (en) * 2014-11-21 2017-08-15 General Electric Company Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD760263S1 (en) * 2014-12-16 2016-06-28 Jenny Q. Ta Display screen with graphical user interface
USD776713S1 (en) * 2014-12-17 2017-01-17 Rgi Informatics, Llc Display device with a timeline graphical user interface
US20160234267A1 (en) * 2015-02-06 2016-08-11 Adobe Systems Incorporated Sharing digital content using an interactive send service system
US10348656B2 (en) * 2015-02-06 2019-07-09 Jamdeo Canada Ltd. Methods and devices for display device notifications and key handling
USD803230S1 (en) * 2015-02-20 2017-11-21 Google Inc. Portion of a display panel with a graphical user interface
KR101736401B1 (en) * 2015-03-18 2017-05-16 네이버 주식회사 Data providing method and data providing device
USD796541S1 (en) * 2015-04-12 2017-09-05 Adp, Llc Display screen with graphical user interface
USD768680S1 (en) * 2015-04-24 2016-10-11 Layer3 TV, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with a graphical user interface
USD777755S1 (en) * 2015-05-22 2017-01-31 RedCritter, Corp. Display screen with animated graphical user interface
USD779544S1 (en) * 2015-05-27 2017-02-21 Gamblit Gaming, Llc Display screen with graphical user interface
US9792953B2 (en) * 2015-07-23 2017-10-17 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and control method for the same
US10311620B1 (en) * 2015-07-29 2019-06-04 Mike Schmitt System and method for creating multi-sided digital images
US10198144B2 (en) * 2015-08-28 2019-02-05 Google Llc Multidimensional navigation
US9741148B2 (en) 2015-09-24 2017-08-22 Unity IPR ApS Onion skin animation platform and time bar tool
JP2019508784A (en) * 2015-12-29 2019-03-28 ホアウェイ・テクノロジーズ・カンパニー・リミテッド Multimedia file management method, electronic device and graphical user interface
US10109319B2 (en) 2016-01-08 2018-10-23 Gopro, Inc. Digital media editing
US10083537B1 (en) 2016-02-04 2018-09-25 Gopro, Inc. Systems and methods for adding a moving visual element to a video
US10285001B2 (en) 2016-02-26 2019-05-07 Snap Inc. Generation, curation, and presentation of media collections
US20170263030A1 (en) * 2016-02-26 2017-09-14 Snapchat, Inc. Methods and systems for generation, curation, and presentation of media collections
JP1577854S (en) * 2016-05-13 2017-06-05
USD812092S1 (en) * 2016-07-29 2018-03-06 Ebay Inc. Display screen or a portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD823889S1 (en) * 2016-07-29 2018-07-24 Ebay Inc. Display screen or a portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD812627S1 (en) * 2016-10-18 2018-03-13 Zencolor Corporation Display screen portion with graphical user interface
USD841673S1 (en) * 2017-01-06 2019-02-26 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Display screen with graphical user interface
US10019133B1 (en) * 2017-04-02 2018-07-10 Charles Russell McNeill Unified computing device interface for assembly of a plurality of types of digital content for transmission to a plurality of target destinations
USD840425S1 (en) * 2017-05-03 2019-02-12 Google Llc Display screen with transitional graphical user interface
USD824415S1 (en) * 2017-06-16 2018-07-31 Stockpitch Financial Corporation Display screen with a graphical user interface
USD827664S1 (en) * 2017-06-28 2018-09-04 Perthera, Inc. Display panel or portion thereof with a graphical user interface
US10423320B2 (en) * 2017-11-13 2019-09-24 Philo, Inc. Graphical user interface for navigating a video
US10248306B1 (en) * 2017-12-20 2019-04-02 Motorola Mobility Llc Systems and methods for end-users to link objects from images with digital content
US10365815B1 (en) * 2018-02-13 2019-07-30 Whatsapp Inc. Vertical scrolling of album images

Citations (186)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3468576A (en) 1968-02-27 1969-09-23 Ford Motor Co Magnetic latch
US4939514A (en) 1987-12-22 1990-07-03 Seiko Instruments, Inc. Foldable data collecting and processing device
USD333636S (en) 1991-12-12 1993-03-02 Transmitter for a vehicle alarm
US5200913A (en) 1990-05-04 1993-04-06 Grid Systems, Inc. Combination laptop and pad computer
JPH05197507A (en) 1992-01-17 1993-08-06 Hitachi Ltd Portable computer
US5268817A (en) 1990-04-27 1993-12-07 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Portable computer with keyboard and having display with coordinate input tablet rotatably mounted to face either toward or away from keyboard when closed over keyboard
EP0588210A1 (en) 1992-09-08 1994-03-23 Hitachi, Ltd. Portable radio telephone set
JPH06242853A (en) 1993-02-15 1994-09-02 Hitachi Comput Eng Corp Ltd Electronic apparatus device and personal computer
JPH06259166A (en) 1993-03-10 1994-09-16 Hitachi Ltd Information processor
US5515345A (en) 1994-08-23 1996-05-07 Jeane K. Barreira Control unit for automobile audio system
JPH08179851A (en) 1994-12-26 1996-07-12 Toshiba Corp Portable computer
US5547698A (en) 1990-04-03 1996-08-20 Van Den Bergh Foods Co. Division Of Conopco Inc. Edible fats
US5661632A (en) 1994-01-04 1997-08-26 Dell Usa, L.P. Hand held computer with dual display screen orientation capability controlled by toggle switches having first and second non-momentary positions
US5708561A (en) 1996-08-13 1998-01-13 Vivek R. Huilgol Portable computer having display slidably and rotatably mounted for movement between landscape and portrait orientation and to open and close speaker ports
US5712760A (en) 1996-01-26 1998-01-27 Texas Instruments Incorporated Compact foldable keyboard
JPH10111658A (en) 1996-10-08 1998-04-28 Fujitsu Ltd Small-sized portable information processor
US5790371A (en) 1994-07-08 1998-08-04 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Modular and extendible electronic working surface
US5793355A (en) 1997-03-03 1998-08-11 Compaq Computer Corporation Portable computer with interchangeable pointing device modules
US5796575A (en) 1992-12-21 1998-08-18 Hewlett-Packard Company Portable computer with hinged cover having a window
US5825352A (en) 1996-01-04 1998-10-20 Logitech, Inc. Multiple fingers contact sensing method for emulating mouse buttons and mouse operations on a touch sensor pad
US5841631A (en) 1996-06-14 1998-11-24 Texas Instruments Incorporated Latch block control for media bay module
US5847698A (en) 1996-09-17 1998-12-08 Dataventures, Inc. Electronic book device
US5900848A (en) 1996-05-17 1999-05-04 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Information processing apparatus
US5926364A (en) 1997-05-30 1999-07-20 International Business Machines Corporation Tri-fold personal computer with touchpad and keyboard
US5949643A (en) 1996-11-18 1999-09-07 Batio; Jeffry Portable computer having split keyboard and pivotal display screen halves
JPH11296259A (en) 1998-04-10 1999-10-29 Canon Inc Portable personal computer
US5987704A (en) 1998-04-15 1999-11-23 Apple Computer, Inc. Dual axis hinge apparatus with braking mechanism
US6005767A (en) 1997-11-14 1999-12-21 Vadem Portable computer having articulated display
US6067224A (en) 1997-10-03 2000-05-23 Fujitsu Limited Portable information processing apparatus with an improved acoustic effect
KR20000036647A (en) 2000-03-24 2000-07-05 유우영 Method for searching using image
US6094191A (en) 1996-03-15 2000-07-25 Fujitsu Limited Keyboard and an information processing apparatus
US6097389A (en) 1997-10-24 2000-08-01 Pictra, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for presenting a collection of digital media in a media container
US6144358A (en) 1997-08-20 2000-11-07 Lucent Technologies Inc. Multi-display electronic devices having open and closed configurations
US6154359A (en) 1996-12-02 2000-11-28 Fujitsu Limited Portable information processing apparatus
CN1292112A (en) 1998-02-25 2001-04-18 夏普公司 The display device
US6222507B1 (en) 1997-11-19 2001-04-24 Nec Corporation Compact personal computer having a plurality of display panels
US6223393B1 (en) 1999-07-09 2001-05-01 International Business Machines Corporation Redundant hinge element for a notebook computer
DE19952486A1 (en) 1999-10-29 2001-05-03 Joachim Schweizer Presentation device has lap-top, main and second screens, controller that rotates image on main screen by 180 degrees when main screen is pivoted by 220 degrees
JP2001167211A (en) 1999-12-07 2001-06-22 Hitachi Ltd Terminal for ic card
US6262885B1 (en) 1998-11-19 2001-07-17 International Business Machines Corp. Portable computing device having a display movable thereabout
US6266236B1 (en) 1997-08-27 2001-07-24 Vadem Apparatus and method for connecting and articulating display in a portable computer having multiple display orientations
US6275376B1 (en) 1998-10-16 2001-08-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable computer display tilt/swivel mechanism and method
US6295038B1 (en) 1998-04-16 2001-09-25 Carlton S. Rebeske Laptop computer
US6302612B1 (en) 1998-03-16 2001-10-16 International Business Machines Corporation Pivotally extensible display device
US20010032320A1 (en) 1999-03-25 2001-10-18 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Resource sharing on the internet via the HTTP
US6323846B1 (en) 1998-01-26 2001-11-27 University Of Delaware Method and apparatus for integrating manual input
US6327482B1 (en) 1998-05-28 2001-12-04 Nec Corporation Mobile radio apparatus with auxiliary display screen
USD452238S1 (en) 1999-12-27 2001-12-18 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic computer
US20020005818A1 (en) 2000-06-27 2002-01-17 Bruzzone Raul Alberto Portable processing device comprising a plurality of screen modules of which at least one folding screen module folds over a main screen module
US6341061B1 (en) 1999-12-28 2002-01-22 International Business Machines Corporation Standup notebook computer
US20020010707A1 (en) 1998-06-17 2002-01-24 Bay-Wei Chang Overlay presentation of textual and graphical annotations
US6343006B1 (en) 1998-11-20 2002-01-29 Jerry Moscovitch Computer display screen system and adjustable screen mount, and swinging screens therefor
US20020021258A1 (en) 2000-03-29 2002-02-21 Eric Koenig Multi-task interactive wireless telecommunications device
US6377444B1 (en) 1999-11-30 2002-04-23 Ingersoll-Rand Company Hinged housings for electronic devices
US6437974B1 (en) 2000-05-23 2002-08-20 Mitsui Comtek Corp. Freestanding electronic presentation system
USD462069S1 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-08-27 Webemage Corp. Remote control
USD463797S1 (en) 2001-07-23 2002-10-01 Apple Computer, Inc. Computing device
US6464195B1 (en) 1997-12-04 2002-10-15 Raymond Hildebrandt Ergonomic mounting for computer screen displays
US6510049B2 (en) 2000-01-06 2003-01-21 Rosen Products Llc Adjustable display monitor unit
US20030048595A1 (en) 2001-09-10 2003-03-13 Omniwin Corp. Collapsible keyboard
US20030080995A1 (en) 2001-10-12 2003-05-01 United Virtualities, Inc. Contextually adaptive web browser
US20030107603A1 (en) 2001-12-12 2003-06-12 Intel Corporation Scroll notification system and method
US20030109232A1 (en) 2001-12-08 2003-06-12 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Camera lens mounting device of folder type telephone
USD476326S1 (en) 2002-01-09 2003-06-24 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Computer
US6597384B1 (en) 1999-12-22 2003-07-22 Intel Corporation Automatic reorienting of screen orientation using touch sensitive system
USD479708S1 (en) 2002-04-03 2003-09-16 Shih-Ming Hwang Remote control
US6628267B2 (en) 1998-03-27 2003-09-30 International Business Machines Corporation Flexibly interfaceable portable computing device
US6642909B1 (en) 2000-08-07 2003-11-04 Anthony R. Oliva Personal electronic book providing keypad and readable and writable CD drives
US6659516B2 (en) 2001-01-05 2003-12-09 Apple Computer, Inc. Locking system for a portable computer
US6661426B1 (en) 1999-09-25 2003-12-09 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. User interface generation
US6665175B1 (en) 2002-02-04 2003-12-16 Deboer Carrie Computer having a monitor that has multiple degrees of freedom with respect to the base of the computer
US20040001049A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-01 Oakley Nicholas W. Multiple mode display apparatus
US20040025993A1 (en) 2002-08-07 2004-02-12 Russell Paul Grady Protective pad attachment for portable computing devices
US6693652B1 (en) 1999-09-28 2004-02-17 Ricoh Company, Ltd. System and method for automatic generation of visual representations and links in a hierarchical messaging system
US6697055B1 (en) 1995-11-16 2004-02-24 Edward Bullister Multifunctional portable computing device with special housing
USD491177S1 (en) 2002-12-31 2004-06-08 Apple Computer, Inc. Computing device
USD491936S1 (en) 2002-11-12 2004-06-22 Aplux Communications Ltd. Tablet personal computer
US6771494B2 (en) 2001-12-17 2004-08-03 Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. Portable computer usable in laptop and tablet configurations
USD494162S1 (en) 2003-08-19 2004-08-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic computer
USD495674S1 (en) 2003-07-04 2004-09-07 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile phone
USD495694S1 (en) 2003-06-11 2004-09-07 Michael J. Chase Edge terminal device
US6788527B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2004-09-07 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Tablet computer keyboard and system and method incorporating same
US20040203535A1 (en) 2003-04-14 2004-10-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mobile phone having a rotational camera lens housing
US20040207568A1 (en) 2003-03-31 2004-10-21 Hitachi, Ltd. Portable information processing apparatus and method for displaying image
US20040212602A1 (en) 1998-02-25 2004-10-28 Kazuyuki Nako Display device
US6819304B2 (en) 2001-10-11 2004-11-16 International Business Machines Corporation Adjustable display device with display adjustment function and method therefor
US20040228076A1 (en) 2003-05-13 2004-11-18 Clapper Edward O. Sliding screen emerging keyboard
US6829140B2 (en) 2001-12-17 2004-12-07 Toshiba America Information Services, Inc. Portable computer usable in laptop and tablet configurations
US20050005241A1 (en) 2003-05-08 2005-01-06 Hunleth Frank A. Methods and systems for generating a zoomable graphical user interface
US20050010860A1 (en) 2000-02-23 2005-01-13 Yuval Weiss Systems and methods for generating and providing previews of electronic files such as Web files
US20050018396A1 (en) 2003-06-30 2005-01-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic apparatus including optical guide that guides light from light-emitting diode to outside of housing
US6859219B1 (en) 1999-10-08 2005-02-22 Gateway, Inc. Method and apparatus having multiple display devices
US20050041378A1 (en) 2003-08-21 2005-02-24 Tomohiro Hamada Electronic apparatus having a housing
US20050063145A1 (en) 2003-09-18 2005-03-24 Homer Steven S. Computer system with rotatable display
US20050071782A1 (en) 2003-09-30 2005-03-31 Barrett Peter T. Miniaturized video feed generation and user-interface
USD504128S1 (en) 2004-04-26 2005-04-19 Acer Incorporated Notebook computer
US6882335B2 (en) 2000-02-08 2005-04-19 Nokia Corporation Stereophonic reproduction maintaining means and methods for operation in horizontal and vertical A/V appliance positions
US20050083642A1 (en) 2002-03-08 2005-04-21 Tsuyoshi Senpuku Mobile communications device, and display-control method and program for mobile communications device
US20050091596A1 (en) * 2003-10-23 2005-04-28 Microsoft Corporation Graphical user interface for 3-dimensional view of a data collection based on an attribute of the data
US20050093868A1 (en) 2003-10-30 2005-05-05 Microsoft Corporation Distributed sensing techniques for mobile devices
JP2005159741A (en) 2003-11-26 2005-06-16 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Mobile unit with camera
US20050128695A1 (en) 2003-12-10 2005-06-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable computer
JP2005242436A (en) 2004-02-24 2005-09-08 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Electronic book
US20050210399A1 (en) 2004-03-18 2005-09-22 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for improved viewing and navigation of content
US20050221865A1 (en) 1992-09-08 2005-10-06 Takanori Nishiyama Portable radio telephone set
US6963485B2 (en) 2002-10-02 2005-11-08 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable computer
US20050257400A1 (en) 1998-11-06 2005-11-24 Microsoft Corporation Navigating a resource browser session
USD512997S1 (en) 2004-05-10 2005-12-20 Lg Electronics, Inc. Laptop computer
US20050282596A1 (en) 2004-06-21 2005-12-22 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Triple-axis rotation folder-type portable apparatus
USD513509S1 (en) 2004-02-13 2006-01-10 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Personal computer
US20060015823A1 (en) 2004-07-15 2006-01-19 Yi-Hsuan Chao Display and preview method for display apparatus
USD516552S1 (en) 2004-12-02 2006-03-07 Sony Corporation Computer
USD518042S1 (en) 2004-08-18 2006-03-28 Fujitsu Limited Personal computer
US7035665B2 (en) 2000-02-21 2006-04-25 Nec Corporation Portable terminal device and wireless communication terminal device
US20060123353A1 (en) 2004-12-08 2006-06-08 Microsoft Corporation Method and system of taskbar button interfaces
US7061472B1 (en) 1999-05-28 2006-06-13 Jopet Gmbh & Co. Kg Presentation device
USD523429S1 (en) 2004-05-28 2006-06-20 Acer, Inc. Notebook personal computer
US7072179B1 (en) 2004-09-10 2006-07-04 Micro Industries Corporation Fanless computer with integrated display
JP2006227409A (en) 2005-02-18 2006-08-31 Nikon Corp Display device
USD528541S1 (en) 2005-08-04 2006-09-19 Acer, Inc. Portable computer
USD528993S1 (en) 2005-09-09 2006-09-26 Hannspree, Inc. Remote control
US20060238439A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Microsoft Corporation State-based auxiliary display operation
US20060264243A1 (en) 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Nokia Corporation Display changing in a portable electronic device
US20060268500A1 (en) 2005-05-31 2006-11-30 Microsoft Corporation Notebook computers configured to provide enhanced display features for a user
US20060271644A1 (en) 2005-05-31 2006-11-30 Takayuki Yamaizumi Generating web service without coding logic with a programming language
US20060277167A1 (en) 2005-05-20 2006-12-07 William Gross Search apparatus having a search result matrix display
US7148877B2 (en) 2003-05-15 2006-12-12 Quanta Computer, Inc. Liquid crystal display with optical disk drive control functions
USD534531S1 (en) 2005-06-24 2007-01-02 Sony Corporation Computer
USD535292S1 (en) 2005-06-24 2007-01-16 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. Ltd Notebook computer
US7187364B2 (en) 2002-11-21 2007-03-06 Danger, Inc. Data processing device having multiple adjustable display and keyboard orientations
US20070073833A1 (en) 2005-09-28 2007-03-29 International Business Machines Corporation Web page preview without browsing to web page
US20070120762A1 (en) 2005-11-30 2007-05-31 O'gorman Robert W Providing information in a multi-screen device
USD544846S1 (en) 2006-07-01 2007-06-19 Marquee, Inc. Remote control unit
US20070138806A1 (en) 2005-12-13 2007-06-21 Apple Computer, Inc. Magnetic latching mechanism
US7239508B2 (en) 2004-07-23 2007-07-03 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte Ltd. Computer laptop flip and lift apparatus
US7250207B1 (en) 2003-10-09 2007-07-31 Ohio Table Pad Company Table pad coupling system
US20070182663A1 (en) 2004-06-01 2007-08-09 Biech Grant S Portable, folding and separable multi-display computing system
US20070240076A1 (en) 2000-06-30 2007-10-11 Nokia Corporation System and Method for Visual History Presentation and Management
US20070242421A1 (en) 2006-04-06 2007-10-18 Norbert Goschin Folding computer
US20070247446A1 (en) 2006-04-25 2007-10-25 Timothy James Orsley Linear positioning input device
US20070296820A1 (en) 2006-06-21 2007-12-27 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Device and method for adjusting image orientation
US20080024465A1 (en) 2006-07-30 2008-01-31 Jeffrey Charles Hawkins Context Driven Navigation Mechanism
US20080024388A1 (en) 2006-07-29 2008-01-31 Oscar Bruce Two-sided display monitor apparatus
US20080059888A1 (en) 2006-08-30 2008-03-06 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Orientation based multiple mode mechanically vibrated touch screen display
US20080062625A1 (en) 1999-10-18 2008-03-13 Jeffrey Batio Portable computer for dual, rotatable screens
US20080074831A1 (en) 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Dell Products L.P. Information Handling System Chassis Foot
US20080088602A1 (en) 2005-03-04 2008-04-17 Apple Inc. Multi-functional hand-held device
US20080092039A1 (en) 2006-10-04 2008-04-17 Brockway Brandon J Web portal page interactive user interfaces with maximum accessibility to user selected portlets
US7366994B2 (en) 2001-05-23 2008-04-29 Eastman Kodak Company Using digital objects organized according to histogram timeline
US7382607B2 (en) 2006-02-16 2008-06-03 Palm, Inc. Housing for a portable computing device
US20080134093A1 (en) 2006-11-30 2008-06-05 Microsoft Corporation Web engine search preview
US20080158795A1 (en) 2006-12-28 2008-07-03 Aoki Paul M Folding electronic device with continuous display
US20080174570A1 (en) 2006-09-06 2008-07-24 Apple Inc. Touch Screen Device, Method, and Graphical User Interface for Determining Commands by Applying Heuristics
US20080209493A1 (en) 2004-11-22 2008-08-28 Eun-Jeong Choi Contents Browsing Apparatus And Method
US7428142B1 (en) 2004-08-25 2008-09-23 Apple Inc. Lid-closed detector
US20080235594A1 (en) 2005-12-23 2008-09-25 Soujanya Bhumkar Methods and systems for enhancing internet experiences
US7433179B2 (en) 2004-08-10 2008-10-07 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic apparatus having universal human interface
US20080284738A1 (en) 2007-05-15 2008-11-20 Synaptics Incorporated Proximity sensor and method for indicating a display orientation change
USD581371S1 (en) 2008-03-11 2008-11-25 Simon Nicholas Richmond Heated apparel controller
US7467356B2 (en) 2003-07-25 2008-12-16 Three-B International Limited Graphical user interface for 3d virtual display browser using virtual display windows
US20090007001A1 (en) 2007-06-28 2009-01-01 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Virtual keypad systems and methods
US20090019383A1 (en) 2007-04-13 2009-01-15 Workstone Llc User interface for a personal information manager
US20090019479A1 (en) 2007-07-13 2009-01-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Iptv capable of auto channel setting and method thereof
US7522946B2 (en) 2004-05-19 2009-04-21 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Hinge apparatus for mobile communication terminals
USD593091S1 (en) 2008-05-13 2009-05-26 Yves Behar Digital display device
USD593085S1 (en) 2008-03-12 2009-05-26 Yves Behar Computer
USD593086S1 (en) 2008-07-15 2009-05-26 Yves Behar Computer device
US20090150826A1 (en) 2007-12-10 2009-06-11 Microsoft Corporation Switching search providers within a browser search box
US20090150784A1 (en) 2007-12-07 2009-06-11 Microsoft Corporation User interface for previewing video items
US20090193364A1 (en) 2008-01-29 2009-07-30 Microsoft Corporation Displaying thumbnail copies of running items
US20090190295A1 (en) 2008-01-30 2009-07-30 Samsung Techwin Co., Ltd. Portable information terminal
US20090244012A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-10-01 Yves Behar Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US20090249244A1 (en) 2000-10-10 2009-10-01 Addnclick, Inc. Dynamic information management system and method for content delivery and sharing in content-, metadata- & viewer-based, live social networking among users concurrently engaged in the same and/or similar content
US20090275366A1 (en) 2008-05-05 2009-11-05 Schilling Donald L Personal portable communication devices with deployable display systems for three dimensional visual representations and/or privacy and methods of use
US20090300511A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-12-03 Yves Behar System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
USD605635S1 (en) 2009-04-06 2009-12-08 Aquent, Llc Remote control device
US20090303205A1 (en) 2008-06-05 2009-12-10 Dell Products, Lp Computation device incorporating motion detection and method thereof
US20090303676A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-12-10 Yves Behar System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US20090322790A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-12-31 Yves Behar System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US7698407B2 (en) 2006-05-22 2010-04-13 Microsoft Corporation Federated personalization of personal portal content
US20100174993A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2010-07-08 Robert Sanford Havoc Pennington Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US7756928B1 (en) 2002-12-30 2010-07-13 Aol Inc. Interoperability using a local proxy server
US7814425B1 (en) 2005-12-30 2010-10-12 Aol Inc. Thumbnail image previews
US7869834B2 (en) 2007-03-28 2011-01-11 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal
US8300022B2 (en) 2009-01-09 2012-10-30 International Business Machines Corporation Dynamically reconfigurable touch screen displays
US8464161B2 (en) * 2008-06-10 2013-06-11 Microsoft Corporation Managing permissions in a collaborative workspace

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5495694A (en) * 1994-09-06 1996-03-05 Kuhns; Richard L. Deflector assembly for a rain gutter
US5827539A (en) * 1995-12-28 1998-10-27 Amway Corporation Dry carotenoid-oil powder and process for making same
US6559516B1 (en) * 2002-01-16 2003-05-06 Hewlett-Packard Development Company Antifuse structure and method of making

Patent Citations (209)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3468576A (en) 1968-02-27 1969-09-23 Ford Motor Co Magnetic latch
US4939514A (en) 1987-12-22 1990-07-03 Seiko Instruments, Inc. Foldable data collecting and processing device
US5547698A (en) 1990-04-03 1996-08-20 Van Den Bergh Foods Co. Division Of Conopco Inc. Edible fats
US5268817A (en) 1990-04-27 1993-12-07 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Portable computer with keyboard and having display with coordinate input tablet rotatably mounted to face either toward or away from keyboard when closed over keyboard
US5200913A (en) 1990-05-04 1993-04-06 Grid Systems, Inc. Combination laptop and pad computer
USD333636S (en) 1991-12-12 1993-03-02 Transmitter for a vehicle alarm
JPH05197507A (en) 1992-01-17 1993-08-06 Hitachi Ltd Portable computer
EP0588210A1 (en) 1992-09-08 1994-03-23 Hitachi, Ltd. Portable radio telephone set
US20050221865A1 (en) 1992-09-08 2005-10-06 Takanori Nishiyama Portable radio telephone set
US5436954A (en) 1992-09-08 1995-07-25 Hitachi, Ltd. Foldable radio telephone set with rotary selector integral with foldable hinge element
US5796575A (en) 1992-12-21 1998-08-18 Hewlett-Packard Company Portable computer with hinged cover having a window
JPH06242853A (en) 1993-02-15 1994-09-02 Hitachi Comput Eng Corp Ltd Electronic apparatus device and personal computer
JPH06259166A (en) 1993-03-10 1994-09-16 Hitachi Ltd Information processor
US5661632A (en) 1994-01-04 1997-08-26 Dell Usa, L.P. Hand held computer with dual display screen orientation capability controlled by toggle switches having first and second non-momentary positions
US5790371A (en) 1994-07-08 1998-08-04 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Modular and extendible electronic working surface
US5515345A (en) 1994-08-23 1996-05-07 Jeane K. Barreira Control unit for automobile audio system
JPH08179851A (en) 1994-12-26 1996-07-12 Toshiba Corp Portable computer
US6697055B1 (en) 1995-11-16 2004-02-24 Edward Bullister Multifunctional portable computing device with special housing
US5825352A (en) 1996-01-04 1998-10-20 Logitech, Inc. Multiple fingers contact sensing method for emulating mouse buttons and mouse operations on a touch sensor pad
US5712760A (en) 1996-01-26 1998-01-27 Texas Instruments Incorporated Compact foldable keyboard
US6094191A (en) 1996-03-15 2000-07-25 Fujitsu Limited Keyboard and an information processing apparatus
US5900848A (en) 1996-05-17 1999-05-04 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Information processing apparatus
US5841631A (en) 1996-06-14 1998-11-24 Texas Instruments Incorporated Latch block control for media bay module
US5708561A (en) 1996-08-13 1998-01-13 Vivek R. Huilgol Portable computer having display slidably and rotatably mounted for movement between landscape and portrait orientation and to open and close speaker ports
US5847698A (en) 1996-09-17 1998-12-08 Dataventures, Inc. Electronic book device
USD392944S (en) 1996-09-30 1998-03-31 Remote control transmitter
JPH10111658A (en) 1996-10-08 1998-04-28 Fujitsu Ltd Small-sized portable information processor
US6492974B1 (en) 1996-10-08 2002-12-10 Fujitsu Limited Small-sized portable information processing apparatus
US5949643A (en) 1996-11-18 1999-09-07 Batio; Jeffry Portable computer having split keyboard and pivotal display screen halves
US6154359A (en) 1996-12-02 2000-11-28 Fujitsu Limited Portable information processing apparatus
USD395868S (en) 1997-01-23 1998-07-07 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic computer
US5793355A (en) 1997-03-03 1998-08-11 Compaq Computer Corporation Portable computer with interchangeable pointing device modules
USD391927S (en) 1997-05-13 1998-03-10 Digital Equipment Corporation Notebook personal computer
US5926364A (en) 1997-05-30 1999-07-20 International Business Machines Corporation Tri-fold personal computer with touchpad and keyboard
US6144358A (en) 1997-08-20 2000-11-07 Lucent Technologies Inc. Multi-display electronic devices having open and closed configurations
USD416003S (en) 1997-08-27 1999-11-02 Vadem Notebook computer housing
US6266236B1 (en) 1997-08-27 2001-07-24 Vadem Apparatus and method for connecting and articulating display in a portable computer having multiple display orientations
US6067224A (en) 1997-10-03 2000-05-23 Fujitsu Limited Portable information processing apparatus with an improved acoustic effect
US6097389A (en) 1997-10-24 2000-08-01 Pictra, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for presenting a collection of digital media in a media container
US6005767A (en) 1997-11-14 1999-12-21 Vadem Portable computer having articulated display
US6222507B1 (en) 1997-11-19 2001-04-24 Nec Corporation Compact personal computer having a plurality of display panels
US6464195B1 (en) 1997-12-04 2002-10-15 Raymond Hildebrandt Ergonomic mounting for computer screen displays
USD399526S (en) 1997-12-24 1998-10-13 Electronic book
US6323846B1 (en) 1998-01-26 2001-11-27 University Of Delaware Method and apparatus for integrating manual input
US20080042987A1 (en) 1998-01-26 2008-02-21 Apple Inc. Touch sensing through hand dissection
US20040212602A1 (en) 1998-02-25 2004-10-28 Kazuyuki Nako Display device
US6972752B2 (en) 1998-02-25 2005-12-06 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Display device
CN1292112A (en) 1998-02-25 2001-04-18 夏普公司 The display device
US6302612B1 (en) 1998-03-16 2001-10-16 International Business Machines Corporation Pivotally extensible display device
US6628267B2 (en) 1998-03-27 2003-09-30 International Business Machines Corporation Flexibly interfaceable portable computing device
JPH11296259A (en) 1998-04-10 1999-10-29 Canon Inc Portable personal computer
US5987704A (en) 1998-04-15 1999-11-23 Apple Computer, Inc. Dual axis hinge apparatus with braking mechanism
US6295038B1 (en) 1998-04-16 2001-09-25 Carlton S. Rebeske Laptop computer
US6327482B1 (en) 1998-05-28 2001-12-04 Nec Corporation Mobile radio apparatus with auxiliary display screen
US20020010707A1 (en) 1998-06-17 2002-01-24 Bay-Wei Chang Overlay presentation of textual and graphical annotations
US6275376B1 (en) 1998-10-16 2001-08-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable computer display tilt/swivel mechanism and method
US20050257400A1 (en) 1998-11-06 2005-11-24 Microsoft Corporation Navigating a resource browser session
US6262885B1 (en) 1998-11-19 2001-07-17 International Business Machines Corp. Portable computing device having a display movable thereabout
US20050146845A1 (en) 1998-11-20 2005-07-07 Jerry Moscovitch Computer display screen system and adjustable screen mount, and swinging screens therefor
US20060126284A1 (en) 1998-11-20 2006-06-15 Jerry Moscovitch Computer display screen system and adjustable screen mount, and swinging screens therefor
US6343006B1 (en) 1998-11-20 2002-01-29 Jerry Moscovitch Computer display screen system and adjustable screen mount, and swinging screens therefor
US20010032320A1 (en) 1999-03-25 2001-10-18 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Resource sharing on the internet via the HTTP
US7061472B1 (en) 1999-05-28 2006-06-13 Jopet Gmbh & Co. Kg Presentation device
US6223393B1 (en) 1999-07-09 2001-05-01 International Business Machines Corporation Redundant hinge element for a notebook computer
US6661426B1 (en) 1999-09-25 2003-12-09 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. User interface generation
US6693652B1 (en) 1999-09-28 2004-02-17 Ricoh Company, Ltd. System and method for automatic generation of visual representations and links in a hierarchical messaging system
US6859219B1 (en) 1999-10-08 2005-02-22 Gateway, Inc. Method and apparatus having multiple display devices
US20080062625A1 (en) 1999-10-18 2008-03-13 Jeffrey Batio Portable computer for dual, rotatable screens
DE19952486A1 (en) 1999-10-29 2001-05-03 Joachim Schweizer Presentation device has lap-top, main and second screens, controller that rotates image on main screen by 180 degrees when main screen is pivoted by 220 degrees
US6377444B1 (en) 1999-11-30 2002-04-23 Ingersoll-Rand Company Hinged housings for electronic devices
JP2001167211A (en) 1999-12-07 2001-06-22 Hitachi Ltd Terminal for ic card
US6597384B1 (en) 1999-12-22 2003-07-22 Intel Corporation Automatic reorienting of screen orientation using touch sensitive system
USD452238S1 (en) 1999-12-27 2001-12-18 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic computer
US6341061B1 (en) 1999-12-28 2002-01-22 International Business Machines Corporation Standup notebook computer
US6510049B2 (en) 2000-01-06 2003-01-21 Rosen Products Llc Adjustable display monitor unit
US6882335B2 (en) 2000-02-08 2005-04-19 Nokia Corporation Stereophonic reproduction maintaining means and methods for operation in horizontal and vertical A/V appliance positions
US7035665B2 (en) 2000-02-21 2006-04-25 Nec Corporation Portable terminal device and wireless communication terminal device
US20050010860A1 (en) 2000-02-23 2005-01-13 Yuval Weiss Systems and methods for generating and providing previews of electronic files such as Web files
KR20000036647A (en) 2000-03-24 2000-07-05 유우영 Method for searching using image
US20020021258A1 (en) 2000-03-29 2002-02-21 Eric Koenig Multi-task interactive wireless telecommunications device
US7138962B2 (en) 2000-03-29 2006-11-21 Eric Koenig Multi-task interactive wireless telecommunications device
US6437974B1 (en) 2000-05-23 2002-08-20 Mitsui Comtek Corp. Freestanding electronic presentation system
US20020005818A1 (en) 2000-06-27 2002-01-17 Bruzzone Raul Alberto Portable processing device comprising a plurality of screen modules of which at least one folding screen module folds over a main screen module
US20070240076A1 (en) 2000-06-30 2007-10-11 Nokia Corporation System and Method for Visual History Presentation and Management
US6642909B1 (en) 2000-08-07 2003-11-04 Anthony R. Oliva Personal electronic book providing keypad and readable and writable CD drives
US20090249244A1 (en) 2000-10-10 2009-10-01 Addnclick, Inc. Dynamic information management system and method for content delivery and sharing in content-, metadata- & viewer-based, live social networking among users concurrently engaged in the same and/or similar content
US6659516B2 (en) 2001-01-05 2003-12-09 Apple Computer, Inc. Locking system for a portable computer
USD462069S1 (en) 2001-04-27 2002-08-27 Webemage Corp. Remote control
US7366994B2 (en) 2001-05-23 2008-04-29 Eastman Kodak Company Using digital objects organized according to histogram timeline
USD463797S1 (en) 2001-07-23 2002-10-01 Apple Computer, Inc. Computing device
US20030048595A1 (en) 2001-09-10 2003-03-13 Omniwin Corp. Collapsible keyboard
US6819304B2 (en) 2001-10-11 2004-11-16 International Business Machines Corporation Adjustable display device with display adjustment function and method therefor
US20030080995A1 (en) 2001-10-12 2003-05-01 United Virtualities, Inc. Contextually adaptive web browser
US20030109232A1 (en) 2001-12-08 2003-06-12 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Camera lens mounting device of folder type telephone
US20030107603A1 (en) 2001-12-12 2003-06-12 Intel Corporation Scroll notification system and method
US6771494B2 (en) 2001-12-17 2004-08-03 Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. Portable computer usable in laptop and tablet configurations
US6829140B2 (en) 2001-12-17 2004-12-07 Toshiba America Information Services, Inc. Portable computer usable in laptop and tablet configurations
USD476326S1 (en) 2002-01-09 2003-06-24 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Computer
US6665175B1 (en) 2002-02-04 2003-12-16 Deboer Carrie Computer having a monitor that has multiple degrees of freedom with respect to the base of the computer
US20050083642A1 (en) 2002-03-08 2005-04-21 Tsuyoshi Senpuku Mobile communications device, and display-control method and program for mobile communications device
USD479708S1 (en) 2002-04-03 2003-09-16 Shih-Ming Hwang Remote control
US6944012B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2005-09-13 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Tablet computer keyboard and system and method incorporating same
US6788527B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2004-09-07 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Tablet computer keyboard and system and method incorporating same
US20040001049A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-01 Oakley Nicholas W. Multiple mode display apparatus
US20040025993A1 (en) 2002-08-07 2004-02-12 Russell Paul Grady Protective pad attachment for portable computing devices
US6963485B2 (en) 2002-10-02 2005-11-08 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable computer
USD491936S1 (en) 2002-11-12 2004-06-22 Aplux Communications Ltd. Tablet personal computer
US7187364B2 (en) 2002-11-21 2007-03-06 Danger, Inc. Data processing device having multiple adjustable display and keyboard orientations
US7756928B1 (en) 2002-12-30 2010-07-13 Aol Inc. Interoperability using a local proxy server
USD491177S1 (en) 2002-12-31 2004-06-08 Apple Computer, Inc. Computing device
JP2004302179A (en) 2003-03-31 2004-10-28 Hitachi Ltd Portable information equipment and picture display method
US20040207568A1 (en) 2003-03-31 2004-10-21 Hitachi, Ltd. Portable information processing apparatus and method for displaying image
US20040203535A1 (en) 2003-04-14 2004-10-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mobile phone having a rotational camera lens housing
US20050005241A1 (en) 2003-05-08 2005-01-06 Hunleth Frank A. Methods and systems for generating a zoomable graphical user interface
US20040228076A1 (en) 2003-05-13 2004-11-18 Clapper Edward O. Sliding screen emerging keyboard
US7148877B2 (en) 2003-05-15 2006-12-12 Quanta Computer, Inc. Liquid crystal display with optical disk drive control functions
USD495694S1 (en) 2003-06-11 2004-09-07 Michael J. Chase Edge terminal device
US20050018396A1 (en) 2003-06-30 2005-01-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic apparatus including optical guide that guides light from light-emitting diode to outside of housing
USD495674S1 (en) 2003-07-04 2004-09-07 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile phone
US7467356B2 (en) 2003-07-25 2008-12-16 Three-B International Limited Graphical user interface for 3d virtual display browser using virtual display windows
USD494162S1 (en) 2003-08-19 2004-08-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic computer
US20050041378A1 (en) 2003-08-21 2005-02-24 Tomohiro Hamada Electronic apparatus having a housing
US20050063145A1 (en) 2003-09-18 2005-03-24 Homer Steven S. Computer system with rotatable display
US20050071782A1 (en) 2003-09-30 2005-03-31 Barrett Peter T. Miniaturized video feed generation and user-interface
US7250207B1 (en) 2003-10-09 2007-07-31 Ohio Table Pad Company Table pad coupling system
US20050091596A1 (en) * 2003-10-23 2005-04-28 Microsoft Corporation Graphical user interface for 3-dimensional view of a data collection based on an attribute of the data
US20050093868A1 (en) 2003-10-30 2005-05-05 Microsoft Corporation Distributed sensing techniques for mobile devices
US20050134717A1 (en) 2003-11-26 2005-06-23 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Portable device with camera
JP2005159741A (en) 2003-11-26 2005-06-16 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Mobile unit with camera
US20050128695A1 (en) 2003-12-10 2005-06-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Portable computer
USD513509S1 (en) 2004-02-13 2006-01-10 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Personal computer
JP2005242436A (en) 2004-02-24 2005-09-08 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Electronic book
US20050210399A1 (en) 2004-03-18 2005-09-22 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for improved viewing and navigation of content
USD504128S1 (en) 2004-04-26 2005-04-19 Acer Incorporated Notebook computer
USD517541S1 (en) 2004-04-26 2006-03-21 Acer Incorporated Notebook computer
USD512997S1 (en) 2004-05-10 2005-12-20 Lg Electronics, Inc. Laptop computer
US7522946B2 (en) 2004-05-19 2009-04-21 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Hinge apparatus for mobile communication terminals
USD523429S1 (en) 2004-05-28 2006-06-20 Acer, Inc. Notebook personal computer
US20070182663A1 (en) 2004-06-01 2007-08-09 Biech Grant S Portable, folding and separable multi-display computing system
US20050282596A1 (en) 2004-06-21 2005-12-22 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Triple-axis rotation folder-type portable apparatus
US20060015823A1 (en) 2004-07-15 2006-01-19 Yi-Hsuan Chao Display and preview method for display apparatus
US7239508B2 (en) 2004-07-23 2007-07-03 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte Ltd. Computer laptop flip and lift apparatus
US7433179B2 (en) 2004-08-10 2008-10-07 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic apparatus having universal human interface
USD518042S1 (en) 2004-08-18 2006-03-28 Fujitsu Limited Personal computer
US7428142B1 (en) 2004-08-25 2008-09-23 Apple Inc. Lid-closed detector
US7072179B1 (en) 2004-09-10 2006-07-04 Micro Industries Corporation Fanless computer with integrated display
US20080209493A1 (en) 2004-11-22 2008-08-28 Eun-Jeong Choi Contents Browsing Apparatus And Method
USD516552S1 (en) 2004-12-02 2006-03-07 Sony Corporation Computer
US20060123353A1 (en) 2004-12-08 2006-06-08 Microsoft Corporation Method and system of taskbar button interfaces
JP2006227409A (en) 2005-02-18 2006-08-31 Nikon Corp Display device
US20080088602A1 (en) 2005-03-04 2008-04-17 Apple Inc. Multi-functional hand-held device
US20060238439A1 (en) 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Microsoft Corporation State-based auxiliary display operation
US20060264243A1 (en) 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Nokia Corporation Display changing in a portable electronic device
US20060277167A1 (en) 2005-05-20 2006-12-07 William Gross Search apparatus having a search result matrix display
US20060268500A1 (en) 2005-05-31 2006-11-30 Microsoft Corporation Notebook computers configured to provide enhanced display features for a user
US20060271644A1 (en) 2005-05-31 2006-11-30 Takayuki Yamaizumi Generating web service without coding logic with a programming language
USD534531S1 (en) 2005-06-24 2007-01-02 Sony Corporation Computer
USD535292S1 (en) 2005-06-24 2007-01-16 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. Ltd Notebook computer
USD528541S1 (en) 2005-08-04 2006-09-19 Acer, Inc. Portable computer
USD528993S1 (en) 2005-09-09 2006-09-26 Hannspree, Inc. Remote control
US20070073833A1 (en) 2005-09-28 2007-03-29 International Business Machines Corporation Web page preview without browsing to web page
US20070120762A1 (en) 2005-11-30 2007-05-31 O'gorman Robert W Providing information in a multi-screen device
US20070138806A1 (en) 2005-12-13 2007-06-21 Apple Computer, Inc. Magnetic latching mechanism
US20080235594A1 (en) 2005-12-23 2008-09-25 Soujanya Bhumkar Methods and systems for enhancing internet experiences
US7814425B1 (en) 2005-12-30 2010-10-12 Aol Inc. Thumbnail image previews
US7382607B2 (en) 2006-02-16 2008-06-03 Palm, Inc. Housing for a portable computing device
US20070242421A1 (en) 2006-04-06 2007-10-18 Norbert Goschin Folding computer
US20070247446A1 (en) 2006-04-25 2007-10-25 Timothy James Orsley Linear positioning input device
US7698407B2 (en) 2006-05-22 2010-04-13 Microsoft Corporation Federated personalization of personal portal content
US20070296820A1 (en) 2006-06-21 2007-12-27 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Device and method for adjusting image orientation
USD544846S1 (en) 2006-07-01 2007-06-19 Marquee, Inc. Remote control unit
US20080024388A1 (en) 2006-07-29 2008-01-31 Oscar Bruce Two-sided display monitor apparatus
US20080024465A1 (en) 2006-07-30 2008-01-31 Jeffrey Charles Hawkins Context Driven Navigation Mechanism
US20080059888A1 (en) 2006-08-30 2008-03-06 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Orientation based multiple mode mechanically vibrated touch screen display
US20080174570A1 (en) 2006-09-06 2008-07-24 Apple Inc. Touch Screen Device, Method, and Graphical User Interface for Determining Commands by Applying Heuristics
US20080074831A1 (en) 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Dell Products L.P. Information Handling System Chassis Foot
US20080092039A1 (en) 2006-10-04 2008-04-17 Brockway Brandon J Web portal page interactive user interfaces with maximum accessibility to user selected portlets
US20080134093A1 (en) 2006-11-30 2008-06-05 Microsoft Corporation Web engine search preview
US20080158795A1 (en) 2006-12-28 2008-07-03 Aoki Paul M Folding electronic device with continuous display
US7869834B2 (en) 2007-03-28 2011-01-11 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal
US20090019383A1 (en) 2007-04-13 2009-01-15 Workstone Llc User interface for a personal information manager
US20080284738A1 (en) 2007-05-15 2008-11-20 Synaptics Incorporated Proximity sensor and method for indicating a display orientation change
US20090007001A1 (en) 2007-06-28 2009-01-01 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Virtual keypad systems and methods
US20090019479A1 (en) 2007-07-13 2009-01-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Iptv capable of auto channel setting and method thereof
US20090150784A1 (en) 2007-12-07 2009-06-11 Microsoft Corporation User interface for previewing video items
US20090150826A1 (en) 2007-12-10 2009-06-11 Microsoft Corporation Switching search providers within a browser search box
US20090193364A1 (en) 2008-01-29 2009-07-30 Microsoft Corporation Displaying thumbnail copies of running items
US20090190295A1 (en) 2008-01-30 2009-07-30 Samsung Techwin Co., Ltd. Portable information terminal
USD581371S1 (en) 2008-03-11 2008-11-25 Simon Nicholas Richmond Heated apparel controller
USD593085S1 (en) 2008-03-12 2009-05-26 Yves Behar Computer
US20130141854A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-06-06 Yves Behar Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US20090300511A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-12-03 Yves Behar System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US8624844B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2014-01-07 Litl Llc Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US8612888B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-12-17 Litl, Llc Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US20090303676A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-12-10 Yves Behar System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US20090244832A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-10-01 Yves Behar Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US8577957B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2013-11-05 Litl Llc System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US20100174993A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2010-07-08 Robert Sanford Havoc Pennington Method and apparatus for managing digital media content
US20090244012A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-10-01 Yves Behar Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US20090322790A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2009-12-31 Yves Behar System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US20150277688A1 (en) 2008-04-01 2015-10-01 Litl Llc System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US8289688B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2012-10-16 Litl, Llc Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US20090275366A1 (en) 2008-05-05 2009-11-05 Schilling Donald L Personal portable communication devices with deployable display systems for three dimensional visual representations and/or privacy and methods of use
USD593091S1 (en) 2008-05-13 2009-05-26 Yves Behar Digital display device
US20090303205A1 (en) 2008-06-05 2009-12-10 Dell Products, Lp Computation device incorporating motion detection and method thereof
US8464161B2 (en) * 2008-06-10 2013-06-11 Microsoft Corporation Managing permissions in a collaborative workspace
USD593086S1 (en) 2008-07-15 2009-05-26 Yves Behar Computer device
US8300022B2 (en) 2009-01-09 2012-10-30 International Business Machines Corporation Dynamically reconfigurable touch screen displays
USD605635S1 (en) 2009-04-06 2009-12-08 Aquent, Llc Remote control device

Non-Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Chinese Office Action mailed Jul. 18, 2013 in connection with Chinese Application No. 200980117859.8.
European Communication dated Nov. 23, 2015 in connection with European Application No. 09727165.4.
European Search Report from corresponding European Application No. 09755433.
http://laptop.org/en/laptop/start/ebook.shtml accessed on Sep. 29, 2008.
International Search Report and Written Opinion for International Application No. PCT/US2009/038599 dated Jun. 3, 2009.
International Search Report from corresponding PCT Application Serial No. PCT/US09/39117.
Japanese Office Action mailed Apr. 16, 2013 in connection with Japanese Application No. 2011-503058.
Japanese Office Action mailed Dec. 4, 2012 in connection with Japanese Application No. 2011-503058 and partial English translation thereof.
Miller, M., "Creating a Digital Home Entertainment System with Windows Media Center", Apr. 2006, Que.
Office Action dated Apr. 4, 2011, for U.S. Appl. No. 12/170,951.

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9880715B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2018-01-30 Litl Llc System and method for streamlining user interaction with electronic content
US9927835B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2018-03-27 Litl Llc Portable computer with multiple display configurations
US10289154B2 (en) 2008-04-01 2019-05-14 Litl Llc Portable computer with multiple display configurations

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20100174993A1 (en) 2010-07-08
US8612888B2 (en) 2013-12-17
US20170090699A1 (en) 2017-03-30
US20140282263A1 (en) 2014-09-18

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
RU2400801C2 (en) Upgradable preliminary visualiser of object in browser-shell
CA2424651C (en) System and method for user modification of metadata in a shell browser
US9681087B2 (en) Method and system for still image capture from video footage
TWI553538B (en) Watch the Gallery app content
US6844885B2 (en) Image editing via grid elements
AU2016201454B2 (en) Management of local and remote media items
US7941761B2 (en) Third party service switching through command bar user interface
US7945848B2 (en) Dynamically modifying a theme-based media presentation
US9823756B2 (en) User terminal device for supporting user interaction and methods thereof
CN101681350B (en) Providing annotations of digital work
CN100432896C (en) Multiple-mode window presentation system and process
US8633900B2 (en) Screen display method for mobile terminal
US20120136756A1 (en) On-Demand Auto-Fill
US5682439A (en) Boxed input correction system and method for pen based computer systems
KR101867644B1 (en) Multi-application environment
US6833848B1 (en) Game console based digital photo album
JP2013535719A (en) Device, method and graphical user interface for user interface screen navigation
US20010056434A1 (en) Systems, methods and computer program products for managing multimedia content
US20040145603A1 (en) Online multimedia presentation builder and presentation player
US20160188181A1 (en) User interface system, method, and computer program product
EP1840897B1 (en) User interface for creating and using media keys
CN102763065B (en) Navigating through a plurality of devices, methods, and graphical user interface of the viewing area
CN100587655C (en) System and method for navigating content in item
JP6391602B2 (en) Media player with image-based browsing
US8928725B2 (en) Video integration

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:AQUENT LLC;LITL LLC;SCOUT EXCHANGE LLC;REEL/FRAME:035497/0904

Effective date: 20150424

AS Assignment

Owner name: LITL LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AQUENT LLC;REEL/FRAME:035535/0465

Effective date: 20100603

Owner name: AQUENT, LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:PENNINGTON, ROBERT SANFORD HAVOC;GUYOT, NOAH BRUCE;KUO, DANIEL;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20091214 TO 20100322;REEL/FRAME:035535/0435

AS Assignment

Owner name: WELLS FARGO CAPITAL FINANCE, LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO PATENT SECUIRTY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AGUENT LLC;REEL/FRAME:036057/0901

Effective date: 20150617

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE

AS Assignment

Owner name: SCOUT EXCHANGE LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS AT REEL/FRAME: 035497/0904;ASSIGNOR:CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC;REEL/FRAME:046364/0443

Effective date: 20180612

Owner name: AQUENT LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS AT REEL/FRAME: 035497/0904;ASSIGNOR:CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC;REEL/FRAME:046364/0443

Effective date: 20180612

Owner name: LITL LLC, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS AT REEL/FRAME: 035497/0904;ASSIGNOR:CRYSTAL FINANCIAL LLC;REEL/FRAME:046364/0443

Effective date: 20180612