US939338A - Electrical transmission of graphic messages. - Google Patents

Electrical transmission of graphic messages. Download PDF

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US939338A
US939338A US1908444227A US939338A US 939338 A US939338 A US 939338A US 1908444227 A US1908444227 A US 1908444227A US 939338 A US939338 A US 939338A
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Gilbert Sellers
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Gilbert Sellers
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N1/00Scanning, transmission or reproduction of documents or the like, e.g. facsimile transmission; Details thereof
    • H04N1/04Scanning arrangements, i.e. arrangements for the displacement of active reading or reproducing elements relative to the original or reproducing medium, or vice versa
    • H04N1/12Scanning arrangements, i.e. arrangements for the displacement of active reading or reproducing elements relative to the original or reproducing medium, or vice versa using the sheet-feed movement or the medium-advance or the drum-rotation movement as the slow scanning component, e.g. arrangements for the main-scanning

Description

G. SELLERS. ELECTRICAL TRANSMISSION OF GRAPHIC MESSAGES.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 18, 1908.

Patented Nov. 9, 1909.

8 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

FIG. 3

[FRom gecnveg Witnesses:

Inventor 6172? r? SeZZenr,

G. SELLERS.

ELEGTRICAL TRANSMISSION OF GRAPHIC MESSAGES.

APPLIOATION FILED JULY 1a, 1908.

939,338, v Patented Nov. 9, 1909.

3 SHEETS-SHEBT 2.

FIG. 4

Inventor Witnesses:

G. SELLERS.

ELECTRICAL TRANSMISSION OF GRAPHIC MESsAGEs.

APPLIOATION FILED JULY 18, 1908.

939,338. Patented, Nov. 9, 1909.

8 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

Inventor Witngsses: 0

W I Glber? ,SeZZmr. a /2 [2E [UL 16711 By J 475% MW A [form ('ys.

tional Encyclopedia, Bell,

UNITED STATES PAEENT OFFICE.

GILBERT SELLERS, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

ELECTRICAL TRANSMISSION OF GRAPHIC MESSAGES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 9, 1909.

Application filed July 18, 1908. Serial N0. 444,227.

ings, forms a full, clear, and exact specification, which will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

his invention has general reference to, and its object is the, improvements in the electrical transmission of graphic messages, pictures, photos, prints, &c., and vislble views of fixed, living, and moving objects, and to reproduce the same at the receiving station either as a graphic message or as a visible, stationary or movable picture; and it consists, essentially, in the novel and peculiar combination of parts and details of construction as hereinafter first fully set -forth and described and then pointed out in the claims.

This invention has its basis upon a series of physical and electrical phenomena and facts the application of which, and the manner in which, they are carried into effect, may be briefly stated, as follows: According to Plateau the persistence of impression on the retina is in ordinary light one half second, such persistence depending on the intensity of the light; Newton observed a spot on the retina or days after looking at the .sun. This is the cause of the streak across the retina due to a rapidly moving object. (See Plateaus investigations in Ganots Physics by Ganot and Atkinson.) Again according to Sale, Siemens, Internm Girard, and others, there are substances-which, when interposed into the electric circuit and exposed to various grades of light, are almost instantaneous in their resistance of the circuit or in lowering and raising the resist-,

ance relative to the light they are bathed in. In the photophone and the speaking arc the wonderful control of electrical resistance is practically proved through the light cast u on crystallized selenium or on a lamp b ack joint. rapid changes to take place in the resistance Such substances cause suchofthe current as to reproduce the human voice ranging from 1,000 semi-vibrations to 40,000. g. '0. Von Hulmholt7s estimations in one second. This means as high and even higher than 20,000 changes may take place in the electrical resistance of a crystallized selenium or lamp black joint in oneahalf second. Then if a selenium point is passed through a field of light containing 20,000 comp ete changes and finish its flight in onehalf second, 10,000 electrical vibrations will be produced in that time -.in the circuit. Again, if a pencil of light pass before the retina over a field corresponding to the field over which the selenium point was passed and durin thesame time, one will see that entire fiel at the latter instant of the li hts passage. Then if the intensity of that fight 1s so regulated by those 10,000 electrlcal vibrations, the illuminated field before .the eye will duplicate the field over which the selenium point was passed. These are the steps that enable me to reproduce such a scene instantaneously and so quickly that a series of scenes may be made to follow in such a short succession that the sensation of movement is the result. In order to carry these principles into efiect and attain the results I construct these instruments substantially as shown in the accompanying sheets of drawings, which serve to fully illustrate this invention, and in which- Figure 1 is a longitudinah'vertical section 1, in Fig. 1, is the sending case or receptacle having a bottom 2,.sides 3, and ends 4:.

In the bottom 2 there is a transverse-slot 5, for the exit of a film 6. Adjacent to one of the ends 4, of the case 1, is journaled, upon a shaft 7, a film containing roller or spool 8,

which roller is provided with a brake band 9, to apply friction to saidspool and thereby prevent undue unrolling of the film 6. In about the center of the case 1 and at the same height .asshaft 7 .is journaled a second is to provide a speed-governing shaft 10, upon which is mounted a filmdeflwting roll 11, from which roller the film 6 deflects downward and passes out of the case 1 through the slot 5. Directly above roller 11 is a feed-roller l3, impin ing upon the film passing between said ro lers 11 and 13. Roller 13 is fastened to a shaft 12, one end of which projects through one of the side walls 3 of the case 1, and has at its extremity a miter-gear 14; meshing with this is a similar gear 15, aflixed to an upright shaft 16, wluch shaft is journaled in a bracket 17, fastened to the extended top 24, said extended top also serving to incase feed-roll 13. At the upper end of shaft 16 is a worm-gear 18, meshing with wormscrew 19 on shaft 20, of a motor 21, said motor being supported on the depressed top 22 of the case 1, and is energized from voltaic cells or other source of electric current 23.

Motor shaft 20 extends beyond worm-screw 19, and near its outer extremity revolves in a bearing in a bracket 25, resting on the curved top 39 of the case 1. On this bracket, and encircling shaft 20 is a cylindrical shell 26, within which are located and revolve brake-shoes 27. These shoes are connected by links 28, through a slot 32, in the shaft 20, to a sliding spindle 29 in the center of said shaft. This spindle 29 terminates in a head 38, to which are connected the shanks 30 of two governor balls 40; the said shanks being pivoted at 31 to the end of the shaft 20. Within the shaft 20, and bearing against the spindle 29 is a spiral spring 33, and against this spring, butts a pin 34.

Upon the shaft 20 is a screw thread 37, overwhich fits a threaded collar 36. Against this collar is placed a key 41 passing through a slot 35 in the shaft 20, which key pushes against the pin 34.

The office of the mechanism just described device for the motor for purposes hereina er to be described. Its operation is as follows: As the motor-speeds up the governor balls 40 are carried outwardly by centrifugal force, and push the spindle 29 inwardly, causing the links 28 to straighten out and the shoes 27 to finally impinge against the inner surface of the stationary shell 26. The friction so enerated will retard the motor speed until lthas fallen off sufliciently to allow the governor balls to drop and withdraw the shoes 27 .from'contact with the-shell. To adjust the governor for various speeds, the collar 36 may be screwed toward or away from the slot 35, and thereby, through the intermedium of the key 41 and pm 34, create greater or lesser pressure upon the spring 33, which, in turn will establish greater or lesser .resistance to movement of the spindle 29.

Mounted upon the shaft 20, at a point central, approximately, between the film rollers 8 and 11 within the case 1, is a disk 42. This disk consists of a hub 43, and two sideplates 44, s aced a proper distance apart b said hub. ear the periphery of this dis 42, and between the side-walls 44 are formed a series of equally-spaced radial cylindrical pockets 45. At the center end of these pockets, and flush with the periphery of the disk are placed condenser-lenses 48, which are so ground as to convert parallel rays of light into divergent rays within the pocket. The bottoms of these pockets 45 are closed by cups of fiber, rubber, or other insulating material 47. Within these cups are fixed circular cells of selenium 46. From these selenium cells lead wires 50 which are connected to one of the lates 44. Wires 49 also lead from the se enium, but they are thoroughly insulated from the plates 44, and are connected to commutator-sectors 51 as described below. Adjacent to the disk 42, on the shaft 20, is located a commutator 52 which is insulated from the shaft by the insulation 53. Upon the periphery of this commutator are a series of metallic sectors 51, radially arranged and insulated from each other, and corresponding in number to the number of pockets -45 within the disk 42. To each one of these sectors is connected a wire 49, mentioned above, from that one of the selenium cells located opposite Each particular sector, as clearly shown in To the shaft-supporting bracket 25, already described, is attached a commutatorbrush stud 55, but thoroughly insulated therefrom by insulation 57. At one end of this stud is attached a binding post 56, to which is led the current-transmlssion wire 60 from the receiving instrument, and at the other end is a' commutator-brush 54, with its free end in contact with one of the commutator sectors 51. To the bracket 25 is fastened a binding-post 58, from which is led the current-transmission line 59 to the receiving instrument. Attention is now called to the fact that when the commutator is revolved, and the brush 54 is passing over the insulating bridge between adjacent sectors 51, the brush is in contact with both adjacent sectors for a very short period of time or space.

The top 39 of the case 1, below the disk 42 is of convex contour, its curvature being concentric to the periphery of said disk, as clearly shown in Fig. 2. Directly below the center of the disk 42, and through the top 39 is located avery narrow slot 61. The length of this slot is equal to the angle formed between the centers of two adjacent pockets 45 in the disk 42, as seen in Fi 2. The relationship of the slot and the poo rets is such that when the disk 42 is revolved, and one of the pockets is passing beyond the range of theslot, the next adjacent pocket is just entering into ran e.- In a similar manner, the relationship pockets and commutator sectors is such that when one pocket is leavin therange of the slot 61, the com- ;mutator-rush is "passing from the commutator-sector belonging to that pocket, tothe sector belon-gln to the pocket jaist enteringintorange 0 said slot. 1

By reference to Fig. 1 it will be observed m that the film 6, already referred to, in

range of the slot 61.

and on either side of the reflector 641- are two a'plane directly below the top- 39', and directl y helow said filmina perpendicular line with the slot 61, is an electric lamp 63 curved rollers, 62 to curvethe surface of the film- 6=to the curvature of the" top 39 as the film is passing across the slot 61. Current for the lamp- 63 isprovidedby the cells.- or other source of current 65. I

Referring to the gears 14, 1:5, 18, and

,worm-screw 19, which compose the filmfeeding mechanism, it will now be understood that the ratio of this gearing is such that the film is fed across the slot 61 as many times the width of the slot 61', as

there are pockets inthe' disk- 42, one revolution of the disk; that is to say,- if there are eight pockets in the disk the fil m must move forward eight times the width ofthe slot during one revolution of the said disk. Every time a pocket with its selenium cell has traversed the range: of the slot, the film has moved forward thewidth of the slot.-

The operation of this sender may now be described as follows: Assuming a live electric circuit to be established by the wires 59 and -60, the governing mechanism is adjusted to the: proper speed, the lamp 63 turned on and motor 21 started. The electrical conductivity of selenium is susceptible to the action of light. Its electrical resistance is susceptible instantaneously to an in finitude of changes by said light-action.

The passing of the film 6 .before' the slot 61,

- with the light projected through said film with its changes in light, and shadow, and contrasts, will afiect the conductivity of the selenium within the pockets as the disk revolves rapidly before" the slot, and there will be set up in the continuous current flowing through the transmission-circuit an infinitude of variations in the intensitythereof, equaling exactly the infinitude of changes in the lights, shadows and contrasts of ,the' image onthe film.

The foregoing description has reference entirely to the transmlssion of an image upon a; film. If, however, it is desired totransmit an image direct from life or nature,-

the' sender illustrated in Fig. 4 is employed. The governing mechanism, the disk, pockets, selenium cells, and motor are precisely the same as in the first instance, but directly in front of the disk 42, Fig. 4:, is located a ground glam 66,- the sole purpose of which is to per mm the functions of arange-finder; In front of this glass is a dark slide 67, having a narrow slot 85, located on a center line with the disk 42 and of a length equaii to the angle formed between the centers of adjacent pockets 45 in the disks 42. The length of this slot determines the width of the Image projected: on Y the ground-glass range finder.

\ To a frame 86,-su-rrounding the dark slide 67 and ground glass 66-, is attached a flexible camera bellows 68, terminating in a camera front 69, in which is afliared a proper photographic lens 70.- This front 69 is susceptible oi a perpendicular movement equal to the height of the image projected on the ground glass and isidedin its motion by the upright guides These guides are stiffened at their upper ends by a brace 72 and at the bottom by the support 73.

Tothe edges of the camera front 69 are pivoted rods 74;, which connect said front with vibratin levers 75, which: levers are journaledat t ei r opposite ends on brackets 81. On said levers 75 are rollers 80 engaging'racewa cams 79; These cams are fixed to a shaft 7, which is journaled in brackets 76. Upon this shaft is keyed a worm gear 78-, which meshes into worm-screw 19' on motor shaft 20'. The raceway cams 79 re volve in the direction of the arrow shown thereon, and in the position shown in Fig. 4!, it will be observed that only a very slight movement is necessary to permit the rollers 80"to drop down the practical radial slots- 8'6, returning the levers 75, connecting rods 74, lens 70, camera front 69, and bellows 68 tothe positions shown in dotted lines in- Fig'. 4. To nullify the shockdue to the sudden drop of these arts spring bumpers are placed under the: rec ends of lovers 75.

These bumpers consist of external cylin drical shells 82 telescoping over smaller shells 83. Within the latter are spiral springs 84, which are in a normally extended? condition. When thepaa-ts above mentioned: drop, the ends of the levers 75. strike shells 82 and compress springs 84, thereby deadening the jar that would otherwise occur;

The speed of the upward movement of the lens and its adjacent parts is equal to the width of the slot for every pocket 45 in the disk 42 that traverses the slot 85 in the dark slide 67. Thus if there" are eight pockets around the disk 42, then the lens moves upward eight widths of the slot for each revolution of the disk.- This upward movement is at a: constant speed, due to the raceway in:

vment is about as 1:250.

The transmission of moving images produced by the progress of a race, a pugihstic encounter, or any other life motion, is accomplished by keeping this sending apparatus in continuous motion, and as the lens completes about 250 cycles per minute, the motion in life will be correctly transformed into an infinitude of current variations in the transmission circuit, through the intermedium of the selenium cells.

In Fig. 5 is illustrated the receiving mechanism, which consists of a case or receptacle 87 having a bottom 88, sides 89, top 90, and a bridge 91 for su porting the operatin mechanism. Upon this bridge near one en of the case is mounted a motor92, operated by a current from a source of electricity 93.

The shaft 95 of this motor has at one end a' the far end of the case 87 and isjournaled in a bracket 115. On said shaft, adjacent to this bracket is keyed a spider 113, having a plurality of equa ly spaced radial arms 117, each terminating in hinge-lugs 118. To these lugs, are hinged, by means of hinge ears 114 and pintles 119, Fig. 9, a plurality of mirrors 112. The opposite ends of these mirrors are connected by lugs 116 and links 111 to a sliding collar 110, which is adapted to freely slide to and fro on shaft 95. The number of mirrors 112 hin ed to the spider 113 corresponds to the num er of pockets 45 in the sending disk 42; also the circle described by the revolution of the mirrors' is of the same diameter as that of the said sending disk. Furthermore, the governor 94 is set to the same speed as the governor on the sending mechanism, and the size of each mirror is the same as the field of the image projected upon the oun'd-glass range finder 66 of the said sending apparatus.

Upon the periphery of the already mentioned sliding co lar 110, is turned a groove 109 for the reception of the forked end 108 of avibrating lever 105. The opposite end of this lever is ivoted to a bracket 107, and intermediate 0 its length, is journaled a roller 106, which fits in spiral groove 120 of a raceway cam 104. Said raceway cam -'roller 106 passin t .radial eaaeee is keyed to a shaft 102, which is suitably journaled in bearings not shown. This shaft also carries a spur gear 103, the latter meshing with intermediate gear 100, which revolves freely on a stud 101, and this in turn, meshes into worm gear 97, and the last named derives motion from the worm screw 96 on the motor shaft 95. Said worm car 97' revolves freely on stud 98 support in bracket 99.

Upon revolving cam 104, it will be observed, that through the action of vibrating lever 105, sliding collar 110, and links 111 the near ends of mirrors 112 will be forced radially. outward until said cam 104 has made one revolution when, because of the hrough the ractically ortion of t e ,oove 120,t e mirrors are su denly returne to their original position. These complete 0 cles are accomplished at the same spec and follow each other with the same ra idity as the cycles of the lens 70, Fig. 4. other words, the motor 92 is synchronized with the motor 21, Figs. 1 and 4, and necessarily the movement of the mirrors is in synchronism with the movement of the said lens 70, or with the movement of the film 6, Fig. 1.

Centrally above the top-most mirror 112 and of a size suflicient to permit rays of light 121 to be spread over the surface of said mirror, is cut an opening 122 in the top 90 of the case 87. Light-rays emanate from a light 123 of great intensity, which light is operated by a current from an electrical source 124. Surrounding this light is a parabolic reflector 125 and in front of the same a condensing lens 126, which focuses the rays 121 upon a small mirror 127. From there the rays are projected through a proper lens 128 and spread over the surface of mirrors 112. Adjoining the lens 128 is an absolutely opaque screen 129 for purposes hereinafter described.

The small mirror 127 is suspended by a fine quartz fiberwire or thread 130 in a high frequency disk galvanometer 131. Below this mirror is sus ended a small silver disk 132 within a coil 133 consistin of a comparatively few turns of insulate wire. This coil, through its binding posts 134 and 135, forms part of the transmission circuit which is composed of the wires 59 and 60, the voltaic cells 136, the said galvanometer 131 and the sending apparatus. Now, the diskgalvanometer 131 has the pro erty of causin the disk 132 to oscillate a out the axis 0 the fiber thread 130, whenever a current, no matter how feeble is passed through the circuit. The are of the oscillation and the rapidity of successive oscillations depends entire of the variations in the intensity of the cury upon the variations and the rapidity 1 rent passing through the circuit. Therefore,

' ceases as created by the selenium cells in the send ing apparatuswill reduce an infinitude of oscillations of the isk 132, the arc of each oscillation representing the light value of that particular portion of the sending image which caused it. And the rapidity of these successive oscillations, will in the same manner correctly represent the light value of the successive portlons of the image as picked up by the selenium cells. The mirror 127 being also attached to the quartz fiber 130 which suspends the disk 132, will naturally oscillate with the disk.

In order to understand the process of reproducing the image in the receiver, attention is called to Figs. 6 7 and 5. Assume the light 123 to be turned on, the motor 92 in operation, and an open circuit in the transmission line. Or, assume the lens 70 of the sender to be capped. In this case the disk 132 of the galvanometer will be in a normal position, and that position is shown in Fig. 6, wherein all the light rays from lamp 123 are blanketed upon dark screen 129 and none of them pass through the lens 128 to the mir rors 112. If the sender now be started and a current established in the transmission line, the disk 132 and mirror 127 will oscillate and permit a portion of the light rays 121 topass through the lens 128 and be deflected upon the mirror 112, the amount of light so passing through the lens being directly proportionate to the light value of that particular portion of the sending image at that precise instant. As the light value of the image increases, the current in theline increases, and the mirror 127 twists through a greater are, permitting a greater portion of light to pass through the lens 128 and upon the mirrors.

112. When the mirror 127 has twisted sufficiently to ermit the full light from the lamp 123 to e spread upon mirrors 112, the equivalent of sunlight streaming through the lens 70 of the sending apparatus has been ther observed that the image of the message,

obtained. The relative position of the mirror 127 to the mirrors 112 is such that the radial movement of the mirrors 112 from the normal to the extreme position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 5, will cause the rays 121 to travel from the point A on said mirrors to point B thereon. This movementocorresponds to the movement of the lens 70, and as the revolution of these mirrors is synchronized to the revolution of the sending disk 42, the exact conditions existing in the sending apparatus are reproduced in the receiver. The li ht values projected upon the mirrors 112 being relatively the-same as in thesending image, the impression produced upon the human eye upon lookin through the opening 122 of the receiver w1ll be that of the image transmitted. It will be furor that of a moving object, a view, &c., received at the receiving station is exhibited to the human eyejlgreuhgh the opening 122 upon the mirrors 112 w ieli arpassing' be; fore the retina of the eye in rapi' succession and overlap each other seas to appear to the eye as a moving picture if the orlginalwa a moving picture, or as a stationary or fixe object, as the case may be. To throw these pictures upon a screen or upon a sensitive film, they arepicked up by a projectlon apparatus (not shown) ofusua construction from the mirrors 112 and then developed in the usual manner. 1

In the foregoing specification I have described the preferred form and construction and instrumentalities with which my present invention is carried into eflt'ect, but I desire it to be distinctly understood that the various details of the several instruments described may be varied in many ways without departing from my invention. Having thus fully described this invention I claim as new and desire to secure to me by LettersPatent of the United States- 1. Means for electrically transmitting graphic messages and views of objects, including a message-sheet of varying degree of transparency; a source of 1i ht; means for projecting the light from sa1d source of 2. The method of electrically transmit-' ting messages and views ofobjects, which conslsts in exposing sald messages, and

views of objects, successively and step by step to a series of rapidly revolving light-sensitive substances which will change its electric con:

ductivity in accordance with the intensity of the lightacting upon said substances, and transmitting the electrical undulations or variations in the intensity of the current and the rapidity of the undulations to a reprodu'cin instrument and to translate these electrical undulations and varying impulses into light-rays of correspondingly varying.

intensity and projecting the same upon a' reflecting surface which renders them visible to the human eye; j,

3. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting messages, pictures and images 0 objects, means for translating said image into a series of electrical im ulses'; a transmission circuit; and means or retranslating these electrical impulses into a duplicate of the sendin image, including a series of revolving re eeting surfaces. e

4. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting messages, pictures and images of objects, means for translating said image into a series of electrical impulses of varying intensity; a transmission-circuit, and means for retransla ting these electrical impulses into a duplicate of the sending image including a series of revolving reflecting surfaces.

5. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting messages, pictures and images of objects, means for translating said image into a series of electrical impulses of varying rapidity; an electrical transmission circult, and means for retranslating said electrical impulses into a duplicate of the original image including a series of revolving reflecting surfaces.

6. Means for translating lights and shades of an image into electric impulses correlated to each other as the lights and shades of the image are correlated, a transmission circuit, means for translating said impulses into correlated light-rays at the receiving station,

7 and further means for projecting said rays upon a reflecting surface to render the same visible, said reflecting surface including a series of revolving mirrors.

7 Means for translating the optical variations of'an image into an undulating current, 'said undulations correlated to each other as said optical variations are correlated, means for transmitting ,said undulations, and further means for retranslating said undulations into a duplicate of the optical variations of the sending image, said means including, a galvanometer and a series of revolving mirrors.

8. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting graphic messages, pictures and images of objects, a transmitting instrument, including a transparent or translucent message-sheet; a source of light; a motor; a disk; a series ofcells in said disk; an element in said cells capable of being electrically excited by rays of light; an electric circuitv of which the electrically excitable element forms a part; means for operating said motor; and means for moving the message-strip between the source of light and the cells, said cells and the means for moving the messa e-sheet being revolved by said motor at pre etermined speed.

9. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting graphic messages, pictures and images of objects, a transmitting instrument, including a suitable message-sheet; a source of light; a motor; a circular disk; a series of cells in said disk; a selenium-element in each of said cells and insulated therefrom; a motor-operating means; means for moving the message-sheet between the source 0 light and the selenium-elements; a commu- 'tator consisting of a series of sections each said source of light 11 on the revolving disk.

and its cells, and an e ectric circuit of which said element is a part.

11. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting messages, pictures, and images of objects, means for projectin said message, picture and image successive y and step-bystep upon a revolving disk having a sense of cel s each of which contains an element which is electrically afi'ected by the light and shade of said message to increase and decrease its electric conductivity in accord with the lighter and darker portions of said image, and an electric circuit of which said clement forms a part.

12. In an apparatus for electrical transmission of graphic messages, pictures and images of objects, a transmitting instrument including a transparent or translucent message-strip; a light-secure chamber; a slotted aperture in said chamber, a source of light below, and in-line of, said aperture; a series of revolving cells located above said aperture; a motorfmeans for governing the speed of said motor, an electric circuit of which said revolving cells are a part, and means for moving the message-strip below said slotted aperture and above the source of light. i

13. In an apparatus for electrically transmitting messa es, pictures and images of objects, a son ing instrument, including a light-tight case; a source of light in said case; a reflector surrounding said source of light, there being a slotted aperture in said case through which the rays of light are projected; a transparent or translucent message-sheet containing a picture of the matter to be transmitted; means for moving said message-sheet between said source of li ht and the slotted aperture; a revolving isk having a series of cells; seleniumelements in said cells and insulated therefrom but electrically connected with said disk; a motor; a source of electrical energy to operate said motor; means for revolving said disk and moving said message-sheet at predetermined speeds; a governor for regulating the speed of said motor, a commutator, the several sections of which are elec- V the rays trically connected with each of said selenium elements, and an electric circuit of which said disk and its selenium elements are a art.

ratus as described, a rotatable disk; a series of cells in said disk; a commutator, the sections of which correspond in number with that of the cells in the disk, and a speedgovernor having means for regulating and s chronizing the number of revolutions 1n tii: transmitting and receiving instruments.

15. In a transmitting apparatus as described, a rotatable disk; a series of cellsin said disk, a commutator having a series of sections corresponding with the number of cells in said disk and in electrical connection therewith; a motor for revolving said disk; a overnor for re ulating the speed of saiddis a series of eed-rolls; a suitable message-sheet; and means for moving said message-sheet at a unison with the revo utions of said disk.

16. In an apparatus of the kind described, the combination, with a transmitting instrument which translates a picture, and view of objects, into a series of electrical impulses of varying rapidity, and intensity, of a transmission circuit for said impulses; a receiving instrument including a source of light, a alvanometer; means for directin roin said source of light upon sai galvanometer and means for directing the rays of light from said galvanometer to a reflecting surface consistlng of a series of revolving mirrors, whereby the electrical impulses received at the receiving instruments are retranslated into a visible image of the matter sent by the sending apparatus.

17. In an apparatus of the ind described, the combination, with a sendin instrument which translates a message whic consists of a graphic or visible picture or image into a series of electrical impulses of varying rapidity and intensity, 0 a transmission circu t'for said electrical impulses; a receiving instrument including means for converting these electrical impulses into rays of light 14. n a transmitting and receiving apparedetermined s eed in 0f varyng intensity; a series of reflecting surfaces; means for projecting these rays of light upon said reflecting surfaces, the angularity of which may be varied to correspond with the variations of the electric current received at the receiving station.

18. In an apparatus of the kind described, the combination, with a transmitting instrument which translates a message consisting of a graphic picture, and a view of objects, into a series of electrical impulses of varying rapidity and intensity, of a transmission circuit for said electrical impulses; a receiving instrument including a galvanometer acted u on by said electrical impulses, a source of ight; means for projecting the rays of light rom said source of light upon the reflecting mirror of said galvanometer; a reflecting surface consistin of a series of mirrors mountedupon an ax e, a motor for revolving said mirror, and means for changing' the angularity of said mirrors, whereby the varying electrical impulses acting u on the galvanometer translate these impu ses into a visible picture of the message sent by the transmitting instrument.

19. In a receiving instrument for electrical impulses varying in intensity and rapidity, means for translating these varying impulses into rays of light of varying intensity, and an instrument for rendering these rays of li ht visible, said means including a suitab e case; an electric motor in said caser a reflector consisting of a series GILBERT SELLERS. Attest:

WILLIAM O. STARK, MICHAEL J. STARK.

US1908444227 1908-07-18 1908-07-18 Electrical transmission of graphic messages. Expired - Lifetime US939338A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2570288A (en) * 1949-05-03 1951-10-09 Howard Paper Mills Inc Photoelectric inspection of sheet materials

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2570288A (en) * 1949-05-03 1951-10-09 Howard Paper Mills Inc Photoelectric inspection of sheet materials

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