US933128A - Hot-air heater. - Google Patents

Hot-air heater. Download PDF

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Publication number
US933128A
US933128A US34358206A US1906343582A US933128A US 933128 A US933128 A US 933128A US 34358206 A US34358206 A US 34358206A US 1906343582 A US1906343582 A US 1906343582A US 933128 A US933128 A US 933128A
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Prior art keywords
drum
casing
heater
heating
air
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US34358206A
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Robert L Short
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CURTIS C LINHART
HARVEY S LINHART
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CURTIS C LINHART
HARVEY S LINHART
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Priority to US34358206A priority Critical patent/US933128A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT-GENERATING MEANS, e.g. HEAT PUMPS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters
    • F24H3/006Air heaters using fluid fuel

Description

R. L. SHORT.
HOT AIR HEATER.
APPLICATION FILED NOV. 15, 1906.
Patented Sept. 7, 1909.
WITNESSES:
UNITED STATES PA ENT OFFICE.
'nonnn'r 'L. snow, or ros'i'onu, onto, as sxclvon, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO HARVEY a. murmur AND corms c. murmur.
HOT-AIR nnnrnn.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Sept. 7, 1909.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, Roumrr L. SHORT, a citizen of the United States, residin at Fostoria, in the couhty of Seneca and tate of Ohio, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Hot-Air Heaters, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being bad to the accompanying drawings. v
This invention relates to air heating systems, and it has particular'reference to a heater that is depressed below the floor level, the upper surface of the heater being supported upon the floor and consisting of an open grate structure similar to that employed in the ordina hot air register.
The heater is inten ed especially-for use with gas, and it has the advantages of economy in the use of fuel, of at heating capacity, and of use in such position that the heater occupies practically no space in the rooms where used.
In the drawings a'ccompan. ing this application, Figure l is a vertica central longi-' tudinal section through the heater showing the arrangement of the parts therein. Fig. 2 is a transverse horizontal section taken substantially on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.
In the ordinary hot .air stems where a large furnace is employed, with hot air pipes leading to registers throughout the building,
. there is necessarily a great loss ofheat incipipes. Furthermore,
dent to the transmission of-the hot air from the furnace to the various re 'sters and in the incidental heating oilthe said conducting in the use of suc furnaces when but little heat'is required, there is always a considerableloss. due to the employment of a large furnace. In my heater, this loss is almost entirely avoided for the reason that there are no conducting pipes to be heated, and the heaters being; located immediately beneath the floors of the rooms to be heated, *there can be no loss due to any of the above mentioned causes. M system of heating, therefore, has the a the heat at the various vantage of locating 'nts needed, the eating devices soloca'ted eing underabsolute control, from the roon r This outside casing has a horizontal flange 3 at its upper end, which flange rests upon the floor and supports the heater. The casing is continuous across-its bottom 4, with the exception of a small 0 ening at the center through which the fue ipe 5 is extended. At'one side and near tli the casing, I provide a door 6 through which access may be had to the burner for lightin and adjusting the same; The upper end 0 the casing 2 is open, except for, a ated cover 7, similiar to the cover for the or inary e bottom ofto be heated, whereby eat convenience in .control of the heating evices is secured.
hot-air register, said cover being provided on its lower side with a flange 8 which or tends gust inside the upper end of the casing 2, sai flange not only holding the cover in place, but also strengthening the upper end of the casing.
Secured to the bottom of the cas1ng,'near each of the sides of the latter, are brackets 9, said brackets extending upwardly and thence inwardly toward the center' ofythecasing. In their horizontal portion these brackets are provided with openings 10 for the passage of the-air, as will be hereinafter described. Supported upon said horizontal portions of the brackets is the interior heating drum 11, said drum being completely closed except at'the center of its lower end where an opening 12 is'provided. Within the'interior of the drum 11, and'supported from the sides thereof by brackets 13 is a funnel-shaped member 14, the lower portion or" apex of said member bein direct y over the center of the opening 12. v irectly below the'apex of the member 14 is the burner 15. AS appears from Fig. 1, the flame, covering the upper surface of the burner, impinges against the lower surface of the 'funnelshaped member 14, whichspreads the flame outward and causes the heat to be directed against the outer surface of the heating drum l1, thereby heating said drum to a very high temperature.
While the amountof fuel consumed may be regulated in the burner, I provide in the fuel pipe 5,'a valve 28, by means of which the amount of fuel may be controlled or may beentirely cut off." To said valve, which may be of'any suitable form, I attach a crank lever 29, to the"free end of which I secure a chain or other 'fife'xible connection 30, said chain passing upwardlythrough the floor 1, within reach of the operator, who, by lifting upon said chain, may open the valve to any desired extent. For automatically closing the valve, I hang upon the free end of the crank lever 29, a weight 31, which is suflicient to rock the valve and close the same when the chain 30 is loosened.
In order that the burner may be always in condition for use, I provide the same with a pilot light, the" necessary fuel for the same being supplied throu h a small pipe 32, that extends from the i lel pipe 5, at a point in advance of the valve 28. By thus arran 'ng'the the p1 ot light lrrespective of the condition of the valve 28. In order to cut off the supply fuel for the pilot light, I provide the pipe 32 with a valve, 33. v
Surrounding the heating drum 11, and resting upon the brackets 9 above the opening 10 in the latter, is a cylinder being of somewhat larger diameter than the drum so as to afford a ,circumferential passage for the heated air. 'This passage is divided by partition plates 35 into a plurality of vertically disposed flues 26, said flues extending from the space below the brackets 9 to the upper end of the heating drum- 11. Also surrounding the cylinder 34, and resting upon the brackets 9, is an open ended drum 37 said drum being constructed at its upper end, as shown at 38, so as to deflect the heated air inwardly away from the floor 1. The drum 37 is spaced from the cylinder 34 so as to afford a circumferential passage 39 for the heated air.
In order to prevent the products ofcombustion from passing into the room, I proyide my heater with a pipe 40, said pipe be- 1ng conducted through the casing and the various heating drums at a point somewhat above the funnel-shaped member 14, the inner end of said pipe being bent downwardly so that its open endis above the center of said member 14, and almost on a level with the upper edges thereof. This pipe will of course be carried to a chimney so that the gases will be safely conducted from the heater.
pipe 32, fuel is supplied for understood that in the operation of the heater the hot air will ascend through the flues 36 and the space 39, displacing the air below the heating drum, and the cold air will pass downwardly inside of the casing 2 and outside of the drum 37, as indicated by the arrows in Fig. 1. The cylinder 34, with the partitions or vanes 35, form a very extended heating surface for the air passing about the same. By turning in the upper end of the drum 37, as shown, the heated air is diverted from the edges of the plate 7,
,and the cold air coming down through the plate about 'its edges, keeps the heater always cold near the floor, thereby avoiding all danger of overheating.
I claim:
1. The combination, with a floor, of a hot-air heater having a drum, means for heating said drum, a second drum surrounding the first mentioned drum, and spaced therefrom, a third drum surrounding both drums and constricted at its upper end, and
means for causing the cold air to pass downwardly outside the third drum, whereby the heated air passes upwardly between said drums and is directed away from the floor. 2. The combination, with floor, of a hot air heater having a drum t at is closed at its upper end, a cylinder surrounding said drum and spaced'therefrom, vanes dividing the space between the drum and cylinder into 'a plurality of flues,- thereby affording an extended heating surface, a second drum surrounding and spaced from said cylinder, said second drum' being constricted at its upper end for diverting the heated air from the floor, means for heating the first mentioned drum, and means for supporting said drums, cylinder and heating means from the floor of the room to be heated. 3. In a hot air heater, a casing, a drum supported within the said casing such position'as to-aiford a passage for air beneath the drum, said drum being closed at its upper end and having an opening in its lower end, a burner so located with respect to the said opening in the drum as to. cause the flame to pass within the drum, a device mounted within the drum above the heater for spreading the flame toward the sides of the drum, a pipe leading into said drum above said spreadin device for conducting the products of comlgustion from the heater, and an open-ended drum surrounding the first mentioned drum and spaced therefrom,
ing affording a passage for cold air.
4. In a hot air heater, a casing, a drum supported within the said casing in such position as to afford a passage for air beneath the drum; said drum being closed at its upper end and having an opening in its lower end, a burner so located with respect to the said opening in the drum as to cause the flame to pass within the drum, a funnelshaped member mounted within the drum above the burner for spreading the flame toward the sides of the drum, a pipe leading into said drum above said spreading member for conducting the products of combustion from the heater, and an open-ended druin surrounding the first mentioned drum and spaced therefrom, said open-ended drum be ing constricted at its upper end, the space between the drums affording a passage for hot air and the space between the open-' ended drum and the casing affording a passage for cold air.
In a hot air heater, a casing that is sup ported from the floor of the room to be heated, said casing being closed at its lower end, bracketssecured to the lower end of the casing within the same, a heating drum mounted upon said brackets, a .burner for heating said drum, and an open-ended drum also supported upon said brackets, said open-ended drum surrounding and being spaced from the heating drum, for the purpose specified.
6. In 'a hot air heater, a casing that is supported from the floor of the room to be heated, said casing being closed at its lower end, brackets secured to the lower end of the casing within the same, a heating drum mounted upon'said brackets, a burner for heating said drum, and an open-ended drum also supported upon said brackets, said open-ended drum surrounding and being spaced from the heating drum, and said open-ended drum being constricted at its upper end, for the purpose specified.
(. In a hot air heater, a drum that is closed at its upper end, said. drum having an openin' in its lower end, means for supporting 831d drum from the floor of the room to be heated, a burner below the opening in the said drum, so that the ,flame of the burner will pass into the drum, a funnel-shaped spreading member carried by the drum above the burner, a pipe leading into the drum above the spreading member for conducting the products of combustion from the heater,
and means for diverting the heated air away' from the 'floor.
8 In a hot air heater, a casing that is su ported below the floor of the room to iie heated, brackets within said casing, a heating drum supported upon said brackets, said heating drum being centrally arranged with-- in the casing and having its upper end closed, a cylinder surrounding said drum and spaced therefrom, vanes connecting the cylinder and drum and dividing the space having an opening below said spreading de v vice, a burner below said opening, and a pipe leading intothe said first mentioned drum for conducting the products of combustion from the heater.
9. In a hot air heater, a casing that is supported below the floor of the room to e heated, brackets within saidcasing, a heating drum supported upon said brackets, said heating drum being-centrally arranged within the casing, and having its upper end closed, a cyllnder surrounding said drum and spaced therefrom, vanes connecting the cylinder and drum and dividing the space therebetween into a plurality of fines, an open-ended drum also supported u on said Jorackets and surrounding said cy der so 'as to afford a circumferential space there between, the upper end'of said open-ended cylinder being constrictedfor the purpose specified, a funnel-shaped spreading device within the first mentioned drum, said drum having an opening below said spreading de-' vice, a burner below said opening, and a pipe leading into the said first mentloned drum above the spreadin device for conducting the products of COIIEHIStlQD. from the heater. 10. In a floor heater adapted to be su ported. from a floor-with its upper end su stantially flush with the .floor, the combination of a casing depending'fronr the floor and closed at its lower end, an open ended drum supported within said casing and leaving an air space between it and the easing, the upper endof said drum .being constricted, an inner drum within the drum first mentioned, an air assagewa formed between the two drums, an a burnefwithin the inner drum.-
11. In a floor heater, the combination of a casing adapted to de end from the-floor of the room to be heated said casing having a" closed lowere'nd, brackets near the lower end of said casi two c'oncentric drums supported on said brackets, means for heating the innermost ,dr'um, whereby" the air, may pass downward between the casing andon-ter rum and upward between said drum and the. innermostdrum, said innermost drum havingv its uopper end closed, a-burner .discharging pr nets of combustion into said innermost drum,-and a pi away such products of com ustion.
12. In a'floor heater, the combination of 'a casing adapted .to depend from the floor and" having a closed lower end, a drum within being for conducting the casing supported above the bottom there of and open at its upper end, a drum'within the open-ended drum and closed at its up er I the innermost drum through the outermost end, whereb an air passageway is provl ed drum and casing for such products of comdownward rom the room between the casbu'stion,
ing 'and outermost drum and upward be- I In testimony whereof, I hereunto eflix my 5 tween the two drums, the outermost drum signature in the presence of two witnesses. 15
being constricted at its upper end to direct .ROBERT L SHORT the air across the upper end of the innermost drum, 2 burner adapted to discharge Witnesses: the products of combustion into the inner- T. J. HESSEY, 10 most drum, there being a pipe leading from WILLIAM H. BURK.
US34358206A 1906-11-15 1906-11-15 Hot-air heater. Expired - Lifetime US933128A (en)

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