US9232781B2 - Electrified bird repellent track - Google Patents

Electrified bird repellent track Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US9232781B2
US9232781B2 US14/714,817 US201514714817A US9232781B2 US 9232781 B2 US9232781 B2 US 9232781B2 US 201514714817 A US201514714817 A US 201514714817A US 9232781 B2 US9232781 B2 US 9232781B2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
device
conductive trace
carrier
shape
conductive
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active
Application number
US14/714,817
Other versions
US20150245604A1 (en
Inventor
Bruce Donoho
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Bird B Gone Inc
Original Assignee
Bird B Gone Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation
Priority to US11/376,270 priority Critical patent/US7802396B2/en
Priority to US14571509P priority
Priority to US12/689,406 priority patent/US8196340B2/en
Priority to US12/890,328 priority patent/US7937885B2/en
Priority to US12/959,834 priority patent/US8020340B2/en
Priority to US13/043,204 priority patent/US8015747B2/en
Priority to US13/224,183 priority patent/US8196341B2/en
First worldwide family litigation filed litigation Critical https://patents.darts-ip.com/?family=44149298&utm_source=google_patent&utm_medium=platform_link&utm_campaign=public_patent_search&patent=US9232781(B2) "Global patent litigation dataset” by Darts-ip is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Priority to US13/472,773 priority patent/US8286385B2/en
Priority to US13/652,221 priority patent/US8407932B2/en
Priority to US13/768,295 priority patent/US8615922B2/en
Priority to US14/107,638 priority patent/US9032663B2/en
Assigned to BIRD-B-GONE, INC. reassignment BIRD-B-GONE, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DONOHO, BRUCE
Priority to US14/714,817 priority patent/US9232781B2/en
Application filed by Bird B Gone Inc filed Critical Bird B Gone Inc
Publication of US20150245604A1 publication Critical patent/US20150245604A1/en
Publication of US9232781B2 publication Critical patent/US9232781B2/en
Application granted granted Critical
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M29/00Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus
    • A01M29/24Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus using electric or magnetic effects, e.g. electric shocks, magnetic fields or microwaves
    • A01M29/26Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus using electric or magnetic effects, e.g. electric shocks, magnetic fields or microwaves specially adapted for birds, e.g. electrified rods, cords or strips
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M19/00Apparatus for the destruction of noxious animals, other than insects, by hot water, steam, hot air, or electricity
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M29/00Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus
    • A01M29/24Scaring or repelling devices, e.g. bird-scaring apparatus using electric or magnetic effects, e.g. electric shocks, magnetic fields or microwaves
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C65/00Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C65/56Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor using mechanical means or mechanical connections, e.g. form-fits
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05CELECTRIC CIRCUITS OR APPARATUS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR USE IN EQUIPMENT FOR KILLING, STUNNING, OR GUIDING LIVING BEINGS
    • H05C1/00Circuits or apparatus for generating electric shock effects
    • H05C1/04Circuits or apparatus for generating electric shock effects providing pulse voltages
    • H05C1/06Circuits or apparatus for generating electric shock effects providing pulse voltages operating only when touched
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4998Combined manufacture including applying or shaping of fluent material

Abstract

An animal deterring device has a carrier with a first conductive trace that is separated from a second conductive trace. The carrier has a bottom with a first glue trough disposed beneath the first conductive trace. The first conductive trace is coupled to the carrier by a first fastener that extends from the first glue trough to the first conductive trace.

Description

This application is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/107,638, filed on Dec. 16, 2013, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/768,295, filed on Feb. 15, 2013, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,615,922, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/652,221, filed on Oct. 15, 2012, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,407,932, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/472,773, filed on May 16, 2012, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,286,385, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/224,183, filed on Sep. 1, 2011, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,196,341, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/043,204, filed on Mar. 8, 2011, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,015,747, which is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/959,834, filed on Dec. 3, 2010, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,020,340, which is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/890,328, filed on Sep. 24, 2010, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 7,937,885, which is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/376,270, filed on Mar. 14, 2006, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 7,802,396. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/043,204 is also a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/689,406, filed on Jan. 19, 2010, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 8,196,340, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/145,715, filed on Jan. 19, 2009. These and all other extrinsic materials discussed herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety. Where a definition or use of a term in an incorporated reference is inconsistent or contrary to the definition of that term provided herein, the definition of that term provided herein applies and the definition of that term in the reference does not apply.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The field of the invention is animal deterrents, and especially as they relate to bird deterrents.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

There are numerous animal deterring devices known in the art, and many of those use electric current to deter, and in some case even kill birds and other relatively small animals. For example, where a relatively large structure is to be protected, a blanket can be configured to include a plurality of vertically arranged and spaced apart electrodes as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,925,748. While such devices may protect a relatively large area, numerous disadvantages remain. Among other things, pooling of water must be avoided at all times to allow for continuous operation. Moreover, as such devices are typically flexible, inadvertent short circuiting may occur by folding or bending a portion of the blanket.

Other known electrified devices include those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,015,176 and EP 1 314 355 in which a string-shaped carrier includes conductive traces embedded or attached to the carrier. Similarly, string-shaped structures may be formed from braided wire that further includes insulator disks as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,031,353. While such devices are generally simple to manufacture and operate, various difficulties remain. Among other problems, such devices often fail to operate properly when moisture or rain runs along the wire, or where droppings are deposited on the wire. Similar disadvantages are observed in devices that have a rail with partially embedded conductive traces from which raised conductive tabs protrude as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 6,006,698, or in devices having a rail with two elevated conductive traces as described in U.S. Pat. App. No. 20050132635. Such devices are particularly sensitive to puddling or fecal contamination.

In still further known electrified deterring devices, conductive traces are mounted to an elevated carrier portion that includes spaces to allow for drainage and flexible installation as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 6,283,064 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,928,768. While such devices are often more reliable than known devices when exposed to moisture or droppings, other disadvantages arise. For example, due to the raised position of the wires, installation is frequently esthetically less pleasing than relatively flat rail-type structures. Moreover, positioning of the wires is at a fixed distance and in a manner that will allow at least some birds to perch in a position in which the bird will not receive the electrical impulse or current.

Therefore, while there are numerous devices and methods for deterring animals, and especially birds are known in the art, all or almost all of them suffer from various disadvantages. Thus, there is still a need for new configurations and methods for bird deterrents.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to configurations and methods for animal deterring devices in which at least two electrically conductive traces are mounted on a carrier and in which the two traces are separated by an arc suppressor.

In one aspect of the inventive subject matter, an animal deterring device comprises a stripe-shaped carrier having a first conductive trace that is separated from a second conductive trace by an umbrelloid arc suppressor, wherein the carrier has a cutout that is configured to allow bending of the device and wherein the device has a height to width ratio between 1:5 and 1:2. It is generally preferred that the carrier in such devices is fabricated from a flexible material, and/or that the carrier has one or more cutouts that are configured to allow bending of the device (e.g., to accommodate horizontal and/or vertical curvature). As above, exemplary umbrelloid arc suppressors may have a T-shape, a stemmed inverted U-shape, or a stemmed inverted V-shape.

Moreover, it is generally preferred that the arc suppressor is continuous along the length of the carrier, and that at least one of the first and second conductive traces are continuous along the length of the carrier. Where desired, at least part of the carrier and/or at least part of the arc suppressor is angled, wherein the angle is selected such that when the device is installed on a horizontal surface water runs off the angled part. Most typically, the first and second conductive traces are spaced apart at a distance that allows formation of an electric circuit via a foot of a bird (e.g., adult pigeon or adult seagull).

Various objects, features, aspects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of one exemplary device according to the inventive subject matter.

FIG. 1B is a vertical cross sectional view of the exemplary device of FIG. 1A.

FIGS. 2A to 2D are exemplary alternative shapes for contemplated umbrelloid arc suppressors.

FIGS. 3A-3B are perspective and vertical cross-sectional views, respectively, of another embodiment of a bird deterrent device.

FIG. 3C is a perspective view of the bird deterrent device of FIG. 3A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The inventor has discovered that animal deterring devices can be manufactured in which at least two electrically conductive traces are mounted on a carrier and in which the two traces are separated by an arc suppressor. Most typically, the arc suppressor in contemplated devices will have an umbrelloid shape and/or a configuration effective to increase creep distance between the first and second conductive traces by at least 1.5 times.

One exemplary embodiment is depicted in FIG. 1A in which the device 100A has a rail shape. Here, carrier 102A is typically manufactured from a thermoplastic elastomer or rubber-containing compound to which the conductive traces 120A and 122A are coupled (e.g., glued, stapled, sewn, etc.). The traces 120A and 122A are separated by the arc suppressor 110A that has an umbrelloid shape (here: T-shape). The traces may be coupled to the carrier on a horizontal or angled (104A) surface as shown in FIG. 1A. The carrier may further include one or more cutouts 106A (shown in dashed lines), which are most preferably configured such that the device can be bent sideways while resting on a horizontal surface without warping of the carrier. It should be noted that the shape of the arc suppressor will generate a space 112A that is protected from contact with conductive material falling vertically (and even from falling at an angle of up to 45 degrees, and more) onto the device. Still further, it should be noted that the shape of the arc suppressor will also provide for a vertical clearance (i.e., empty space between the shortest vertical distance between at least one of the conductive traces and the top surface of the device or the arc suppressor) that is effective in disrupting a conductive film, flow, and/or layer between the traces.

Typically, the carrier 102B will have a strip or otherwise elongated configuration, and is most preferably relatively flat such that the device can be bent, or even provided in a rolled-up configuration. FIG. 1B depicts a vertical cross section of the device in which the carrier 102B has an angled section 104B and a horizontal section onto which the conductive traces 120B and 122B are mounted. Between the traces is the arc suppressor 110B. It should be recognized that contemplated devices may not only have an arc suppressor that separates the first and second conductive traces, but may also have an (second) arc suppressor that separates at least one of the conductive traces from the material upon which the device is mounted (e.g., metal roof). With respect to the shape of contemplated second arc suppressors it should be recognized that the second suppressor will have a downward facing surface that forms in combination with another surface an edge or other protruding shape from which water, condensation, or other liquid will run off. A metal wire of other deformable material may be included to maintain a particular shape where the carrier is intentionally deformed.

It should still be especially appreciated that the shape of the arc suppressor will elongate the creep distance between the conductive traces at least 1.5 times, thereby preventing all or almost all circumstances where moisture, dew, or rain may cause short-circuiting. As used herein, the term “creep distance” refers to a distance that is measured between two points on a body when following the shortest path between those points along the surface of that body. As also used herein, the term “umbrelloid shape” refers to any shape of an element that is coupled to the device where that element has a downward facing surface portion when the device is installed on a horizontal surface. Most typically, the downward facing portion is contiguous with an upward facing portion, and the element will therefore have a sharp angled or rounded edge from which water or other fluids can drip off. Viewed from a different perspective, elements with umbrelloid shape will generally have a downward facing portion and an upward facing portion that are either substantially parallel (+/−15 degrees), or form an angle between 15 and less than 90 degrees. Exemplary umbrelloid shapes are depicted in FIGS. 2A to 2D. Suitable umbrelloid shapes therefore especially include a T-shape, a stemmed inverted U-shape, and a stemmed inverted V-shape.

With respect to the carrier, it is contemplated that the carrier may be fabricated from numerous materials, including natural and synthetic materials, wood, glass, metals and metal alloys, and all reasonable combination thereof. However, especially preferred materials include those that provide sufficient flexibility to the carrier to allow the carrier to conform to uneven surfaces. Most preferably, the carrier is soft enough to be manually deformed. It is also noted that where the carrier is especially pliable, a desired form may be retained by inclusion of a more resilient element within or coupled to the carrier. For example, contemplated carriers may include a metal wire or other deformable element that assists the carrier to maintain a desired configuration. Furthermore, it is generally preferred that the carrier material is non-conductive and that the conductive traces are coupled to the carrier in a relatively simple manner (e.g., via gluing, sewing, stapling, etc.). However, in alternative aspects, the carrier may also be made from, or include a conductive material. In such devices, it is then contemplated that only one conductive trace may be needed, and that such trace is typically coupled to the carrier via an insulator.

It is still further preferred that the carrier is generally flat (i.e., has a width and length that is larger than the height) and configured as a stripe or has an otherwise elongated structure, wherein the particular width and height are in most circumstances determined by the size of bird or other animal that is to be deterred. Thus, and most commonly, the carrier will be configured such that entire device has a height to width ratio between 1:5 and 1:2, and more typically between 1:4 and 1:3. For example, suitable carriers may have a width between 1 cm and 10 cm, more typically between 2 cm and 7 cm, and most typically between 3 cm and 5 cm. The length of such devices is generally determined by the desired overall length of the device or device segment and may therefore vary between several cm and several meters and even longer. The height of contemplated devices will generally be between 1 mm and 3 cm, and more typically between 3 mm and 1 cm. Further contemplated carriers may include one or more cutouts having a size that allows side-to-side flexing of the carrier. For example, such cutouts may be formed to allow positioning the carrier in a 90 degree angle with a radius of less than 20 cm, more preferably less than 15 cm, and most preferably less than 10 cm.

First and second conductive traces are typically spaced apart at a distance that allows formation of an electric circuit when a foot of a bird (e.g., an adult pigeon, an adult seagull) rests on the device. Therefore, and depending on the particular bird, suitable distances between first and second traces will be between 5 mm and 2 cm, and more typically between 7 mm and 1.5 cm. In still further preferred aspects, the first and second conductive traces are parallel to the arc suppressor, and/or at least one of the first and second conductive traces are continuous along substantially (+/−5%) the entire length of the carrier. Where desirable, at one part of the carrier is angled to a degree such that when the device is installed on a horizontal surface water runs off the angled part. Depending on the particular configuration, the angled part may include the portion to which the trace is coupled, and/or a portion between conductive trace and the arc suppressor or the outer edge of the carrier.

With respect to the arc suppressor, it is generally preferred that the arc suppressor has an umbrelloid shape and is continuous along the length of the carrier. While there are numerous alternative configurations are contemplated for the arc suppressor, it is generally preferred that the arc suppressor increases the creep distance at least 1.5 times, more typically at least 1.7 times, even more typically at least 2.0 times, and most typically at least 2.2 time. In especially preferred aspects, the arc suppressor has an umbrelloid shape and a height to width ratio between 1: and 1:1, and more typically between 1:6 and 1:1. For example, contemplated arc suppressors generally include stemmed structures in which a first generally vertical element carries a horizontal or curved element to form a T-shape, a stemmed inverted V-shape, a stemmed inverted U-shape, or an otherwise stemmed structure that has at least one generally horizontally extending protrusion. Depending on the particular shape, it should be appreciated that a vertical gap will be formed between at least part of the arc suppressor and the portion of the carrier to which the traces are coupled, and that such gap will assist in breaking a layer of conductive material that extends across the device.

Further alternative arc suppressors will resemble in shape insulator chains as known from high voltage power lines. While not limiting to the inventive subject matter, it is generally preferred that the arc suppressor is continuous along substantially the entire length (+/−5%) of the carrier. To further facilitate run-off of moisture, condensation, mist, or other fluids, it is generally preferred that at least part of the arc suppressor may be angled, wherein the angle is selected such that when the device is installed on a horizontal surface water runs off the angled part. Therefore, particularly preferred devices will have a stripe-shaped carrier having a first conductive trace that is separated from a second conductive trace by an umbrelloid arc suppressor, wherein the device has a height to width ratio between 1:5 and 1:2.

Another embodiment of a bird deterrent device 300 is shown in FIGS. 3A-3C, in which the device 300 has an elongated carrier 302, to which conductive traces 320 and 322 can be coupled using any commercially suitable fastener(s) including, for example, glues and other adhesives, and metal and plastic staples, thread, and other mechanical fasteners, and any combination(s) thereof. Carrier 302 can be manufactured from a thermoplastic elastomer or rubber-containing compound, or other commercially suitable materials or combinations thereof. In preferred embodiments, the carrier 302 is relatively flat such that the device 300 can be bent, or even provided in a rolled-up configuration.

Traces 330 and 332 are preferably knitted, such as those described in U.S. patent publ. no. 2010/0180490 to Donoho, although braided traces are also contemplated.

In preferred embodiments, each of the conductive traces 320 and 322 are coupled to carrier 302 by threads 330 and 332, respectively. The traces 320 and 322 may be coupled to the carrier 302 on a horizontal surface or an angled surface 304, and are preferably disposed over glue troughs 340 and 342, respectively. In especially preferred embodiments, the first trace 320 is coupled to the carrier 302 by a thread 330 that extends from the first trace 320 to the first glue trough 340 to form first and second seams 350 and 352, respectively, and the second trace 322 is coupled to the carrier 302 by a thread 332 that extends from the second trace 322 to the second glue trough 342 to form third and fourth seams 354 and 356, respectively. Sewing traces 320 and 322 to the carrier 302 advantageously allows the traces 320 and 322 to flex as the carrier 302 flexes.

Furthermore, sewing the traces 320 and 322 to glue troughs 340 and 342 rather than the bottom of carrier 302 advantageously raises the seams 350 and 352 from the bottom of carrier 302, which ensures that that an accumulation of water beneath the carrier 302 will not short the traces 320 and 322 due to absorption of water by thread 330 and/or 332. Moreover, glue can be disposed in glue troughs 340 and 342 to attach the carrier 302 to a surface, which can create a barrier between any accumulated water and seams 354 and 356 to further prevent water from being absorbed by, and seeping up, threads 330 and 332. In this manner, shorting of one or both of traces 320 and 322 can be prevented because water is prevented from seeping up threads 330 and 332. If the threads 330 and 332 were otherwise extended to a bottom of carrier 302, rain or other sources of water could be absorbed by, and seep up, thread 330 or 332, which could cause trace 320 or 322 to short.

In some contemplated embodiments, the traces 320 and 322 can be coupled to the carrier 302 using plastic thread, metal staples, or plastic staples, for example, which would also prevent water from seeping up the fasteners.

In other contemplated embodiments, the traces 320 and 322 can be separated by an arc suppressor 310 having an T-shape, although other umbrelloid shapes or other commercially suitable shapes could be used that are sufficient to prevent the traces 320 and 322 from arching. It should be noted that the shape of the arc suppressor 310 can advantageously generate a space 112A that is protected from contact with conductive material falling vertically (and even from falling at an angle of up to 45 degrees, and more) onto the device 300. Still further, it should be noted that the shape of the arc suppressor 310 will also provide for a vertical clearance (i.e., empty space between the shortest vertical distance between at least one of the conductive traces 320, 322 and the top surface of the device 300 or the arc suppressor 310) that is effective in disrupting a conductive film, flow, and/or layer between the traces 320 and 322.

Thus, specific embodiments and applications of electrified animal repellent tracks have been disclosed. It should be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art that many more modifications besides those already described are possible without departing from the inventive concepts herein. The inventive subject matter, therefore, is not to be restricted except in the spirit of the appended claims. Moreover, in interpreting both the specification and the claims, all terms should be interpreted in the broadest possible manner consistent with the context. In particular, the terms “comprises” and “comprising” should be interpreted as referring to elements, components, or steps in a non-exclusive manner, indicating that the referenced elements, components, or steps may be present, or utilized, or combined with other elements, components, or steps that are not expressly referenced. Furthermore, where a definition or use of a term in a reference, which is incorporated by reference herein, is inconsistent or contrary to the definition of that term provided herein, the definition of that term provided herein applies and the definition of that term in the reference does not apply.

Claims (16)

The invention claimed is:
1. A deterrent device, comprising:
an elongated carrier having a bottom with a first trough at least partially disposed below the first conductive trace; and
a first conductive trace sewn to the elongated carrier via a first fastener that extends from the first conductive trace to the first trough.
2. The device of claim 1, further comprising a second conductive trace sewn to the elongated carrier via a second fastener.
3. The device of claim 2, wherein the bottom further comprises a second trough at least partially disposed below the second conductive trace.
4. The device of claim 3, wherein the second conductive trace sewn to the elongated carrier via the second fastener that extends from the second conductive trace to the second trough.
5. The device of claim 2, wherein the first and second conductive traces are separated by an arc suppressor.
6. The device of claim 5, wherein the arc suppressor has a shape selected from a group consisting of an umbrelloid shape, a T-shape, a stemmed inverted U-shape, and a stemmed inverted V-shape.
7. The device of claim 5, wherein the arc suppressor has a configuration effective to increase creep distance between the first and second conductive traces by at least 1.5 times.
8. The device of claim 1, wherein the first conductive trace comprises a knitted wire.
9. The device of claim 1, wherein the first trough comprises a raised portion on the bottom of the elongated carrier.
10. The device of claim 9, wherein the first fastener extends from the first conductive trace to the raise portion of the first trough.
11. The device of claim 1, wherein the first conductive trace comprises a braided wire.
12. The device of claim 1, wherein the device has a height to width ratio between 1:5 and 1:2.
13. The device of claim 1, wherein the first fastener comprises a plastic thread.
14. The device of claim 1, wherein the first trough is directly beneath the first conductive trace.
15. The device of claim 2, wherein each of the first and second conductive traces comprises a knitted wire.
16. The device of claim 2, wherein each of the first and second conductive traces comprises a braided wire.
US14/714,817 2006-03-14 2015-05-18 Electrified bird repellent track Active US9232781B2 (en)

Priority Applications (12)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/376,270 US7802396B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2006-03-14 Electrified bird repellent track
US14571509P true 2009-01-19 2009-01-19
US12/689,406 US8196340B2 (en) 2009-01-19 2010-01-19 Electric deterrent device having knitted conductors
US12/890,328 US7937885B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2010-09-24 Electrified bird repellent track
US12/959,834 US8020340B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2010-12-03 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/043,204 US8015747B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-03-08 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/224,183 US8196341B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-09-01 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/472,773 US8286385B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-05-16 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/652,221 US8407932B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-10-15 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/768,295 US8615922B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-02-15 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/107,638 US9032663B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-12-16 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/714,817 US9232781B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2015-05-18 Electrified bird repellent track

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/714,817 US9232781B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2015-05-18 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/993,384 US20160120167A1 (en) 2006-03-14 2016-01-12 Electrified Bird Repellent Track

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/107,638 Division US9032663B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-12-16 Electrified bird repellent track

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/993,384 Division US20160120167A1 (en) 2006-03-14 2016-01-12 Electrified Bird Repellent Track

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20150245604A1 US20150245604A1 (en) 2015-09-03
US9232781B2 true US9232781B2 (en) 2016-01-12

Family

ID=44149298

Family Applications (8)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/043,204 Active US8015747B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-03-08 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/224,183 Active US8196341B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-09-01 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/472,773 Active US8286385B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-05-16 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/652,221 Active US8407932B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-10-15 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/768,295 Active US8615922B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-02-15 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/107,638 Active US9032663B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-12-16 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/714,817 Active US9232781B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2015-05-18 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/993,384 Abandoned US20160120167A1 (en) 2006-03-14 2016-01-12 Electrified Bird Repellent Track

Family Applications Before (6)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/043,204 Active US8015747B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-03-08 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/224,183 Active US8196341B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-09-01 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/472,773 Active US8286385B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-05-16 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/652,221 Active US8407932B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-10-15 Electrified bird repellent track
US13/768,295 Active US8615922B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-02-15 Electrified bird repellent track
US14/107,638 Active US9032663B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-12-16 Electrified bird repellent track

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/993,384 Abandoned US20160120167A1 (en) 2006-03-14 2016-01-12 Electrified Bird Repellent Track

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (8) US8015747B2 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140150330A1 (en) * 2012-12-05 2014-06-05 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified Deterrent Device Having Insulative Layer
US20140311013A1 (en) * 2012-12-05 2014-10-23 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified Deterrent Device Having Insulative Layer

Families Citing this family (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7481021B2 (en) * 2003-12-04 2009-01-27 Bird Barrier America, Inc. Electric deterrent device
US8015747B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-09-13 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
DE202010017470U1 (en) 2009-01-19 2012-01-03 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. electrical quenching
EP2621266B1 (en) 2011-10-04 2016-04-06 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird deterrent device with cavity
WO2013052073A1 (en) 2011-10-04 2013-04-11 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird deterrent device with treads
GB2495740A (en) 2011-10-19 2013-04-24 P & L Systems Ltd Deterrent Device
US8434209B1 (en) 2012-06-26 2013-05-07 Bird Barrier America, Inc. Animal deterrent device with insulated fasteners
US20140317993A1 (en) * 2013-04-25 2014-10-30 Bird Barrier America, Inc. Electric deterrent device with voids and flaps
US20150335007A1 (en) * 2014-05-21 2015-11-26 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Bird Deterrent with Built-In Adhesive

Citations (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3366854A (en) 1965-04-21 1968-01-30 Charles A Cowsert Pest repelling apparatus and methods
US4015176A (en) 1975-09-25 1977-03-29 Shock-M-All, Inc. Apparatus for removing birds and other pests
US4186512A (en) 1977-09-29 1980-02-05 Shock-M-All, Inc. Electrified insect trap having short circuiting means
US4274123A (en) 1979-08-01 1981-06-16 Rogers Jr Thurmond J Animal repellant apparatus
US4299048A (en) 1980-05-19 1981-11-10 Bayes James W Pest bird control
DE3930012A1 (en) 1989-09-08 1991-03-14 Windhager Trading & Consulting Electrical bird scaring system e.g. for building - has plastic strip with built in cables to apply mild electric shock
US5031353A (en) 1989-08-29 1991-07-16 Gardiner James T Dominator wire
US5095646A (en) 1991-02-22 1992-03-17 Bunkers Kenneth C Bird extermination device
US5107620A (en) 1990-05-03 1992-04-28 Mahan Richard E Electrified table cloth
WO1993020689A1 (en) 1992-04-16 1993-10-28 Neville Weston Greenwood Deterrent for small animals and/or birds
WO1995008915A1 (en) 1993-09-30 1995-04-06 Neville Weston Greenwood Deterrent arrangement
US5570537A (en) 1995-04-27 1996-11-05 Black; Douglas A. Electronic insecticidal cable
US5850808A (en) 1997-10-14 1998-12-22 Fi-Shock, Inc. System for repelling pests
US6006698A (en) 1996-12-11 1999-12-28 Societe Ecopic Line S.A.R.L. Electrical device for repelling birds
WO2000021363A1 (en) 1998-10-10 2000-04-20 Walter Pollmann Device for scaring away birds
US6283064B1 (en) 1999-12-30 2001-09-04 Contech Electronics, Inc. Pest repelling device
US6314914B1 (en) 1999-01-27 2001-11-13 Keith M. Betzen Capacitor powered animal repelling and training device without bait
EP1314355A2 (en) 2001-11-23 2003-05-28 Tresse Industrie Electrical bird repellent device
US20050132635A1 (en) 2003-12-04 2005-06-23 Riddell Cameron A. Electric deterrent device
US6925748B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2005-08-09 Mcgill David Taylor Flexible apparatus cover providing electrical shock upon contact
US6928768B1 (en) 2004-02-19 2005-08-16 Hot Foot America Lp Deterrent strip for repelling birds and other pests
WO2005107452A1 (en) 2004-04-27 2005-11-17 Walter Pollmann Animal repelling device
US20060032111A1 (en) 2004-08-10 2006-02-16 Willard Douglas H Conductor connector and methods for making and using the same
US7249436B2 (en) 2005-04-15 2007-07-31 Kaba Corporation Electric shock bird and animal deterrent
US20070214710A1 (en) 2006-03-14 2007-09-20 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
US7351913B2 (en) 2004-02-19 2008-04-01 Bell Environmental Services, Inc. Anti-roosting device
US20100180490A1 (en) 2009-01-19 2010-07-22 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electric Deterrent Device Having Knitted Conductors
US8015747B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-09-13 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
US8640380B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2014-02-04 P & L Systems Limited Deterrent device

Patent Citations (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3366854A (en) 1965-04-21 1968-01-30 Charles A Cowsert Pest repelling apparatus and methods
US4015176A (en) 1975-09-25 1977-03-29 Shock-M-All, Inc. Apparatus for removing birds and other pests
US4186512A (en) 1977-09-29 1980-02-05 Shock-M-All, Inc. Electrified insect trap having short circuiting means
US4274123A (en) 1979-08-01 1981-06-16 Rogers Jr Thurmond J Animal repellant apparatus
US4299048A (en) 1980-05-19 1981-11-10 Bayes James W Pest bird control
US5031353A (en) 1989-08-29 1991-07-16 Gardiner James T Dominator wire
DE3930012A1 (en) 1989-09-08 1991-03-14 Windhager Trading & Consulting Electrical bird scaring system e.g. for building - has plastic strip with built in cables to apply mild electric shock
US5107620A (en) 1990-05-03 1992-04-28 Mahan Richard E Electrified table cloth
US5095646A (en) 1991-02-22 1992-03-17 Bunkers Kenneth C Bird extermination device
WO1993020689A1 (en) 1992-04-16 1993-10-28 Neville Weston Greenwood Deterrent for small animals and/or birds
WO1995008915A1 (en) 1993-09-30 1995-04-06 Neville Weston Greenwood Deterrent arrangement
US5570537A (en) 1995-04-27 1996-11-05 Black; Douglas A. Electronic insecticidal cable
US6006698A (en) 1996-12-11 1999-12-28 Societe Ecopic Line S.A.R.L. Electrical device for repelling birds
US5850808A (en) 1997-10-14 1998-12-22 Fi-Shock, Inc. System for repelling pests
WO2000021363A1 (en) 1998-10-10 2000-04-20 Walter Pollmann Device for scaring away birds
US6314914B1 (en) 1999-01-27 2001-11-13 Keith M. Betzen Capacitor powered animal repelling and training device without bait
US6283064B1 (en) 1999-12-30 2001-09-04 Contech Electronics, Inc. Pest repelling device
EP1314355A2 (en) 2001-11-23 2003-05-28 Tresse Industrie Electrical bird repellent device
US7481021B2 (en) 2003-12-04 2009-01-27 Bird Barrier America, Inc. Electric deterrent device
US20050132635A1 (en) 2003-12-04 2005-06-23 Riddell Cameron A. Electric deterrent device
US6925748B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2005-08-09 Mcgill David Taylor Flexible apparatus cover providing electrical shock upon contact
US6928768B1 (en) 2004-02-19 2005-08-16 Hot Foot America Lp Deterrent strip for repelling birds and other pests
US7351913B2 (en) 2004-02-19 2008-04-01 Bell Environmental Services, Inc. Anti-roosting device
WO2005107452A1 (en) 2004-04-27 2005-11-17 Walter Pollmann Animal repelling device
US20060032111A1 (en) 2004-08-10 2006-02-16 Willard Douglas H Conductor connector and methods for making and using the same
US7249436B2 (en) 2005-04-15 2007-07-31 Kaba Corporation Electric shock bird and animal deterrent
US20070214710A1 (en) 2006-03-14 2007-09-20 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
US8407932B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-04-02 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
US8015747B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2011-09-13 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
US8196341B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2012-06-12 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified bird repellent track
US20100180490A1 (en) 2009-01-19 2010-07-22 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electric Deterrent Device Having Knitted Conductors
US8733014B2 (en) 2009-01-19 2014-05-27 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electric deterrent device having knitted conductors
US8640380B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2014-02-04 P & L Systems Limited Deterrent device

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Patent Cooperation Treaty, "Notification of Transmittal of the International Search Report and the Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority, or the Declaration", PCT/US11/51513, mailed Apr. 23, 2012.

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140150330A1 (en) * 2012-12-05 2014-06-05 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified Deterrent Device Having Insulative Layer
US20140311013A1 (en) * 2012-12-05 2014-10-23 Bird-B-Gone, Inc. Electrified Deterrent Device Having Insulative Layer

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US8015747B2 (en) 2011-09-13
US20140096891A1 (en) 2014-04-10
US20110314724A1 (en) 2011-12-29
US8615922B2 (en) 2013-12-31
US20150245604A1 (en) 2015-09-03
US20110146589A1 (en) 2011-06-23
US20130036600A1 (en) 2013-02-14
US20120224294A1 (en) 2012-09-06
US9032663B2 (en) 2015-05-19
US8196341B2 (en) 2012-06-12
US8286385B2 (en) 2012-10-16
US20130160350A1 (en) 2013-06-27
US8407932B2 (en) 2013-04-02
US20160120167A1 (en) 2016-05-05

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3366854A (en) Pest repelling apparatus and methods
US4876827A (en) Gutter assembly
AU769840B2 (en) Variable-position decorative light mounting system
AU769493B2 (en) Deflection device for birds, and for pigeons in particular
CA2054447C (en) Gutter guard screen support clip
US5595027A (en) Gutter protector
EP0467961B1 (en) Electronic insect trap
JP3444600B2 (en) Window, in particular a sealing device for a roof window
US4471561A (en) Insect eradicator
US6463878B1 (en) Bird feeder apparatus-to deter crawling insect encroachment
US3531090A (en) Electrical fence post with wire-connector
US4349989A (en) Fence guard
US4756116A (en) Snail barrier
US4969418A (en) Animal training system
CA2178926C (en) Flea trap
US4860996A (en) Composite strand fence
US4015176A (en) Apparatus for removing birds and other pests
US5544445A (en) Landscape edging device
US5433029A (en) Bird repellent apparatus for wires and the like
US4690382A (en) Coving attachment
EP0847690B1 (en) Electrical bird repelling device
US5452743A (en) Clip for downspout tip-up lateral
CA2451518A1 (en) Bird resistant power line insulation
US4165577A (en) Electric baseboard trap for crawling insects
EP0377550A1 (en) Bird repelling system with improved mounting fixture

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BIRD-B-GONE, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DONOHO, BRUCE;REEL/FRAME:035660/0141

Effective date: 20110217